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Women’s Position in Stories

In: English and Literature

Submitted By Joemanning
Words 1215
Pages 5
Jowdat Kassis
Prof. Rhoda Stamell, Eng 1010
November 16, 2009
Women’s Position in Stories A folk tale is a short story that comes from the oral tradition. Folk tales often have to do with everyday life and frequently tell an inspiring tale of the lower class (peasants) triumphing over the higher class (nobles). In their original versions, most folk tales are not children's stories because of the violent nature of the story. Most folk tales come from true stories with tragic endings or violent and horrific events. For example, the “humpty dumpty” story was about a man who tried to commit suicide several times and succeed at the end. Also the “little red riding hood” story masked the ending of little red riding hood falling victim to a rapist. Unlike a folk tale which has cultural background, a fairy tale involves magic and fantasy. Examples of fairy tales are, “Goldilocks and the Three Bears”, “Beauty and the beast”, and Disney’s “Cinderella”. Usually fairy tales include fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, gnomes, and talking animals. Since folktales usually mirror the values and culture of the society from which they originated, a fairy tale can be a folk tale. In essence a fairy tale can also be a subgenre or genre of a folktale. Up until 1450 folktales were passed on orally, so not all folktales were the same. Because Folktales have been told by so many different people there were many different versions. In 1450 the printing press was invented and the folk stories were written in books. People around the world began to put more of their efforts in recording their cultural history by collecting regional folktales into books. That’s how our wonderful folktales from the 17, 18th, and 19th centuries emerged. There are three distinct folktales that reveal aspects of how a culture idealizes women. Those folktales are “The Ash Girl”, “The little glass...

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