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Women and Politics

In: Social Issues

Submitted By saraahmad
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There is no doubt that over the years, men have been dominating politics of most countries in the world. But it doesn’t mean they did splendid job in what they are suppose to do? Politics has never been an easy place for any man who supposedly can’t even handle political landscape at home. Family of course.
Today, most countries in the world face problems of democracy, justice, equality, social problems arising from bad governance of those in corridor of power who are mostly men. Having failed to provide good governance, when come to think of it, there is nothing wrong if women who are noted to be caring, concern, and responsible are given more chances in government for possible change in the ‘status quo'. Should a woman involve in politics have always been subject of controversy over the years. But among other political posts today few women are already presidents of countries and senators, assembly members, and councilors . Cristina Fernández de Kirchner (Argentina), Dilma Rousseff (Brazil) and Joyce Banda (Malawi)- presidents of representative countries have proven that woman can own a place on the top of political settings.
Woman have been viewed weak and are less interested or less knowledgeable about politics than men. Perhaps this is why women feel removed from the current political process. If women see that politics remains a men-only club then they are far less likely to participate and to put themselves forward. If they see a women leader in the political settings, it encourages them to vote, to campaign and to engage in politics.
Many women cannot participate in politics because they are held back by factors such as violence, poverty, lack of access to quality education and health care, the double burden of paid and unpaid work. And because of these obstacles, we are losing a lot of good women leaders and countries and people are suffering from their absence.This is why it is so important to actively promote women’s political participation, including through affirmative measures, as appropriatee.
Women’s participation is fundamental to democracy and essential to the achievement of sustainable development and peace. To show that countries with women’s leadership in the corporate sector results in improved business performance. And we know that countries with more women in parliament tend to have more equitable laws and social programmes and budgets that benefit women and children and families.
In 1911, women were allowed to vote in just two countries in the world. Today, a century later, that right is virtually universal. All over the world, the cries for democracy are being amplified through new technology. With mobile phones, thanks to companies like Nokia and others, and twitter and facebook, women are making their voices heard, and there can be no real democracy without women’s full and equal participation.
In every country and in every region, women want their voices to be heard. Given the challenges that we face today, we need the best leaders we can find, and many of these leaders are women. Women bring their own insights and perspectives, and diversity improves decision-making.
Women tend not to be so concerned by institutional arrangements and big numbers, and focus instead on particular issues and how they affect their families. But one thing politicians know for certain is that we can only win elections if we win the support of female voters. If we look at the policy changes in paid maternity leave and family-friendly working hours, the huge increases in spending on health care and education, and the minimum wage, we can see radical change benefiting women.

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