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Women, Voting, Elections, and Candidates

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Submitted By brneyez89
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Charity Davis

Women, Voting, Election, and Candidates

The ratification of the nineteenth admendment and the passage of the voting rights act of 1965 gave women the right to vote but because the lack of education many blacks that lived on the plantation were told whom to vote for. For example African Americans were granted the right to vote. Even though this right was granted African Americans didn’t see the effect on the amendment unit. Once they moved up north they began to get involved in political and participate in primarily as voting or the formalized that resulted in formation of institution. In the voter turnout among men and women in the 1950s and 70s indicated that women were les likely to be politically active because of the way in which they had been raised as children. For example, if a father is the soul provider and the mother stay at home the girl may have the impression that is all she is suppose to do. This could have an impact on her participation in politics and the lack of ambition. According to Aristotle women have no place in politics; their life should be spent raising children, cooking, and cleaning and have no time for political affairs. People with a higher education are most likely to vote than those of no education or a lower level of education. According to Virginia Sapiro noted that women had a high level of education and who were mothers were more likely to participate in politics than other women (Harrison, pg 124). Example Hilary Clinton Secretary of State ran for president 2007-2008. She attended Yale Law School and Yale University. She is a mother with a higher level of socioeconomic status. The gender gap has been a force in all presidential election between men and women voted, example in the presidential election between Obama and Hilary Clinton, Obama was from the streets of Chicago he worked with the welfare system…...

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