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Business Plans Handbook

Business Plans
A COMPILATION OF BUSINESS PLANS DEVELOPED BY INDIVIDUALS NORTH THROUGHOUT AMERICA

Handbook
VOLUME

16
Lynn M. Pearce, Project Editor

Business Plans Handbook, Volume 16 Project Editor: Lynn M. Pearce Product Manager: Jenai Drouillard Product Design: Jennifer Wahi Composition and Electronic Prepress: Evi Seoud Manufacturing: Rita Wimberley Editorial: Erin Braun

ª 2010 Gale, Cengage Learning ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright herein may be reproduced, transmitted, stored, or used in any form or by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, scanning, digitizing, taping, Web distribution, information networks, or information storage and retrieval systems, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the publisher. This publication is a creative work fully protected by all applicable copyright laws, as well as by misappropriation, trade secret, unfair competition, and other applicable laws. The authors and editors of this work have added value to the underlying factual material herein through one or more of the following: unique and original selection, coordination, expression, arrangement, and classification of the information.

For product information and technology assistance, contact us at Gale Customer Support, 1-800-877-4253. For permission to use material from this text or product, submit all requests online at www.cengage.com/permissions. Further permissions questions can be emailed to permissionrequest@cengage.com

While every effort has been made to ensure the reliability of the information presented in this publication, Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, does not guarantee the accuracy of the data contained herein. Gale accepts no payment for listing; and inclusion in the publication of any organization, agency, institution, publication, service, or individual does not imply endorsement of the editors or publisher. Errors brought to the attention of the publisher and verified to the satisfaction of the publisher will be corrected in future editions. Gale 27500 Drake Rd. Farmington Hills, MI, 48331-3535

ISBN-13: 978-14144-3908-2 ISBN-10: 1-4144-3908-3 1084-4473

Printed in the United States of America 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 13 12 11 10 09

Contents
Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix BUSINESS PLANS Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) Quick Cash Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Bed and Breakfast Rocheport Bed and Breakfast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Beekeeping Business B. Strand’s Bees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Car Wash and Car Detailing Business Wash and Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Counseling Practice Roper Counseling Services Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Custom Carpentry Shop Choice Cut Carpentry Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Day Camp Organizer Camp in the Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Diner Shoestrings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Domestic Services Provider Helping Hands Personal Services LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Energy Efficiency Auditing Firm Energy Physicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Gift Shop The Busy Bee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Home Organization Service Break Free Organizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 House Cleaning Mid-Missouri Maid Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Ice Cream Parlor SonnyScoops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Nature Photography Business Shutterbugs Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Online Party–Planning Company Theme Party in a Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Organic Cleaning Supplies Green Home Care Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Physical Therapy Practice Healing Hands Physical Therapy Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
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CONTENTS

Stable Miller Stables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Wine Storage Wine Portfolio Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 APPENDIXES Appendix A Business Plan Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Fictional Plan 1 - Food Distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Fictional Plan 2 - Hardware Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Appendix B Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Consultants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 SBA Regional Offices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Small Business Development Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Service Corps of Retired Executives Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Venture Capital & Financing Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Appendix C Glossary of Small Business Terms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Appendix D Cumulative Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261

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B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

Highlights
Business Plans Handbook, Volume 16 (BPH-16) is a collection of business plans compiled by entrepreneurs seeking funding for small businesses throughout North America. For those looking for examples of how to approach, structure, and compose their own business plans, BPH-16 presents 20 sample plans, including plans for the following businesses:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) Bed and Breakfast Beekeeping Business Car Wash and Car Detailing Business Counseling Practice Custom Carpentry Shop Day Camp Organizer Diner Domestic Services Provider Energy Efficiency Auditing Firm Gift Shop Home Organization Service House Cleaning Ice Cream Parlor Nature Photography Business Online Party–Planning Company Organic Cleaning Supplies Physical Therapy Practice Stable Wine Storage

FEATURES AND BENEFITS
BPH-16 offers many features not provided by other business planning references including:






Twenty business plans, each of which represent an attempt at clarifying (for themselves and others) the reasons that the business should exist or expand and why a lender should fund the enterprise. Two fictional plans that are used by business counselors at a prominent small business development organization as examples for their clients. (You will find these in the Business Plan Template Appendix.) A directory section that includes: listings for venture capital and finance companies, which specialize in funding start-up and second-stage small business ventures, and a comprehensive
VII

HIGHLIGHTS



• •



listing of Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) offices. In addition, the Appendix also contains updated listings of all Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs); associations of interest to entrepreneurs; Small Business Administration (SBA) Regional Offices; and consultants specializing in small business planning and advice. It is strongly advised that you consult supporting organizations while planning your business, as they can provide a wealth of useful information. A Small Business Term Glossary to help you decipher the sometimes confusing terminology used by lenders and others in the financial and small business communities. A cumulative index, outlining each plan profiled in the complete Business Plans Handbook series. A Business Plan Template which serves as a model to help you construct your own business plan. This generic outline lists all the essential elements of a complete business plan and their components, including the Summary, Business History and Industry Outlook, Market Examination, Competition, Marketing, Administration and Management, Financial Information, and other key sections. Use this guide as a starting point for compiling your plan. Extensive financial documentation required to solicit funding from small business lenders. You will find examples of: Cash Flows, Balance Sheets, Income Projections, and other financial information included with the textual portions of the plan.

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B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

Introduction
Perhaps the most important aspect of business planning is simply doing it. More and more business owners are beginning to compile business plans even if they don’t need a bank loan. Others discover the value of planning when they must provide a business plan for the bank. The sheer act of putting thoughts on paper seems to clarify priorities and provide focus. Sometimes business owners completely change strategies when compiling their plan, deciding on a different product mix or advertising scheme after finding that their assumptions were incorrect. This kind of healthy thinking and re-thinking via business planning is becoming the norm. The editors of Business Plans Handbook, Volume 16 (BPH-16) sincerely hope that this latest addition to the series is a helpful tool in the successful completion of your business plan, no matter what the reason for creating it. This sixteenth volume, like each volume in the series, offers business plans used and created by real people. BPH-16 provides 20 business plans. The business and personal names and addresses and general locations have been changed to protect the privacy of the plan authors.

NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
As in other volumes in the series, BPH-16 finds entrepreneurs engaged in a wide variety of creative endeavors. Examples include a proposal for automated teller machines, bed and breakfast, beekeeping business, and a car wash and car detailing business. In addition, several other plans are provided, including a counseling practice, custom carpentry shop, day camp organizer, diner, domestic services provider, and physical therapy practice, among others. Comprehensive financial documentation has become increasingly important as today’s entrepreneurs compete for the finite resources of business lenders. Our plans illustrate the financial data generally required of loan applicants, including Income Statements, Financial Projections, Cash Flows, and Balance Sheets.

ENHANCED APPENDIXES
In an effort to provide the most relevant and valuable information for our readers, we have updated the coverage of small business resources. For instance, you will find: a directory section, which includes listings of all of the Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) offices; an informative glossary, which includes small business terms; and a cumulative index, outlining each plan profiled in the complete Business Plans Handbook series. In addition we have updated the list of Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs); Small Business Administration Regional Offices; venture capital and finance companies, which specialize in funding start-up and second-stage small business enterprises; associations of interest to entrepreneurs; and consultants, specializing in small business advice and planning. For your reference, we have also reprinted the business plan template, which provides a comprehensive overview of the essential components of a business plan and two fictional plans used by small business counselors.
IX

INTRODUCTION

SERIES INFORMATION
If you already have the first fifteen volumes of BPH, with this sixteenth volume, you will now have a collection of over 340 business plans (not including the one updated plan in the second volume, whose original appeared in the first, or the two fictional plans in the Business Plan Template Appendix section of the second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh volumes); contact information for hundreds of organizations and agencies offering business expertise; a helpful business plan template; more than 1,500 citations to valuable small business development material; and a comprehensive glossary of terms to help the business planner navigate the sometimes confusing language of entrepreneurship.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Editors wish to sincerely thank the contributors to BPH-16, including:
• • •

Laura Becker Paul Greenland Kari Lucke

COMMENTS WELCOME
Your comments on Business Plans Handbook are appreciated. Please direct all correspondence, suggestions for future volumes of BPH, and other recommendations to the following: Managing Editor, Business Product Business Plans Handbook Gale, a part of Cengage Learning 27500 Drake Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48331-3535 Phone: (248)699-4253 Fax: (248)699-8052 Toll-Free: 800-347-GALE E-mail: BusinessProducts@cengage.com

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B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

Automated Teller Machines (ATMs)
Quick Cash Services

22 Bridge Rd. Union City, New Jersey 07087 Laura Becker
Quick Cash Services will take advantage of the opportunity to supply ATM machines to areas that have few bank–owned ATM machines.

BUSINESS OVERVIEW
Mission Quick Cash Services will take advantage of the opportunity to supply ATM machines to areas that have few bank–owned ATM machines. This includes placing ATM machines in convenience stores, supermarkets, and gas stations. The main objective will be to find locations that are under–banked (not served well by the banking community) and meet that demographics’ needs for cash. Objectives Quick Cash Services’ objective is to build a large portfolio of independently–owned ATM machines across the New York, New Jersey, and the Connecticut tri–state area. The company will continue to place ATM machines in under–banked urban areas, as well as other areas where there are few bank–owned ATM machines. Business Strategy ATM machines can be placed in high traffic locations such as convenience stores, supermarkets and gas stations. In addition, deals can be made with merchants to locate machines in other types of stores.
‘‘Of the approximately 395,000 ATMs operating in the U.S. today, two–thirds are located in ‘‘off–premise’’ locations from financial institutions, mostly at merchants. About three–fourths of these off–premise ATMs (73 percent) are not bank–owned or branded [i.e., affiliated with a particular bank]. Such networks of ATM installations are due to independent sales organizations (ISOs) that market, install and manage machines to help merchants meet consumer needs for cash. Dispensing and incoming interchange fees are shared between the ISO’s sponsoring bank, ATM processor (or ‘‘driver’’), the ISO and the merchant. Approximately 27 million ATM transactions occur everyday.’’

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The independently–owned ATM machine business focuses on building a portfolio of machines that can be placed in strategic high foot-traffic locations. Revenue from the business is generated by charging a
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AUTOMATED TELLER MACHINES (ATMs)

transaction fee when cash is dispensed from the machine. Usually the transaction fee, also known as the ‘‘surcharge’’ fee, is a fixed fee which ranges from $2 to $3 dollars per transaction. The smaller the cash withdrawal, the higher the percent return per transaction. This means that if two people withdraw cash from the same machine, one withdraws $20 dollars and the other withdraws $100 dollars, the person who withdraws $100 will pay a lower percentage transaction fee to withdraw cash ($2 / $20 = 10 percent versus $2/$100 = 1 percent). The larger the number of transactions, the more profitable the business becomes. Since many bank–owned ATM machines offer their clients no fee transactions, it is important to pick locations that do not have a high number of bank ATM machines in the area. ATM machines can be purchased or leased and they require a merchant data processor to assist in processing bank card transactions. The industry is very much tied to cash. As new forms of payment continue to grow within the United States economy (for example debit card transactions), the need for cash will diminish. As long as people continue to need cash for their day to day lives, the ATM business will continue to flourish. Here is a case study example of an ATM machine that is located in a busy sports bar in an urban area.

Case Study: ATM in a sports bar within a blue–collar metropolitan area This ATM was installed in April 2006 and has been operating successfully since that time. The ATM owner does not pay for the phone line charge and pays the location owner a portion of the surcharge income.
Start up costs $3,465 $ 500 $ 100 $4,065 Initial ATM cost Locator cost (amount paid to a professional salesperson for the location) Phone line installation (line is shared with location) Total start up costs

Year 2006 (partial) 2007 2008

# Transactions 3,162 4,985 4,253

Gross revenue $ 6,324 $12,462 $10,632

Startup $4,065

Expenses $3,162 $6,231 $5,316

Annual net profit ($ 903) $5,431 $5,016

Business Strategy Quick Cash Services is an ATM provider for locations in urban and suburban areas with fairly dense populations. Each location will have relatively high day–to–day foot traffic. ATM machines are purchased or leased by Quick Cash Services and then installed in a supermarket, a convenience store, a gas station, or on the street. The business develops strong relationships with the owners of the locations where the ATM machines reside. The relationship is viewed as a partnership arrangement in which Quick Cash Services pays a small percent of the net profit from each machine to the location owner in exchange for a fixed rent price and a secure location.

START–UP DETAILS
New ATM machines can be purchased for between $3,000 to $6,000 depending on the model according to ‘‘How to Advice.com’’ and Franklin ATM. Leasing options are also available and monthly payments can range from between $70 to $110 per month. Servicing the ATM machines is the responsibility of the business as well. The business owner will need to select an independent sales organization (ISO) to process withdrawal transactions. The National Association of ATM ISOs and Operators will have lists of ISOs. The business owner will need to interview a number of companies and select an ISO to contract with (contracts are usually from one to
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several years). Setting up an account with a merchant service provider once selected usually takes approximately two weeks once the application is complete. Quick Cash Services has a merchant account with First Data Corporation. The merchant provider has a relationship with the business’ bank. Prior to setting up a merchant account, the business owner will need to set up a business account at a bank and discuss the type of the account with the bank and the accountant. The business owner will also need to service the ATM machines on an ongoing basis including: regularly adding cash, fixing mechanical problems, and fixing software problems. A toll–free number is provided on all machines for customer service issues.

Owning and Operating an ATM Machine in a Merchant Store (either store–owned machine or placed in store by independent owner) Basic Questions and Answers on Owning and Operating ATM Machines as a Store Merchant.
Benefits of having an ATM in your business or location
• •

Allows your customers access to their available cash from their debit, bank and credit cards. Keeps your customers in–house so they don’t leave your location to get cash from a different ATM nearby. Increases retail sales by up to 50 percent of the amount withdrawn from your ATM. Reduces or eliminates the need to accept checks. Reduces credit card usage and credit card fees and expenses. Generates store traffic from walk–by traffic. Increases your customer satisfaction and loyalty. Free processing/no fees. Best of all you will receive surcharge revenue for every transaction.

• • • • • • •

How much revenue can you expect to generate from an ATM placement? That generally depends on the amount of foot traffic your location has on a daily basis. The rule of thumb goes like this. 3 percent – 5 percent of the foot traffic that actually sees the ATM machine will use the ATM. So let’s figure that you have a total of 300 people a day coming through your doors, and let’s say that you are charging a $2.25 surcharge per valid withdrawal. If you take the middle road that 4 percent of the people that see the ATM machine will use it, you can count on your new automated teller machine to generate you a minimum of 360 transactions per month at $2.25 per valid withdrawal. That comes out to $810 per month or a total of $9,720 per year. All of that from one ATM machine at one location. How secure are ATM machines from robbery? ATM machines are broken down into two different types of ATM classifications: Level 1 armored ATM: Level 1 ATMs are used primarily as outdoor ATMs, such as outdoor entertainment districts, outdoor flea markets, outdoor concert and events, etc. Non–armored ATMs: Non–armored ATMs are used primarily for indoor locations that are closed to the public when employees are not present. (i.e. indoor malls, movie theaters, night clubs, restaurants, bars, etc.) Good examples of non–armored ATMs are the Triton 9100 ATM and the Tranax Mini Bank 1500 ATM. Can I co–brand my ATM with my company/merchant name? If the ATM machine is owned entirely by you (or if it’s in the agreement with the owner), then yes you can.
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AUTOMATED TELLER MACHINES (ATMs)

MARKET ANALYSIS
The industry as a whole is a cash flow industry. Owners of ATM machines are looking for large numbers of transactions to return a robust return on capital. This means that for every dollar that is invested, the owner wants their original principal returned plus interest. The greater the turnover of capital, due to transactions, the greater the return on investment will be to the owner of the ATM machine. Most merchant service providers will credit the machines owner’s account with the original principal plus the transaction fee within three business days. The fees for the merchant provider are generally debited from the ATM machines owners account on the fifth business day of the following month. Currently, the ATM industry is in a relatively slow growth phase. There are several reasons for the slowdown in growth. First, there has been growth in the number of ATMs located outside of banks over the last decade. The average number of transactions generated per machine declined by 5 percent in 2005. Second, there is growth in the popularity of surcharge–free networks in which banks/financial institutions agree not to charge members of various networks. Third, there has been growth in the debit card sector. Debit cards can now be used in more and more retail operations which makes the need for cash on hand lower. The early response in the industry was consolidation. Smaller players were being sold to medium and large–sized ATM fleet owners. Many ATM ISOs are looking for alternatives though. There has also been a lot of discussion about using the ATM machines for purposes other than simply dispensing cash, such as selling gift cards. That is still being looked at for potential opportunities as well as check imaging (depositing checks electronically without envelopes). In the near term the most promising opportunity for ATM ISOs is co–branding. Co–branding is when ATM ISOs partner with financial institutions/banks. ‘‘The number one topic in ATMs these days is ATM co–branding,’’ says Melissa Fox, a consultant with Boston–based Dove Consulting, a unit of Hitachi Consulting Corp. Fox recently completed a study on new business models for ATM deployment. Co–branding occurs when a bank pays an ATM ISO to use the bank’s brand on an ATM. The bank’s customers can use the ISO–owned ATM without paying surcharges. To compensate the ISO for the loss of the surcharge and the interchange revenue from transactions made by bank’s customers, the bank pays the ISO a monthly fee based on a number of factors, including the number of cards and machines in the region and the volume of transactions. The bottom line is that, co–branding aside, there are still opportunities for ISOs in the under–banked areas of the country. These areas serve less affluent individuals who still deal primarily with cash. Their need for cash will continue to grow and therefore servicing this demographic is a strong niche. There are other new revenue ideas as well, including using ATM machines to dispense gift cards. Better ATM Services offers technology to enable ATMs to dispense prepaid gift cards through the ATM cash tray. The gift card idea is in the early development stages and has not seen a lot of traction yet within the industry.

Global vs. Domestic Markets The total size of the ATM machine business globally is 1.5 million machines as of 2006 according to ATMIA (Automated Teller Machine Information Association).
Growth in North America has been slowing while growth of machines in Asia has been increasing. The opportunity within the tri–state area would be to develop a portfolio of a few hundred ATM machines. The key to a successful ATM business is finding high traffic locations to place your machines. Locations for the machines are one of the highest barriers to entry. There are opportunities to purchase used machines and lease machines that will allow someone to begin the business with as little as $5,000. The initial investment will be
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AUTOMATED TELLER MACHINES (ATMs)

used to either purchase or lease machines’ as well as money to be used in the ATM machine. If you have a strong credit rating, your bank might lend you the capital you need to place cash in the ATM machine. If this is not an option, your initial investment will be the cash need to help your business function. ‘‘In the tight business market that ATMs have become, managing your costs has become imperative,’’ says John Clatworthy, Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Cash Connect. Installing the right type of ATM in the right location also should be a consideration, says Clatworthy. It doesn’t make sense, for instance, to install a high–priced, sophisticated Diebold or NCR machine in a bowling alley. And for high–traffic locations, it makes sense to use an ATM with a large cash cassette so it won’t have to be replenished.

Location, location, location Finding the right location is probably the most important component of the business. The business owner will need to spend a lot of time investigating differing locations and meeting with merchants to find the right fit.
Franklin ATM has devised a statistical model that identifies predicted transactions by type of location.
Variables analyzed 12 8 6 6 in development Predicted transaction range 50–800 per month 120–700 per month 50–400 per month 80–600 per month 150–250 per month

Category Bars Gas stations Office buildings Convenience stores Bingo halls

COMPETITION
The competition within the ATM business is relatively strong. Most ATM machines will offer the same types of products and services. Quick Cash Services offers a machine that allows its clients to withdraw cash and check balances. Machines owned by banks will also allow clients to deposit money if the client has an account with that banking company. Prices for withdrawals of cash range from $1 dollar per transaction to as high as $3 dollars per transaction. Quick Cash Services has slightly different prices depending on the area where the ATM is situated and how many other ATM machines are in close vicinity. Machines that are generally the only ATM within a five block radius have transaction prices at $3, while machines that are within a close proximity to other ATMs are priced closer to $2 per transaction. The largest ISO in the industry is Cardtronics, based in Houston, TX. Cardtronics operates the largest ATM network in the world with over 32,000 ATMs including significant networks in the United Kingdom and Mexico. Cardtronics has relationships with businesses such as 7–Eleven, Target, Walgreen’s, CVS, Duane Reade, ExxonMobil and Chevron. Cardtronics has jumped into the co–branding business described above by developing relationships with major financial institutions including J.P. Morgan Chase, PNC Financial Services Group Inc., HSBC Bank USA N.A., and Huntington Bancshares Inc. According to a study done by Dove Consulting, 38 percent of ATM ISOs surveyed have at least one co– branding deal in place with a financial institution. Another 24 percent of ISOs are actively pursuing a co– branding agreement. Only 5 percent of ISOs surveyed said they were not interested in co–branding at all.

MARKETING & SALES
The business marketing strategy is to make sure the customers that frequent the supermarket or convenient store are aware that our services are available. The owner of the ATM machines should partner with the host locations to place advertisements inside and outside of their establishment to
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AUTOMATED TELLER MACHINES (ATMs)

make customers aware of the ATM machine. This strategy has proven successful in convenient stores, gas stations and supermarkets. The costs of advertising within host locations are minor and in some cases the price is picked up by the host location.

OPERATIONS
Quick Cash Services is a family–owned and operated business. The business installs the machines, sets up the internet connections, and services the machines with cash on a regular basis. The ATM machines are connected to software which enables us to monitor their current cash balance, as well as alerting us if there is a mechanical problem. Adding cash to the machines is something that the business owner can do on their own, by withdrawing money from the bank on that day. Machines are usually filled with approximately $5,000 in ten and twenty dollar bills. This will usually last for about a week to ten days depending on the traffic in the location. Keep in mind that there is sometimes a lag of up to three business days before the merchant service provider replaces the cash withdrawn from the ATM machine into the business bank account. The business owner should have $2,000 of reserve cash available for servicing at any time. There is an 800 customer service phone number on every ATM machine. Usually calls are due to mechanical failures such as jammed cash or cash that will not dispense. There is an alternative to withdrawing and loading the cash into the ATM machine as the business owner. There are a number of companies that offer secure cash loading services, as well as ATM machine maintenance. According to Brinks, they will handle all the operations of your ATM services for a percentage of the receipts. This percentage runs between 40–60 percent of the gross revenues— this is a good option for those that own many, many machines producing significant revenue. There are also companies that provide financing for cash loads. For instance, ATM Business ‘‘rents’’ funds to ATM operators in maximum advances of one load per ATM (about $8,000 to $10,000) at an interest rate of prime plus 3 percent. For the business owner who wants an ATM machine without managing its operation, there are companies that will provide comprehensive management services. NationalLink has a complete turn– key placement program; all you need to do is supply space and power, and NationalLink will do the rest. Under this program, the business owner receives a portion of the surcharge.

Fees There are two types of fees that ATM owners receive. The surcharge (an ATM ‘‘usage’’ charge to customer withdrawing cash); and the interchange fee which is a fee the bank pays in part to the ATM owner and the processing network for each successful transaction.
A regular cash dispensing ATM machine collects ‘‘interchange’’ fees for each successful transaction it performs. Banks charge for using a non–bank ATM because the bank has to pay an ‘‘interchange fee’’— typically about fifty cents—to the ATM owner, to cover its costs of providing and maintaining the ATM. (There’s also a separate, smaller fee that goes to the ATM network.) The interchange fee is designed to cover the costs of operating the ATM, but it’s only an estimate, so low–volume ATMs may end up losing money, while high–volume ATMs can turn a large profit, even without surcharges. Therefore, the interchange is a fee that the cardholder’s issuing bank pays to the network and ATM owners to cover processing costs. The networks and ATM owners keep a portion to cover their cost of providing network access into cardholder’s banks. Without this service, there would be no way to get approval codes for transactions because banks don’t just let anyone connect to their system. ATM business operators must be connected with a processing network who collects and distributes the transaction fees to the bank, the ATM owner and to the processing company.
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Then, the processor keeps a portion of this money for administration costs, and shares a portion of it with their ISO, or distributor that setup the merchant location for service. This interchange does not come out of the surcharge, therefore the machine owner normally keeps 100 percent of the surcharge amount he collects on his machine because the processing is paid for by the interchange fee. Interchange fees on card transactions amount to over $7.9 billion for ATM cash withdrawals. There are two types of customer charges: the surcharge and the foreign fee. The surcharge fee may be imposed by the ATM owner (the ‘‘deployer’’ or Independent Sales Organization) and will be charged to the consumer using the machine. The foreign fee or transaction fee is a fee charged by the card issuer (financial institution, stored value provider) to the consumer for conducting a transaction outside of their network of machines in the case of a financial institution.

Equipment The equipment needed to handle the operations of the business includes the following:
• • • •

ATM Machines Merchant Services Software Computer Ethernet Internet Connections

ATM Manufacturers • Tranax ATM Manufacturer: Founded in 1986, Tranax is a leading innovator of retail ATM and self– service technology, serving the retail markets. Tranax has sold and supported more than 100,000 ATMs and self–service terminals throughout North America. Since 2006, Tranax started its own manufacturing, and has shipped over 20,000 ATM and self–service terminals. Tranax, headquartered in Hayward, California, became an independent operating company of Eltna Group in August 2008.


Triton ATM Manufacturer: Triton is a major provider of off–premise ATMs and ATM management software globally. Triton ATMs are made in the USA. WRG ATM Manufacturer: WRG was founded in 1989 as a coin operated music and game operator. Tidel ATM Manufacturer: Tidel began in 1978 as part of the Southland Corporation (now known as 7–Eleven, Inc.) by inventing a robbery deterrent product that has become familiar to retail store operators everywhere—the Timed Access Cash Controller (TACC). Today there are over 250,000 TACCs working in retail locations throughout the world. In 1992, Tidel made history once again by introducing dial–up ATM technology to the commercial marketplace. Tidel set the standard for low– cost, high–reliability ATM performance and expanded the product line to include scalable ATMs and multimedia point–of–sale kiosks that could dispense everything from cash to stamps to event tickets. The success of Tidel’s ATM platform didn’t go without notice in the marketplace and among the larger players in the ATM world. As a result, Tidel and NCR Corporation entered into an asset purchase agreement in 2006 where Tidel sold all of its ATM products to NCR EasyPoint, LLC. Tidel originally released the Sentinel cash management system in 2002. This new product represented the next revolution in intelligent cash management, providing a host of features designed to provide users with real–time cash accountability. The Sentinel product line continues to move forward with its scalable platform that can incorporate the newest advances in cash management technology and unique user– specific features and peripherals. Tidel Engineering L.P. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Sentinel Technologies, Inc., a private holding company. Diebold ATM Manufacturer: For 150 years, Diebold has brought together a combination of innovation, expertise and quality service to become a global leader in providing integrated self– service, security systems and services. Headquartered in Canton, Ohio, Diebold employs more than
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17,000 employees, with representation in more than 90 countries worldwide. In 2008, Diebold reported total revenue of $3.2 billion. Diebold is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange.


Hyosung–Nautilus ATM Manufacturer: With over 27 years of experience in the industry, Nautilus Hyosung has developed proven technologies to help customers achieve greater effectiveness.

Hours of Operation The business hours for the ATM business are flexible, but require a significant amount of time. Travel time between locations is a factor. Quick Cash Services uses the early morning hours to fill ATM machines with cash. Withdrawals from banks for cash to be loaded into ATM machines are generally done in the afternoon. If a maintenance call needs to be made, it is usually done in the morning, but could come at any time during the day.
This business can be run on a part–time basis with only a few machines. Staffing requirements will vary depending upon the number of machines deployed. One person can handle several machines, but if a larger network of machines is established, more personnel will be needed. Staffing also will vary depending on what part of the business is done by the owner versus outsourcing.

Professional Support Initially there will be a need for legal advice when setting up the company that will conduct the business. This can be accomplished without a lawyer, but there are a number of nuances and some legal advice is recommended. There will likely always be a need for an accountant, since the number of transactions and the multiple types of taxes will be fairly complex. Insurance There are multiple types of insurance that are needed to run an efficient ATM business. The owner should purchase liability insurance. Kiosk specific insurance will run approximately $495 dollars per machine for $1 million dollars of liability, according to Arizona Central Insurance Company.
An owner can also purchase property insurance that runs approximately $500 per $10,000 of damage depending on the location of the machine. Cash can also be insured but rates can run as high as $1,000 per $10,000. Most ATM machine vendors self–insure their cash and keep amounts of less than $10,000 in a machine.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Year 1** Revenue* Expenses Purchases Merchant service Insurance liability Property Internet Rent Accounting Legal Net income Assumptions: **Year 1 assumes 4 ATM machines purchased ***Year 2 assumes 8 ATM machines purchased ****Year 3 assumes 10 ATM machines purchased ATM machines are assumed to cost $3,000 Merchant Service takes approximately 5 cents per transaction. Year 1 (10 transactions per day *5 cents *365 days *4 machines). Rent is the amount an owner would pay a host location. *Revenue is calculated by estimating the average transaction at $50, the average withdrawn amount per day ($500), and multiplying the transaction fee which is $2. ($500 / $50 * $2 $20). This number is then multiplied by the number of days in a year and the number of ATM machines. $12,000.00 $ 730.00 $ 1,980.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 2,400.00 $ 2,847.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 1,500.00 $ 3,243.00 $24,000.00 $ 2,190.00 $ 5,940.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 7,200.00 $ 8,541.00 $ 2,500.00 $ 1,500.00 $29,729.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 30,000.00 4,015.00 10,890.00 11,000.00 13,200.00 15,658.50 2,500.00 1,500.00 71,836.50 $29,200.00 Year 2*** $87,600.00 Year 3**** $160,600.00

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Bed and Breakfast
Rocheport Bed and Breakfast

123 Main St. Rocheport, Missouri 65279 Kari Lucke
Olivia and Stan Jordan propose the opening of a luxurious yet competitively priced bed and breakfast inn in the historic town of Rocheport, Missouri.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Olivia and Stan Jordan propose the opening of a new bed and breakfast inn in the historic town of Rocheport, Missouri. In order to stand out among other bed and breakfasts (B&Bs) in the area, the Jordans plan to make the Rocheport B&B the best and most luxurious while remaining competitive in terms of rates. They are able to do this based on the fact that they will do most of the remodeling work themselves, as well as all of the maintenance and service necessary for operation of the business. Olivia has a B.S. in culinary arts and thus is capable of producing outstanding meals, which is an extremely important aspect of a B&B. Stan has been a building contractor for 20 years and has the knowledge and skills to do most of the remodeling work as well as any ongoing maintenance. The Jordans aim is to provide a new place of rest and relaxation for residents from around the state and beyond.

