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Women in Psychology

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Words 1571
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Women in Psychology Paper
Johnny Williams
PSY310
January 9, 2012
Lillian Fillpot

Women in Psychology Paper A conversation of women in psychology can only be conducted with discussion of the many women who have contributed much of their lives to education as well as educating others with the knowledge that they have learned. This paper will define Inez Beverly Prosser, PhD, a woman who has made significant contributions to the field of psychology between the years 1850 and 1950. This paper will also cover and describe her background, theoretical perspective, and contributions to psychology. Inez Beverly Prosser was born on December 30th approximately 1895 within Texas; no one is for certain of her exact birth date all that is known is stated. Out of eleven brothers and sisters Inez was the first daughter to her parents. Her father, Samuel Andrew Beverly, always seem to find work as an attendant no matter where they moved to. Her mother, Veola Hamilton, stayed and turned their house into a beautiful home. The family continued to move when the children were little, first in 1900 to Yoakum in the south of Texas and in 1907 to Corpus Christi. Prosser and her oldest brother, Leon, came back to Yoakum to attend the high school. After finishing at the top of her class in 1910, Prosser enrolled at Prairie View State Normal and Industrial College to be found 45 miles northwest of Houston. In 1912, she graduated from College with a two year degree, and was now allowed to begin her lifelong dream of teaching.

Many African Americans at that time did not believe that college was attainable and rarely focused on attending college to pursue a degree. Inez Beverly Prosser had an enduring passion for education and was very appreciative of the power it presented for shifting lives. Her family considered to send her older brother Leon to college, believing that they could manage to pay for college for only one of their children. However, Inez’s desire was without a doubt much greater, and even her brother Leon persuaded his parents to pay for her instead to attend college and not for him. It proved to be a very excellent venture. Her ultimate accomplishments as an educationalist enabled her to donate her counsel and currency that helped five of her siblings graduate from college, and this act of generosity within itself was very remarkable for any point and time in our history for any race of people. Inez Beverly Prosser began her college work at a college named Prairie View A&M University, a historically black college northwest of Houston. With a two-year diploma, she began educating in Austin, Texas in 1913, first starting at a black elementary school and on to a high school. She completed her bachelor's degree at the Samuel Huston College in Austin in 1926. For the reason that segregated schools, Inez’s was required to leave Texas for graduate employment. She accomplished her master's degree at University of Colorado and completed her doctorate in psychology at the University of Cincinnati in 1933. She did not let segregated schools or anything associated with segregation stand in her way of achieving her education. She completed her dissertation on research that personality variables and examined self-esteem in coordinated pairs of African American middle school children with only partially the children having attended segregated schools and the other half attending integrated schools in the Cincinnati area. She accomplished that African American children fared enhanced in segregated schools with African American colleagues and black teachers. Specifically, she established that African American children from integrated schools qualified more social maladjustment, thought a reduced amount of security in their community associations and had less acceptable associations with their families. They were also more likely to believe second-rate at school, had less than acceptable relationships with their teachers and were more raring to go to leave school early. Her conclusions were very divisive in the decade’s primary to the Supreme Court decision in 1954 of the Brown vs. the Board of education case, although supported by some well-known African-Americans such as W.E.B. Dubois and Carter Woodson, who unenthusiastically approved segregated schools in anticipation of such time that detrimental attitudes of white teachers would satisfactorily adjust to put forward an optimistic experience for black children. She exhausted the last seven years of her life schooling in black colleges, first at Tillotson College in Austin, and at Tougaloo College in Jackson, Miss. She took a one-years depart of absence from Tougaloo to finish her PhD. She educated one more year and In September 1934, on her way to Mississippi after visiting family in Texas, she was killed in a car wreck near Shreveport, La. Even despite that her life was cut short, Inez Beverly Prosser was influential in supporting many black students in obtaining finances for college and for graduate study. The importance of her achievement in obtaining her PhD was acknowledged by her appearance on the cover of the publication of the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People called the crisis, 1933. Prosser began the research for her doctoral dissertation, titled "Non-academic development of negro children in mixed and segregated schools," in November 1931. The assignment intended as a cohort to a dissertation completed in 1931 by Mary Crowley in which the educational attainment of African American students compared between integrated and segregated schools. Crowley, who was the Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Hamilton County in Ohio, helped Prosser get hold of permissions at a variety of schools to carry out her research. Even though Prosser and Crowley both asked about the differences between the segregated and integrated schools, Prosser payed close attention on non academic variables that definitely applied. Crowley had completed that there were no differences in students' educational accomplishment between the two types of schools; Prosser, on the contrary, found that African American students did change for the better in segregated schools. The students enrolled in ethnically diverse schools were found to be more withdrawn, strive more with social maladjustment, and come into contact with more disappointment with family and teacher relationships, among other factors. Prosser's investigation based on a small illustration size, 32 coordinated pairs of students, and accredited in her dissertation that some of her conclusions were based on non significant numerical outcomes. She further fulfilled that out of the ordinary personality types may do better in diverse schools. Although Prosser is commonly referred to as the first African-American woman to earn a PhD in Psychology, others believe that Ruth Winifred Howard was the first. The dissimilarity depends on how one defines a psychologist. Those who disagree that Howard, earning PhD at the University of Minnesota in 1934 is the first African-American woman to earn a PhD, cling to the view that a psychologist is someone who earned the degree contained by a psychology branch. In Prosser’s case, even though her dissertation study was in psychology, her doctoral teacher and other members of her working group were psychologists, and much of her assignments were in psychology, and this is why she is often deprived of her well-earned heading. Inspite of all of her accomplishments as it pertains to education; Inez Beverly Prosser’s found the time to become a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha and the African Methodist Episcopal Church and was very active in both of these groups. On August 28, 1934, in a road trip going back home following a stop with her relatives in Texas, Prosser, by the side of her husband and sister, tangled in a head-on automobile accident. From the impact of the crash Prosser smashed into and ended up going through the windshield. She was taken to a Hospital in Shreveport, Louisiana, to care for her injuries. However, inspite of her infirmary stay she died at the Hospital on September 5, 1934; a very sad day for her family and friends. Inez Beverly Prosser was merely 38 when she died, having just accomplished her doctoral degree the previous year. The dedication on her headstone at the Southern Memorial Park burial ground in San Antonio gives voice to the passing away of a talented future that her death represented her head stone reads as follows: "How many hopes lie buried here”, In honesty, a very befitting inscription for a person who dedicated her life’s work for the betterment and upliftment of people in general. A person can only imagine some of the obstacles faced because of the injustices that were very much factors at the time of her strive for education. Although her life was cut short, from the short time that she did have on this planet until the time of her untimely death, Inez Beverly Prosser without a doubt made a difference within her family as well as the many people of the world who have been fortunate enough to read some of her superior works. Knowing that we have no control of our time to live and to die, all we can do as people is attempt to make a positive impression on our fellow man as well as conduct ourselves in an orderly fashion in hopes to make a positive difference in many lives as possible. References Goodwin, C. J. (2008). A history of modern psychology (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Feministvoices. (). Retrieved from http://www.Feminisitvoices.com

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