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William James

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By Ladyshaq
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William James was born on January 11th, 1842. He grew up in a well-educated environment. His father was deeply interested in philosophy and theology and made sure to provide his children with a rich education. James came from a family with a strict father, raised in tolerance. They were a wealthy and cultured family. James attended Harvard, studying a broad spectrum of just about everything. He finally received his medical degree in 1869, but then became depressed and anxious about like. He was not found of medicine and was then offered to teach a course in the relations between Psychology and Physiology. He was also the founder of Harvard’s first Psychology lab. James then began to teach psychology as well as writing the first U.S. test, Principles of Psychology, in 1890. James was well known for his Philosophy which he explored many areas. But many people might know about his collaboration with Carl Lange, and the Theory of Emotions. This theory suggest that emotions occur as a result of physiology reactions to events. James’s theory was proposed in 1884. Even though many people did not believe his theory he stood firm to it. This theory proposed the emotions happen as a result of an event, our body arouses, interprets, then the emotion occurs. William James describes it thus: "My theory ... is that the bodily changes follow directly the perception of the exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion. Common sense says, we lose our fortune, are sorry and weep; we meet a bear, are frightened and run; we are insulted by a rival, and angry and strike. The hypothesis here to be defended says that this order of sequence is incorrect ... and that the more rational statement is that we feel sorry because we cry, angry because we strike, afraid because we tremble ... Without the bodily states following on the perception, the latter...

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