Business Overview A bed and breakfast inn is a small lodging establishment, usually a private home, that offers private bedrooms for rent; owners supply breakfast to their guests on the morning of their stay. B&Bs normally offer rooms with private bathrooms and/or a suite of rooms that share a bathroom. Breakfast is usually served in a dining room or the guests’ rooms, and quality and presentation of the food is one of the key factors that distinguish the best B&Bs. Decor is also important; many B&Bs are historic buildings and incorporate Victorian or other historical decor and furnishings. Most owners live in the residence and manage the business themselves, although some may hire outside workers to clean the guest rooms. B&B owners must be friendly and willing to host a variety of people in their homes on an ongoing basis. Leisure travel dominates this sector of the innkeeping business, attracting in particular guests who enjoy the cultural, historic, and unique aspects of B&Bs.

INDUSTRY AND MARKET
Industry Analysis B&Bs represent a $3.4 billion industry, according to the Professional Association of Innkeepers International (PAII), and the industry is still growing. Whereas there were only 1,000 B&Bs in the United States
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serving about 1 million guests in 1990, by 2008 there were more than 20,000 serving over 50 million guests annually. According to a May 5, 2009, Time magazine article, ‘‘Americans have a wide array of lodgings to choose from when they take a vacation...Yet more and more people are flocking to bed-and-breakfast inns.’’ As life becomes more complicated and Americans continue to search for ways to ‘‘get away from it all,’’ B&Bs will continue to gain in popularity.

Market Analysis The market for the Rocheport B&B consists of couples and individuals in the nearby town of Columbia, Missouri (population 94,000), as well as surrounding areas. Because Rocheport is located in the middle of the state, the metro areas of St. Louis (population 2.8 million) and Kansas City (population 2 million), both of which are a two-hour drive from Rocheport, are also considered important markets.
According to a Michigan State University study, most visitors to B&Bs are middle-aged, well-educated professionals in moderately high income brackets. About two-thirds of guests are couples. Eighty-two percent of the people surveyed indicated they were married, and about half had children at home. Newlyweds and empty-nesters accounted for a smaller portion of B&B guests.

Competition Although there are three other B&Bs in Rocheport—Yates House B&B, School House B&B, and Amber House B&B—there are plenty of customers to go around, so to speak. The existing B&Bs are often hard to reserve, especially in the summer, due to high demand. Rocheport B&B may pick up those visitors who cannot get a reservation elsewhere, and then once the guests experience the service and accommodations the Jordans offer, it is highly likely that these people will come back as returning guests. Also, the fact that the Rocheport B&B is the village’s newest inn should draw travelers who are interested in sampling a new place or who are attracted to new experiences and ventures.

PERSONNEL
Management Olivia and Stan Jordan will manage the business on a day-to-day basis. Stan will perform all routine maintenance on the house and grounds, and Olivia will do all the cooking and cleaning. With Olivia’s degree and experience with cooking, she will be able to plan and create extraordinary and creative breakfasts, which is a vital part of the B&B experience. Professional and Advisory Support The Jordans plan to join Bed & Breakfast Inns of Missouri (BBIM), which hosts an annual conference, provides a weekly state-specific newsletter on happenings in the industry, and manages an online forum of others in the business. Member inns can use the BBIM logo on marketing materials, showing that they have been inspected and approved by a reputable agency. The inspection and application fee is $100. BBIM also provides opportunities for free online marketing, including a listing on the BBIM site, which includes a link to the individual inn’s web site and a variety of ways to search for inns, such as location, specialty, or route; gift certificates that are good only at BBIM inns; and a frequent guest program.

STRATEGIES
Business Strategy To the Jordans, people who stay at the Rocheport B&B are houseguests, not customers. The Jordans’ motivation to operate a B&B is based on their desire to meet new people and provide travelers and
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guests with a unique and enjoyable experience, as well as to use their skills and talents in a positive way. It is this philosophy that will make the Rocheport B&B a success. In this business, those who are in it for the money will not be successful, as they do not have the underlying enthusiasm or drive to provide what is essential to any good B&B: an interest in people and a willingness and desire to serve them well. However, those who do have this passion for interacting and serving other people—such as the Jordans—will accomplish and exceed their business goals as a result of their underlying motivations.

Growth Strategy The most effective form of advertising for B&Bs, according to PAII, is word of mouth. The idea is that once guests experience the Rocheport B&B, they will tell others about it, and new business will be generated. In addition, online reviews have become a key factor in the industry. At such sites as BedandBreakfast.com, users rate inns they have visited based on guest rooms, service, value, cleanliness, and dining. A 2009 ComCore study showed that 25 percent of B&B guests surveyed viewed online reviews before deciding which B&B to visit, and 75 percent of those stated that the reviews significantly impacted their decision.
As the Jordans welcome more guests, their reputation as an excellent B&B in the Rocheport area will grow, due to both word–of–mouth promotion and positive online reviews. Such ‘‘free’’ marketing will bring new guests to their inn, and the Jordans can continue to build their client base. According to Harold Alexander of the University of Minnesota Extension as well as many others, ‘‘It’s not unusual for guests to return again and again to favorite bed and breakfast...and develop long-lasting friendships with the owners.’’

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
Description The Rocheport Bed & Breakfast is located in Rocheport, Missouri, on the Missouri River. The home was built in 1915 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. With some moderate remodeling, the Rocheport B&B will become a four-bedroom inn. Each guest room will have its own private bathroom, and breakfast will be served in the main-level dining room or on the large, shaded, wood deck at the back of the house, depending on weather conditions.
The goal of the Rocheport B&B is to provide a quiet, relaxing, and enjoyable place to stay for guests looking for a romantic weekend away, a place to relax after a long day of shopping or on the trail, or just some ‘‘down time’’ away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. The inn is within walking distance of several restaurants and the Katy Trail. The Katy Trail, originally part of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas rail line, is the longest state park in the country and a very popular destination for bicyclists as well as hikers. Rocheport is also home to Les Bourgeois Winery and several unique shops and antique stores.

Unique Features/Niche The Rocheport B&B will stand out as the most accommodating and luxurious B&B in Rocheport. In addition to the standard B&B fare for upscale inns, such as exquisite decor, king-sized beds, luxurious bedding, private baths with showers, Wi-Fi, TV/DVD, radio/CD player, and refrigerator with complimentary beverages, the Jordans’ inn will also provide the following amenities: a complimentary bottle of wine at arrival; homemade chocolate chip cookies in the afternoon; 24-hour coffee and tea; spa robes for all guests; free bike rental; a large library of both books and DVDs; and free shuttle services to village attractions. In addition, the inn will feature a multi-level wooden deck off the back of the house with tables, cushioned chairs, and a fire pit; an eight-person hot tub located on the bottom-level deck; and a two-person hammock under maple trees in the backyard. Every detail in the accommodations and surroundings, from the crystal chandeliers in the bedrooms to the c.1870 walnut table with seating for 10 in the dining room, will reflect the highest quality.
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In the B&B industry, the quality of the hosts is also vital to an inn’s success. Olivia and Stan both have an outgoing nature, never-ending energy, and a flare for conversation—characteristics that are critical to making guests feel instantly at ease and welcome.

Pricing Room rates at the Rocheport B&B will be on par with the average rate charged by the other inns in the village. For Amber House, rates run from $149 to $239; for School House, $149 to $260; and for Yates House, $169 to $269.
The Rocheport B&B will offer four guest rooms, two with the amenities described under ‘‘Unique Features/Niche,’’ at a rate of $169 per night, and two with these amenities plus a gas fireplace and a twoperson Jacuzzi tub, at a rate of $259. Rates are reduced by $20 on all weekdays except Friday.

MARKETING AND SALES
Advertising and Promotion When they are ready to open the inn, the Jordans will send a press release to local media regarding their new business and what it will offer. They will also run a quarter-page ad in the popular local monthly magazine Inside Columbia, which caters to the same market as the Rocheport B&B. Other forms of advertising will brochures, which will be distributed and placed in tourist information racks in key locations along Interstate 70 (which runs past Rocheport) and listings on web sites such as BBIM, mentioned under ‘‘Professional and Advisory Support,’’ as well as similar web sites that provide free listing opportunities. Cost All of the marketing methods are low cost or free and have been proven effective for this type of business. Total upfront costs include the ad in Inside Columbia ($585) and 500 standard brochures ($125). Ongoing costs will occur when brochures need to be reprinted or updated but 500 copies are expected to last three years or longer.

OPERATIONS
Customers As mentioned under ‘‘Market Analysis,’’ most visitors to B&Bs are middle-aged, well educated, and work in a professional field earning moderately high incomes. Because Columbia is the nearest large town, it will be the focus of marketing efforts. The following statistics regarding the Columbia population are relevant:
• • •

Individuals between the ages of 35 and 54—24% Couples with children under the age of 18—27% Households with incomes of $50,000 or more—40%

In addition, Columbia is home to two private four-year colleges and the state’s flagship university, as well as three large hospitals. In 2008 Forbes magazine rated Columbia 11th on its list of Smartest Cities in America, based on the education levels of Columbia-area residents. Columbia also has the highest number of doctors per capita than any other city in the United States besides Rochester, Minnesota, where the Mayo Clinic is located. Such facts illustrate the kind of education and income levels that are typical of B&B visitors. Columbia is not the only market, however, and the Rocheport B&B will welcome guests from around the United States as well as other countries.
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Facility and Location The Rocheport B&B is located at 213 First Street in Rocheport, Missouri. The location is zoned as commercial. The Jordans own the adjoining empty lot, which will be used for guest parking.
The location of the inn is ideal in that it is on the Katy Trail and the Missouri River and is within walking distance of shops and restaurants. Rocheport itself is an excellent location because it is only 2 miles off Interstate 70 and is in the middle of the state, allowing easy access from Kansas City and St. Louis, as well as providing a convenient place for people who are traveling I-70. Currently the home consists of six bedrooms (two main level and four upper level) and two and a half bathrooms (one and a half main level and one upper level). The Jordans will occupy one of the mainfloor bedrooms and the adjoining bathroom. The other main-floor bedroom will be furnished for guests. Remodeling on the main floor will consist of turning the half-bath into a full bath, with Jacuzzi tub, and adjoining it with the guest bedroom. Three of the bedrooms on the upper level will be furnished for guests, and one of the bedrooms will be converted into two bathrooms. The remaining bathroom upstairs will be remodeled to accommodate a two-person tub. Total cost of renovations is estimated to be $50,000.

Legal Environment In Missouri, B&Bs are considered ‘‘lodging establishments’’ and thus must undergo an annual inspection by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). Owners must also submit to additional inspections if deemed necessary by the state. The DHSS then grants (or renews) an occupational license, good for one year. Relevant local ordinances include those regulating fire safety, electrical wiring, fireplaces, and plumbing, in addition to zoning regulations. B&B owners must also register the name of their business with the Missouri Secretary of State and obtain a business license from Boone County.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
The following two worksheets detail start-up costs and expected profits for the first three years. Loan payment is calculated based on a 7 percent fixed-rate commercial loan. First-year expected sales and food costs are based on the national average occupancy rates at B&Bs (40%); second- and third-year figures are based on an expected annual growth rate of about 10 percent. Expenses are calculated to increase by approximately 5 percent per year in addition to the increases incurred by accommodating more guests.

Start-Up Costs
Capital requirements Legal fees, licenses Furnishings, linens, and electronics for rooms Business supplies Other starting inventory (bicycles, toiletries, food and beverages) Kitchen equipment, dishes Outdoor furniture and amenities Building renovations Petty cash (working capital) Directional and entrance signs Parking lot preparation Advertising Totals On hand $ 0 $ 2,000 $ $ 500 0 Needed $ 500 $ 8,000 $ 0 $ 5,000 $ 1,000 $ 3,000 $ 50,000 $ 0 $ 1,500 $ 2,000 $ 710 $71,710

$ 500 $ 0 $ 0 $ 500 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $3,500

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Worksheet 2: Sales and Earnings
1st Year Net sales Less expenses Loan payment Food Housekeeping/room supplies Utilities Repairs and maintenance Vehicle expenses (for shuttle) Insurance Total expenses Net profit before taxes $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,400 5,840 500 4,200 600 500 1,200 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,400 6,420 750 4,620 750 625 1,320 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,400 7,350 1,000 5,080 1,000 750 1,450 $125,000 2nd Year $137,500 3rd Year $151,250

$ 14,240 $110,760

$ 15,885 $121,615

$ 18,030 $133,220

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Beekeeping Business
B. Strand’s Bees

102 Georgetown Road Montgomery Corners, Illinois 61022 Paul Greenland
B. Strand’s Bees raises bees for the production of products such as honey and beeswax, and for crop pollination services.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview Owned by Bill Strand, B. Strand’s Bees raises bees for the production of products such as honey and beeswax, and for crop pollination services. Our business relies on the performance of 500 honey bee colonies. Of these, some remain at our location in Montgomery Corners, Illinois, while other are relocated at different times throughout the season, depending on the needs of the orchards and farms to which we provide pollination services.
Savvy product marketing is critical for successful beekeepers. Over the years, the B. Strand’s brand name has become well known in our region thanks to an identity and related product packaging designs developed by a local advertising agency. We market the majority of our products to well-heeled tourists who visit the neighboring town of Brendenwood, Illinois, where Bill Strand’s wife operates a separate but affiliated gift shop operation called The Busy Bee. B. Strand’s is a relatively small operation. Our competitors include other beekeepers in northwestern Illinois who sell their products at farmers markets, organic food stores, and other locations, and rent their hives/provide pollination services to area orchards and farms.

MARKET ANALYSIS
Our operation is located in the town of Montgomery Corners, Illinois, in Davis County. We are only a short distance away from the historic town of Brendenwood, a popular tourist destination marked by nineteenth century architecture, unique shops, restaurants, B&Bs, wineries, and more. The majority of the honey and beeswax that we produce is sold through a gift shop in Brendenwood named The Busy Bee, which sells candles, beeswax, honey, and bee-themed merchandise. Owned and operated by Bill Strand’s wife, Leah Strand, this separate but affiliated retail business

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provides us with a unique channel to sell our offerings to tourists, many of whom have large disposable incomes. Our competitors include other beekeepers in northwestern Illinois. Leading the competition is Webster’s Bee Farm, a large commercial operation with 2,500 colonies. Super Bees (1,500 colonies) and Henry’s Honey Haven (1,250 colonies) are two other sizable operations in our area. While most of our competitors market their offerings on a regional or national basis, we mainly focus on supplying our affiliated retail operation with branded products, and serving a few local orchards and farms.

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
According to Midwestern State University’s College of Agriculture, the United States is home to roughly 150,000 beekeepers. Collectively, they own about 3 million colonies of honey bees. Large commercial beekeeping operations maintain as many as 2,000 colonies. The beekeeping industry provided limited employment opportunities during the mid-2000s. However, at that time a significant number of commercial beekeepers were nearing retirement, providing opportunities for new individuals to ‘‘learn the ropes’’ and take over their operations. Many beekeepers belong to beekeeping clubs at the county level, or belong to one of three regional societies. These include the Heartland Apicultural Society, the Western Apicultural Society, and the Eastern Apicultural Society. At the national level, beekeepers may belong to either The American Honey Producers’ Association or the American Beekeeping Federation.

MANAGEMENT
B. Strand’s is headed by owner Bill Strand. Bill Strand acquired the operation in 2002 from his fatherin-law, Stephen Goers, who established the business in 1984 under the name Bee Line Bees. Goers has since retired, but lends occasional assistance and expertise as needed. Strand’s wife, Leah, who operates an affiliated gift shop in a neighboring town, also lends occasional assistance but is not an employee. Bill Strand is a member of both the American Honey Producers’ Association and the American Beekeeping Federation.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Our operation produces approximately 30,000 pounds of extracted honey each year. The majority of this is packaged and sold as traditional liquid honey under our brand name. In addition to liquid honey, we also sell:
• • •

Comb honey, which remains in the edible honeycomb. Whipped or creamed honey, which can be spread like butter. Chuck honey, which is liquid honey with pieces of honeycomb remaining in the jar.

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We also sell beeswax to several area businesses that use it to produce candles, soaps, and other items. Finally, we rent our bees out to a number of area farms and orchards throughout the spring and summer months.

OPERATIONS
B. Strand’s Bees is located in a rural area, in close proximity to a number of orchards and farms to which we rent colonies for the purposes of pollination services. Our business is located on a plot of land that includes three outbuildings. The success of B. Strand’s Bees literally rests upon the wings of our bees. Specifically, we rely upon about 500 colonies of Italian honey bees. In addition to an excellent reputation for honey production, this type of bee resists disease more effectively than German bees and is less defensive, making it the bee stock of choice in the United States. Our honey bees reside in beehives known as supers, or wooden boxes that contain a series of frames. Each colony consists of an egg-producing queen bee, hundreds of drones, and as many as 50,000 worker bees. On average, we are able to harvest about 75 to 80 pounds of honey from each colony per year. Hives must be inspected on a regular basis to monitor production and detect potential problems. A number of pests pose potential threats to our business, including tracheal mites, varroa mites, wax moths, and small hive beetles. In addition, we must monitor hives for diseases such as European foulbrood and American foulbrood. Although some may assume that beekeeping is a seasonal endeavor, we operate our business yearround. In the spring we focus on caring for old hives and establishing new ones. For hives with low food supplies, we provide them with a syrup consisting of sugar and water until they are able to begin producing honey. At this time we also acquire new bees from dealers and move them near sources of nectar, such as clover fields and orchards. Honey is first harvested late in the spring or during the early summer months, at which time a mild, light-colored crop is produced. A second harvest follows in the fall, producing a darker, more flavorful honey. During the fall we prepare our hives for the winter months, at which time we perform maintenance on our equipment, analyze records, and engage in planning for the following season. We utilize a wide range of equipment to carry out our operations. In addition to protective clothing, special tools, supers, and frames, we also rely upon a forklift, as well as a large truck used for making deliveries. One important aspect of our operation is honey packaging, which is performed in a dedicated outbuilding. In addition to placing honey into jars, we also place our branded label onto containers. Labels include information such as the grade and weight of the honey, along with our contact information.

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FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Budget Receipts Honey Pollination fees Spring hives Summer hives Wax Total receipts Variable costs Bees (replacement bees) Queens (replacement) Insurance Chemical for fume boards Jars Labels Marketing Parasite and disease control Registration fees Sugar Vehicle costs/maintenance Total variable costs Fixed costs Equipment Brood boxes and frames Extracting equipment Feeders Fume boards Hive tools/smokers Honey supers/frames Protective clothing Queen excluders Top, bottoms, and inner covers Facility Upkeep Total fixed costs Total costs Returns Returns over variable costs Net returns $52,855 $36,855 $ 9,500 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 4,500 1,200 500 825 9,500 2,000 1,000 8,520 100 1,250 5,750 $60,000 $12,500 $15,000 $ 500 $88,000

$35,145

$ 6,500 $16,000 $51,145

LEGAL
Per the Illinois Bees and Apiaries Act, our business is required to register our bee colonies with the Illinois Department of Agriculture, which provides free inspections in order to identify pests, diseases, and to recommend treatments. This service is provided as part of the Illinois Bees and Apiaries Program. In addition to adhering to state regulations, we also have secured liability insurance from an agency recommended by the American Beekeeping Federation. Such coverage is necessary in the event of a lawsuit related to the consumption of our honey products, or in the event that a visitor to our facility has a negative reaction to a bee sting.

MARKETING & SALES
Over the years, the B. Strand’s brand name has become well known in our region thanks to an identity and related product packaging designs developed by a local advertising agency many years ago.
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Because the majority of our honey production is earmarked for resale through The Busy Bee, our affiliated retail operation in Brendenwood, Illinois, B. Strand’s Bees does not engage in direct-toconsumer marketing. Beyond The Busy Bee, we have established relationships with several grocery stores and farmers markets in neighboring towns that carry our honey products. On a similar note, little marketing is needed for our pollination services. Because the wild honey bee population has been severely impacted by pests and diseases, there is ample demand for our domestic honey bees. As an established operation, we have relationships in place with several area orchards and farms that rely upon our colonies for the pollination of pumpkins, apples, melons, blueberries, and cucumbers. Our marketing consists mainly of relationship building activities. Throughout the season, we pay occasional visits to the orchardists and farmers with whom we normally work in order to stay visible. On occasion, we bring complimentary honey products to them for their enjoyment, and take them out for lunch.

SWOT ANALYSIS


Strengths: We are an established operation with a unique retail outlet through which we sell the majority of our honey and beeswax. Weaknesses: We are a relatively small beekeeping business, limiting our ability to provide pollination services to larger orchards and farms. Opportunities: Because pests and disease have virtually eliminated wild honey bees in our area, there is ample demand for pollination services provided by our domestic honey bees. Threats: Pests and disease are potential threats to our operation.







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Car Wash and Car Detailing Business
Wash and Go

150 Merchant Rd. Portland, Maine 04101 Laura Becker
Wash and Go provides a full service vehicle cleaning and detailing operation in Portland, Maine.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Wash and Go will own and operate a car wash and car detailing business in Portland, Maine. The car wash will be an automatic process where customers will exit their vehicles and watch as the cars are professionally washed. Wash and Go also provides a car detailing service which accounts for additional revenue. Independently owned car wash services, like Wash and Go, will provide a number of different vehicle cleaning services to clients. Revenue is produced from exterior washing, interior washing, detailing, and merchandise sales. Wash and Go offers a very high quality service and competes heavily on price with other car washes in the area. The customer base consists of individual car owners, fleet companies (which include taxi and limo companies) and car dealerships.

MARKET ANALYSIS
According to the International Carwash Association, the car wash industry can generally be organized along two lines: suppliers and retailers. Suppliers include providers of car washing equipment, solutions manufacturers and distributors. Retailers include car wash companies operating in one or more lines of business: self serve car wash; in–bay automatic (stationary automatic) car wash; or conveyor automatic car wash. Professional car wash establishments are more ecologically–friendly relative to parking lot or driveway car washing. Water and cleaning fluid are routed to a treatment facility as opposed to the curve or drains, according to the International Carwash Association.

OPERATIONS
Car wash services can be stand alone entities, or operated as part of a group of automobile services or convenience stores. An example of car washing or detailing as one of many services is the oil lube shop.
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Many oil lube shops offer car washes as one of the multitude of services they offer. Other examples of car washing services are automated service and self service car washes. Wash and Go operates a conveyor automatic car wash service, which allows customers to hand off cars and watch as the cars are transported down a conveyor belt while having either individuals wash the cars or machines (brushes) wash the cars. Some customers prefer hand washed cars as they may eliminate the potential for slight scratches that may occur in brush washed facilities. Hand washed car washes are usually more expensive, and cannot be as competitive on pricing. Self service washing provides for the car owner to wash a car at a facility that offers all of the necessary cleaning tools.

Types of Car Washes When analyzing the decision to own a car wash business, one of the first decisions is to decide what type of car wash to establish. There are several options, as noted and described below.
Self service car wash Customers wash their own vehicles in individual wash bays. These bays can either have self serve equipment or in–bay automatic equipment in them. The advantage of this type of car wash business is that there are low labor costs. Hours of car wash availability can be seven days a week, 24 hours a day. Stand alone automatic car wash When lot size is limited, a car wash business that uses only the in–bay automatic service may be preferable. The stand alone automatic car wash consists of one or two in–bay automatics and a vacuum and vending area. Automatic car wash There are three basic types of automatic car wash: touch, touch–free and conveyors. A touch automatic car wash uses cloth or cloth–like materials to clean the car. A touch–free automatic car wash uses chemicals and high powered water sprays to clean the car. The conveyor system is a touch automatic car wash system that uses conveyor belts to pull cars through the system. The touch automatic car wash system with conveyors can provide an exterior wash cycle and an interior wash. There are three basic conveyor platforms including:


Full Service Tunnel—The vehicle is cleaned inside and outside. The vehicle owner typically pays and then leaves the vehicle and goes to a waiting area while the vehicle is cleaned. This method is considered to be the premium offering; but it is also involves the most labor. Express Tunnel—Only the exterior of the vehicle is cleaned and vacuums may be offered to the customer after the car wash. The customer usually pays at a pay station prior to the tunnel and then remains in the vehicle during the car wash. This is a fast, low–priced tunnel car wash. This method has a goal of high volume and low costs for the operator. Flex Serve—The customer is offered an exterior car wash with the option for interior cleaning and detailing provided at an additional charge. The vehicle owner usually pays at a pay station prior to the tunnel and remains in their vehicle during the car wash. Those that wish to have their interior cleaned can either exit their vehicle and wait for the attendants to complete the interior cleaning or proceed to an area where self–vacuuming can be completed.





The benefits of tunnel car wash systems include high volume and high revenue potential and the ability to provide extra services such as detailing and quick lube for additional revenue opportunities.
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Car wash and convenience store combination In–bay automatics and self service car wash equipment can be a profitable addition to a convenience store operation, adding significant revenue to the entire operation.

Performing Site Analysis—Location, Location, Location When setting up a car wash, it is extremely important to find the right location.
Lot Selection


A good rule of thumb to follow concerning lot sizing is 100 to 120 feet deep X a minimum of 75 feet wide depending on the number of bays. (Typical 4 bay self–serve wash would require a lot 100 to 120 feet deep X 100 feet wide minimum). Good access from both directions of traffic flow is important. Ideal traffic speed should be under 40 mph. Lot size and shape will determine if you design a ‘‘Drive–in–back–out’’ or ‘‘Drive–through’’ building. (Income streams tend to favor the ‘‘drive–through’’ design). Ideal locations are near residential areas, apartment complexes or busy traffic flow routes. A good rule to follow regarding the cost of property is that the monthly lease payment should not exceed 15 percent of the gross monthly income of the wash.

• • •

• •

Bay and Building Sizing
• •

Ideal bay size is 16 feet wide X 28 feet long (inside measurements). Typical pump room is 10 to15 feet wide X 28 feet length.

Building Placement


Depending on specific codes, your building should be placed on the lot to allow for 1–2 cars minimum to be ‘‘stacked’’ behind each bay waiting to wash. Vacuums can be placed in this area but should not impede the normal flow into the bays. Make sure there are adequate drying and vacuuming areas that are out of the main traffic flow. Ideally, your bays should have a southern exposure to help reduce ice build–up in cold weather conditions. Local codes will also have ‘‘set–back’’ requirements on building placement.

• •



Staff The operations of a car wash facility are vital to the success of an automatic facility. A self service facility will require a few employees to assist occasionally in the washing process as well as employees to collect cash transactions. For an automatic facility, it is necessary to have employees assist in the cleaning process and to have an employee facilitate transactions. The employees needed in the Wash and Go facility are a facility manager, a wash reception person, a tire cleaner, a vacuum operator, one detailing cleaner, and at least six drying operators. All of these employees are paid on an hourly basis. Many of the staff generates a significant portion of their income from tips. The facility is open from 8a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days a week. Cleaning Equipment A car wash business needs to keep an inventory of cleaning fluid at all times. This includes chemicals that are mixed with waters to clean the exterior of automobiles as the vehicles move through the conveyor system.
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Wash and Go purchases window cleaning fluid and detailing wax and keeps that in inventory as well. The business also needs to supply towels to the drying staff. There are many suppliers of cleaning supplies available. A leading supplier is Kleen–Rite Corporation.

Management and Control Software It is a good idea to use management and control software to account for all transactions and to be able to analyze usage trends and patterns. Professional Support In setting up the Wash and Go operation, an outside attorney was hired to assist in establishing and incorporating the company.
A business will also need assistance from an insurance broker to attain the correct amount of liability insurance for the facility. Wash and Go works with a local banker to set up a revolving credit account and a payroll company to manage the payroll process. An outside accountant helps with books and records. Wash and Go set up a merchant account through First Data Corporation which allows the business to transact using credit cards.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Revenue Projections—Bays
• •

Studies find that it takes a population base of 1,000–1,500 people to support one self serve bay. At this population level, the national average is approximately $1,350 per bay, per month of gross income for one self serve bay.

Revenue Projections—Vacuums
• •

The ideal number of vacuums to have is one and a half vacuums per one bay of self–serve. National average of revenue per vacuum is approximately $222 per vacuum per month in gross revenue.

Operating Cost Projections Average operating costs is approximately 52 percent of gross income which includes 9.3 percent for attendant labor. (Lease payments, income tax, debt reduction or depreciation are not included). Barriers to entry The initial investment into a car wash will depend on whether you plan to purchase an existing facility or build a facility. An outright purchase can be financed through banks or credit unions, similar to financing of any small business. When building a facility, many factors will come into play.
For example, is there a facility that already exists? Will the owner have to build from scratch? Is the land available for lease? The land that Wash and Go decided on was available for lease and there was a vacant business on the property that had offered automobile lubrication. The Wash and Go start up was based on these factors. Leases can range in prices depending on the location and area of the country. The Wash and Go lease, which is a three year lease, is $1,000 dollars per month. The business needed contracting work from a builder, and money to purchase water pumps, a conveyor belt, vacuums, cleaning fluids, drainage systems, computer terminal, and a cash register. The amount needed for start up, which includes money for employees was approximately $100,000.
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OBJECTIVES
The Wash and Go business objective is to provide a superior car wash and detailing service to individuals and businesses in the Portland, Maine area. The strategy has been to focus on businesses and to provide an alternative to self cleaning automobiles.

