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Why Did the 1905 Revolution Fail

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Why did the 1905 revolution fail?
One of the main reasons that the 1905 revolution failed was because the October Manifesto merely only satisfied the middle classes’ appetite for reform. However this was only a short term change in government therefore it was not really a revolution because the changes were not permanent. To add, the readiness of the liberals to accept the government’s political and economical bribes indicted that they were not genuinely ready for a revolution at this time. Furthermore the duma did not have as much power as the tsar portrayed them to have. They were not able to pass laws and did not have any control on the state’s finance. To add, another reason why the 1905 revolution failed was because after the strong opposition shown by the first two Dumas, the tsar took away the vote from the people who wanted more change and also opposed the tsar. As a result of this, the electoral system was weighed in favour of the wealthy and those who supported the tsar. The tsar made a conscious decision to make sure that the third and fourth dumas were less openly obstructive and supportive of the tsar as they were keen to project an image of Russia as a democratic nation.
This show’s why the 1905 revolution failed because the October Manifesto was not effective enough to cause an effective revolution Another main reason why the 1905 revolution failed was because of the Tsarist Government. They were highly effective in dispersing the revolution, whilst still upholding the tsar’s absolute right to rule. Ministers, Witte and Stolypin shared similar economic policies and had the same objective of preserving the Tsarist regime. There is a strong case for suggesting that Stolypin and Witte were the last hope for Tsar; however in the end they both made tactical errors. They were blamed for creating the economic problems in Russia and this is one of the main reasons that opposition against the Tsar returned later on. The tsar was aware of the uprising opposition and they made a clever, tactical move by bringing in the duma. It split the opposition which was their intention and took power away from the revolution. The middle class were easily appeased by the duma and were happy to go back to living as they were before. The first two dumas were dominated by SD’S and SR’S which made the new assembly strong anti- government. However, the Tsar needed the dumas to continue, so after the first two dumas they made sure the third and fourth were supportive the Tsarist regime so they could still uphold their right to rule.
This shows how the Tsarist government was a big factor as to why the 1905 revolution failed because they gave the people a false sense of people power.

Another main reason why the 1905 revolution failed was because the peasants felt alienated by the tsarist regime.
The tsar were aware of this and knew they had to bring the countryside under control. In order to appease the peasants the tsar announced that mortgage repayments would be reduced and then abolished however this resulted in land seizure and lawlessness
In order to restore the relationship between the tsar and the peasants, Stolypin wanted to buy up land to make the peasants efficient. He intended to produce a growing class of alienated peasants. However there was no real chance of reform because the Russian peasantry was so backwards and Stolypin had so little time to change things.
This shows why 1905 revolution failed because the peasants were too oppressed by the tsar to attempt to cause any effective reforms.
Another main reason why the 1905 revolution failed was because the power and control the tsar had over the army outweighed the rise in opposition from the industrial working class. The industrial working class remained to be the only major opposition towards the government. The workers did not, on the whole benefit from Russia’s prosperity and felt that they were being left behind to some extent. This led to a number of strikes and protest such as Bloody Sunday; however none of these protest had a great enough impact to cause reform. Furthermore the army stayed loyal to the tsar, crushing revolutionary disturbances and arresting thousands of revolutionaries.
This shows why the 1905 revolution failed because the tsar managed to keep its power even in great times of opposition because of its alliances with the army.

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