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Women and Girls Right

In: Other Topics

Submitted By jimizzy
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Final Paper
Women and Girl Rights The issue of gender equality has always been and will always be a topic of controversy. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) defines “gender equality as the measurable equal representation of women and men not seen as the same but having equal values and should be accorded equal treatment” the right to see women and girls as not the same as men and boys but should be given equal opportunity in every facet of life is a debate that will linger for a very longer time not because laws have not been put in place to uphold it because its implementation will require adequate follow up and time. The way the society sees women plays a crucial role in gender equality. Gender role affects the way women and men are expected to behave and act in a given society and this behavior differs among cultures and ethnic groups. The role of a girl or boy is first initiated by their parents. The mother of a girl child is usually more protective of her and she is taught different etiquettes which she must follow and if not obliged she is seen as wayward and a societal misfit. The fiction “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid illustrates this when she writes “this is how you….this is how you behave in the presence of men who don’t know you very well, and this way they won’t recognize immediately the slut I have warned you against becoming” this depicts how a girl is expected to live by certain rules made by her mother to protect her from becoming a “no good”. The girl has no voice and is expected to do as she told. Boys on the other hand, are portrayed as tough, strong and need less protection than girls. The women are required to satisfy men’s every need and if they try to speak they are punished. However, the shift in gender roles in the past 30 years has been huge. It has happened so quickly that men and women are still trying to sort out what...

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