Purchase Existing Establishment Versus Building New Establishment One of the first decisions to make when establishing a car wash is to decide whether to purchase an already existing car wash establishment, or to build a new establishment on purchased or leased land.
Purchasing an existing facility may require a consultant to help evaluate the business and to determine a fair market value. Car wash facilities are normally valued by one of two methods. The first is to evaluate the adjusted monthly average income and create a multiple of 12–25 times this value. The second is to use a multiple of four to seven times the annual adjusted net income. Both of these methods of creating a market value excludes real estate, and subtracts lease or rental expenses to create the net value. When purchasing an existing car wash, it is important to:
• • • • •

Analyze existing facility, review demographics Observe and review entire operation in all departments Review management, equipment, improvements and property Analyze existing competition within a three mile radius Check with City Planning Department to determine if any new car washes are being planned or built Analyze existing marketing and advertising programs, bonus and commission schedules, any employee agreements, medical and pension plans, vendor agreements and sub–leases (if applicable) Analyze how extra services and sales may be added or upgraded Review property to determine what additional profit centers may be added, such as oil lube, smog testing, gasoline, express detailing, engine cleaning, convenience store, windshield repair, paint chip repair, etc. Review existing computer software for suitability Review operational income and expense statements Review Lease Agreement (if applicable) regarding lease terms, rent increases and other conditions that would affect buyer Assure that the property is free of toxic contamination. Provide recommendation if an Environmental Phase One is required Prepare a valuation of the business to use in determining a reasonable purchase price Provide a list of Conditions and Contingencies to be used in preparing an offer, escrow instructions and Purchase and Sale Agreement Analyze facility for possible State and Federal violations Provide handbooks, materials and forms to be used in the operation Provide new bonus and commission schedules, marketing and advertising programs, in the event business is purchased Review offers, purchase agreements, assist with negotiations, interact with buyer’s attorney and accountant to protect the buyer’s interest
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• • •



• •

• • •



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• •

Assist buyer during due diligence period Provide a Business and Operational Plan for use by owner, management and, as required, by outside lenders if purchase is completed Provide lender’s contacts for outside financing Provide insurance contacts for required coverage Provide unlimited telephone consultations with all parties involved

• • •

Prior to developing Wash and Go, management performed some simple market analysis to determine the ideal location to place the car wash establishment. It was concluded that a high traffic area would be the best location for the establishment. During the location analysis, there were no existing car wash facilities found within a three mile radius of Wash and Go’s chosen location. The Wash and Go facility is located approximately one mile from a major highway, and the main route in and out of Portland, Maine. It is also a wise idea to be in close proximity to local car dealerships. There are four dealerships within a one mile radius of Wash and Go, and one taxi service. Close proximity to a highway allows customers to stop at the car wash on the way to and from work. During the five year period since Wash and Go opened, the business has undertaken several studies of consumer behavior and traffic patterns. The majority of Wash and Go’s business during the weekdays is between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. On the weekends, the business is busiest during the middle of the day from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. This market analysis has helped to determine employment and operational requirements.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
After finding the location, the next step was to decide on the type of car wash service to offer. Wash and Go is located near many local businesses, so it was decided to offer an automatic conveyor service (full service tunnel service) for customer convenience. This will allow the business to approach both car dealerships and car services (taxi and limo) and offer car washing at a bulk discount rate. It was also decided that having a hand washed service compared to an automated wash service would be too costly. Wash and Go then began the process of ordering the proper equipment for an automatic conveyor car wash, including automated brushes to wash cars.

Car Wash Equipment D & S Car Wash Systems offers in–bay automatic systems such as Quicksilver Touchless and Odyssey Soft–Touch. In addition, D & S offers drive–through tunnel equipment such as the Quicksilver Express and the Odyssey Express. D & S offers a myriad of options for self–service equipment. In addition, D & S offers vacuums and other ancillary products.
For tunnel equipment used in conveyor car washes, Hanna Systems is another vendor. Hanna claims to have the broadest line of conveyor wash systems and components in the industry, including Soft Cloth, Light Foam, Hand Wash and Hi–Pressure Touchless conveyor systems. Additional Equipment and Supply Providers
• •

Ryko Manufacturing Company American Car Wash Equipment and Supply
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CAR WASH AND CAR DETAILING BUSINESS
• • • • •

PDQ Autobase Belanger Inc. Autec AOK

There is a web site for resale car wash equipment and supplies at Car Wash Consignments.com. The site connects buyers and sellers of used equipment and supplies.

COMPETITION
The nearest car wash service to Wash and Go is approximately four miles north of the facility. This facility is a self serve facility and does not compete directly for the same business. Wash and Go has a few different cleaning features and is priced competitively relative to other automated service facilities.

ADVERTISING
Prior to opening the business, it is helpful to advertise in a local newspaper or on local television. A direct mail campaign with introductory coupons is also helpful. The goal is to obtain as much customer information as possible in order to continually offer special promotions to draw in business.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
The bulk of Wash and Go’s revenue is produced from full service car washes. Full service consists of an exterior car wash, interior cleaning and hand drying of an automobile. Exterior washes alone are less popular, and detailing produces the least amount of revenue. Each service that Wash and Go offers has a different price which is listed below. The business’ financials, which are broken out by year, contain information about the number of unit sales and the total revenue per service. The financials also list the cost of each service per unit sale. Expenses consist of rent, staff payroll, legal, insurance and accounting bills. During the first year the operation had a loss of nearly $59,000. The second year of operation showed a gain of $16,400 before taxes. The third year showed a gain of over $101,000 before taxes.

Prices
Price list Full wash Exterior wash Interior clean End user detail Business fleet washes Car dealership details $ 15.00 $ 9.00 $ 8.00 $140.00 $ 10.00 $ 70.00

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Balance Sheet
Year 1 Unit sales Full wash Exterior wash Interior clean End user detail Business fleet washes Car dealership details Revenue Full wash Exterior wash Interior clean End user detail Business fleet washes Car dealership details Total Cost of sales Full wash Exterior wash Interior clean End user detail Business fleet washes Car dealership details Total Expenses Administrative staff Hourly workers Rent Legal Insurance Accounting Total $ $ $ $ $ $ 36,500.00 98,550.00 12,000.00 5,000.00 3,000.00 2,000.00 $ 36,500.00 $ 98,550.00 $ 12,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 8,100.00 $ 36,500.00 $ 98,550.00 $ 12,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 97,100.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,050.00 300.00 150.00 450.00 1,050.00 900.00 3,900.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2,450.00 600.00 375.00 675.00 2,100.00 1,350.00 7,550.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ 3,850.00 1,000.00 450.00 1,050.00 3,500.00 1,800.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ 22,500.00 6,750.00 4,000.00 21,000.00 15,000.00 21,000.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ 52,500.00 13,500.00 10,000.00 31,500.00 30,000.00 31,500.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ 82,500.00 22,500.00 12,000.00 49,000.00 50,000.00 42,000.00 1,500 750 500 150 1,500 300 3,500 1,500 1,250 225 3,000 450 5,500 2,500 1,500 350 5,000 600 Year 2 Year 3

$ 90,250.00

$169,000.00

$258,000.00

$ 11,650.00

$ 70,650.00

Cash Flow Projections
Magic Wand Self Service and In–Bay Automatics Cash Flow Projection Monthly income per bay in case of self service or in–bay automatic car wash can vary over a broad range from $1,500 to $15,000, depending on several parameters. If the car wash activity is good, it is a wise decision to convert a self service bay to an in–bay automatic bay system. This conversion can increase the number of cars washed per hour from four–five cars to 10–12 cars, marking threefold increase in revenue. Magic Wand Tunnel Car Wash Cash Flow Projection While a tunnel car wash is a fast and continuous car wash system, it has higher costs involved. It is particularly important to pay more attention to labor costs while estimating cost and revenue in this case, because tunnel car wash systems typically require presence of multiple staff on site.

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Counseling Practice
Roper Counseling Services Inc.

4302 Welty St. Stonefield Building, Ste. 750 Chicopee Bend, Colorado 80500 Paul Greenland
Roper Counseling Services provides individuals, groups, and families with confidential and effective treatments for a wide range of emotional and behavioral difficulties.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Roper Counseling Services offers confidential and effective treatments for a wide range of emotional and behavioral difficulties. Specifically, our practice provides individual counseling services for children, adolescents, and adults. Group therapy is offered for people dealing with similar issues, such as eating disorders. Finally, we also provide both marital and family therapy.

Business Overview Over the course of one’s life, challenges and difficulties are inevitable. Individuals are often able to overcome difficult times and deal with challenges in successful, optimal ways. However, sometimes even effective coping strategies and the support of family and friends is not enough. Situations resulting from abusive relationships, traumatic childhoods, addictions, loss, and chemical imbalances can spiral out of control, requiring assistance from trained professionals. With nearly 25 years of experience, Roper Counseling Services has a broad range of professional expertise, allowing us to help troubled individuals in almost any situation. Organizational Structure Our practice is incorporated in the state of Colorado and employs three licensed psychologists with doctorate degrees from programs approved by the American Psychological Association, as well as three licensed clinical social workers. Company History Roper Counseling Services was established in 1985, when President Dr. George Roper first established his independent practice. Since that time, the business has grown at a measured pace. Until 2001, Roper ´ Counseling Services was a partnership comprised of Dr. Roper and Dr. Renee Coates. Our growth was such that, by 2001, we had identified the need to add another practitioner. At that time, Dr. Mary Anne Townsend joined the business, which continued to grow.
Our burgeoning patient base, which grew largely through word-of-mouth referrals, as well as exposure from local, regional, and national speaking commitments, required us to add additional capacity. In 2008 we agreed to merge with an existing counseling practice named Evergreen Associates. This resulted
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in the addition of three licensed clinical social workers: Peter Mullen MSW, LCSW; Steven Vetro MSW, LCSW; and Halley Peterson MSW, LCSW. All three practitioners had established reputations in the community. By joining Roper Counseling Services, they enabled our practice to become the largest of its kind in the Chicopee Bend area.

MARKET ANALYSIS
Mental illnesses, as well as behavioral and emotional difficulties, are quite common throughout the population. For example, according to data issued by the American Psychiatric Association in 2006, each year approximately 20 percent of U.S. adults suffer from a diagnosable mental illness. According to a national study conducted by PXPL Associates Inc. in April 2009, stress levels throughout the United States were at an all-time high. The research, which involved interviews with 2,347 people, revealed that 37 percent of individuals categorize their stress level as overwhelming. Sixty-four percent of respondents indicated that their stress levels were significantly higher compared to the same period the previous year. According to the study, overall economic uncertainty was the leading cause of stress (31%), followed by relationship problems (29%), and financial concerns (24%). Although most people have adequate support networks in place to deal with their stress, a significant portion of the population either lacks such support, or does not rely upon appropriate coping mechanisms. Despite the fact that there is a strong market for the services offered by Roper Consulting Services, the partners realize that several barriers to our growth exist within the marketplace. These namely are a lack of awareness about mental illness, as well as a variety of misconceptions. For example, according to a 2006 consumer survey on mental health conducted by the American Psychiatric Association, 44 percent of U.S. adults indicated that they know little or virtually nothing about mental illness. Furthermore, 33 percent believed that mental illnesses are caused by either personal or emotional weakness. Finally, some 24 percent of the population believed that, most of the time, personal or emotional strength is enough to overcome common mental illnesses.

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 166,000 psychologists were employed in 2006. By 2016, this number is projected to grow 15 percent, reaching 191,000. In addition, 595,000 social workers were employed 2006. That profession is projected to grow 22 percent by 2016, at which time the number of social workers will rise to 727,000. According to Colorado’s Department of Regulatory Agencies, Division of Registrations, in 2009 the state was home to approximately 2,150 active licensed psychologists.

PERSONNEL
George M. Roper, Ph.D., President—Dr. Roper graduated in 1984 from the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology, where he earned his doctorate degree in psychology. He earned a master’s degree in psychology from South University in West Palm, Florida. Dr. Roper has been a mental health practitioner since 1978, providing services to individuals, couples, families, and groups. His special interests include stress management, co-dependent relationships, substance abuse, and marital therapy. Dr. Roper is a licensed psychologist and has been practicing in Colorado since 1985.
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Renee Coates, Ph.D., Vice President—Dr. Coates earned Master’s and Doctor of Psychology degrees from the University of the Rockies in Colorado Springs, graduating in 1990. Dr. Coates has worked in the counseling field since 1985, working mainly with individuals and couples. Her special interests include women’s issues, depression, domestic violence, and marital therapy. Dr. Coates is a licensed psychologist and has been practicing in Colorado since 1985. Mary Anne Townsend, Ph.D.—Dr. Townsend received her doctorate degree in 1997 from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, as well as a master’s degree in psychology from the University of Illinois in 1991, at which time she began working in the counseling field. A highly skilled practitioner, Dr. Townsend specializes in working with children and adolescents in both residential and outpatient settings. Dr. Townsend is especially interested in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, griefand loss-related issues, and anxiety. She is a licensed psychologist and has been practicing in Colorado since 2001. Peter Mullen MSW, LCSW—With more than 20 years of experience, Peter is a graduate of The School of Social Work at Colorado State University, where he received his undergraduate and graduate degrees. He provides both individual and group therapy in a wide range of settings. Peter is especially interested in men’s issues, parent-child conflicts, anxiety, eating disorders, and depression. He has been a licensed clinical social worker since 1989. Steven Vetro MSW, LCSW—Steven received his BSW degree from the Arizona State University School of Social Work, and his MSW degree from the School of Social Work at Colorado State University. He has been serving our community for 15 years, providing individual, family, and group therapies. His areas of interest include personal and occupational stress, life balance, creativity enhancement, anger management, divorce and divorce recovery, blended families, and life transition issues. He has been a licensed clinical social worker since 1994. Halley Peterson MSW, LCSW—After receiving her BSW degree from Illinois State University, Halley earned an MSW degree from the School of Social Work at Colorado State University in 1999. She offers individual, family, and group therapies. Halley specializes in working with older adults and their families, and focuses on grief and loss, isolation and loneliness, life transition issues, end-of-life issues, anxiety, and depression. She has been a licensed clinical social worker since 1999. Eric Simms, Practice Manager—Our practice is especially fortunate to have Eric on-board. With an undergraduate education that includes double majors in accounting and marketing, he has the necessary skills to handle accounting, bookkeeping, and payroll for the practice, and also develops and executes marketing strategies needed to help us grow. Additionally, Eric manages professional licensure for all the counselors, ensuring that we remain in compliance, and also negotiates fee schedules with insurance companies, as well as area hospitals and counseling centers where we provide services. Mary Sidwell, Administrative Assistant—Mary is responsible for greeting clients and other professionals when they enter our practice. She often is the first impression that people have of our business, and we value her exceptional interpersonal skills. She is especially gifted at dealing with individuals who can be challenging in various ways. Mary books appointments for clients and maintains schedules for our therapists. In addition, she handles all travel arrangements, orders office supplies and other items, maintains patient records, takes care of inbound and outgoing U.S. mail and overnight packages, and performs a wide range of other duties as needed.

Professional & Advisory Support Roper Counseling Services relies upon the firm of Willington, Bradfield & Terell for legal services. Tax services are provided by Rocky Mountain Professional Services. In addition, our firm has established checking accounts with the Bank of Colorado, which also provides us with merchant card services, allowing us to take credit card payments from clients.
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GROWTH STRATEGY
Our practice will rely on word-of-mouth referrals, as well as the marketing tactics outlined in the Marketing & Sales section of this plan, to achieve meaningful growth over the next five years. Based upon the growth that both of our practices have experienced over the past five years (prior to merging), the Bureau of Labor Statistics projections for our professions referenced in the Industry Analysis section of this plan, and our professional observations of the local market, we anticipate our patient base will grow at a compound annual rate of 3.5 percent over the next five years.

SERVICES
Roper Counseling Services provides assessment and treatments for a wide range of mental health issues, drawing from nearly 25 years of experience. Our specialties include:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

ADD/ADHD Abuse Anxiety Bipolar Disorder Career Issues Conduct Disorder Couples/Marital Creativity Enhancement Cultural Issues Depression Divorce Eating Disorders Gender Identity Grief Impulse or Habit Control Interpersonal Conflict Intimacy Isolation or Loneliness Life Balance Life Transition Men’s Issues Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Oppositional Defiant Behavior Parent-child Conflicts Women’s Issues
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MARKETING & SALES
Practice Manager Eric Simms has developed a detailed marketing plan for our practice that includes specific tactics for furthering our growth. These include:
• •

Printed collateral describing our practice for prospective clients and referral sources. An ongoing, highly targeted direct mail campaign that promotes our capabilities to professional referral sources in a 20-mile radius surrounding our practice. An expanded Yellow Page advertisement with pictures of our counselors and a short list of common services offered. A professional networking strategy that involves membership in the local chamber of commerce and county medical society. Local, regional, and national public speaking engagements on a wide range of mental health topics. A regular presence on a weekly local radio program called On Your Mind, where callers can phone in and ask our counselors general questions on the air. A Web site with complete details about our practice, as well as a resource section where people can obtain general information about mental health issues. In addition, our site allows people to request their first appointment with us online.





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OPERATIONS
Facility & Location Following its merger with Evergreen Associates, Roper Counseling Services relocated its offices to the Stonefield Building. Located on the thriving east side of Chicopee Bend, with ample parking space and access to major highways and bus routes, this office complex is home to other professionals who may serve as new referral sources for us. These include several attorneys and physicians, as well as two social service agencies.
In addition to the benefits listed above, we chose to relocate to the Stonefield Building because the office space was already suitable for our specific needs. It previously was home to a burgeoning psychiatry practice that closed its doors when two of the partners retired, and another decided to relocate elsewhere. In addition to the main entrance accessible off the waiting area, a separate entrance is available for therapists and staff. In addition, the facility offers soundproof counseling rooms, as well as a large, secure space for records storage.

Billing & Payment Roper Counseling Services accepts payments from private insurance plans, as well as self-payments from individuals. Unless clients make other arrangements with us ahead of time, we require payment at the time of service. In addition to personal checks, we also accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express. We have an existing computerized billing system for mental health practitioners that tracks patient accounts and generates all necessary forms and statements. Fees The fees that we charge vary depending upon contracts negotiated with different insurance companies, hospitals, and other agencies. Due to the complexity associated with various contracts, this information is not normally included with our business plan. However, it can be provided upon request. Generally speaking, our fee schedule is comparable with other counseling practices in our market.
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Hours of Operation Regular appointments are offered by appointment only; walk-ins are not welcomed. However, we do leave several slots in our schedules open every day for clients with urgent needs. In addition, all of our counselors rotate on-call duty, so that one is always available at any time for emergencies. An answering service forwards relevant after-hours calls received via our main number to the counselor on-call’s cell phone.

LEGAL
Colorado’s Department of Regulatory Agencies, Division of Registrations, has minimum licensure requirements that must be met by both psychologists and social workers. Our psychologists meet all necessary requirements, including:
• • •

Doctoral degrees from American Psychological Association-approved programs. One year of supervised post-degree experience. Successfully passing an examination in psychology prescribed by the state’s Board of Psychologist Examiners. Completion of a jurisprudence examination developed by the Board of Psychologist Examiners.



Our social workers also have met me minimum licensure requirements for their profession established by Colorado’s Board of Social Work Examiners. In addition to compliance with licensure requirements, our practice also has secured appropriate liability insurance coverage from Smithfield Insurance Associates.

FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS
In 2008, Roper Counseling Services and Evergreen Associates generated combined net income of approximately $91,635. A detailed breakdown can be seen in the following balance sheet, which covers the time period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008.
Income Billings Consulting Public speaking Royalty income Total income Expenses Salaries Utilities Rent Insurance 401 K contributions Office supplies Marketing & advertising Telecommunications & internet Professional development Travel & entertainment Subscriptions & dues Repairs & maintenance Taxes Total expenses Net income $500,460 $ 4,700 $ 27,600 $ 21,540 $ 32,529 $ 9,800 $ 12,850 $ 4,980 $ 33,980 $ 13,280 $ 5,200 $ 1,289 $ 17,650 $685,858 $ 91,635 $625,413 $128,460 $ 16,840 $ 6,780 $777,493

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COUNSELING PRACTICE

Based on our analysis of the market, and taking current economic conditions into consideration, we are forecasting that net income for our expanded practice will grow at a compound annual rate of 4 percent for the next five years.
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 $ 95,300 $ 99,112 $103,077 $107,200 $111,488

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Custom Carpentry Shop
Choice Cut Carpentry Inc.

18765 Grattidge Way Boston, Massachusetts 02106 Paul Greenland
Choice Cut Carpentry provides custom carpentry services to both individuals and businesses in the Boston area.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview Choice Cut Carpentry Inc. provides custom carpentry services in the Boston area. Specifically, we specialize in custom cabinetry and shelving projects. One other unique niche that sets us apart from other carpenters is the production of unique, decorative wooden boxes. In addition, we also offer workshops and educational seminars for amateur woodworkers and professional carpenters looking to learn new skills.
Incorporated in the state of Massachusetts, our business is owned by Douglas Fortune and his sons, Nicholas and Bradley Fortune. For over 25 years, Douglas has been doing part-time carpentry project work for individuals and businesses throughout Boston. During this time, he has developed a reputation for craftsmanship and quality. Our target market is mainly comprised of upper-income individuals, mid-sized businesses, builders, architects, and several large corporations in the Boston area.

MARKET ANALYSIS
Our competitors include other carpentry shops throughout Boston. Many other shops offer some of the carpentry services that we provide. In addition, several of our competitors are large-sized shops that are able to take on projects of a scope that is beyond our capabilities. However, few carpentry shops offer the level of skill and craftsmanship that we provide. Our focus is on quality and detail. Many of the projects we work on are simply too customized for larger, production-focused shops to perform cost-effectively. In addition, our educational programs provide us with a strong differential in our market. The only noteworthy competitor that we have in this area is a local community college, which offers a strong vocational program. However, that program is focused on teaching elementary woodworking skills to as many people as possible, while our program is focused on the principles of quality craftsmanship. Finally, another key differential for our business is the production of custom designer boxes.
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CUSTOM CARPENTRY SHOP

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Custom Cabinets Cabinets from Choice Cut Carpentry are of the highest quality, offering finer construction and a longer lifespan than semi-custom or stock cabinets. Because they are crafted specifically for a certain environment, situation, or application, our cabinets ensure the most efficient use of space. In addition, our customers benefit from great flexibility in designing their cabinets. We offer many options, from different wood types and hardware to stains and finishes. In addition, we also offer a wide range of lighting solutions for customers who wish to have lights inside of their cabinets.
Prior to construction, considerable time is devoted to understanding customer requirements and desires. When meeting with clients, we gain a complete understanding of what their storage challenges are and discuss various options and solutions with them. Ultimately, we produce computer-generated plans that depict how the proposed custom cabinets will look in their environment. In addition, we present a wide range of options to the customer pertaining to stains, finishes, hardware, and lighting. Choice Cut Carpentry builds cabinets for virtually every situation or application. However, most of our work falls into one of the following categories:
• • • • • • • • • • • •

Bathroom Cabinets Computer Cabinets Display Cabinets DVD Storage Cabinets File Cabinets Garage Cabinets Kitchen Cabinets Laundry Room Cabinets Medicine Cabinets TV Cabinets Wardrobe Cabinets Wooden Cabinets

Custom Boxes Douglas Fortune began making custom wooden boxes at the age of 13, carrying on a family tradition that began with his great-great-grandfather. The Fortune name is well-known throughout Boston for those seeking a wide range of custom-made boxes, including jewelry boxes.
As with cabinetry, we are capable of building just about any type of custom wooden box. Our customers almost always have very specific requirements when placing orders with us. Most of the boxes that reproduce fall into one of the following categories:
• • • • • •

Cigar Boxes Gift Boxes Golf Boxes Humidors Jewelry Boxes Puzzle & Game Boxes
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CUSTOM CARPENTRY SHOP
• • • • • • •

Tea Boxes Tea Chests Tool Boxes Tool Chests Toy Boxes Watch Boxes Wine Boxes

OPERATIONS
Location and Facilities Custom Cut Carpentry is located between downtown Boston and the city’s prestigious Beacon Hill area. Our location provides convenient access to upper-income individuals, the many commercial businesses that we serve, as well as Interstate 90 and other major highways.
Our carpentry shop is situated in an existing 625-square-foot structure, located on property that has been in the Fortune family for several generations. This is a significant advantage for our business, allowing us to operate in an expensive geographical area without having to lease or purchase property. Another advantage is that our facility is already set up and partially equipped for commercial woodworking. Aside from purchasing several new pieces of equipment and making minor physical improvements to the facility, our location is ready for business.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Start-up budget Advertising Materials Property improvements Miscellaneous items Legal Accounting Office supplies Woodworking equipment Office equipment Power/utilities Auto Fuel Meals Phone book ads Salaries Total $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 9,000 35,000 12,000 2,000 1,800 1,200 500 13,000 400 4,000 18,000 3,500 500 1,200 90,000

$192,100

The owners’ investment is $125,000; the remaining balance of $67,100 will be secured from the bank as an operating line of credit.

Major Suppliers
Tools: Choice Cut Carpentry relies upon national and international manufacturers for the supply of hand and power tools. Some of the hand tools that we rely upon are acquired at flea markets, estate sales, and highly specialized manufacturers. However, we purchase common hand and power tools from the following companies:
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• • • • • • • •

Black and Decker Corp. Husqvarna AB Stanley Works Makita Corp. Robert Bosch AG Otelfingen WMH Tool Group Inc. (JET) Amana Tool St. James Bay Tool Co.

Lumber: Our business uses a wide range of wood to produce products. The types of wood that we purchase include:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American Black Walnut American Elm American White Oak Aromatic Red Cedar Aspen Bald Cypress Balsa Basswood Black Cherry Butternut Chestnut Douglas Fir Eastern White Pine Ebony Hickory Lauan Mahogany Pecan Poplar Red Oak Redwood Rosewood Southern Yellow Pine Spruce SPF Sugar Maple Sugar Pine
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• • • • • •

Teak Western Hemlock Western Red Cedar White Ash White Oak Yellow Birch

We rely upon a number of different suppliers in the New England area, including:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

4 Lumber Co., Eighty Four, Pennsylvania Allen Lumber Company Inc., Barre, Vermont American Lumber Company L.P., Hamburg, New York Applewood Lumber Co., Phoenixville, Pennsylvania Arlington Coal and Lumber Co., Arlington, Massachusetts Britton Lumber Company Inc., Fairlee, Vermont Brookside Lumber and Supply Co., Bethel Park, Pennsylvania Cape Cod Lumber Company Inc., Abington, Massachusetts Catawissa Lumber and Specialty, Catawissa, Pennsylvania Cersosimo Lumber Company Inc., Brattleboro, Vermont Crane Co., Stamford, Connecticut Futter Lumber Corp., Rockville Centre, New York Graebers Lumber Co., Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania GV Moore Lumber Company Inc., Ayer, Massachusetts Hancock Lumber Company Inc., Casco, Maine J.T. Lumber Newport, Rhode Island Jackson Lumber and Millwork Co., Lawrence, Massachusetts Lakeville Lumber, Lakeville, Massachusetts LaValley Lumber Company L.L.C., Sanford, Maine Lezzer Lumber Inc., Curwensville, Pennsylvania Massachusetts Lumber Co., Cambridge, Massachusetts Moose River Lumber Company Inc., Jackman, Maine National Lumber Co., Mansfield, Massachusetts Nickerson Lumber Co., Orleans, Massachusetts OC Cluss Lumber Co., Aliquippa, Pennsylvania Old Town Lumber Co., Kenduskeag, Maine Rex Lumber Co., Acton, Massachusetts

Hardware: The hardware that our shop uses to produce custom cabinetry, as well as boxes, is obtained from a number of national and international suppliers, including:
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

3M A H Peter Meier Accuride Amerock Amerock Allison Amerock Galleria Berenson Blum Buck Snort Lodge Century Hardware CompX National Lock Grass Hera Lighting Ironaway Ives Kampel Knape and Vogt Laurey Hardware Mepla Precision Casewerk Quickscrews Rev-A-Shelf Rockford Process Control Salice Schaub and Company Soss Sugatsune

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY
Choice Cut Carpentry is owned by Douglas Fortune and his sons, Nicholas and Bradley Fortune. For over 25 years, Douglas has been doing part-time carpentry project work for individuals and businesses throughout Boston. During this time, he has developed a reputation for craftsmanship and quality. When budget cuts prompted the elimination of industrial arts education at the suburban school district where Douglas had taught woodworking for 17 years, the circumstances presented him with the opportunity to apply his knowledge and experience in a new way, resulting in the formation of Choice Cut Carpentry.
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Nicholas and Bradley Fortune began learning about woodworking at a very young age. Benefiting from their father’s instruction, they developed into fine craftsmen and have assisted their father with many cabinetry and other woodworking projects. Following high school graduation, both Nicholas and Bradley pursued college courses in design, engineering, and CAD/CAM. These invaluable skills allow Choice Cut Carpentry to offer customers project plans created with the latest technology.

MARKETING & SALES
Because of his extensive prior experience performing project work for individuals and commercial enterprises, Douglas Fortune is well known for his carpentry skills. Prior to establishing his own business, word-of-mouth referrals generated more opportunities than he could accommodate on his own. With the help of his two sons, Choice Cut Carpentry will have the capacity to accommodate existing demand. To generate new business, a marketing plan has been developed that focuses heavily on regular direct mailings to area architects, home builders, and unions. In addition to promoting our services, these mailings will also feature details about upcoming educational opportunities that our business offers. The mailings will promote our Web site, which contains detailed information about our services, educational offerings, and general information about custom cabinetry. Finally, our business will do a limited amount of newspaper advertising.

Advertising Budget Based upon our marketing plan, the following advertising budget has been established:
• • •

Direct Marketing—$4,500 annually Newspaper—$2,000 annually Interactive Marketing—$2,500 annually

Customers Our target market is mainly comprised of upper-income individuals, mid-sized businesses, builders, architects, and several large corporations in the Boston area. Over the years, Douglas Fortune has established a reputation for service and quality within each of these categories. Particular niches that generate considerable business include builders and individuals seeking custom shelving and cabinetry for home theaters and DVD libraries, as well as consulting firms, individual attorneys, and mid-sized law firms in need of built-in bookshelves.

SWOT ANALYSIS
Business Feasibility & SWOT Analysis • Strengths: The level of craftsmanship and quality offered by Choice Cut Carpentry, as well as our educational offerings, set us apart from competitors.


Weaknesses: When competing for bids, other carpentry shops may beat us on price when dealing with customers who value cost savings over quality. In addition, we do not concentrate on very large projects. Opportunities: There is ample demand and growth potential among high-income customers and businesses in the Boston area who value quality craftsmanship and excellent customer service. Threats: Because our business is staffed by three highly-skilled individuals, any one of whom would be very difficult to replace, illnesses and injuries can threaten our ability to complete projects.
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B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

Day Camp Organizer
Camp in the Park

67 Shore Park Dr. Oyster Bay, New Jersey 11771 Laura Becker
Camp in the Park will establish and operate daily camps for local, neighborhood children with traditional summer camp activities including swimming, music, art, and sports.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Objectives The objective is to establish a summer day camp for children who live in a neighborhood area. Specifically, there is a local village with a large municipal park containing a playground, pool, tennis courts, basketball courts, and fields. The camp will be provided for children who reside within the village. Business Overview Camp in the Park will provide traditional summer day camp activities including sports, music, art, music and swimming. The camp will be set up in a local park or other area with permission from the local authorities and regulatory agencies.
The camp can be run by a skeletal year–round staff which comprises the main management of the camp company. This management will oversee a much larger, seasonal staff. The camp management is responsible for all administrative functions of the camp including: hiring, regulatory requirements, securing food vendors and activity vendors for the camp, etc. Once the camp season begins, the seasonal staff runs the operation on a daily basis. This would be an ideal business for local parents of camp-aged children, or perhaps school teachers who have summers free and would like to earn some additional money over the summer.

MARKET ANALYSIS
According to the National Camp Association (http://www.summercamp.org/), there are approximately 10,000 camps in the United States (of which roughly 60 percent are sleep–away camps). The majority of camps are privately–owned. Over 95 percent of camp owners only own one camp since it is truly a hands–on enterprise.
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DAY CAMP ORGANIZER

The average camp tuition is $2,500 with the average number of children at a camp being 450. Therefore, the gross revenue of the average camp is approximately $1,125,000 ($2,500 x 450 campers). $1,125,000 multiplied by 10,000 camps means that the total industry revenue is in the 11 billion dollar range. More specifically, the American Camp Association (http://www.acacamps.org/) states that there are 6,200 nonprofit camps including religious organizations and youth agencies; and 2,300 privately– owned, for–profit operators. Running a camp requires a tremendous investment in the infrastructure and overhead with such items as salaries, insurance, food, maintenance, activities and travel posing significant expenses. Interestingly, the outlook for the camp industry is strong. In the last years, camps have become even stronger since there are many households with two working parents who need to provide entertainment and daycare for their children during their working hours. In addition, the advent of specialty camps—whether it be music, weight loss, or learning disabled camps—has broadened the camp market as well. In a 1999 study, the American Camp Association found that over 50 percent of the respondents reported an average increase in enrollment of 9 percent from the previous year. Demographic trends would suggest that the demand for child–care options will continue to increase. According to CampGroup (http://www.campgroup.com/camping.htm), ‘‘The universe of 12,000 camps is comprised of literally hundreds of different types of camps.’’ CampGroup believes that the majority of camps fit into about 16 basic types of camps which include:
• •

Sleep–away camps and day camps Traditional camps (those who operate in a location whose primary purpose is the camp) and non– traditional camps (a local Y) General camps and specialty camps For–profit camps and not–for–profit camps Accredited camps and non–accredited camps Special population camps and general population camps Religious camps and non–sectarian camps

• • • • •

The American Camp Association provides accreditation for camps who meet certain criteria. According to CampGroup, although any summer camp can seek ACA accreditation, only 2,340 of the estimated 12,000 summer camps are ACA accredited. Of the 2,340 ACA accredited camps, approximately 25 percent are for–profit and 75 percent are not–for–profit. There are sleep–away camps located in all 50 states but the largest concentrations are in California, New York and Pennsylvania. Day camps are also located across the country. The largest percentage of day camps are located in areas with large metropolitan areas such as California, Illinois, New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts. MSG Accountants, Consultants and Business Valuations provided an industry report on ‘‘Day Camps’’ (http://www.msgcpa.com/general.php?category=Industry+Library&headline=Day+Camp) which states that ‘‘Although, each type of camp varies greatly in the types of activities it offers, camps generally provide a program consisting of outdoor activities, such as hiking, swimming, games, sports, arts and crafts, and programs designed to promote awareness of nature. Many camps in the industry have set themselves apart by emphasizing and specializing in specific camping programs.’’
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Examples of different types of programs include:
• • • • • • • • • •

Sports Music Horseback Riding Outdoor Adventures Religion Special Needs At Risk Youths Weight Loss Theater Dance

Many localities are interested in establishing summer camps in the area because they can give a nice boost to the local economy. A summer day camp for children is a solid economic growth contributor for a local economy. There are significant employment opportunities; and of course, staff will buy things at local stores such as food and necessities.

COMPETITION
The competitive environment will depend greatly on the location of the community day camp. Camp in the Park faces competition from privately–owned day camps in the area. Generally speaking, the goal at Camp in the Park is to create a very similar environment to those of the privately–owned camps. The Camp in the Park fee structure is usually significantly lower than the other camps because it is not run to make a profit; and there are no year–round staff to pay. Hiring is done completely on a seasonal basis. The other camps in the local area that Camp in the Park competes with are Pierce Country Day Camp (http://www.piercecamps.com/), North Shore Day Camp (http://www.northshoredaycamp.com/) and Crestwood Country Day Camp (http://www.crestwoodcountryday.com/).

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Establishing the Camp There are several steps involved in establishing a community summer day camp. This can be done in a variety of ways.
The approach that Camp in the Park has taken is to establish a Camp Board composed of volunteer parents. There are officers on the Board (president, vice president, treasurer and secretary). Alternatively, if the camp management is running the camp they are the ones to make these decisions. The first step will be to set up a meeting with a corporate attorney to discuss the best legal status for the company (for instance, should the camp be a not–for–profit; or a for– profit organization, etc.). The attorney will also file the necessary documents to get the camp set up and to obtain a corporate seal and to create by–laws based on the interests of the board and the mission of the camp.
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Depending on how the camp is set up, there may be funding available from government programs (particularly if the camp is a non–profit organization or if it is a specialty camp of some sort). It is worth investigating potential funding sources. Examples of things that need to be decided include the following: Do officers need to be elected or appointed; how long should board members serve; do their children need to be attending camp, etc. The mission of the camp will also be discussed, including:
• • • • •

Age of campers (for instance, 3 year olds–10 year olds) General camp versus specialty camp (all activities or focus on the arts, etc.) Hours of operation; dates of operation Fees to be charged Salary structure for staff (base salary, bonuses)

Finding a Location The Camp Board/Management will need to find a location to host the camp. Camp in the Park operates within a village neighborhood that has a Park. The Camp approached the Trustees of the Village to obtain permission to operate a Camp in the Park for residents of the Village.
When looking for a location, the selectors should bear in mind that the camp will need restroom facilities and significant outdoor space for sports and other activities. An indoor space for inclement weather days will also be needed. A private or public park with permission obtained from the appropriate authorities is an ideal, low–cost location.

Hiring Staff The camp will likely need a staff including a Director, Assistant Director, Group Leaders, Counselors, Lifeguards, Art Director, Music Director, Sports Director and any other area of interest the camp wishes to pursue. Determining Fees for the Camp This can be done by gauging what other camps in the area charge for tuition and then coming up with an appropriate fee schedule (either for the whole camp session; weekly; etc.) Creating a Schedule of Activities for the Groups The Board/Management should determine what activities should be offered at the camp. Then it is important to interview various providers to see who will best meet the camp’s needs. For instance, if the camp is interested in providing music instruction, the camp board/management will want to interview several music directors. Seeking Regulatory Approval with All Applicable Licenses The camp operators will need to be sure to follow local regulations including obtaining all necessary inspections (such as from the Board of Health) and registrations.

OPERATIONS
Personnel It is important to recruit staff that has experience working with children. For a fairly small community day camp, staff will be hired on a seasonal basis (just for the camp season). The camp operators will take care of the administrative issues throughout the rest of the year. The camp may wish to hire a certain
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number of teachers in addition to college age and high school age counselors. It is also important to ensure that the appropriate background checks are employed for all incoming staff. This is a standard staff application:
Name: _________________________________________________________________SS#: ______________________________________________ Address : __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Home Phone: _______________________________ Cell Phone:_________________________E-Mail: _______________________________________ Birth Date: _____________________________ Summer Age:_________________________ Are you a US Citizen? _____________________________ High School Attended: ________________________________________________________ Year of Graduation ________________________________ Colleges Attended: ________________________________ Major:_______________________________ Grade: ________________________________ ________________________________ Major: ______________________________ Grade: ________________________________ Can you swim? __________________ Red Cross Certifications: WSI ___________________ ALS _______________ First Aid ___________________ CPR Certifications: Comm ______________________ Infant _____________________ Adult ____________________ RTE _____________________ Are you available to work on _______________________________________________________________________ and all weekdays (excluding Friday, July 3rd) from Monday, June 29th through Friday, August 21st without any days off? _______________________________________________________ Do you have any impairments, physical, mental or medical which would interfere with your ability to satisfactorily perform the essential functions of this job? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If yes, please explain _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ How did you hear about Day Camp in the Park? ____________________________________________________________________________________ Do you smoke? _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please list any experience you have had with children. _______________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Did you ever attend camp? If so, which? _________________________________________________________________________________________ If yes, what was your favorite experience? ________________________________________________________________________________________ Please list what land sports, water sports, arts & crafts and performing arts activities you are skilled in: ________________________________________ _ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

References: Please list three contacts: school reference (i.e.: teacher, counselor), job supervisor, babysitting and any other relevant reference. Name Phone # Relationship

Harassment The camp’s policy is to prohibit all forms of harassment by our employees. This includes sexual, racial, religious, and other forms of harassment. Have you ever been accused of harassment of any person including, but not limited to, workplace harassment? Yes? No? Explain. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Criminal Record Have you ever been convicted of a crime, other than a minor traffic offense? If yes, please describe. Yes? No? Explain _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ I authorize investigation of all statements herein, including any checks of criminal records, and release the camp and all others from liability in connection with same. I also understand that misrepresentations or falsifications herein or in any other documents completed or submitted by the applicant will result in dismissal, regardless of the date of discovery by the camp.

Applicant’s signature

Date

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Staff Pay Scale The following pay scale is an example of the pay scale of a camp on Long Island, New York named North Shore Day Camp. It is provided as a framework as compensation can vary greatly in different areas of the country and for different types of camps.
Pay scale
Total potential salary $1,000 $1,700 $2,100 $2,500 $2,800 $3,000 $3,100

Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade College freshman College sophomore College junior College senior Adult staff

Base $ 400 $1,100 $1,500 $1,900 $2,200 $2,400 $2,500

Bonus $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600 $600

Regulatory Approval—Department of Health One of the first things the Camp Board will need to determine is who is responsible for licensing the camp in the area. Camp in the Park is licensed by The Health Department who inspects the camps at least twice a season to assure that all physical facilities are properly operated and maintained, and that adequate supervision exists to provide a healthy and safe environment in accordance with the New York State Sanitary Code. It also investigates reports of serious incidents of injury, illness and all allegations of abuse or maltreatment and, when requested, provides parents or guardians of prospective campers an opportunity to review inspection reports and required plans.
Each year the Nassau County Department of Health oversees the issuance of permits for approximately 150 camps, which will host in excess of 32,000 children. A summer day camp needs a permit to operate if it is occupied by children less than 16 years of age between June 1st and September 15th and is primarily for the purpose of outdoor organized group activities. The Department of Health will also require that each camper has an up to date medical form on file (physical examination within the last year); and that the camp employs a Medical Director.

Indoor Facility If the camp operators choose a local facility that has an indoor weather space there will be no need to do anything further. However, if the host property for the camp is in a park as Camp in the Park’s is, then the camp operators may wish to look into purchasing or renting a large tent to provide a covered area for hot summer days. In addition, an indoor building for inclement weather days may be considered.
Depending on the size and number of tents required, the cost may run anywhere from $2,500 to $10,000.

Information Required from Campers • Camper Profile (includes emergency contact information)


Medical Forms: The Board of Health will likely mandate that current health forms are on file for all staff and campers.

Information Required from Staff • Counselor Profile (includes emergency contact information)


Medical Forms: The Board of Health will likely mandate that current health forms are on file for all staff and campers.
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Schedule of Activities The camp operators will decide what activities to offer in the camp. Some of these activities can be performed by in–house staff (such as time in the playground); while other activities may require an outside vendors (such as Yoga).
The camp operators will negotiate arrangements with all outside vendors including fees and schedule. The camp should create a daily schedule to incorporate all of the activities. A sample schedule from Camp in the Park follows:
Camp Schedule

Age groups 3 Year olds (8)(B/G) 4 Year olds (19)(B/G) 5/6 Year olds (15)(G) 5/6 Year olds (19)(B) 7 Year olds (12)(G)

9:00 to 9:15 Drop-off & welcome Drop-off & welcome Drop-off & welcome Drop-off & welcome Drop-off & welcome

9:20 to 9:55

10:00 to 10:35

10:40 to 11:15

11:20 to 11:55 Lunch & tent games Lunch & tent games Lunch & tent games

12:00 to 12:35

12:40 to 1:15 Pick-up @ tent

1:20 to 1:55

2:00 to 2:35

2:40 to 3:15

3:20 to 4:00

Soccer

Swim

Music

Yoga

Music

Yoga

Swim F

Arts & crafts

Group

Swim I

X X X X X
Soccer 3:00 Pickup Swim I Yoga S W I M F Arts & crafts Cheerleading Arts & crafts Tennis 2:30–3:00

Playground

Sports

M U S I C

Group

Soccer

Arts & crafts

Tennis 1:30–2:00

Swim I

Yoga

Lunch & Playground tent games Lunch & tent games

Soccer

Sports

Music

Soccer

Swim I

Yoga

Cheerleading

Playground S W I M F

8/9/10 Year Drop-off olds & (18)(G) welcome 7/8 Year olds (13)(B) Drop-off & welcome

Arts & crafts

Swim I

Music

Soccer

Lunch & Tennis Playground tent games 1:00–1:30

Yoga

Sports

Soccer

Arts & crafts

Music

Lunch & tent games

Swim I

Yoga

Tennis 2:00–2:30

Playground

ORGANIZATION
Camp Orientation—Counselors It is a good idea to hold an orientation session prior to camp opening. Workshops can be conducted to teach staff how to handle various situations. It is also helpful to provide a Staff Training Manual that the staff can take home with them for further study.

CAMP IN THE PARK—STAFF TRAINING MANUAL
Being a Good Counselor Counseling at camp is a big job. It is a huge step that you’re taking, probably one of the biggest steps of your life. The step is from selfishness to selflessness; from self–centeredness to being centered on others. Because you are going to be in a leadership role, people will be noticing you. Campers will look up to
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you and follow your example. You will have to show them how to make good choices. . .not with a frown on your face because you don’t like the food, not with a lack of cooperation with the program, not with a sloppy appearance, not by being late, but in good, positive ways. Some ways to be a positive example: encourage a shy camper to make a new friend, pitch in at cleanup time with a smile, and sing along with enthusiasm at campfires. Regressive Pull Sometimes the staff can be the biggest kids at camp, and this is not necessarily good. ‘‘Regressive pull’’ is what we call the influence children have on our behavior that comes from working with them intensely, and especially in groups. In other words, if you spend enough time with children, you start to look and act just like they do! Counselors need to remind themselves who is ‘‘bigger’’—that is, who is the adult and who is the child. Counselors need to understand what their success in working with children will depend in part on being able to, in a sense, enter a child’s world without giving up their own maturity.

Why Am I At Camp?
To Make New Friends Camp is a special place where children learn to make a friend and how to be a friend. You, the counselors, are trained to make sure that campers start making friends as soon as they arrive, because camp is a community where kids work and play together, contribute and cooperate with each other. While campers might arrive with friends, it’s not necessary for them to know anyone when the camp season begins. It’s especially fun to have winter friends and summer friends! You give campers the opportunity to leave any concerns they have from school behind and reinvent themselves. To Help Your Campers Try New Things Camp is a special place where children can be involved in tons of activities—just about anything they can imagine is here. It’s impossible to get bored because there’s always something new to try. You will encourage campers to participate in activities from archery to arts and crafts, dance to nature. To Help Children Practice Growing Up Camp is a special place where kids can make their own decisions—you provide the limits and boundaries that help them feel safe. You will help your campers believe in themselves, listen to them, respect them, and teach them to make good choices. Camp is a place for kids to practice growing up— under your watchful eye! To Coach Self–Confidence Camp is a special place where you will encourage your campers to feel good about themselves. You will coach them to leave their comfort zones, take healthy risks, and then enjoy the rewards of personal achievement. You will teach your campers to say ‘‘You bet I can!’’ when they are faced with new challenges—and make them feel like an important part of a caring community. To Build Physical and Emotional Safety Nets Camp is a special place where you will establish the boundaries that create an envelope of physical and emotional safety around each camper—the environment that helps children feel secure and willing to try new activities and experiences. You will coach campers to make good decisions and reap the rewards. To Teach New Skills Camp is a special place for children to learn skills in all sorts of activities. Whether you’re a boating counselor who shows campers how to paddle a canoe or a cabin counselor who learns right alongside your group, you will help your camper learn skills they won’t find anywhere else! You will share your enthusiasm with your campers—and help them discover activities they never even knew they loved. To Create a Community Where Children Are Listened to and Respected Camp is a special place where children are respected and listened to. The camp experience is based on the building blocks of self–respect: belonging, learning, and contributing. You help create a community,
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and every member of the community is as important as any other. You coach cooperation and responsibility, enabling children to make their own choices within limits that keep them safe. To Help Campers Have Fun Last but not least, camp is a special place. . .for kids and counselors to have fun! You aren’t a teacher giving exams or homework—first and foremost, you are here so that campers can enjoy a fun, successful summer while acquiring life–long skills.

ABOUT CAMP IN THE PARK
• • • • •

All counselors should be on their feet while they are with their group unless the children are seated. Parent confidentiality should be maintained: ages, grade, enrollment forms, and your rules. Keep all group lists, schedules and attendance sheets in your attendance folder at all times. Any notes you wish to send home should be cleared by your supervisor. ‘‘Lost and Found’’ should be brought to Headquarters. Lost items are displayed daily during lineup. Please check boxes often for your campers’ missing articles. Please make sure your campers have all items labeled. We are not responsible for anything that may be lost or stolen other than which is brought and signed for at the main office. Encourage campers to leave valuables at home. Radios and cell phones should not be brought on campus or on camp vehicles. This includes tape recorders, boxes, headphones, walkmen, watchmen, etc. Counselors should take a count of the children in their group often to be certain none of them has strayed. A careful attendance check must be taken daily at morning lineup. Although campers should be accompanied to the lavatory or drinking fountain, all campers should be shown the various locations of these during orientation. Campers must remain with the group unless accompanied by a staff member. Personal Profile sheets should be reviewed during the first week of camp and any important notations should be brought to the attention of the director, supervisor, and/or a nurse. Please observe the eating habits of your campers. Sometimes a camper’s behavior may be conditioned by hunger and/or food allergies. Please consider individual needs for each camper to rest. If a camper appears abnormally tired, it should be reported to one of our nurses, as should any change in camper’s physical being. If the temperature takes a sudden drop, please make certain the camper is dressed warmly and that extra clothing later is removed if the weather becomes warmer. The same care should be taken on rainy days to keep youngsters as dry as possible. Counselors should supervise personal cleanliness and hygiene to the campers where appropriate. All safety procedures and precautions should be discussed with campers and practiced at all times. These are itemized on the pages that follow. Sneakers must be worn by counselors and campers at all times. Campers should not be carried. Walk side–by–side, talk with campers, but don’t carry them.
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ABOUT THE BUDDY SYSTEM
At the beginning of each session and prior to any swimming activity, the swimming ability of each camper will be assessed by a Certified American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor. Campers will be designated as either a swimmer or non–swimmer.
• • •

Swimmers will be identified by wearing wristbands. Non–swimmers will NOT be issued wristbands. Appropriate swimming areas will be assigned to each of these groups. Non–swimmers will be limited to areas no deeper than chest height. The ratio of lifeguards of bathers shall be at least 1 to 25. The ratio of counselors to bathers shall be at least 1 to 7. The designated Buddy System coordinator will oversee attendance accounting.

Other information includes:
• • •

The coordinator will be at least 16 years of age, remain on duty at the facility entrance during the entire swim period, and have in his or her possession:
• • •

A full alphabetical listing, noting group and swim level. A full set of alphabetical group lists. Alphabetical group lists by period.

Other regulations include:


Upon entering the pool, all bathers will sit at the edge of the pool in the area they have been assigned to for recreational or instructional swim. Only after assessing that bathers are seated in their appropriate areas, and that lifeguards and counselors are in their assigned locations, will campers be directed to enter the pool(s). For all campers 6 years of age or older, buddies of the same swim abilities will be assigned at the beginning of each camp session. The buddy system will be in effect during all recreational swim. (If swimmers of differing abilities are ‘‘buddied,’’ they may only swim in the appropriate area for the buddy of lower ability.) Buddy checks will be conducted a minimum of every 15 minutes.





A buddy check will be conducted as follows.
• • •

Lifeguards in charge will give two whistle blows. All campers will maintain silence and move immediately to the nearest pool side. Lifeguards will scan pool for distressed swimmers and assistance rendered if needed. An all–clear signal will be given. Staff will take a head count in each area, and reconcile the account with the attendance posted with the buddy coordinator. If a swimmer is unaccounted for, the ‘‘lost swimmer’’ and/or ‘‘lost camper’’ plan will be activated. Once all campers are accounted for, the lifeguard in charge will give the signal to resume swimming.
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DEFINING A COUNSELOR’S ROLE
The Role of Play The role of a counselor has been described in many different ways—as a camper’s best friend, as a kind of surrogate parent, or even as a coach. None of these analogies is perfect, because being a camp counselor has its own special characteristics and relationships. Since most counselors have not been parents, trying to be one may not be too meaningful.
There are also drawbacks to the concept of being a camper’s best friend. Besides the ability to set limits with campers (for their own physical and emotional safety), a counselor would not confide in or share with a camper an aspect of his or her personal life as one might do with a friend. A counselor would not expect to get advice from or lean on a camper as one might a best friend. Finally, a counselor would not engage in certain kinds of activities with a camper that one might with friends. So, while a counselor can have a lot of fun and be enormously helpful to a child, being a best friend is a very different kind of relationship. Another way to view the role of a counselor with children is as a wise, benevolent, and caring older brother or sister. An older brother or sister wouldn’t let a younger sibling do something to hurt themselves or others. An older brother or sister would intervene when a younger sibling was getting too wound up. Older brothers and sisters care for their siblings and have fun with them and take interest in them while still being able to put on the brakes when needed. Also, unlike a friend, there are certain confidences or aspects of your private life you would not share with a younger brother or sister because it would be confusing, upsetting, or put too much of a burden on them. We all know that younger siblings can be curious. An older brother or sister would know this is natural, but would be careful not to share information that was essentially private.

The Decisions You Make Being an effective counselor also means making sound decisions for your campers. The first question to ask yourself when making a decision that affects campers is: ‘‘Whose well–being am I serving— mine (I get to be popular; I get to have fun doing what I want to do; I get to be with my friends) or my campers?’’. A second question is: ‘‘What is the risk involved, and am I certain that everyone will be able to negotiate that risk and end up safe both emotionally and physically?’’ with the greatest of relationships and the best of intentions, if our decision–making endangers or compromises the safety of children, we have lost the trust given to us when we assumed the responsibilities of being a counselor. Time You Spend When it comes to the quality of time a counselor spends with campers, some tips that may help you be a more successful counselor include:


The time you spend at the beginning of a session getting to know the campers and establishing a way of meeting as a group will pay dividends during the rest of the season. This is the time to establish routines, create a rapport, and win the trust of your campers. Make a ritual of meeting at the same time every day for five to ten minutes to simply acknowledge how helpful or considerate specific campers have been to one another during the day. This public recognition should become part of your group culture. It is especially effective when done at the end of the day. Allow your campers to solve problems as a group right from the start. For example, instead of you and your co–counselor imposing your system of clean–up jobs on the campers, have them brainstorm how
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the system should work. Remember, lay down your ground rules for the group problem–solving right from the start.

Challenging Times When campers begin to show challenging behavior, think of their actions as nonverbal statements. Campers are usually expressing one of three to four statements with their misbehavior: they are seeking attention, power, revenge, or trying to protect themselves.
Take a Deep Breath The first thing to do when responding to such behavior is to take a deep breath and ask yourself, ‘‘What is my intention with this camper?’’ That is, how do you want to come across? Many younger or inexperienced counselors are not aware of what their intention is and may seem angry or vindictive even when they are trying to be thoughtful or engaging. How you come across to campers will have tremendous effects on what results you get. Ask yourself if you are trying to get even, show the kid whose boss, punish the kid, or get to the bottom of things. Stay Calm Secondly, stay calm. If you are taking the camper’s action personally, you will react out of anger or frustration and be less effective. Find out what the child is trying to get from his or her behavior. When kids act in such a way that they either get into trouble or push other children away, it can be powerful simply to say, ‘‘I understand what I think you are trying to do; let’s see if we can do it in a way that doesn’t get you in trouble or cause you to lose friends.’’ Helping children solve problems and learn social skills is easier if they think you have their best interests at heart. Camp is full of opportunities for children to learn new and more effective behaviors for getting what they want, like making and keeping friends and getting attention and recognition for their true accomplishments. Have a great summer!

Lunch/Snacks Depending on whether the camp facility has a kitchen, the camp will have two options: either hire a cook to prepare lunch and snacks; or order food from outside vendors.
At Camp in the Park, the camp does not have cooking facilities so the camp uses two vendors during the week. One provides pizza and pasta; the other provides bagels and hamburgers. For snacks, the camp can buy in bulk at a store like Costco that stocks pretzels, party mix, cereals, fruit, etc. Water can be provided by having a water cooler on site (such as Poland Spring).

Safety/First Aid Training It will be important to identify several senior staff members to participate in safety and CPR training. In addition, the camp must stock a First Aid Kit and keep a log of any incidents. Transportation Parents and guardians will be responsible for dropping off and picking up children. Bus service will be provided for all off–site trips. Insurance A camp insurance program usually includes all lines of cover including property, liability, vehicles, workers’ compensation, excess liability, camper medical, directors/officer’s liability and more.
It will be at the camp’s discretion how much insurance to purchase; but a general rule is the more coverage the camp can afford, the better. The camp should have a primary policy which will cover up to $1,000,000 per incident; and at least two incidents per year. The camp can also add excess liability insurance for any additional amount (such as up to $5,000,000).
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Camper Accident/Medical Insurance is for camper incidents whereby the camp will provide insurance coverage to campers (for instance, if a camper breaks an arm) which covers out–of–pocket expenses for medical care. There are several insurance providers that focus on the camp market. Some suggestions include:


Amskier: Amskier is an administrator/broker in the insurance business. The company says that they act as a ‘‘partner’’ to the camp and refer to themselves as a direct insurer. Amskier advised on what types of insurance the camp should have and then finds underwriters for specific policies. Amskier also provides experts and workshops on issues such as child abuse and swimming safety. Markel Philadelphia Insurance Companies Ace

• • •

The camp operators will want to check insurance company ratings when choosing a provider to ensure stability of the insurance company. A.M. Best and S&P provide ratings among others.

Camp Pricing The community summer camp should be priced competitively to attract as many campers as possible.
For the full eight–week session, Camp in the Park charges $3,000. There is also a four–week option priced at $2,070. The competing privately–owned camps in the area charge approximately $6,500 for the eight–week session.

MARKETING & SALES
Promoting the Camp Camp can be provided to local residents through a mailing announcing the camp and the details and word-of-mouth. In addition, local flyers and ads can be placed throughout the town.

CUSTOMERS
Parent Orientation It is a nice idea to hold a parent meeting prior to the beginning of camp to discuss the parent manual and answer any questions that parents may have. Things to go over at the meeting would include camp rules, hours, supplies needed and general safety tips. Customer Service The camp will have a camp phone with the camp director at all times. Parents can always contact the Director with any concerns. The camp also has an email address to which parents can forward questions.
The camp will provide important announcements by email as well as by flyers distributed to campers. All notifications will be posted at camp as well.
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FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Assumptions 85 campers at $3,000 for an 8 week summer Insurance: includes liability, worker’s compensation and disability insurance (liability $1,000,000 per incident; excess liability at $10,000,000) Revenue Expenses Payroll-staff salaries and bonuses Music director Drama instructor Sports director and staff Tennis instructor Art instructor Yoga instructor Dance instructor Insurance (liability, worker’s comp and disability) Village-license fee Accountant Taxes Safety training (first aid/CPR) Paper goods / first aid supplies Supplies / pool supplies Art supplies Tent Lunch / snacks Field trips with bus (3 to 4 per summer) Science events Wacky Wednesday entertainment Magician event Boy vs girl day Pajama day Olympic family night Total expenses Net profit $ 103,000.00 $ 2,800.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 15,000.00 $ 4,500.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 4,000.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 15,000.00 $ 1,750.00 $ 2,050.00 $ 3,800.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 4,000.00 $ 1,500.00 $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000.00 $ 6,400.00 $ 800.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 400.00 $ 600.00 $ 700.00 $203,300.00 $ 51,700.00 $ 255,000.00

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Diner
Shoestrings

41238 S. Main St. Rock Bend, Ohio 44300 Paul Greenland
Shoestrings is a traditional diner focused on serving breakfast and lunch to cost–conscious consumers.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview Shoestrings is a traditional diner focused on serving breakfast and lunch to cost–conscious consumers. Located in downtown Rock Bend, Ohio, the diner serves affordable sandwiches, soups, and desserts, as well as a limited selection of hot entrees. Shoestrings primarily caters to employees of businesses in the downtown area, which is being revitalized. A key differential will be a free ‘‘bottomless’’ basket of seasoned shoestring potatoes with every order for patrons who dine in. The recipe for this signature item comes from a well–known downtown diner that closed its doors during the 1980s. Business Philosophy At Shoestrings, our objective is to be a ‘‘home away from home’’ for our customers. We feel that everyone is entitled to a reasonably–priced, home–cooked meal in a friendly setting. At our diner, customers can relax with friends and coworkers while enjoying simple fare like peanut–butter–and–jelly sandwiches, chicken noodle soup, and banana cream pie. Shoestrings is an inviting place that offers a brief reprieve from a busy workday. We will put considerable effort into developing relationships with our customers and remembering important details about them.

MARKET ANALYSIS
Like other ‘‘rust belt’’ cities, Rock Bend, Ohio has struggled for several decades. Local manufacturers have closed their doors or relocated operations to countries where low–cost labor is in ample supply. Over the years, commercial and residential development activity began occurring away from the city’s downtown area. In the wake of these developments, downtown Rock Bend was peppered with abandoned factories and empty office buildings. As local manufacturers began to struggle or cease operations, so did the service businesses that catered to their employees. Particularly hard hit were local restaurants and eateries. The revitalization of Rock Bend began during the early 2000s, when Webster Aerospace Corp. announced plans to establish a large research and development facility in the downtown area. The company was attracted by tax incentives, the availability of affordable real estate, and most importantly, a local workforce
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that included one of the largest concentrations of engineers nationwide. Webster Aerospace served as a catalyst for the rebirth of downtown Rock Bend. In time, other defense and aerospace companies began establishing research and development offices in the area. In addition to research and development, companies also began to establish test facilities and hire specialized manufacturing workers to build prototypes of new systems and products. A major development unfolded in 2009, when Platinum Worldwide Aerospace announced plans to relocate its headquarters to Rock Bend. In addition to relocating 750 workers, the company proceeded to hire 400 new employees. Platinum Worldwide’s new headquarters will open its doors in January of 2010, bringing the total downtown workforce population to approximately 6,500. In advance of this significant development, a variety of new service–related businesses, including restaurants and eateries, are being planned in the area. Several national fast food franchises, including McDonald’s and Burger King, have been planned for downtown Rock Bend. In addition, we are aware of at least two upscale restaurants that will open in the next 12 months. With its focus on low–cost meals, personalized service, and of course, its signature potatoes, Shoestrings will be the only restaurant of its kind in Rock Bend. According to data from the Rock Bend Economic Development Council, there are approximately 6,500 workers in the downtown area. Among respondents to a recent survey by DownTown Beat, a weekly online newsletter for people who live or work in downtown Rock Bend, 30 percent indicated that they eat out at least once per week. Based on the Economic Development Council’s figures, this puts the size of the weekly downtown lunch crowd at approximately 1,950 people. The DownTown Beat survey also asked readers about their lunchtime preferences when eating out. According to the survey, 5 percent were unsure, 30 percent preferred fast food chains, 50 percent indicated they like to dine out at locally–owned cafes and sandwich shops, and 15 percent indicated a preference for gourmet restaurants. Based on this data, we estimate that there are approximately 975 prospective customers in our market. During its first year, Shoestrings is confident that it will corner 20 percent of its market niche (195 customers per week).

Competition With its focus on affordable meals and personalized service, and its signature potatoes, Shoestrings will be the only restaurant of its kind in Rock Bend.
Shoestrings will face competition from a number of eating and drinking places. These include the fast– food chain restaurants, McDonald’s and Burger King, each of which is planning to open a new location in downtown Rock Bend. Also vying for a share of the downtown lunch crowd’s wallet is a small, locally–owned chain called That’s a Wrap, which focuses mainly on sandwich wraps, soups, and baked goods. While this chain has developed a following, it has a more expensive (and limited) menu than Shoestrings, and caters to a more upscale demographic. Presently, our main competition will come from Spike’s Pub, a popular downtown bar that serves lunch food such as burgers and fries. However, this institution also offers a relatively limited menu compared to Shoestrings.

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
According to data from the National Restaurant Association (NRA), the restaurant industry had sales of $566 billion in 2009. A leading private–sector employer, the industry provided jobs for approximately 13 million people who worked at about 945,000 locations that year.
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The following NRA chart provides a breakdown of the industry by category:
2009 Estimated sales (Billions) $516.00 $377.90 $ 17.10 $ 40.10 $ 27.90 $ 52.90 $ 49.90

Type of establishment Commercial Eating places Drinking places Managed services Lodging-place restaurants Retail, vending, recreation, mobile Other

In 2009, the NRA forecasted that industry sales will increase 2.5 percent. Smaller, locally–owned establishments like Shoestrings are the driving force within the industry. In fact, NRA figures reveal that 91 percent of all eating and drinking places have less than 50 employees.

OPERATIONS
Organization Shoestrings is owned and managed by Terry Croteau, who has 15 years of restaurant management experience. Prior to establishing Shoestrings, Croteau managed restaurants for several leading national chains in Chicago and Phoenix. He has formal training in restaurant management from the Washington– based Stanley Richfield Culinary Academy of Spokane, from which he graduated in 1993.
Croteau will be supported by Assistant Manager Annie Thompson, who has five years of experience managing a local family restaurant in the area. Shoestrings’s staff will consist of the following positions. Corresponding monthly salaries are provided.
• • • • • •

Owner/Manager (Terry Croteau): $1,950 Assistant Manager (Annie Thompson): $1,350 Waiter: $1,100 Waitress: $1,100 Part–Time Cook: $1,000 Part–time Dishwasher: $800

With their management experience, Croteau and Thompson are qualified to provide any necessary training to employees of Shoestrings. Employees will be paid weekly on Fridays. Initially, we are not able to provide our employees with health insurance or retirement benefits, but will consider these benefits as our business continues to grow.

Professional and Advisory Support Shoestrings has retained the local accounting firm of Smith & Weller to assist us with bookkeeping and tax responsibilities.
Commercial checking accounts have been established with Rock Bend Financial, a local bank that also is providing us with partial financing. Rock Bend Financial also has assisted us with the establishment of merchant accounts, so that we are able to accept credit card payments.
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Suppliers Shoestrings has negotiated supplier agreements with several local food–service wholesalers in Rock Bend that have a reputation for quality and reliability:
• • •

Veggie Mania Rock Bend Meats Fantastic Fruit

In the event that one of the aforementioned specialty suppliers cannot meet our needs, the following national suppliers can both provide all of the food–service products that we require. In addition, these wholesalers will supply us with general cooking and restaurant supplies, such as napkins, salt and pepper, etc.:
• •

Marsh Food Products Corp. Brock’s Food Supply Inc.

Hours Shoestrings will be open Monday through Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Facility and Location Shoestrings will be located at 41238 S. Main St.
Formerly home to a well–known local eatery, our location is a short walking distance from the majority of companies located in downtown Rock Bend. The building in which Shoestrings is located is owned by Jeff Stevens, whose family operated the restaurant formerly located there. Stevens has agreed to rent the facility to Shoestrings for $900 per month.

Equipment Although much of the equipment needed to operate the restaurant is already present, approximately $15,000 in capital purchases will be needed before we are ready for business, including:
• • • • •

1 sandwich refrigerator 2 commercial grills 1 meat slicer 1 bread slicer 1 commercial microwave oven

In addition, the establishment requires reupholstered booths, new tables, and new flooring, which will cost approximately $15,000.

GROWTH STRATEGY
Shoestrings plans to grow the business via a strategy comprised of traditional and, most importantly, word–of–mouth advertising. Based on the aforementioned data from the Rock Bend Economic Development Council and the DownTown Beat survey, Shoestrings is confident that in the first year it will corner 20 percent of the weekly downtown Rock Bend lunch crowd that prefers to dine at locally–owned cafes and sandwich shops (195 customers per week).
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Moving forward, we project that our market share will increase to 30 percent (293 customers per week) during our second year, and 35 percent (341 customers per week) during our third year.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Shoestrings has established the following menu, which will be revised based on customer feedback during the first year of operation. As previously mentioned, a key differential will be a free ‘‘bottomless’’ basket of seasoned shoestring potatoes served with every order (for customers who dine in). Appetizers
• • • • • • • • •

French Fries Onion Rings Nachos Pizza Bread Sweet Potato Fries Potato Chip Basket Chicken Quesadillas Vegetable Quesadilla Chicken Bruschetta

Soup of the Day
• •

Cup Bowl

Sandwiches
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Poorboy Cajun Chicken Melt Chicken Breast Rock Bend Burger Rock Bend Cheeseburger Hickory Burger Pizza Burger Bacon Cheeseburger Turkey Burger Veggie Burger Turkey Club Veggie Club Super Chicken Burrito Super Vegetable Burrito Super Steak Burrito
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• • • • •

Rock Bend BBQ Double Decker BLT Grilled Cheese Grilled Ham & Cheese PBJ

Salads
• • •

Garden Salad Caesar Salad Southwestern Chicken Salad

Hot Entrees
• • • • •

Turkey Pot Pie Meatloaf Braised Beef Roasted Chicken Vegetable Quiche

Beverages
• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Coke Diet Coke Sprite Diet Sprite A&W Root Beer Iced Tea Lemonade Hot Tea Coffee Hot Chocolate Milk: Whole, Low–fat, Skim, and Chocolate Juices: Apple, Cranberry, and Grapefruit Waters: Bottled, Mineral, Sparkling

Homemade Desserts
• • • •

Apple Pie Pumpkin Pie Banana Cream Pie French Silk Pie
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MARKETING & SALES
We will promote our signature shoestring potatoes in all marketing and advertising communications. According to research from the National Restaurant Association (NRA), 68 percent of adults believe that food available from restaurants offers taste and flavor sensations that are difficult to replicate in a home kitchen. This is certainly the case with our shoestring potatoes. The recipe for this signature item comes from a well–known downtown diner that closed its doors during the 1980s. Although that restaurant closed, the former owner has continued to sell the shoestring potatoes at local events and festivals over the last 20 years. They are a highly popular favorite among locals, and we anticipate they will be a key differential for our restaurant. An annual marketing budget of $5,000 has been established for Shoestrings. Marketing tactics include: 1. Coupons and Specials: Every Wednesday, Shoestrings will distribute a free coupon sheet to its customers that include specials for the following week. We feel this tactic will be especially effective, given the current economic conditions and related need for consumers to watch their budgets. According to research from the NRA, 27 percent of adults pay more attention to specials and coupons than they did two years ago. Print and Online Advertising: A regular advertising presence will be established in the DownTown Beat, a weekly online newsletter for people who live or work in downtown Rock Bend, as well as The Bend, a free weekly paper serving the downtown market. The estimated annual cost for a presence in these two publications is $3,500. Web Site: Shoestrings will develop a simple Web site, which will be included as a link on a variety of local Web portals. The cost to develop our site is estimated at $500. E–mail Marketing: A database of customer e–mail addresses will be developed. This will be used to communicate weekly specials and new menu items.

2.

3. 4.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
As the following three–year statement illustrates, Shoestrings will record a $9,820 net loss during its first year. The operation will become profitable during its second year, with an estimated net profit of $47,117, followed by an estimated net profit of $73,932 during the third year.
Three-Year Income Statement
Year 1 Average customer volume Total revenues Total cost of goods Total expenses Net profit 10,140 $121,680 $ 13,450 $118,050 ($ 9,820) Year 2 15,236 $182,832 $ 14,123 $121,592 $ 47,117 Year 3

17,732 $212,784 $ 14,829 $124,023 $ 73,932

Financing for Shoestrings will consist of a $30,000 commercial loan from Rock Bend Financial, which also has agreed to supply us with a $25,500 line of credit. In addition, Owner/Manager Terry Croteau is providing $20,000 from his personal savings.

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Domestic Services Provider
Helping Hands Personal Services LLC

123 Market St. Galena Park, Illinois 60444 Paul Greenland
Helping Hands Personal Services offers reliable, dependable domestic services to those who need a helping hand.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview Helping Hands Personal Services offers reliable, dependable domestic services to those who need a helping hand. Specifically, our business assists the elderly, disabled, and busy adults with light housekeeping, laundry, transportation, grocery shopping, companionship, errands, and meal preparation.
In addition, we offer professional assistance for individuals who need help understanding and resolving issues with Medicare, Medicaid, or private health insurance companies, as well as a referral service that connects individuals with community programs and other resources that our business does not provide directly. Finally, our Technology Helper service attempts to bridge the technology gap that exists between younger and older adults. Our staff helps those not experienced with computers and the Internet with tasks such as buying and selling items on eBay, e-mail, and online shopping.

Organizational Structure Helping Hands Personal Services has been established as a limited liability company in order to secure full limited liability for its three owners.

MARKET ANALYSIS
Helping Hands Personal Services will focus on three target markets. Our primary target market will be older adults with annual household incomes of $40,000 or more. However, we also will promote our services to adults with minor disabilities or physical limitations, as well as working adults with household incomes of $100,000 or more. The community of Galena Park is a relatively affluent area, with above average household incomes. Our primary target market is poised for explosive growth in the coming years. According to Older Americans 2008: Key Indicators of Well-Being, a report issued by the Federal Interagency Forum on
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Aging-Related Statistics, the United States was home to approximately 37 million people over the age of 65 in 2006, representing 12 percent of the population. The size of this population is forecast to increase to 71.5 million people by 2030, at which time adults over age 65 will account for 20 percent of the U.S. population. In addition to growing in numbers, our target market also is growing in terms of economic resources. According to the aforementioned report, some 15 percent of older adults lived below the poverty line in 1974. However, by 2006 this percentage had fallen to 9 percent. During this same time period, the number of older adults considered to be within the high income category increased from 18 percent to 29 percent, while those considered to be low income decreased from 35 percent to 26 percent. Generally speaking, the aging baby boomer segment will be a key driver of growth in our target market in the coming years.

Competition Beyond individuals who offer some of the same services that our business offers, our main source of competition will be Lennox House, a local community agency that offers a mid-sized domestic services program. Another strong competitor is Comfort Care, a national provider of in-home care with approximately 270 independently owned and operated offices throughout the world. There is a Comfort Care franchise within range of our local market that provides many of the same services we offer, including grocery shopping, companionship, light housekeeping, meal preparation, and transportation.

PERSONNEL
Management The owners of Helping Hands Personal Services have a unique blend of experience that qualifies them for success within their industry niche.
Kathy Stammers, MSN, MBA: A hospital staff nurse for more than 25 years, Kathy Stammers has extensive experience caring for geriatric and disabled patients, and she understands the challenges they face when trying to live independently. Kathy earned an undergraduate nursing degree from St. Anthony Nursing School in Petri, Wash., followed by a Masters of Science in Nursing degree from The Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing at Loyola University in Chicago, and a Masters of Business Administration from the University of Phoenix. Ross Caravelle, MSW: Ross also hails from the healthcare industry, where he spent 15 years working as a hospital social worker. In that role, Ross gained extensive experience helping patients and their families deal with a wide range of issues. Benefiting his role as a partner in Helping Hands Personal Services is his working knowledge of community agencies and resources in the Galena Park area. In his role as a hospital social worker, Ross regularly served as a liaison with various community programs and agencies, and helped to arrange and coordinate resources for patients and their families. He earned a Masters of Social Work degree from Temple University’s School of Social Administration in Philadelphia. Sherry Kendall: After working for seven years as the human resources manager for a mid-sized landscaping company, Sherry Kendall applied her knowledge of health insurance to secure a job as a registration/insurance specialist at Abington Community Hospital in Chicago. In that role, she was responsible for overseeing a staff that verified insurance information, conducted patient interviews, and made various financial arrangements. She has extensive knowledge about reviewing itemized charges on hospital bills, communicating with physicians and their office staff, completing insurance claim forms, troubleshooting and correcting erroneous insurance claims, and dealing with third-party insurance
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companies and government agencies (e.g., Medicaid and Medicare). Sherry has an Associates Degree from Clark Community College in Rexford, Ill.

Staffing In addition to its three founding partners, Helping Hands Personal Services will initially employ a staff of five full-time and 15 part-time employees. Although we do not provide patient care services, we require that all of our staff members receive training to become certified nursing assistants. This basic training will prepare all of our staff to assist customers who need help with more involved personal services, such as bathing or transferring from bed to chair. In addition, all of our staff must pass criminal background checks, have valid Illinois driver’s licenses, and pass a basic skills competency exam that we have developed specifically for our business.
We have made arrangements to promote job offerings through the career planning offices at a local community college, as well as a four-year college, that offer programs in the field of human services.

Professional & Advisory Support Our business has selected the firm of Smithfield, Luke, and Moran to provide us with legal services. Specifically, this law firm has experience in both employment and franchise law, which will help us to effectively deal with labor issues and support future growth and if and when we are in a position to expand beyond our local market by offering franchises in other locations. Specialized Accounting LLC has been retained to provide tax advisory services.

GROWTH STRATEGY
During its first three years of operations, Helping Hands Personal Services will focus on growing locally. A graduate research methods class at Parkville University recently conducted an independent analysis of our local market in order to determine both initial and projected demand. The results of this research, which was drawn from a statistically significant survey of Galena Park residents over age 65, indicate that the total market demand for our services is approximately 460 customers, representing 1,840 service hours weekly. Based on the estimated market share held by our competitors, as well as our initial start-up capital, we are confident in our ability to support 100 customers during our first year, or 400 service hours weekly. Due to considerable untapped potential in the market, and because our overhead is low and we plan to reinvest as much profit as possible into the business, we estimate that our customer base will grow at a compound annual rate of approximately 37 percent during its first three years:
• • •

Year 1: 100 customers Year 2: 137 customers Year 3: 188 customers

In years four and five, we anticipate the implementation of a regional growth strategy, marked by the formation of company-owned satellite locations in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Iowa. We will concentrate our efforts on communities with higher-than-average household incomes. Our plan will be to apply the same staffing model, whereby we rely upon local colleges and universities as sources of potential employees. Long-range growth plans call for the potential expansion of our business via a franchise model. Early expansion will be concentrated within the midwestern United States, in order to minimize the geographic distance between franchisees, company-owned offices, and our headquarters.
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SERVICES
Helping Hands Personal Services will offer a variety of services for customers, depending on their needs. Many of the services we provide will fall into one of the following major categories: Light Housekeeping—Our staff performs basic housekeeping tasks for customers, including vacuuming, dusting, and mopping. Extensive cleaning jobs, such as window washing, are not provided. Laundry—Our staff will clean laundry and linens in the customer’s home or at a local Laundromat. Transportation—Transportation services are provided to doctor appointments and other locations using the customer’s insured vehicle. Companionship—This service involves our staff spending time with customers and their families. The preparation of simple meals and other basic domestic tasks is included, as well as assistance with grooming, and personal care. Personal Shopping—Based on lists and instructions provided by the customer, our staff will run errands to local stores, shopping malls, and grocery stores and make purchases on their behalf. Technology Helper—Staff will provide basic computer skills training to customers, including Internet use. For customers who wish to take advantage of modern technology but have no desire to learn about computing, our staff will bridge the gap for them by providing research services. Examples include buying and selling items on eBay, maintaining a presence on social networking sites, assisting with e-mail correspondence with friends and family members, ordering merchandise from e-commerce Web sites, filling out government forms online, and online bill payment. To assist customers without computers, certain staff members will be equipped with laptop computers that connect to the free municipal wireless network that is accessible anywhere in the community of Galena Park. Insurance Assistance—Professional assistance is available to those who are having difficulty navigating the insurance system, and sorting out issues related to Medicare and Medicaid. This premium service is offered by our partners at a rate of $45 per hour. Referral/Resource Service—The partners of Helping Hands Professional Services also provide professional assistance to those who may benefit from programs provided by local, regional, state, or national organizations and agencies. At a rate of $45 per hour, we will perform custom research based on a customer’s needs, helping them to identify appropriate services, make contact with the right individuals, and fill out any necessary paperwork.

MARKETING & SALES
We have identified a number of key marketing tactics to drive the growth of our business. These mainly focus on the target market of older adults, as well as the children of older adults who purchase services for their parents. Among the key tactics we have identified are:


Presentations to local companies. Our partners will arrange to make presentations at large and mid-sized organizations throughout the Galena Park area. Our objective will be to reach working adults who seek services for their older parents. Brochure. An attractive, four-color capabilities brochure will be developed to promote our business. In addition to serving as a leave-behind item following live sales presentations, the brochure also can be given to people requesting information about our services.
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Newspaper Advertising. We will run regular newspaper ads in The Senior Times, a local free newspaper serving the senior market in Galena Park. This publication has a solid readership base, and the advertising rates are very affordable. Internet Marketing. Helping Hands Personal Services will maintain a regular presence on the World Wide Web. In addition to a Web site that provides basic information about our services, we also will maintain a presence on popular social networking sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, in order to initiate dialogue with adults who are decision makers for services used by their older parents.



OPERATIONS
Facility & Location Helping Hands Personal Services has identified affordable, modest office space that will meet our needs during the first three years of operations. We have strategically located our office near the local colleges from which we hope to hire staff. Billing & Payment We require that all customers contract with us for a two-hour minimum per week. Customers are required to pre-pay for two weeks of service. Our office will generate monthly statements, with payment due within 30 days of the statement date. In addition to personal checks, we also accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express. We have purchased a simple ‘‘out-of-the-box’’ billing system to maintain customer accounts. This software allows us to generate all necessary forms and statements. Fees A simplified billing structure allows us to provide most services at a flat rate of $25 per hour. Hours of Operation Helping Hands Personal Services will provide services around-the-clock, depending on a customer’s needs and the availability of our staff members. Our office will maintain regular hours, from 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through Friday. An answering service will be available to take calls after hours. In the event of an emergency, one of the managing partners will be available at all times.

FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS
Based on an average charge of $25 per hour for services rendered, we estimate that our first-year gross revenues will total $520,000. With a projected compound annual growth rate of 37 percent, we estimate revenues and net profits will increase significantly during the first three years of operations, providing us with the necessary capital for growth within our local market, and initial seed money to commence our regional growth plan in year four.
Three-Year Income Statement
Year 1 Average customer volume Total revenue Total expenses Net profit 100 $520,000 $449,418 $ 70,582 Year 2 137 $712,400 $516,831 $195,569 Year 3 188 $975,988 $594,355 $381,633

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The following is an estimated balance sheet for our first year of operations:
First-year balance sheet Income Total income Expenses Salaries Utilities Rent Insurance Equipment Office supplies Marketing & advertising Telecommunications Travel & entertainment Subscriptions & dues Repairs & maintenance Taxes Total expenses Net income $380,000 $ 2,900 $ 11,700 $ 11,740 $ 6,250 $ 3,950 $ 14,380 $ 2,300 $ 2,450 $ 450 $ 500 $ 15,784 $449,418 $ 70,582 $520,000

Helping Hands Personal Services has applied for a $150,000 commercial loan from The Bank of Galena Park, from which the business also hopes to secure a reasonable line of credit. In addition, the owners are collectively providing $120,000 of their own money as start-up capital.

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Energy Efficiency Auditing Firm
Energy Physicians

130 Hewitt Ave. Long Beach, California 90805 Laura Becker
Energy Physicians performs residential and commercial energy efficiency audits and recommends ways to reduce energy consumption and save money.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Mission Statement Energy Physicians was created to help educate members of its community in an effort to become more energy independent. By analyzing energy usage in a residential or a commercial space, Energy Physicians will help its customers reduce energy costs and help reduce energy emissions. Business Overview Energy Physicians assists its customers in reducing the amount of electricity, natural gas or petroleum (heating oil or propane) that they use during the course of a year. The aim is to save money by reducing consumption and to take advantage of any tax incentives available. Energy Physicians has three business areas including: Energy Efficiency Audits; Customized Rebate Overview; and Alternative Systems Recommendations and Design. A representative assignment would include an initial consultation which is free, and then a full scale audit of the residence or commercial space at a flat rate price. The audit will examine all energy consumption and will design a program to mitigate energy usage and apply for tax rebates from federal, state and local governments. In addition, the company will recommend Alternative Energy Systems when applicable.
The energy consulting business has been a lucrative endeavor since the deregulation of natural gas and electricity in the early 1990s. After gasoline, heating oil, and natural gas had record high prices in the summer of 2008, there has been a renewed focus in the United States to mitigate energy expenses. There have been many improvements over the last decade in energy efficiency. Lighting, washing machines, dishwashers, driers, and television sets are all categorized by their energy efficiency rating. In many states around the country, utilities, states and local governments will offer rebates and tax incentives to end–users who use energy efficient products. The Obama Administration has increased the stakes in energy efficiency by adding language to the Stimulus Bill that creates tax incentives for individuals and companies that make improvements that are deemed energy efficient. Energy Efficiency Auditors, such as Energy Physicians, have knowledge of the current incentives and an ability to create energy savings within customers’ homes or businesses. This is the backbone of the consulting reports that are created after audits. Energy Physicians provides a full scale energy audit that
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will focus on multiple areas in order to save money and reduce consumption. A robust report will allow our customers to see specifically where they are spending their money by analyzing their bills and examining the interior and exterior of their residential or business property. In addition to creating a template for savings, Energy Physicians will determine if a customer’s space will benefit from alternative sources of energy such as solar, wind or geothermal processes. Our knowledge and contacts in the alternative energy markets will allow us to educate our customers and give them a level of comfort with this beneficial, relatively new, technology.

BUSINESS STRATEGY
Energy Physicians is a family–owned business that focuses on residential and commercial customers within a 300 mile radius of Long Beach, California. We believe that the ability to enhance energy efficiency is in the earliest stages of development. Efficiency will come in products that use electricity, natural gas and petroleum, as well as, with processes that create heat and air conditioning. We believe that not only will our customers be interested in saving money, but they will also be interested in creating fewer emissions created by current energy processes. We are very enthusiastic about our current and future business prospects. The energy efficiency business is important in multiple ways. First, the business’ efforts to improve the way customers use energy is important environmentally. In addition, since most people are interested in saving money on gasoline, it is helpful to teach them how they can save money with slight changes to the products they use in their home or office.

Objectives Energy Physicians’ objectives are to be at the forefront of energy efficiency changes; and to steer customers in an energy–efficient direction so that they can save money, and help to have eco–friendly energy. The business aims to increase its customer base from high double digits to high triple digits over the next three years.

OPERATIONS
The Energy Efficiency Auditing business is broken down into two main areas: Field Consultants and Administration. 1. Field Consultants: Field consultants are the staff who speak to our clients and perform the auditing of residential and commercial space. Since these people are the face of our organization, it is imperative that they have a strong knowledge of energy efficiency, as well as a good bedside manner. Field consultants need to take a two prong training course prior to visiting clients alone. We have designed our own training tools, which are gathered and updated quarterly to keep field consultants up–to–date with the newest tools to create an energy efficient environment. Our training materials can be viewed online, and we ask consultants to pass an exam prior to making their first accompanied visit to a client. We also have new consultants make ten accompanied audits with an experienced consultant prior to taking on independent work. During an initial consultation, field consultants are instructed not to press new clients to purchase an energy audit, but there is definitely a need for consultants to sell their knowledge and the reputation of our company. Administration: The business administration team consists of a financial bookkeeper who handles payroll, employee benefits, and invoicing and bill payment. This person works in conjunction with our office manager, who handles appointments, system issues, and customer support.

2.

Energy Physicians opened its doors in November of 2005. The business started with three people and currently has twenty–five employees.
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Certification Auditors should receive certification from The Association of Energy Engineers. The Association conducts the testing for the Certified Energy Manager CEM (www.aeecenter.org/certification/CEMpage.htm). Competition The majority of the competition in the energy efficiency audit business will come from other energy efficiency auditors; alternative energy companies; and utilities.
When looking at the three segments of the business, none of the existing competitors currently overlap all three of these business lines. Other energy auditors will provide audits but will not suggest alternative companies or implement rebates. Alternative energy companies such as Solar Photovoltaic or Wind Power will perform a consultation to determine how much a customer can save and how long it will take to break even on any initial investment (in most states with a rebate system the current break even period is approximately seven years). We feel that combining all of our expertise in all three business lines will allow us to balance the current needs of customers with the initial goal of saving customers money in the short term rather than over the long term. The business philosophy is that by generating customers’ current cash flow within efficient products and rebates; then they are more likely to all alternative products in the future which will save them additional money.

MARKET ANALYSIS
The energy efficiency industry consists of energy conservation and alternative energy programs. Beyond the financial goals of running a business, industry goals are to move the United States away from petroleum–oriented energy sources and toward natural energy sources. Energy efficiency is a growth industry. The growth will be seen in several areas. For instance, the Obama Administration has made their intentions clear by promising to create a significant number of ‘‘green’’ jobs that will become available over the next few years. In addition, industry growth will come in the form of rebates and incentives in the proposed 2009 fiscal budget. The energy efficiency industry over the short term will continue to grow at a steady pace. We believe that as prices of electricity, natural gas and petroleum continue to climb, there will be a greater incentive for businesses and residents to find ways to save on energy and power. Over the long term the industry will be able to grow geometrically. As the United States begins to enact programs that allow people to save money using alternative power and energy, the need for consultants to direct businesses and residents to companies that provide alternative energy will continue to increase. As Energy Efficiency Auditors, Energy Physicians has great expertise in the rebate and incentive market. The business’s contacts within the alternative energy community will the business to help customers adapt and take advantage of the upcoming change to an alternative energy and power world. According to the Department of Energy, the United States will invest $3.2 billion dollars into energy efficiency and conservation (http://www.eere.energy.gov). This funding will support energy audits and energy efficiency retrofits in residential and commercial buildings; the development and implementation of advanced building codes and inspections; and the creation of financial incentive programs for energy efficiency improvements (www.doe.gov). The barriers to entry in the energy efficiency business are relatively low, and the costs to start a new auditing business are approximately $10,000 dollars. These costs would include the following:
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• •

Purchase Inspection Equipment Blower Door Testing—an adjustable frame door vital to testing for air leaks (US News and World Reports, November 10, 2008) Infrared camera—allows auditor to identify less obvious energy leaks



PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Energy Physicians offers three different services within the energy efficiency business. The three services are:
• • •

Energy Efficiency Audit Customized Rebate Overview Alternative Systems Design

Energy Efficiency Audit After an initial consultation, an audit is performed which solves the issue of energy measurement. The energy audit report can be used as a starting point for Energy Management Plans, Retrofitting Existing Systems and Designing a new Energy Process (www.pqa.net).
Energy Physicians performs two types of audits. The basic audit consists of historical statistical analysis of past consumption and energy pricing on the residential or commercial facility. After the historical statistical analysis is performed, field consultants will perform a walk–through audit. The walk–through provides information on the facility’s energy use profiles and an assessment of the energy systems and equipment. Field consultants will also gather information on the building conditions, process equipment and conditions of temperatures, pressures, flows and leaks (www.pqa.net). The other audit is an Advanced Technical Audit which provides a historical analysis; a walk–through audit; and a report on complex energy consumption. This detailed analysis focuses on consumption and performance. The study answers the question of why the consumption is so high and a relative rating on performance. The studies can include details on heat loss and computer simulations on how to mitigate this problem. The study will also recommend product and systems that can be used to create a more energy efficient facility.

Customized Rebate Overview Initially, Energy Physicians presents a report to a customer that analyzes the Energy Star Government Program (http://www.energystar.gov/). This program focuses on residential and commercial products that use less energy and are eligible for rebates. Products in more than sixty categories are eligible for the ENERGY STAR. They use less energy, save money, and help protect the environment (www.energystar.gov). A typical household spends more than $2,000 on energy per year according to the Department of Energy. Energy Star products will normally consume 33 percent less energy during the course of a year.
Next, Energy Physicians provides guidance on all of the state and federal incentives that are deemed beneficial for the customer. Most of the rebates are listed on the Department of Energy’s website and are listed by state.

Alternative System Design Our last business line is geared to the client that is interested in future saving and an investment into their home or office space. Alternative energy solutions include: Solar Panel Installation for electricity or hot water; Wind Energy Solutions for electricity and hot water, and Geothermal solutions for heat and hot water. Many states have subsidies that will provide most of the upfront costs for the different alternative energy solutions. The federal government also issues a tax credit that can be used to mitigate the upfront cost of alternative systems.
Prior to the initial consultation, Energy Physicians can enter a customer’s zip code into the company’s Solar or Wind calculator. This calculator with provide the field consultant with the information needed to discuss
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the saving a customer will incur and the length of time to recoup the initial costs of a new alternative systems. As consultants, we educate customers on electricity consumption and teach them how to use our calculator. The solar or wind calculator will tell you:
• • •

How much a solar system will cost for your house What tax credits, rebates and other incentives are available to you Potential financing costs and energy savings

Pricing Pricing for each line of business should be competitive with current market rates. According to the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, costs for businesses run from $100 to $400 depending on energy consumption. Residential facilities cost an average of $250.
Energy Physicians offers a rebate program which costs the customer an additional $100, plus 30 percent of rebates received. The company files the rebates for customers and mails them to the applicable agency. Energy Physicians offers an alternative energy program which costs an additional $100. The business has a referral arrangement with partners who provide and install alternative systems.

MARKETING & SALES
The marketing and sales effort is multi–pronged:
• •

Website—The business must provide users with a user–friendly, customer–focused interface. Advertising on Field Consultants’ cars—Since most business is conducted at client sites, Energy Physicians advertises on the consultants’ cars which provide contact information, including website address, email and phone numbers. The company name, Energy Physicians, is relatively easy to remember and the phone number is easy to remember.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Profit and Loss Estimates
Revenue Energy audits Residential Business Energy rebates Alternative systems Referral to equipment provider Total revenue Expenses Inspection equipment purchases Blower door Infrared camera Website design Website hosting Vehicle leasing—field consultants Office rent Total expenses Net income $ 10,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 4,000.00 $ 360.00 $ 1,800.00 $ — $18,160.00 $12,900.00 — $ $ — $ — $ 360.00 $ 2,700.00 $ 18,000.00 $21,060.00 $ 64,120.00 $250 per audit $400 per audit $100 per audit Receive 10% of customer savings $100 per job $300 per referral $ 13,000.00 $ 8,000.00 $ 2,600.00 $ 5,460.00 $ 500.00 $ 1,500.00 $31,060.00 $ 39,000.00 $ 16,000.00 $ 7,800.00 $ 16,380.00 $ 1,500.00 $ 4,500.00 $85,180.00 Year 1 Year 2

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Gift Shop
The Busy Bee

102 Main Street Brendenwood, Illinois 61025 Paul Greenland
The Busy Bee is a unique, eclectic, bee-themed gift shop.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview The Busy Bee is a unique, eclectic, bee-themed gift shop business that is owned and operated by Leah Strand. The business is located in the historic town of Brendenwood, Illinois, a popular tourist destination marked by nineteenth century architecture, unique shops, restaurants, B&Bs, wineries, and more.
Our business’ flagship product is B. Strand’s Honey, which is supplied by B. Strand’s Bees, a commercial beekeeping business owned by Leah Strand’s husband, Bill, in nearby Montgomery Corners, Illinois. In addition, we sell a wide range of bee-themed merchandise and edible items, along with a typical offering of gift items, greeting cards, candy, sandwiches, and beverages, which are obtained from various wholesalers. Currently in its fifth year of operations, The Busy Bee has developed a strong following among the affluent tourists who visit Brendenwood each year.

MARKET ANALYSIS
Our primary service area is Brendenwood, Illinois, a popular tourist destination marked by nineteenth century architecture, unique shops, restaurants, B&Bs, wineries, and more. Specifically, we compete for consumers in the immediate vicinity of downtown Brendenwood. The area on and around Main Street includes approximately 350 establishments, including 70 retailers. Of these, about 10 are gift shops similar in size to our operation, but with a different focus; our establishment is unique in its offering of bee-themed products. Specifically, the B. Strand’s brand name has become well known in our region due to strong marketing efforts in recent years. Beyond other area gift shops, we face competition from larger retail enterprises in the area, including a nearby Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, which offers a few of the same honey-related products and gift items that we sell. According to a survey conducted by the City of Brendenwood, the Brendenwood Downtown Business Owners Association, the Jackson County Economic Development Council, and the consulting firm Rogers
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Associates, retail sales within the City of Brendenwood totaled $12 million in 2008. This reflects a five-year annual growth rate of 4.5 percent. Due to weak economic conditions, growth is expected to remain flat in 2009, increase 1.5 percent in 2010, 2.5 percent in 2011, 3.5 percent in 2012, and 4.5 percent in 2013. In addition to individual marketing efforts by area businesses, the Brendenwood Downtown Business Owners Association conducts an annual marketing campaign to attract affluent tourists from nearby cities, including the Chicago and Milwaukee markets.

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
During the mid-2000s, players within the gift, novelty, and souvenir stores industry generated annual sales of approximately $21 billion, according to the Small Business Development Center National Information Clearinghouse. At that time, the industry included some 85,700 establishments and provided employment for about 300,000 people.

MANAGEMENT
The Busy Bee is owned and operated by Leah Strand. Prior to establishing her own business, Leah earned an Associates degree in business management from North Central Community College in 1993. Her retail career began in college. After working in the gift shop at North Central Community College for two years, she secured a position with nearby Good Shepherd Hospital, working first as a retail clerk. In 1995 Strand was promoted to supervisor of the hospital’s main gift shop. In 2000, she was promoted to manager of guest services, which included management of two gift shops, as well as a coffee shop and sandwich shop. Strand’s love of bees came from her father, Stephen Goers, who established a bee keeping business in 1984 called Bee Line Bees. Goers has since retired, but sold the operation to Leah’s husband, Bill Strand, in 2002. Three years later, in 2005, Leah decided to combine her business management experience with her love of bees and establish a retail enterprise to help her husband sell honey and related products.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Edible Honey Products • Packaged Liquid Honey
• • • • • • • •

Comb Honey (in the edible honeycomb) Whipped or Creamed Honey (spreadable/butter-like) Chunk Honey (liquid honey with pieces of honeycomb remaining in the jar) Honey Wine Honey Beer Honeybee Pollen Sweet Natural Honey Candy Honey Sticks (apple, blueberry, cherry, grape, lemon, peppermint, pure clover, raspberry, strawberry, ˜ watermelon, root beer, banana, pina colada, licorice, and peach) Honey Straws (apple, blueberry, cherry, grape, lemon, peppermint, pure clover, raspberry, strawberry, ˜ watermelon, root beer, banana, pina colada, licorice, and peach)
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Health & Beauty Products • Alpine Swiss Honey Soap
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Royal Jelly Country Honey Soap Beeswax Hand Cream (unscented, lilac-, lavender-, and rose-scented) Beeswax Lip Balm

Deli
Sandwiches • Roast Beef
• • • •

Pastrami Corned Beef Honey Smoked Ham Honey Smoked Turkey Breast

Available on a variety of breads, including:
• • • • • •

White Wheat Rye Croissant Bagel French

Cheese selections include:
• • • • • • • • • •

Cheddar Colby Colby Jack Feta Mozzarella Muenster Provolone Swiss White American Yellow American

• • • • •

Salads Chicken Salad Crab Salad Tuna Salad Egg Salad Potato Salad
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• • • •

Macaroni Salad Baked Beans Cole Slaw ortellini Salad

Home Decor ´ • Beeswax Candles (beehive, bees, votive, cone, rope, star, cylindrical, rectangular, and spherical designs)
• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Porcelain Figurines Decorative Pillows Throw Rugs Wall Hangings Yard Ornaments Clocks Statues & Statuettes Picture Frames Bookends Paperweights Glasses Plates Coffee Mugs

Greeting Cards • Birthday
• • • • • • • •

Blank Engagement General Humor Get Well I Love You Missing You New Baby Wedding

Beverages • Bottled Water
• • • • •

Cafe Latte Chinese Tea Coffee Fruit Drinks Fruit Flavored Sodas
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• • • • •

Green Tea Lemon Tea Milk Milk Tea Soft Drinks

Candy • Blow Pops
• • • • • • • •

Bottle Caps Chewing Gum Gummi Bears Jolly Rancher Nerds Now & Later Sugar Daddy Tangy Taffy

OPERATIONS
Facility and Location The Busy Bee is located in a leased, 2,000-square-foot storefront on Main Street in downtown Brendenwood. This retail space was already equipped for operations at the time the business was established. Its previous occupant operated a combination gift shop/sandwich shop, and closed the business due to retirement. Personnel In addition to Leah Strand, The Busy Bee employs two seasonal part-time workers. Suppliers Beyond honey and related products supplied by B. Strand’s Bees, The Busy Bee has negotiated supplier agreements with several regional food-service wholesalers, as well as a variety of national and international merchandise wholesalers.
Too extensive to list within this plan, our supplier list is very large. For example, within the greeting card category alone, we buy from the following suppliers:
• • • • • • •

American Card Products American-Made Greeting Cards Blue Mountain Arts, Inc. CardSenders Cardstar Continental Cards, Inc. Emotions Greeting Cards
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Floral Poetry Greeting Cards Fusion Designs Heart & Mind Greetings InterGreet.com Karen Cole Paper Luvapet Specialty Company Marcel Schurman NancyB...Cards Notes & Queries Running Rhino & Co. Sianscript Simon Elvin Cards Sliding Pillar Press Snafu Designs Wishing Well Studios Your True Greetings

Hours The Busy Bee is open Monday through Sunday from Memorial Day through October 31st, which is Brendenwood’s peak tourist season. We are open on weekends during most of the off-season, but are closed on major holidays and during the months of January and February. Our hours of operation generally are 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Equipment The following equipment was acquired from the previous occupant:
• • • • • • • • • • •

1 sandwich refrigerator 1 meat slicer 1 bread slicer 1 commercial microwave oven 1 refrigerated deli case 1 cash register 15 product display cases Shelving for product display 1 in-store music system ´ 10 cafe-style tables ´ 40 cafe-style chairs
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FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Sales
Sales Forecast
2009 Cards Health & beauty Deli Candy Edible honey products Beverages Home décor Total sales $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 15,896 18,961 21,540 12,540 35,869 19,654 25,863 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2010 16,373 19,529 22,186 12,916 36,945 20,244 26,664 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2011 16,864 20,116 22,852 13,303 38,053 20,951 27,464

$150,323

$154,857

$159,603

Profit and Loss
Pro Forma Profit and Loss
2009 Sales Direct cost of sales Total cost of sales Gross margin Expenses Payroll Sales and marketing and other expenses Depreciation Leased equipment Utilities Insurance Rent Payroll taxes Other Total operating expenses Net profit $ 52,500 $ 5,500 $ 3,250 $ 463 $ 3,700 $ 3,800 $ 12,500 $ 7,875 $ 850 $ 90,438 $ 21,587 $ 54,600 $ 6,000 $ 3,250 $ 463 $ 4,280 $ 4,150 $ 12,500 $ 8,190 $ 1,000 $ 94,433 $ 19,788 $ 56,074 $ 6,500 $ 3,250 $ 463 $ 4,650 $ 4,500 $ 12,500 $ 8,411 $ 1,000 $ 97,348 $ 19,994 $150,323 $ 39,073 $ 39,073 $111,250 2010 $154,857 $ 40,636 $ 40,636 $114,221 2011 $159,603 $ 42,261 $ 42,261 $117,342

LEGAL
The Busy Bee is incorporated in the State of Illinois, and has obtained appropriate business and liability insurance policies. Our business is represented by the Brendenwood-based law firm Wade & Potter.

MARKETING & SALES
Our honey products are very popular with customers. Over the years, the B. Strand’s brand name has become well known in our region thanks to an identity and related product packaging designs developed by a local advertising agency many years ago. Event marketing is an important part of our operation. For the past 10 years, the city of Brendenwood has hosted an annual fall festival, which effectively marks the end of the tourist season. For the past four years, The Busy Bee and B. Strand’s Bees have served as flagship sponsors of this event, which has adopted the name Brendenwood Honey Harvest Festival.
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The Busy Bee has a strong retail presence at the festival, where we sell liquid honey and other edible honey products. In addition, the event provides us with an opportunity to provide free product samples to tourists, distribute coupons related to our end-of-year sale, add new customers to our mailing list, and help to further build the B. Strand’s Bees brand name. In addition to the Brendenwood Honey Harvest Festival, The Busy Bee participates in event marketing efforts at several parades throughout the season, including a Memorial Day parade, a Fourth of July parade, and a Labor Day parade. Besides event marketing, we regularly distribute coupons and flyers to area hotels and B&Bs in order to entice their customers to pay us a visit. We also are a regular advertiser in The Brendenwood Guide, a weekly tourist publication that is distributed to area merchants and lodging places. Finally, one particularly innovative marketing tactic is our use of a yellow, bee-themed Volkswagen Bug, which has been designed to look like a giant bee. The vehicle is an effective attention-getter with area tourists.

SWOT ANALYSIS


Strengths: We are unique in our market, and serve as the exclusive retail distributor for an established, popular brand of honey. Weaknesses: Leah Strand is the brains behind The Busy Bee, but also spends a great deal of her time on operational matters, making the development of growth strategies a challenge. Opportunities: Due to our popularity and a growing, loyal customer base that returns each season, we are positioned for future expansion as economic conditions improve. Threats: We are subject to the impact of economic conditions on consumers’ discretionary spending. In addition, the beekeeping business that supplies our popular liquid honey is a relatively small enterprise, and is subject to risks such as poor crops due to pests and diseases.







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Home Organization Service
Break Free Organizing

43 Bleak St. Missouri City, Missouri 64072 Kari Lucke
Break Free Organizing is devoted to helping people organize their homes so that they can reduce stress, increase productivity, and improve their quality of life.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Mission Break Free Organizing is devoted to helping people organize their homes so that they can reduce stress, increase productivity, and improve their quality of life. Business Overview Julie McDonald, B.A., is owner and sole proprietor of Break Free Organizing. She serves the mid–Missouri community by aiding people who want to become more organized in their daily lives. The premise of the business is that many people feel trapped by their surroundings and lack of organizing skills and overwhelmed at the prospect of change. Julie acts as a guide to people who need help getting started, as well as those who need ongoing services. Although Julie will purchase organizing supplies for customers, the business is based on a service, not products.
The professional organizing industry has exploded in recent years. The National Association of Professional Organizers, founded in 1985, now has 4,200 members and a growing number of consumers who seek their services. The philosophy at Break Free Organizing is ‘‘A cluttered house is a cluttered mind’’ and ‘‘A place for everything, and everything in its place.’’ We believe that by helping people become more organized, we free them from stress, allow them more time for their families, and improve their quality of life. Break Free Organizing adheres to the ethic principles of the National Organization of Professional Organizers (NAPO), which are as follows:


I will serve my clients with integrity, competence, and objectivity and will treat them with respect and courtesy. I will offer services in those areas in which I am qualified and will accurately represent those qualifications in both verbal and written communications. When unable or unqualified to fulfill requests for services, I will make every effort to recommend the services of other qualified organizers and/or other qualified professionals.
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I will advertise my services in an honest manner and will represent the organizing profession accurately. I will keep confidential all client information, both business and personal, including that which may be revealed by other organizers. I will use proprietary client information only with the client’s permission. I will keep client information confidential and not use it to benefit myself or my firm, or reveal this information to others. I will decide independently and communicate to my client in advance my fees and expenses and will charge fees and expenses that I deem reasonable, legitimate, and commensurate with my experience, the services I deliver, and the responsibility I accept. I will make recommendations for products and services with my client’s best interests in mind. I will seek and maintain an equitable, honorable, and cooperative association with other NAPO members and will treat them with respect and courtesy. I will respect the intellectual property rights (materials, titles, and thematic creations) of my colleagues, and other firms and individuals, and will not use proprietary information or methodologies without permission. I will act and speak on a high professional level so as not to bring discredit to the organizing profession.



• •



• •





MARKET ANALYSIS
Americans have been taking on more demands and commitments in their work and personal lives but have gained no extra time to deal with them. The result is an everyday environment of chaos and clutter that robs people of precious time and induces even more stress than already present due to overbooked schedules and, sometimes, just too much stuff. The professional organizing industry was created to help these people bring peace and order to their lives. Several studies have illustrated the need for professional organizing services in America. For example:


A 2008 study by NAPO showed that 55 percent of respondents would save 16 minutes to 1 hour a day—or two to 15 days a year—if they were more organized. A recent Real Simple magazine survey showed that women waste an average of 55 minutes a day looking for things they know they have but can’t find. The Small Business Administration reported that 80 percent of papers that are filed are never looked at again. The life of the average American is becoming more, not less, complicated, which sets the stage for major growth in the professional organizing industry.







Our market consists of upper–middle and upper–class families, specifically women, in Columbia and surrounding areas. Columbia’s population grew from 69,000 in 1990 to approximately 94,000 in 2007. The population of Boone County, which includes the towns of Ashland, Centralia, and Hallsville, is around 146,000. The median household income of Columbia residents is $42,163, with a race distribution of 83 percent White, 9 percent Black, and 8 percent other. Fifteen percent of the Boone County population has an annual income of $100,000 or more. Many professional organizers choose to specialize in one or more areas. Common areas of specialty include home offices, closets, garages, children’s spaces, and business offices, as well as packing and
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moving. Break Free Organizing focuses on helping women, usually with children, and the major living areas in their homes—entryways, bedrooms, kitchens, and living areas, While the ideal goal for people may be to have their entire house organized, right down to the last closet, we try to help those people who are far from that, people who can’t get out the door in the morning because they can’t find their car keys or because the kids can’t find their homework or their shoes. These are the people we seek to serve.

Competition Only a handful of professional organizers operate out of Columbia, Missouri, and little information is available about their services. An online search brings up only three local businesses: Organization Plus and Packed, Stacked & Labeled; and Organize It. . .One Room at a Time. Closets by Design advertises as an organization service but focuses on closet storage and the sale and installation of their high–end storage units.

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY
According to the NAPO, a good professional organizer has the following characteristics:
• • • • • • • • • • • •

Ability to ask the right questions to understand what a client wants and needs Ability to listen and infer what a client means Ability to customize organizational systems to meet client needs Ability to teach and transfer basic organizing skills Ability to visualize spatially and see the big picture Ability to break goals down into manageable steps Ability to categorize and plan ahead Ability to use technology to support organizing efforts Physical and mental endurance Compassion Responsibility Professionalism

Julie McDonald has all of these characteristics, as well as a bachelor of arts degree in business from the University of Missouri. She was employed as an administrative assistant at two different University Physicians clinics for eight years. During that time, Julie dealt with people on a daily basis and learned to be diplomatic, trustworthy, and efficient. All of these characteristics are important attributes of a good professional organizer. Diplomacy and trustworthiness are especially vital. Many people who invite professional organizers into their homes are embarrassed about their living situation, and the organizer must be able to coach and help the person without being judgmental or critical. Julie has these skills as well as the business acumen to manage the financial and record–keeping aspects of the position.

Professional and Advisory Support Julie is a member of the National Association for Professional Organizers (NAPO), which provides educational and business resources for the industry. She is working on becoming certified by the organization, and expects to complete the requirements for the certification by June 2009. In addition, Julie has taken several classes offered by NAPO, including PO–001T: Introduction to Professional Organizing, PO–101T: Starting an Organizing Business, and PO–102T: Fundamental Organizing Principles.
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BUSINESS STRATEGY
Professional organizing is a service industry. Our aim is not to sell products but to provide services to clients who need them. Although some industries must advertise to convince customers that they need the service that they provide, professional organizers must advertise to convince customers that their business is the best one to provide the services the clients already knows he or she needs. In other words, it is not difficult to convince a overworked and harried working mother that she needs to get organized—and help doing it; the objective is to convince her that (a) Break Free Organizing is the best place to find that help, and (b) it will be well worth the money she invests. Once we have a client, our goal is to provide what he or she needs and wants in a timely, affordable, and professional manner.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES Break Free Organizing adheres to standards set by the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO). According to the NAPO website, ‘‘A professional organizer enhances the lives of clients by designing custom organizing systems and processes and by transferring organizing skills. A professional organizer also educates the public on organizing solutions and the resulting benefits.’’ Pricing The fees for services provided by Break Free Organizing are based on a per–hour cost. Nationwide, professional organizers charge anywhere from $40 an hour to $200 an hour, according to NAPO. Based on the demographics of Columbia, Missouri, rates for services provided by Break Free Organizing will be $75 an hour. This includes time spent working in the client’s home as well as meeting with the client and completing necessary paperwork and/or prepatory work.

MARKETING & SALES
Advertising The main means of promotion of the business will be a website, brochures, and advertising in the local media, including the monthly ‘‘door mail’’ packet, which is delivered to homes throughout Columbia, and the local newspaper, the Columbia Daily Tribune. We will also run an ad in the CenturyTel yellow pages. Word of mouth will become a major form of advertising once clients use the services and pass the information along to their friends and family. Cost The cost for the Yellow Page ad is $500 twice a year. Fees for advertising in door mail run approximately $100 a month. We will print 200 brochures twice a year at a cost of 50 cents per brochure. The cost of the website is minimal at approximately $100 a year.

OPERATIONS
Customers Our target customers are women ages 25 to 50 who still have children living at home. Average household income of target customers is $100,000 and up. According to current demographics, this constitutes approximately 15 percent of the population of Columbia, or 14,100 individuals. Hours Break Free Organizing will operate on an appointment basis. The business phone will ring in the owner’s home and be answered 24/7 by a person or an answering machine.
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Services The basic procedure is as follows: After a potential client contacts Julie, she meets with the client in his or her home and together they devise a plan of action. Julie then creates a contract that specifies exactly what services she will perform and the estimated cost. After the contract is finalized and signed, Julie and the client agree on a time when Julie will arrive for the first appointment and any following appointments if necessary. Jobs may last anywhere from a couple of hours for one room to several days for an entire house.
A sample job is illustrated below. Charlene, a wife and mother of two children, ages 8 and 12, calls Julie asking for help getting organized. She is not sure what part of her house needs it the most, but she knows her main problem is getting the kids and herself out the door on time in the morning. She has limited funds for the project. Julie sets up a time to meet Charlene in her home, and at that time Charlene shows Julie the house and answers Julie’s questions about the current situation and what Charlene would like to see happen. Based on her observations and the information Charlene provides her, Julie suggests that organizing the entryway, where the family enters and exists the home, and the adjoining coat closet will provide the family with the most benefits. The area is piled with coats, shoes, paperwork, old phone books, electronics, and many other items that do not ‘‘have a home.’’ When Julie returns at the designated time, she and Charlene together handle each item in the entryway and closet and place it one of three piles: Keep, Give Away, or Throw Away. After they have gone through everything in the area, the Throw Away pile is taken out to the garage, where the trash is collected, and the Give Away is stowed in the back of Charlene’s mini van for transporting to the Salvation Army or other charity. The items in the Keep pile are then sorted into categories, and anything that does not belong in the entryway is put away somewhere else in the house. With only the remaining Keep items left, Charlene and Julie devise a plan for where things will go. Julie suggests an inexpensive table with space for outgoing mail, gloves and hats, keys, cell phones, and other items that the family needs to take out the door with them every day. With Charlene’s approval, Julie purchases and installs the table, and the two of them put away the items that belong there. The coat closet is left open for coats and the vacuum cleaner, which was previously sitting in the dining room because there was no room for it in the closet. Julie also installs hooks for the children’s school backpacks. After three hours, the area is organized and the job done. Julie provides Charlene with a ‘‘reminder’’ sheet that lists what the family must do in order to make the area work efficiently for them. Sometimes this involves changes in behavior or habits, and the reminder sheet is a hard copy that Charlene can use when explaining the new system to her family. Julie then provides an invoice to Charlene for $225, and Charlene writes a check.

Facility and Location Because Julie operates her business out of her home, additional space is not required. All of the paperwork and deskwork is done in Julie’s home office. Legal Environment For protection of herself and her business, Julie carries business insurance through NAPOSure.com. The program is underwritten by the Philadelphia Companies and includes liability and bonding protection.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Start–up costs for the business are minimal and cover only advertising, contracts, and a small amount of storage supplies. Other ongoing expenses would include gas and maintenance on Julie’s vehicle and insurance. For the first year, while she is gaining clients, Julie predicts she will complete 40 hours of work a month. The following year, after she has gained more clients, she expects to work 60 hours a
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month, and the third year, 80. Because Julie expects word of mouth to provide advertising after the first year, she does not expect to increase her adverting costs in years 2 and 3. However, the price of advertising will likely increase by approximately 10 percent each year. Vehicle costs are figured at 25, 27, and 30 cents per mile in year 1, 2, and 3, respectively, with mileage increasing each year (year 1: 3,600 miles; year 2: 4,800 miles; year 3: 6,500 miles). Julie intends to keep her hourly rate at $75 for the first three years.
Professional Organizer 1
2009–2010 Projected income Projected advertising costs Projected vehicle costs Projected insurance costs Profit $36,000 2,500 900 1,200 $31,400 2011–2012 $54,000 2,750 1,296 1,200 $48,754 2013–2014 $72,000 3,025 1,950 1,200 $65,825

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House Cleaning
Mid-Missouri Maid Service

4500 Stonecreek Drive Columbia, Missouri 65201 Kari Lucke
Mid-Missouri Maid Service (MMS) will be a local house cleaning service operating out of Columbia, Missouri.

INTRODUCTION
Executive Summary Mid-Missouri Maid Service (MMS) will be a local house cleaning service operating out of Columbia, Missouri. Owned and operated by Olivia and Scott Jones, MMS will serve upper-middle and upperincome families who own their own home in Columbia, as well as older people who cannot or prefer not to clean their own home. Couples, especially two-income couples with children, are the primary target market, as they tend to have the least amount of time to spend house cleaning. It is not hard to convince such couples that a house cleaning service will benefit them, and MMS’s ability to schedule a cleaning appointment almost immediately after gaining a new client will help those clients feel confident about and happy with their decision to hire MMS. Business Philosophy The philosophy at MMS is that having a clean home improves a family’s quality of life, and Olivia’s goal is to help families realize, both mentally and physically, that condition. Olivia finds great satisfaction in bringing peace of mind and a sense of relief and contentment to people who want a clean house but do not have the time or the inclination to do it themselves. Goals and Objectives • Gain a small client base on which MMS can build in the first three months of business.
• •

Have enough clients within the first year to justify the hiring of two more employees. Earn net revenues of $70,000 the first year of business.

Organization Structure MMS is a sole proprietorship owned and operated by Olivia and Scott Jones. Initially, all cleaning will be done by Olivia and two part-time employees. Scott will handle all accounting and bookkeeping, including payroll and taxes, scheduling, and customer service issues.

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INDUSTRY AND MARKET
Industry Analysis According to American Demographics, about 10 percent of Americans hire someone else to clean their home. In addition, a report released by the Home Cleaning Centers of America (HCCA) in 2007 showed that residential house cleaning has become one of the fastest-growing industries in the country. The industry had $20 billion in annual revenue, and HCCA predicted growth rates of 20 percent per year.
In 2008 the U.S. Census Bureau reported 1.5 million people employed as maid / house cleaners; 29 percent of these were employed by private households. The Census Bureau also predicted a growth rate (14 percent) through 2016. According to the 2009-10 edition of the Occupational Outlook Handbook, ‘‘Much of the growth in these occupations will come from cleaning residential properties. As families become more pressed for time, they increasingly hire cleaning and handyman services to perform a variety of tasks in their homes. Also, as the population ages, older people will need to hire cleaners to help maintain their houses.’’

Competition There are several house cleaning businesses in Columbia, including Merry Maids and numerous individually owned agencies. However, the market is not saturated, and quality of service is an important issue for those looking for cleaning services. Whereas Merry Maids is one of the larger companies in town, it also has had some negative publicity, both locally and nationally. In addition, according to research by the House Cleaning Alliance (www.house-cleaning-alliance.com), people searching for house cleaners on the Internet select business that are classified as ‘‘not a franchise’’ over those who are deemed ‘‘thorough,’’ ‘‘dependable,’’ ‘‘careful,’’ and ‘‘affordable.’’ In other words, according to this report, people prefer a cleaning business that is not a franchise. Also, if they hire a franchise cleaning company, clients can often end up with different people cleaning their house every time, which can result in inconsistency, and franchised workers are trained to follow a set protocol, regardless of individual conditions, which can result in less effective results.
In order to compete with Merry Maids and individually owned business such as Casa Bonita House Cleaning, Tiger Maids, and Housecleaning Specialists, MMS will focus on providing quality services for an affordable price.

PERSONNEL
Management Scott Jones will handle the day-to-day business of MMS, including scheduling appointments, providing estimates, and handling all bookkeeping and other support activities for the cleaning work done by Olivia and the staff. Scott has an associate’s degree in business from Moberly Area Community College and has the knowledge and skills needed to keep the business on track. Olivia is a high school graduate and has worked as a house cleaner for three different companies over the past several years, including Merry Maids, House Cleaning Plus, and Maid for Hire. Staffing Other than Olivia and John, MSS will employ two part-time workers, each of whom will work 20 hours a week. To find these employees, Olivia and John will conduct a thorough search using the local newspaper and online job sites. Because Columbia is home to two four-year colleges and a major state university, the demand for part-time jobs is high, so there should be no lack of applications. The more
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important factor will be the quality of the people Olivia and John choose to hire. They will conduct background and reference checks on all potential employees so as to ensure, as much as possible, that the people they do hire are dependable, trustworthy, and willing and able to do what is required. When a hiring decision is made, employees will receive a detailed job description and sign an agreement stating that their first month of employment is on a probation basis. If during the training period the person is not able to complete the duties as required, he or she will be released from employment, and a new employee will be sought. Olivia will conduct hands-on training. Several people have agreed to let her clean their house at no charge in exchange for using the home as a training ground for the new employees. Each new employee will clean a minimum of two houses with Olivia before he or she is considered ready to go out on a real job. Employees will carry a written checklist with them to each home in order to ensure each job is completed correctly. Employees will be paid $12 an hour, which is a competitive salary for the sector. No insurance or vacation time will be included, as is most common with part-time jobs.

Professional and Advisory Support Because Scott will take care of all accounting and tax issues for the company, the only professional support needed by MMS upfront will be an insurance agent (Patricia Willsmeyer, State Farm) and a lawyer (George Smith, Smith & Johnston Associates), for any legal issues that may arise.

BUSINESS STRATEGY
The strategy for conducting business is as follows: Scott will visit each interested client’s home to gather information needed to provide an estimate and inform the client (via a brochure) of the services that MMS will provide, then he will follow up—within two days—by phone or e-mail with the actual estimate. If the client agrees to use the service, Scott will take the service contract to the client’s home for signing; at the same time, they will set up a schedule of cleaning, based on the customer’s needs. All information will be input into Scott’s computer using the industry-specific software program, Maid Manager Pro 5.0. Olivia will accompany Scott on this home visit so that she can introduce herself to the client and answer any questions about the cleaning process. After a client has been contracted, Olivia and one employee will follow up with the cleaning based on the schedule that has been set up.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
Description MMS will provide residential cleaning services to households in the Columbia area. Basic house cleaning services include dusting furniture and removing cobwebs; sweeping, vacuuming, and/or mopping floors; cleaning and disinfecting bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry rooms; picking up and straightening living areas; and performing other cleaning duties as requested or contracted. Whereas other cleaning services can do the same basic job, MMS will do it consistently (the same people will clean the same homes, even as the business expands) and well. Consistent quality service is vital to keeping customers, and MMS will make this one of the primary focuses of business. Pricing All estimates will be determined by a formula made available through a software program designed specifically for the industry. Scott inputs all factors, including number of bedrooms and bathrooms, square footage,
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number of pets and/or children, and so forth, and the program calculates how long it should take to clean the house. As a baseline, MMS charges $30 an hour. Using the figure gained from the program, Scott can determine an accurate estimate, which then becomes the amount charged to the customer for each cleaning. For example, a typical 2500-square-foot, 3 bedroom/2 bath home housing a family of four would cost $100 to clean. This figure can be adjusted based on customer preferences such as having only certain rooms cleaned, having additional cleaning tasks completed, or other variations. The frequency of cleaning (e.g., biweekly, weekly) also factors into the cost, as more frequent cleaning results in less work each time. MMS pricing is comparable with individually owned competitors and lower than that for franchises such as Merry Maids, which charges approximately $150 for a one-time cleaning of a home with pets and children.

MARKETING AND SALES
Advertising and Promotion MMS will use a web site and brochures as its main forms of advertising. The web site will list services included, reasons to use a cleaning service—as well as reasons to use MMS—and other pertinent information. A photo of Scott, Olivia, and, later, the other employees will be posted to give customers a personal link to the company. Photos will also be used to inspire and convince potential customers that they would benefit from the service. Brochures will contain the same basic information as the web site in a condensed and printed form. Another form of advertising will consist of signs for vehicles, which will be placed on cars driven by Scott, Olivia, and employees.
Word of mouth is considered another form of advertising. As people use MMS’s services and are satisfied, they will recommend the company to friends and family. Word of mouth is considered one of the most effective means of advertising for this type of company.

Cost Advertising costs are expected to be minimal and include approximately $100 for web site fees and $250 a year for brochure printing. Image ‘‘Professional’’ is an important characteristic of a house cleaning company. Sometimes this is a challenge if other local companies have given a different impression. For MMS, professionalism is the number–one focus of image. Quality that is consistent is also key and a characteristic that is hard to find in residential cleaning companies. Finally, price is a part of a company’s image, and MMS will exhibit competitive prices for exceptional service. Focusing on these three factors—professionalism, consistent quality, and value—MMS will build an image that will set them apart from other cleaning companies.

OPERATIONS
Customers According WorkEnders, Inc., people who hire outside cleaning help are typically dual-income households, professional single adults, high-income single-parent families, or affluent empty-nesters or retirees. (The latter category represents a smaller portion of the market in Columbia due to the city’s relatively young population.) Typically, clients range in age from 35 to 65 years old and have household incomes of $75,000 or more annually. The following is a breakdown of the related demographics for Columbia:
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Percentage of population 30% 47% 27%

Characteristic Ages 35 to 65 Homeowners Annual income $75,000 or more

Population 28,200 44,180 25,380

Equipment MMS will provide all cleaning supplies and equipment. Equipment will include vacuum cleaners, buckets, mops, cleaning solutions, rags and sponges, and other necessary cleaning supplies. Hours Cleaning services will be provided Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will be determined by the clients’ needs and schedules. Facility and Location The business will be operated out of the Jones’s home at 4500 Stonecreek Drive, Columbia, Missouri. Legal Environment All employees of MMS will be licensed and bonded.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Initial start-up costs are as follows:
Start-up expenses Equipment Cleaning supplies Office supplies Uniforms Brochures Vehicle signs Computer hardware and software Insurance Business license Total start-up expenses Cost $1000 $ 250 $ 250 $ 100 $ 250 $ 100 $ 500 $ 200 $ 100 $2750

Funding for start-up costs will be provided by money from a personal savings account.
First year monthly expenses Cleaning supplies Office supplies Salaries Vehicle costs Insurance Other Total monthly expenses, first year Cost $ 100 $ 50 $1920 $ 200 $ 50 $ 100 $2420

Estimated incomes are based on low figures using the average cost of $100 per cleaning.
No. houses cleaned weekly 5 10 15 No. houses cleaned biweekly 15 20 25 No. houses one-time clean 5 10 15 Total no. houses/ cleanings per year 25 / 710 40 / 1160 55 / 1550 Total net income $ 71,000 $116,000 $155,000 Total gross income $ 49,700 $ 81,200 $108,500

Year Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

Minus taxes $21,300 $34,800 $46,500

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Ice Cream Parlor
SonnyScoops

725 Shore Dr. Brooks Falls, Minnesota 55008 Paul Greenland
SonnyScoops is a popular ice cream shop in Brooks Falls, Minnesota.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview SonnyScoops is a popular ice cream shop in Brooks Falls, Minnesota.
In 2009, Paul Richardson agreed to acquire an existing ice cream retail business in Brooks Falls, Minnesota, named SonnyScoops, which has been in business for 22 years. Its well-known owner, Sonny Massari, is selling the business due to retirement. SonnyScoops is a fixture in Brooks Falls. Located across from Sandy Beach on the shores of Silver Lake, this ice cream shop is very popular with tourists and locals alike during the summer months. Although sales are strongest during the summer, SonnyScoops enjoys an established customer base year-round. In addition to its location across from a popular beach, the ice cream shop is one block away from an elementary school, a middle school, and a high school. In addition, it also is within close geographic proximity to two popular parks, as well as a youth/community center.

Business Philosophy SonnyScoops is the destination of choice for the coolest treats in town. Our commitment to our customers means providing quality ice cream and frozen desserts in a fun, family-friendly environment.

MARKET ANALYSIS
The town of Brooks Falls, Minnesota, is located northwest of Minneapolis, near the town of Brainerd. The area includes many lakes and resorts that attract tourists for fishing, camping, biking, swimming, boating, and more. In 2002 a new competitor named Buster’s Ice Cream Palace opened its doors several blocks away. However, because of its better location and established reputation, the impact on SonnyScoops’ market share was minimal. Difficult economic conditions ultimately forced this primary competitor to close its doors midway through the summer 2008 season. In 2010, Paul Richardson plans to further strengthen
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SonnyScoops’ position of market leadership by expanding the business’ product selection and sales reach (via the addition of mobile operations). Other competition comes from established national franchises such as Dairy Queen and McDonald’s. Once again, our geographic location serves us well in this regard, because Dairy Queen is located 1/2 mile from our establishment. McDonald’s is only two blocks away, however, putting that restaurant within easy walking distance from the beach and other popular locations. For consumers in search of food and dessert, this puts us at a slight disadvantage.

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
Manufacturers and distributors in our industry are represented by the International Ice Cream Association, which recognizes National Ice Cream Month in July. According to the association, the U.S. ice cream industry generates more than $21 billion in sales each year, and uses approximately 9 percent of the milk produced by the nation’s dairy farmers. According to data from the National Restaurant Association (NRA), the restaurant industry had sales of $566 billion in 2009. A leading private-sector employer, the industry provided jobs for approximately 13 million people who worked at about 945,000 locations that year. Our establishment is part of the Retail, Vending, Recreation, Mobile segment of the industry, which generated sales of $52.9 billion in 2009.

PERSONNEL
Management SonnyScoops is owned and managed by Paul Richardson, a retired schoolteacher from St. Paul, Minnesota. Prior to establishing SonnyScoops, Richardson operated a mobile ice cream business for eight years in the Twin Cities. This was the perfect business opportunity during the summer months when he wasn’t teaching school. Richardson has owned a vacation property in Brooks Falls for 15 years. The opportunity to purchase SonnyScoops dovetailed nicely with his experience in the ice cream business and plans to relocate permanently to Brooks Falls.
Richardson will be assisted by his wife, Jane, who has seven years of retail management experience. Most recently, she managed a local concession business at an indoor sports complex in the Twin Cities.

Staffing In addition to the Richardsons, SonnyScoops will employ a staff of four part-time employees. Professional and Advisory Support SonnyScoops has retained the local accounting firm of Lane & Heller to assist us with bookkeeping and tax responsibilities.
Commercial checking accounts have been established with Brooks Falls Bank, a local bank that also is providing us with partial financing. Brooks Falls Bank also has assisted us with the establishment of merchant accounts, so that we are able to accept credit card and debit card payments.

GROWTH STRATEGY
SonnyScoops has historically offered 24 flavors of ice cream, as well as a limited selection of novelties. Moving forward, Paul Richardson has plans to double the business’ selection of ice cream products and
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novelties, add a wide selection of water ice, and add a mobile sales operation consisting of a portable ice cream cart and an ice cream truck. The new mobile operations will allow the business to capitalize on additional sales from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Specifically, the ice cream cart will offer novelties and a limited selection of ice cream at a nearby soccer field. The ice cream truck will frequent three nearby subdivisions, as well as a beach on the other side of the lake.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Beginning with the 2010 summer season, SonnyScoops will offer the following expanded lineup of ice cream and other frozen desserts: Ice Cream & Sherbet Banana Banana Fudge Banana Split Banana Strawberry Black Raspberry Black Raspberry Sherbet Blue Moon Butter Almond Butter Pecan Butterfinger Butterscotch Cherry Vanilla Chocolate Chocolate Chip Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Chocolate Macadamia Nut Chocolate Peanut Butter Coconut Fudge Coffee Cookies & Cream Double Chocolate Double Oreo French Vanilla Grasshopper Heath Bar Crunch Lemon Sherbet
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Lime Sherbet M&M Mint Chocolate Chip Mocha Chocolate Chip Mud Pie Orange Creamy Orange Sherbet Peach Peanut Butter Cup Fudge Peppermint Stick Pistachio Pralines & Cream Rainbow Sherbet Rice Krispy Treat Rocky Road Snicker Doodle Strawberry Vanilla Vanilla Chocolate Chip Vanilla Fudge Vanilla Peanut Butter Cup White Chocolate Raspberry Ices Banana Black Cherry Black Raspberry Blue Raspberry Bubble Gum Cherry Chocolate Coconut Cotton Candy Grape Lemon Lime Mango Orange
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Orange Creamy Passion Fruit Peach Pina Colada Pineapple Rootbeer Red Raspberry Sour Apple Strawberry Strawberry Kiwi Strawberry Lemonade Tangerine Vanilla Watermelon Novelties Creamsicles Fudgesicles Popsicles Klondike Bars Dove Bars Snicker Bars Rocket Push-Ups Ice Cream Sandwiches Vanilla Ice Cream Bar Chocolate Ice Cream Bar Strawberry Shortcake Stick Vanilla Ice Cream Cup Chocolate Ice Cream Cup Strawberry Ice Cream Cup Sugar-Free Ice Cream Cups

MARKETING & SALES
A comprehensive marketing plan has been developed for SonnyScoops. The plan includes both short-term and ongoing tactics.
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Short-Term Tactics In the short-term, a number of promotions and activities are planned around the re-launch of the business in the summer of 2010. Specifically, we will host three ‘‘Free Ice Cream Day’’ events during the Memorial Day, Fourth Of July, and Labor Day holiday weekends. This will allow us to get maximum exposure during peak tourist weekends. Each weekend (on Friday and Saturday), we will offer free junior-size, single-scoop servings of all our ice cream flavors from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Moving forward, we will offer the same promotion every year on the Fourth of July weekend, budget permitting.
In addition, during our first year of operations, we will pass out a limited number of coupons for free one-scoop ice cream cones. Distribution will occur on Sandy Beach, in an effort to generate additional foot traffic to our business. As with the ‘‘Free Ice Cream Day’’ promotion, we may continue this tactic if it proves to be a cost-effective means of increasing our customer base.

Ongoing Tactics We plan to use certain marketing tactics on a regular basis to promote our business. These include the following.
Radio Advertising—During the summer, SonnyScoops will advertise with our market’s Top 40 radio station, which has a strong listener base and is broadcast daily at Sandy Beach. We plan to offer regular on-promotions to drive foot traffic to our business during times of the day that are typically slow. Event Marketing—Each year, SonnyScoops will host monthly beach volleyball tournaments at Sandy Beach. Print Advertising—There are two main newspapers in our market: the Brooks Falls Gazette and the Sandy Beach Shopper. SonnyScoops will run regular advertisements in both publications, in order to promote weekly specials. In addition, we will offer occasional buy-one-get-one-free coupons during periods when business is slow.

OPERATIONS
Suppliers SonnyScoops will purchase its products from several suppliers. The bulk of our ice cream and sherbet will be purchased from Nick & Cody Ice Cream Corp., allowing us to offer the popular Nick & Cody’s brand.
In addition, we will acquire the supplies needed for our ice water frozen desserts, as well as novelties, from one of the three following regional suppliers:
• • •

Martial Distribution Peterson Foods GDC Corp.

Hours SonnyScoops will operate seven days a week, Memorial Day through Labor Day, from noon to 10:00 p.m. Throughout the rest of the year, we will close at 5:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and at 9:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. We will be closed on Sundays. Facility and Location SonnyScoops is located in a 1,000-square-foot storefront at 725 Shore Dr. For its first five years of operations, Paul Richardson has agreed to lease the storefront from the previous owner, Sonny Massari.
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Equipment Although much of the equipment needed to operate the restaurant is already present, approximately $21,300 in capital purchases will be needed before we are ready for business, including the following expenses, as noted below.
To expand our product lineup, we will need to purchase three additional 12-bucket ice cream display cases at a cost of $3,000 each. There also will be costs for adding mobile operations to the business. Purchased at a cost of $1,800, the ice cream cart consists of a 7-cubic-foot electric freezer with a battery life of 10 hours. The ice cream truck is a 2003 Ford E150, purchased at a cost of $10,500. It includes a high-top roof, 20cubic-foot freezer, digital music system with speaker and microphone, Plexiglas slide windows and serving shelf, a five-foot canopy, as well as a menu display.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Following are projected figures for our first year of operations.
Sales Ice cream Ice water Novelties Total sales $ 63,067 $ 17,520 $13,728 $94,315

Pro Forma Profit & Loss
Sales Total cost of sales Gross margin Expenses Payroll Sales and marketing Utilities Vehicle Business loan Insurance Rent Total operating expenses Net profit $ 35,000 $ 8,520 $ 4,300 $ 4,500 $ 5,000 $ 750 $ 6,500 $ 64,570 ($ 4,157) $ 94,315 $ 33,901 $ 60,413

Based on our best estimate, we expect our net profit to increase at a compound annual rate of 7 percent through 2014. We expect to break even during our third year of operations. Financing for SonnyScoops will consist of a $40,000 commercial loan from Brooks Falls Bank, which also has agreed to supply us with a $15,000 line of credit. In addition, Owner/Manager Paul Richardson is providing $30,000 from his personal savings.

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Nature Photography Business
S h u t t e r b u g s I n c.

24 Williams St. North Appleton, Wisconsin 54296 Paul Greenland
Shutterbugs is a nature photography business specializing in macro or close-up photography.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview Shutterbugs is a nature photography business specializing in macro or close-up photography. Our specialty includes photographing insects, arachnids, and unique textures found on objects like seeds, fruit, and leaves. We sell photographs to a variety of customers, including magazines, book publishers, stock photography agencies, and museums.
Incorporated in the state of Wisconsin, Shutterbugs is owned by photographer Jeff Thomas. Prior to starting his own photography business, Thomas spent 15 years working as an in-house photographer for a large corporation. Convinced that his prospects for success as a nature photographer are very good, Thomas has decided to pursue nature photography on a full-time basis by establishing Shutterbugs.

MARKET ANALYSIS
According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were approximately 122,000 photographers employed in 2006. Of these, half were self-employed. The majority of these photographers worked for advertising agencies, commercial and portrait photography studios, newspapers, and magazines. Based on this information, it is reasonable to assume that the number of professional nature photographers is comparatively small. Although the playing field may be somewhat smaller than in other areas of photography, Shutterbugs’ competitors hail from all corners of the world. The advent of digital photography has made it much easier for individuals to enter the field and submit their work electronically. Focusing on macro photography and specializing in arachnids and insects provides Shutterbugs with key differentials that set us apart from other nature photographers. In the photography business, individuality is highly prized, and unique photos are more important to editors and than a photographer’s educational background or professional designations. Because magazine editors, book publishers, stock photography agencies, and museums have purchased photographs
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from Thomas on a regular basis over the past five years, he has developed a reputation for his work and is confident that he has a strong foothold in a competitive market.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Nature Photography After completing photo shoots that may result in hundreds or thousands of images, Thomas selects the very best ones, performs photo editing, and uploads them to his digital portfolio, which current and prospective customers can access for viewing.
In addition, certain images may be submitted to photo stock agencies, which resell them and provide Thomas with royalty income that varies depending on how the images are used. For example, he receives larger royalties if an image is used on a book cover, as opposed to being used as a small thumbnail image in a magazine article. Although Thomas sometimes works on assignment, he normally pursues photo shoots on his own and populates his portfolio with a steady stream of new images. Broad subject categories include:
• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Amphibians Arachnids Crustaceans Earth Fruit Ice & Snow Insects Mammals Plants Reptiles Rocks & Sand Trees Water

Within each broad category, there are numerous sub-categories. Because arachnids and insects are Shutterbugs’ specialty, the number of images that customers can choose from is quite large. Examples of the types of arachnids we have photographed include:
• • • • • • • •

Garden Spiders Jumping Spiders Golden Silk Orb Weaver (Banana Spider) Ghost Spiders Lynx Spiders Sheet-web Weavers Hacklemesh Weavers Wolf Spiders
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Examples of the types of insects we have photographed include:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American Plum Borers Ants Aphids Armyworms Asiatic Garden Beetles Asiatic Oak Weevils Aster Leafhoppers Bagworms Bark Beetles Beet Webworms Billbugs Black Cherry Aphids Blister Beetles Boxelder Bugs Butterflies Caterpillars Cherry Fruitworms Colorado Potato Beetles Douglas Fir Bark Beetles Eastern Tent Caterpillars Elm Leaf Beetles Flies Harvestmen (daddy long legs) Japanese Beetles Leafhoppers Locusts Mexican Bean Beetles Millipedes Mosquitos Moths Red-banded Leaf Rollers Springtails Stink Bugs Weevils Willow Galls Wireworms
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Commercial Photography Shutterbugs performs commercial photography on a periodic basis to Jeff Thomas’ former employer. At this time, the business does not pursue commercial assignments from other parties. Classes & Workshops In addition to teaching nature photography courses at a local community college, Shutterbugs will host classroom and field-based macro photography workshops for small groups of both aspiring and experienced nature photographers. Offered four times per year, these will be offered at one of three forest preserves in Wisconsin.

OPERATIONS
Location and Facilities Jeff Thomas lives in a rural area, which provides ample opportunities for photographing various subjects in nature without having to travel. Even so, Thomas travels throughout the United States in search of specific photography subjects.
Thomas has devoted an existing outbuilding on his property to Shutterbugs. The building includes a loft where he will perform photo editing and perform general business tasks. The main level of the building includes a small space for classroom instruction, as well as an area for performing macro photography. The remainder of the main level space is devoted to equipment and gear storage.

Special Equipment Over the course of his career, Jeff Thomas has amassed much of the equipment needed for his business. However, additional equipment and supplies will need to be purchased. Important items include outdoor gear such as:
• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Snowshoes Windproof/Waterproof Clothing Head Gear Hand Warmer Packets Umbrellas Headlamps Bug Repellent Sunscreen Screen Bug Hat Hiking Boots Winter Boots Backpacks Ski Poles

New photography equipment that must be purchased includes:
• • •

Camera Bodies Lenses Tripods
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• • • • •

Lens Reversing Attachment Reflectors Flash Memory Cards Batteries Filters

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Following is an estimated three-year balance sheet for shutterbugs:
Income Commercial photography Education & instruction Royalties Licensing Total income Expenses Marketing Photography supplies Miscellaneous Office supplies Legal Accounting Photography equipment Computer technology/software Utilities Automotive Fuel Meals Salary Outdoor apparel/gear Health & liability insurance Total expenses Net income $ 2,000 $ 1,000 $ 500 $ 300 $ 750 $ 400 $ 8,500 $ 2,000 $ 1,400 $ 2,500 $ 6,500 $ 3,500 $30,000 $ 3,500 $12,000 $74,850 $ 150 $ 1,500 $ 1,500 $ 1,000 $ 300 $ 1,000 $ 450 $ 5,500 $ 1,000 $ 1,600 $ 3,500 $ 8,500 $ 4,000 $ 55,000 $ 1,000 $ 14,000 $ 99,850 $ 6,650 $ 1,500 $ 1,750 $ 1,000 $ 300 $ 1,500 $ 500 $ 5,500 $ 1,000 $ 1,800 $ 4,500 $ 9,500 $ 4,500 $ 65,000 $ 1,500 $ 16,000 $115,850 $ 4,850 2010 $25,000 $10,000 $14,500 $25,500 $75,000 $ $ $ $ 2011 27,500 10,500 23,500 45,000 $ $ $ $ 2012 28,500 11,000 26,200 55,000

$106,500

$120,700

The owners’ investment is $25,000, which will provide a financial cushion during the first year of operations. The business will essentially break even during its first year, and turn a modest profit in years two and three.

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY
Shutterbugs is owned by photographer Jeff Thomas. Prior to starting his own photography business, Thomas spent 15 years working as an in-house photographer for a large corporation. In that role, he photographed everything from architecture and machinery to products and people. In particular, he developed special expertise photographing very small machine components. Nature photography has always been Thomas’ true passion. Recently, he celebrated the publication of Small World, a coffee table book featuring a collection of close-up pictures taken over a period of five years. Based on the success of that project, his publisher contracted him to compile a similar book called Along Came the Spiders. Convinced that his prospects for success are very good, Thomas has decided to pursue nature photography on a full-time basis by establishing Shutterbugs. His former employer has retained him on a freelance basis,
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providing a steady stream of project work. In addition, he has been hired to teach nature photography classes at a local community college. Together, this situation will provide him with enough work to generate a steady stream of income while putting more effort toward nature photography.

MARKETING & SALES
Shutterbugs will generate new business by continually pitching samples of Jeff Thomas’ work to prospective customers. A brief but high-impact proposal, consisting of a query letter and a four-color sample sheet, will be developed and used for reaching out to museums, nature magazines, and book publishers. The proposal will include instructions for accessing our online portfolio. In addition, Shutterbugs will continuously submit new images to leading stock image libraries, which will allow our business to generate a regular stream of income. In keeping with our marketing strategy, the following advertising budget has been established:
• •

Query Letters & Proposals—$500 annually Web Site/Online Portfolio—$1,500 annually

SWOT ANALYSIS
Business Feasibility & SWOT Analysis • Strengths: Shutterbugs will begin operations with a solid base of initial contacts, as well as a steady stream of work from Jeff Thomas’ former employer.


Weaknesses: Although macro photography and our focus on insects and spiders is a key differential, it also significantly limits the types of photography we offer and the assignments we work on. Opportunities: There always is a strong market for exceptionally unique photographs, which we have a strong reputation for. By devoting more time to nature photography, our foothold within this market niche will only become stronger. Threats: The success of Shutterbugs rests solely upon the shoulders of Jeff Thomas. In the event of an injury or illness, of which there is an increased risk (due to the dangerous environments in which he sometimes has to work), no other employees exist to generate income for the business.





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Online Party–Planning Company
Theme Party in a Box

140 Eastminster Ln. Riverhead, New York 11901 Laura Becker
Theme Party in a Box will provide website access to all–in–one theme parties for children. Everything that is needed for the party is sent by mail directly to a home. During difficult economic times, these parties will be cost–efficient and time–saving.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Theme Party in a Box (TPB) offers everything someone would need to throw a birthday party for a child aged 1–12. The objective is to provide every element of the party in one box so that a parent can efficiently and inexpensively hold a child’s party at home. It is one–stop–shopping from a website. The customer picks a theme, and orders a box that comes with everything needed for a party. This includes costumes, decorations, paper goods, games/activities/crafts, a shopping list for themed foods, and party favors at a low cost. Instructional photos and step–by–step directions are included to guide the customer through each step of the party. The Theme Party in a Box website also provides instructional videos of actual parties with each theme. As the business grows, the owner hopes to provide live chat capability to answer questions and make suggestions.

Market Analysis Until the recent economic downturn, celebrating a child’s birthday became almost a competitive sport for many parents. ‘‘Celebrating a child’s birthday has evolved into something much larger than blowing out candles on a cake. Especially, it seems, in New York, there are particular pressures that have made the event a revealing challenge to the ingenuity and social skills of parent and child, and sometimes to their entire relationship. Many children here grow accustomed by the age of 3 to having 10 or 20 of their closest friends gather for cake and favors, at the very least, and often additional attractions, from a singing clown to a tuxedo–clad magician at part of a gymnasium or museum set aside for them, if not the Plaza or a double–decker bus. Fanned by the 80’s wave of conspicuous consumption, the latest generation’s parties tend to be ornate, intense and expensive: $200 for the magician or clown, $100 for a party room somewhere, as much as $200 for a cake. (‘‘The Birthday Boom,’’ New York Times, January 22, 1995).
‘‘There is a keeping–up–with–the–Joneses mentality,’’ said children’s party planner Leesa Zelken of Santa Monica, California–based Send in the Clowns. ‘‘(Parents) tell me, ‘I need to do more. I want to do it better’,’’ than their neighbors. (Melinda Fulmer, MSN, Money, http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/ CollegeAndFamily/RaiseKids/KidsPartiesatSpareNoExpensePrices.aspx)
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According to Hallmark, Americans spend more than $10 billion a year on birthday gifts. On birthday parties themselves, parents spend billions more. (Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, February 2008, http://www.abagmd.org) In ‘‘Children‘s Birthday Parties in Contemporary America’’ (Nanzan Review of American Studies, Volume 23 (2001): 83–91, Yasue Kuwahara) the author makes clear that after reviewing results from two questionnaires sent to parents that children’s birthday parties have become competitive for parents and are a new form of ‘‘conspicuous consumption.’’ In other cultures, birthday parties are about the children, but recently in the United States the parties are about the parents showing off their wealth. Parents can spend up to $1,000 for a party at a local party franchise such as a gym, bowling alley, claymaking studio, dance studio, etc. Traditionally there are a lot of options for children’s birthday parties including holding the party outside of the home at a location such as a children’s gym, movie theater, bowling alley, etc. These options can cost up to $1,000 for an average party. If parents choose to hold a birthday party in the home they have many party places they can purchase items from, including various web sites (i.e. www.orientaltrading.com; www.partysupplydirect, www.partycity.com) and party retail locations such as Party City.

Recession During the economic downturn, many parents are looking for alternatives. It is possible to provide parents with the same convenience of have a one–stop–shopping location and service, by sending them everything they need in one simple, easy–to–use box at a low cost—approximately $150. More and more people are going back to the idea of the ‘‘old–fashioned party.’’
‘‘The days of over–the–top, birthday party ideas for kids are over. With increasing prices and income staying steady, parents need to find ways to throw their kids affordable birthday parties.’’ www.associatedcontent.com, July, 2008, ‘‘How to Throw a Free Birthday Party for Kids That’s Still Fun’’). There is currently no one–stop web site that offers everything a parent needs to host a child’s birthday party at a reasonable all–in–one price. Thus, came the idea for Theme Party in a Box.

COMPETITION
There is currently one company in the United States offering a similar service, although not identical. The company offers a web site located at www.birthdayinabox.com. However, this website only provides pieces of the puzzle, such as decorations, party supplies, etc. It is not an all–inclusive service. There are only a few web sites offering party planning from start to finish—but none are as inclusive as the Theme Party in a Box.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES
Customers will visit the web site located at www.themepartyinabox.com. All a customer needs to do is choose the theme for the party. Once chosen, the customer will receive a box with everything included for a party, such as: 1. 2. 3.
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4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Theme costumes Face paint supplies Tattoos Paper goods including plates, utensils, cups, napkins Decorations including table centerpiece, tablecloth Balloons Party Door/Street Sign Games/Activities with step–by–step instructions Instructional video/photos Themed food shopping list Birthday cake decorations

BUSINESS STRATEGY
• • • •

Start creating inventory for the business Need to source party materials at lowest cost possible Party Themes—Establish themes for boys and girls for different age ranges between 1 and 12. Design user–friendly, easy–to–use web site with search categories including theme, age, girl/boy, etc.

EXAMPLE: THEME PARTY IN A BOX–PIZZA PARTY
Age recommendation: 5 and up

Pizza Party Supplies • 8 invitations: $1.99
• • • • • • • •

20 red paper plates: $4.99 24 red plastic forks: $1.79 20 12–ounce red cups: $1.99 50 red napkins: $1.59 1 red tablecloth: $1.59 Pizza Sticks: $1.45/4 sheets 18 balloons in pizza colors (red, yellow, lime green): $2.69 Total $18.08

Food Supplies The total cost for pizza is $3/pizza, including premade dough, tomato sauce and toppings. Per party, the totoal cost of food is $35, which includes both the pizzas and cake ingredients. Party Favors Assuming 8 children per party, the cost of party favors will be approxsimately $15 per party.
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Pizza Party Games and Activities
Toss Dough Like Pro Divide the kids into pairs. Give each pair a ball of dough and challenge them to toss the dough just like a real pizza chef. Have the kids form two lines with teammates facing each other. Toss the ball of dough between the teammates, and after each toss, have them take a step backward. When a team drops the dough, they are out. I’m Making a Pizza Game Players form a circle and take turns saying: ‘‘I’m making a pizza and it will have (fill in blank).’’ The first person fills in the blank with an item for their pizza like anchovies, cheese, etc. Then the next person says, ‘‘I’m making a pizza and it will have blank,’’ repeat what the first person said, and add an item. When a player forgets an item previously named, he/she is out of the game. The game is over when all players have had a turn. Or, you can keep going around, and as players forget items, the circle will get smaller and the game ends when only one player is left. Pizza Box Folding Purchase several unfolded pizza boxes from a local pizzeria. Divide the kids into teams and give each team an equal amount of boxes. The object of the game is to be the first team to get all of their boxes folded, in the shortest amount of time, with only one teammate folding at a time. Dough Boy Inflate small round balloons. Divide children into teams of 3–5 children. Each team will designate a member to be its ‘‘Dough Boy.’’ Divide the balloons equally between the teams. Each Dough Boy pulls on an adult–sized sweatshirt and sweatpants over his/her clothes. When you say ‘‘Go,’’ each team has two minutes to try to stuff as many balloons into their Dough Boy’s clothes as possible. When the time expires, remove the balloons from each Dough Boy one at a time, counting to determine which team had the most balloons stuffed in their Dough Boy. Categories The children sit on the floor in a circle. One person is chosen as the leader. The leader begins by selecting a category such as ‘‘types of dessert’’ or ‘‘things in a kitchen.’’ He/she starts a slap, clap, snap rhythm by slapping his/her knees twice, clapping twice and snapping his/her fingers twice. Everyone joins in the rhythm. The leader then says one category item such as ‘‘ice cream.’’ Play continues clockwise, moving to the leader’s left. Play continues until someone is unable to think of an item, misses the beat, or repeats what someone else already said. When someone misses, that player can begin a new category. For a more competitive game, the person that misses can be eliminated. Continue until you have one winner.

Baking
Make and Bake Now it’s time for the kids to really make and enjoy their own pizza. You may want to purchase prepared pizza dough from a supermarket, or use ‘‘Boboli’’ pizza crusts. You’ll need standard toppings: cheese, sauces, pepperoni, onions, olives etc. Have the children knead dough, then put it in a bowl and let it sit for about one hour. This will allow the dough to rise. Have the children ‘‘punch’’ down the dough to get any air out. Roll the dough (coat the rolling pin and surface with flour). Have the children add tomato sauce to the dough and spread it around the surface. Have different pizza toppings laid out in bowls so the children can choose what they want to add (mozzarella cheese, pepperoni, peppers, mushrooms, meatballs, etc.). The best way to cook pizza at home is on a pizza stone, which can be purchased at any kitchen or home goods store. Heat the pizza stone for about 20 minutes at 425 degrees. Put the pizza in the oven and let it cook at 425 degrees for 15 or 20 minutes. You will know it is done when the cheese starts to bubble and turn brown.
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The above pizza can also be made with already prepared pizza dough bought from a supermarket or local pizzeria. Parents can also use ‘‘Boboli’’ pizza crusts, or substitute pizza bagels. Pizza Cake Bake a 12–14 inch round yellow sheet cake (made in a cake or pizza pan). Top with red frosting not quite to the edge of the cake (sauce). Top with white chocolate chips (cheese), strawberries, blueberries, kiwi, etc. Place the cake into a real pizza box with the lid propped open.

Arts and Crafts
Decorator Chefs Use fabric markers and smocks, white chef’s hats, oven mitts, or aprons. Have each child use fabric markers to decorate his/her own chef items to take home. Suggestions for decorating include: having each child draw his/her name, favorite food items, kitchen utensils, names of spices and restaurant logos.

Party Favors Provide goody bags with candy and pizza stickers. Children will also take home their decorated pizza boxes and chef hats/aprons, etc.

OPERATIONS
Web Site Objectives
• •

Design a Website Create user–friendly, bright, fun pages that are easily searchable by categories such as: Age of Child; Party Themes; Girl/Boy Put instructional video on website—password protected. Once customer pays, gets access to step–by– step instructions.



Web site design can be done either by the business owner—after learning some html coding—or by hiring a design firm. Web design firms would be able to get a website like this started for approximately $5,000–$10,000. Search Engine Optimization A significant percentage (approximately 85 percent) of website traffic comes from search engines, so it is important to consider this in website development. There are ways to increase website traffic such as submitting your site to search engines; and advertising techniques that will trigger your ad by keyword and highlight your listing above the rest. The Google web site has many helpful programs for small business owners for ad placement and ranking results, etc. Monthly Hosting There will be a monthly fee of approximately $30 for hosting the website. Customer Support The owner can set up a toll free phone number that will be directed to the owner’s home/office phone. Typical services cost a little as $9.95 per month, and include such things as:
• • • •

One Toll Free or Local Number 100 Call Minutes Unlimited Extensions (sales department, accounts department, etc.) Month–to–month service
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FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Product Pricing The business owner would take into account the cost of the party supplies described above and estimate the sales volume for the first three years. The cost of the web site development and customer support must also be considered.
Average price to host party at third–party facility: $500–$700. Price of themed party in a box: $150

Profit and Loss Projections for Year 1 and Year 2 The figures below assume 8 children per party.
Year 1 Income Sales revenue—$150/Box Cost of sales Party supplies—$18.08 each Party favors—$15/party for 8 children Party food (if included)—$35/party Web site design Shipping (each box $4.95) Gross profit Operating expenses Salaries Home office rent Web site monthly hosting—$30/month Customer service phone support—$9.95/month Marketing and sales Income from operations Taxes Net profit $ $ $ $ — — 360.00 119.40 $ $ $ $ — — 360.00 119.40 $30,000.00 $18,616.00 $ $ $ $ $ 3,616.00 3,000.00 7,000.00 5,000.00 990.00 $52,500.00 $24,828.00 $ 6,328.00 $ 5,250.00 $ 12,250.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 1,732.50 $ 27,672.00 Year 2

$ 11,384.00

$ 2,500.00 $ 2,979.40 $ 8,404.60

$ 2,500.00 $ 2,979.40 $24,692.60

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Organic Cleaning Supplies
Green Home Care Solutions

3400 Fox Ridge Drive Columbia, Missouri 65201 Kari Lucke
Green Home Care Solutions is committed to providing customers with high-quality organic and earth-friendly cleaning and personal care products that people can use with peace of mind.

INTRODUCTION
Mission Statement Green Home Care Solutions is committed to providing customers with high-quality organic and earthfriendly cleaning and personal care products that people can use with peace of mind, knowing that its parent company, Warhols, strictly adheres to a green business and production strategy and that the products cause no harm to the environment. Executive Summary Green Home Care Solutions is a home-based, direct sales business that sells organic and environmentally safe home and personal care products person-to-person and via the Internet. As the sole proprietor, John Clinton purchases the products at wholesale prices from Warhols, a large and well-established company based in Irvine, California, and then sells them at retail prices to consumers in the mid-Missouri area. Goals and Objectives As the sole proprietor of Green Home Care Solutions, John Clinton has enunciated several specific goals for his first year of business:
• • •

Provide sample products and brochures to 25 new customers a month. Sell $2000 worth of products monthly. Attend and promote the business at two trade shows: the Columbia Home Show in May and the Mid-Missouri Business Expo in October. Establish and maintain an up-to-date, informative, and user-friendly website for Green Home Care Solutions.



Company History Warhols, Green Home Care Solutions’ parent company, was established in 1902 as a home goods general store in San Francisco, California. After two decades of success as a retail store, Warhols moved from a location-based business to a direct selling business and started selling products door-to-door. By
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1950 it was growing as a very successful company that provided products to 5,000 associates for retail sale. In 2007, Warhols had grown to represent 30,000 associates nationwide.

INDUSTRY AND MARKET
Industry Analysis The direct selling industry, also called network marketing, consists of independent entrepreneurs who buy products at wholesale prices and then earn a profit by selling them at retail. According to the Direct Selling Association, in 2007 sales in the industry reached $30.8 billion in the United States and $114 billion worldwide. Market Analysis According to the Direct Selling Association, more than 74 percent of Americans purchased products or services through direct selling in 2007. In addition to the increasing popularity of this method of purchase, a 2008 study by the Natural Marketing Institute (NMI) found that more consumers are incorporating organic products into their lifestyles. NMI found that, across six organic product categories, total U.S. household penetration rose from 57 percent in 2006 to 59 percent in 2007, and the percentage of Americans who used organic products consistently increased from 16 percent to 18 percent in the same time period. This number is expected to continue to increase. Competition Products that are considered competition for those sold by Green Home Care Solutions include such brands as Green Works and Nature’s Source cleaners, sold in discount chain stores such as Wal-Mart. Although the prices of these products are slightly less than Green Home Care Solutions’, they do not last as long and contain more water and other filler ingredients.
A comparison of the price, contents, and number of uses for comparable off-the-shelf products is presented in the brochure for Green Home Care Solutions’ cleaning products, showing customers that, even though the price of the former may be somewhat less upfront, they save more money using Green Home Care Solutions’ products, as well as achieve better results. Convenience is another benefit of buying from Green Home Care Solutions. The products can be ordered online or over the phone, and they are delivered to the customers’ homes.

PERSONNEL
Management John Clinton is the sole proprietor of Green Home Care Solutions. He has a bachelor of arts degree in business from the University of Missouri and thus has a good background for the daily operation of a direct selling operation. He also has excellent interpersonal skills—another requirement for working with customers—gained from his position as fiscal officer in the Finance Department for the University, a position that he held for five years. Most important, however, is John’s tenacity. Direct selling requires self-motivation and persistence, traits that John has exhibited both in his personal and his work life. Professional and Advisory Support Warhols is a member of the Direct Selling Association, a national trade association. The association’s mission statement is ‘‘To protect, serve and promote the effectiveness of member companies and the independent business people they represent. To ensure that the marketing by member companies of
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products and/or the direct sales opportunity is conducted with the highest level of business ethics and service to consumers.’’ As an associate of Warhols, John has access to all of the company’s resources, including weekly and monthly publications, an annual conference, and online tools and advice. Also, executive staff of Warhols act as mentors to sales associates such as John who are just starting out in business. Each new Warhols associate is assigned an adviser for the first year. Through this relationship, John obtains expert direction and advice as he establishes his business.

STRATEGIES
Business Strategy Green Home Care Solutions follows a green strategy set by Warhols—not just in the products, but in everyday business as well. For example, all packaging materials are biodegradable and lightweight, all printed materials use soy-based ink, and as much communication as possible is done via e-mail or other non-paper method. In addition, Warhols packages its products using gravity-fed filling processes. In other words, gravity feeds, rather than less energy-efficient means such as conveyor belts, are used to put the product into the package. Growth Strategy Growth in Green Home Care Solutions is based on repeat business. The philosophy is that once customers try the products, they will like them and continue to purchase them. Getting people to try the product is the first step, and John accomplishes this in a number of ways. For example, anyone who visits John’s website can request a free catalog and a free sample of a select number of products. John then mails these to the interested client and follows up via telephone or e-mail in about a week to ensure that the customer received the packet and to ask whether the person is interested in ordering. John also attends certain trade shows and exhibits, during which he provides samples, catalogs, brochures, and other information about the product to potential clients.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
Description Green Home Care Solutions sells a variety of products for the home and consumer, including cleaning supplies, laundry detergent and supplies, personal care items such as soap, indoor plant treatments, aromatherapy items, and other related items. All of the products are certified organic and/or environmentally friendly. They are created from biodegradable plant and vegetable ingredients and do not contain any of the toxic and harmful added elements that many other products do, such as dyes and perfumes, chlorine, enzymes, and artificial coloring. Also, Warhols uses no animal testing on any of its products. Unique Features/Niche The fact that Green Home Care Solutions’ products are organic and environmentally friendly sets them apart from many other products. Because of statistics such as the following, Americans are becoming more aware of the detrimental effects of non-organic products:


The average American uses about 25 gallons of toxic, hazardous chemical products per year in his or her home, most of which are found in household cleaning products. More than 7 million accidental poisonings occur each year in the United States; 75 percent involve children under the age of 6.
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The toxic chemicals in household cleaners are three times more likely to cause cancer than air pollution. Of chemicals commonly found in homes, 150 have been linked to allergies, birth defects, cancer, and psychological abnormalities. More than 32 million pounds of household cleaning products are poured down the drain each day nationwide. Many of these cleaners’ toxic substances, which are not adequately removed by sewage treatment plants, are returned to the rivers from which cities draw their drinking water.





Pricing Prices of the products are based on wholesale prices set by Warhols plus 30 percent. In other words, if John purchases a box of laundry soap for $8.00 from Warhols, he sells it to the customer for $10.40. A complete list of products and prices is available on request.

MARKETING AND SALES
Advertising and Promotion The main forms of advertising used by Green Home Care Solutions are brochures/catalogs and a website. John hands out brochures and catalogs to all interested customers at the two annual trade shows he attends; he also leaves them at places potential customers visit, such as grocery stores, health stores, beauty salons, malls, and other such locations.
One means of promotion that is cost-free is the experience John and his wife gain by using the products themselves. Because he uses the products, John can give first-hand information to customers regarding the uses, quality, and life cycle of the products.

Cost Warhols provides catalogs at a nominal price of 50 cents each. The company also provides a free template for a brochure, which John customizes on his computer and then prints at a local copy shop. Average price for brochures is between 25 and 50 cents each, depending on format and use of color. John purchases approximately 100 catalogs twice per year and prints 50 copies of brochures for Green Home Care Solutions four times a year, with one new brochure for each season. This allows John to personalize the brochure and target customers based on needs that are common during certain times of the year.
All promotional materials list John’s website address, which is available for anyone to access. Cost of the domain for the website is $25 a month. John maintains the website himself, so no additional labor costs are involved. The cost of the samples and brochures that are mailed to people who visit John’s website, as mentioned in Section 4.2, vary but average around $50 per month ($2 per mailing times 25 customers). Costs for advertising per year are thus approximately $100 for catalogs, $300 for the website, $100 for brochures, and $600 for sample mailings, for a total of $1,100 per year.

Image The image portrayed by Green Care Home Solutions is exemplified by its slogan, ‘‘Clean Home, Clean Earth.’’ The idea is to make people feel good about cleaning with organic products, so that they can have a clean home without harming the environment. Customers are also encouraged to be proud to be using products that are made by a company that is striving to converse energy and reduce waste.
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OPERATIONS
Customers The customers for Green Home Care Solutions are middle- to upper-income individuals ages 25 to 55 in the mid-Missouri area, especially in and around Columbia, who own their own homes. Although anyone can buy the products, research by Warhols has determined that these are the people who are most likely to be interested in buying organic home products. Columbia is a town of approximately 94,000. The median household income of Columbia residents is $42,163, with a race distribution of 83 percent White, 9 percent Black, and 8 percent other. Forty percent of residents are between the ages of 25 and 50, Green Home Care Solutions’ target age range. Forty-seven percent of Columbians own their own home. As a relatively liberal and young population, Columbia is the ideal location to sell organic products. Suppliers Warhols is Green Home Care Solutions’ sole supplier. Warhols is a well-established and reputable company that has been in business for more than 100 years. Approximately 30,000 associates in the United States sell the Warhols product line, which consists of 250 different products. Equipment Because Green Home Care Solutions is based on an ordering system—the customer orders the product from the catalog or website—no inventory is necessary. However, John keeps some of his newest and best-selling products on hand to show to customers. He also purchases sample sizes of some items to give to customers. Facility and Location All business is conducted out of John’s home, located at 3400 Fox Ridge Drive, Columbia, Missouri.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Based on the goals John has set for the first year of business, the following profits and expenses are predicted.
Income Sales Expenses Promotional materials Inventory and samples Trade show booth rental Total first-year expenses Net profit $ 1,100 $ 500 $ 500 $ 2,100 $21,900 $24,000

Thus the profit from the first year of business is expected to be $21,900. As John grows his client base, profits should increase. Expenses will increase only due to inflation.

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Physical Therapy Practice
H e a l i n g H a n d s P h y s i c a l T h e r a p y I n c.

27008 Gill St. Dallas, Texas 75255 Paul Greenland
Healing Hands Physical Therapy is a holistic, wellness-focused physical therapy practice that helps individuals restore function and prevent disability following an illness or injury.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Business Overview From back and knee pain to tennis elbow and stiff shoulders, most people contend with physical setbacks at some point in their lifetime. These may result from sports-related injuries, overuse, occupational stress, surgery, and more. Oftentimes, individuals are able to recover from physical strain and injuries on their own. However, professional intervention is sometimes needed.
Healing Hands Physical Therapy is a holistic, wellness-focused physical therapy practice that helps individuals restore function and prevent disability following an illness or injury. Specifically, our trained, licensed physical therapists work under the order of a physician to improve the function of a patient’s ligaments, joints, muscles, and nerves. Treatments primarily focus on improving flexibility, range of motion, and strength. Although we rely on different types of equipment to deliver treatment, our practice emphasizes a handson treatment method or modality known as manual therapy. Our practice also offers services such as acupuncture, massage, and golf performance training, which are provided without a physician’s referral. With many years of combined experience, Healing Hands Physical Therapy has a unique blend of professional experience, allowing us to provide relief and improvement to patients in a wide range of situations.

Organizational Structure Our practice is incorporated in the state of Texas and employs three licensed physical therapists— including owner Paul Irwin—who all hold degrees from programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. In addition, we employ a physical therapist assistant, a licensed massage therapist, and an administrative assistant.

MARKET ANALYSIS
Healing Hands Physical Therapy focuses on serving individuals with private health insurance, as well as upper-income individuals who are able to pay privately for our services.
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Our geographic location in downtown Dallas, Texas, is well-suited for our target market, and puts us in close proximity to a large concentration of white-collar workers. In addition to 12 Fortune 500 companies in the city proper, the larger Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex area is home to more corporate headquarters than anywhere else in the nation. Our city’s central business district alone was home to more than 135,000 employees during the mid-2000s. This figure is expected to exceed 138,000 in 2010 and total almost 150,000 in 2020. Our practice also is in close proximity to many physician offices, providing easy access to a strong referral base.

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
According to projections from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, above average growth is projected for the physical therapy profession as a whole. From 2006 to 2016, employment of physical therapists is projected to grow 27 percent, increasing from 173,000 to 220,000. Among the factors contributing to the profession’s growth are an increased interest in health promotion, as well as the aging of the population. In particular, the baby boom generation is a key market for the services we provide. According to the Executive Council of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Examiners, the state agency charged with licensing practitioners, 10,126 actively licensed physical therapists and 4,673 actively licensed physical therapy assistants were practicing in Texas as of February 2008.

PERSONNEL
Paul Irwin, PT, DPT, CSCS (Owner & President)—Paul holds a doctorate degree in physical therapy from Northern Central University. Specializing in the assessment and treatment of spinal problems, he holds a related certification from the McKenzie Institute. In addition, Paul is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. His other areas of clinical focus include: post-surgical conditions, orthopedic and musculoskeletal injuries, sports-related injuries, as well as golf-related injuries and conditioning. Paul has more than 18 years of experience as a physical therapist. Prior to establishing his own practice he worked at Pineview Health System, where he oversaw a staff of more than 25 people, including physical therapists, occupational therapists, and athletic trainers. Paul is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association. Angela Jones, PT—Angela earned her physical therapy degree at Washington University, and started her career in Phoenix, Arizona, developing special expertise as a hand therapist. In this role, she focuses on patients with conditions such as arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, overuse syndromes, tendon injuries, and more. In addition to being a gifted therapist, Angela also has skills making custom splints and braces. In addition to her role as a physical therapist, Angela has an undergraduate degree in marketing. She uses her expertise in this area to handle marketing and advertising responsibilities for our practice. Angela is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association. Michelle Christiansen, PT—Michelle trained as a physical therapist in Alaska, where she treated patients with a variety of orthopedic and musculoskeletal conditions. She has a very strong interest in manual therapy, and specializes in peripheral joint injuries. Before joining our practice, Michelle worked at Greenview Medical Center in Waller County, Texas, and at Northern Star hospital in Anchorage, Alaska. She also is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association. Jennifer Thompson, LMT—Jennifer is a true asset to our practice, allowing us to provide a blend of services on a cash basis without a physician’s referral. We often cross-sell her services to patients, giving them a complimentary massage at the end of the regular treatment, with hopes that they will become regular clients. Jennifer offers several different types of massage, including Shiatsu, classic Western,
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basic, deep tissue, hot stone, medical, and sports. Trained at the Dallas Academy of massage therapy, Jennifer is nationally certified and is licensed by Texas’ Department of State Health Services. Christine Roth, PTA—In addition to working as a physical therapist assistant, Christine has been an alternative medicine practitioner for 10 years. This aspect of her professional background brings another holistic element to our physical therapy practice. Specifically, Christine is a NCCAOM certified acupuncturist, and also has expertise in areas such as massage therapy, reflexology, and therapeutic touch. Josephine Smith, Administrative Assistant—Josephine is usually the first person patients see when they enter our facility. Her cheerful disposition and strong organizational skills make her the ‘‘glue’’ that holds our practice together. Josephine is responsible for booking appointments and managing all of the therapists’ schedules. While this task is somewhat simplified by the use of a special software program, she has in-depth knowledge about the way our practitioners work and the amount of time that various treatments will take. Josephine also is responsible for managing medical records and handling all other general office duties.

Professional & Advisory Support We have retained the law firm of Johnson, Pratt & Weller to provide our practice with necessary legal services. In addition, tax and accounting services will be provided by Lone Star Accounting LLC. Business checking and merchant accounts (allowing us to accept credit card payments) have been opened with Texas National Bank.

GROWTH STRATEGY
Our physical therapists are fortunate to have established referral relationships with many Dallas-area physicians. We are confident that these relationships will be of immediate benefit to us during our first year of operations, allowing us to see a steady stream of patients. However, the staff of Healing Hands Physical Therapy understands how critical marketing is to the success of our practice and its future growth. With this in mind, we are committed to marketing our practice on a consistent basis, per the tactics outlined in the Marketing & Sales section of this plan. Based on our physical therapists’ combined knowledge of the local market, our unique holistic/spa-like approach, our plans to aggressively market the practice, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projections for the physical therapy profession referenced in the Industry Analysis section of this plan, we anticipate our patient base will grow at a compound annual rate of 7.5 percent during its first three years of operation.

SERVICES
Healing Hands Physical Therapy provides assessment and treatments for a wide range of injuries and physical conditions, drawing from several decades of combined experience. The treatments we offer include a number of modalities and techniques, such as:
• • • • • •

acupuncture aquatic therapy cold compresses electrical stimulation gait training hot packs
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• • • • • • •

massage mobilization/manipulation neuromuscular reeducation therapeutic exercises ultrasound video analysis (for golf performance) work hardening/conditioning

Several of our services are offered without a physician’s referral. These include massage, acupuncture, and a golf clinic that helps golfers improve their performance and avoid injuries.

MARKETING & SALES
Our practice will take a two-pronged approach to focused growth. Because referrals from physicians are critical to our success, we will put a strong emphasis on tactics that allow us to stay visible with area physicians and their office staff. In addition, we will take an ‘‘ask your doctor’’ consumer marketing approach, similar to that employed by pharmaceutical companies. Specifically, our approach will focus on generating awareness about our practice and its capabilities among individuals suffering from conditions such as back pain or knee pain, with a call-to-action encouraging consumers to see their doctor and request a referral if appropriate. We have developed a marketing plan for our practice that includes several key tactics, including:
• •

Printed collateral for prospective clients and referral sources. A sustained, targeted direct mail campaign that promotes our capabilities to referring physicians in Dallas’ central business district. An incentive program that offers a free 30-minute massage to existing or former patients who refer family members and friends to us. Sponsorship of golf performance clinics at area golf courses and country clubs. Relationship building initiatives (business lunches, dinners, etc.) with area golf pros and instructors to encourage referrals. Relationship building initiatives (business lunches, dinners, etc.) with area referring physicians and clinic nurses to encourage referrals. An expanded Yellow Page advertisement with a short list of common services offered. Advertising in the Dallas County Medical Society’s Dallas Medical Journal, in order to stay visible among referring physicians. Advertising in local lifestyle magazines to reach our upscale target market. Radio advertising and occasional free massage giveaways. Free educational presentations, focused on ergonomics and proper body mechanics, for employees at local Fortune 500 corporations. A Web site with complete details about our practice and its holistic philosophy.
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• •

• • •



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OPERATIONS
Facility & Location Healing Hands Physical Therapy is located within the Greater Dallas Professional Center, in the heart of downtown Dallas. Our 3,620-square-foot facility is situated in close proximity to where many affluent, white collar professionals work. It offers easy access to all major highways, and is only several blocks from the DART Rail. Appealing features include an open floorplan, many windows providing natural light, and 13-foot ceilings.
This facility is well situated for our needs, needing little modification. In order to transform the space into a natural, healing environment, we will purchase a wide range of plants, several fountains, and a sound system that will allow us to play soothing music. Additionally, we will have the facility painted in natural earth tones. We estimate the cost of these improvements will be $10,000. Our largest capital investment is a $20,000 commercial therapy pool, which we will use for aquatic exercise and therapy. We have selected an above-ground pool with a modular design, allowing us to relocate it to a different facility in the future, if needed. A central part of our practice, the pool includes features like an underwater treadmill, hydrotherapy jets, a temperature control system, an underwater bench, stainless steel support bars, and stairs for easy access. In addition, other start-up purchases include two treadmills, three exercise bikes, a universal machine, parallel bars, and a variety of smaller items such as leg and ankle weights, medicine balls, and core stabilization balls. These purchases will collectively cost about $12,500.

Billing & Payment Healing Hands Physical Therapy accepts payments from private insurance plans, as well as selfpayments from individuals. Unless clients make other arrangements with us ahead of time, we require payment at the time of service. In addition to personal checks, we also accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express.
We have an existing computerized billing system for physical therapy practices that tracks patient accounts and generates all necessary forms and statements. This application includes a database of the diagnosis and procedure codes needed when submitting claims to insurance companies. In addition, the application tracks patient visits and flags us when we reached the maximum number of visits approved by a patient’s insurance company.

Fees The fees that we charge vary depending upon contract rates with different insurance companies. Due to the complexity associated with various contracts, this information is not normally included with our business plan. However, it can be provided upon request. Generally speaking, our fee schedule is comparable with other physical therapy practices in our market. On average, we are reimbursed at a rate of roughly $75 per patient visit. Hours of Operation Our practice is open from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

LEGAL
Our physical therapists and physical therapist assistants are all licensed by the Executive Council of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Examiners, the state agency charged with licensing practitioners in the state of Texas. Additionally, we all carry appropriate business and professional liability insurance.
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FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS
During its first year of operation, Healing Hands Physical Therapy will generate estimated net income of $117,699. A detailed breakdown can be seen in the following balance sheet, which covers the time period January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010:
Income Patient care revenue Massage therapy revenue Public speaking Total income Expenses Salaries Utilities Rent Insurance 401 K contributions Office supplies Marketing & advertising Telecommunications & internet Professional development Travel & entertainment Subscriptions & dues Repairs & maintenance Taxes Total expenses Net income $307,000 $ 6,478 $ 39,000 $ 15,693 $ 15,350 $ 6,200 $ 35,000 $ 4,980 $ 24,000 $ 3,800 $ 4,300 $ 1,100 $ 24,800 $487,701 $117,699 $507,000 $ 95,000 $ 3,400 $605,400

The owners’ investment is $75,000, which covers the $42,500 in start-up costs outlined in the Operations section of this plan, and provides cash-on-hand for operations as we establish our patient base during the first year. In addition, our practice also plans to secure an operating line of credit from Texas National Bank. Based on our analysis of the market, we are forecasting that net income for our expanded practice will grow at a compound annual rate of 5.5 percent for the next three years:
Year 2010 2011 2012 Net income $117,699 $124,172 $131,002

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Stable
Miller Stables

4040 South Turtle Creek Lane Columbia, Missouri 65203 Kari Lucke
Miller Stables LLC will provide a safe and accessible boarding facility at an affordable cost for horse owners who need a place to keep their horse(s). It will also offer excellent onsite care and related services.

INTRODUCTION
Mission Statement Miller Stables LLC will provide a safe and accessible boarding facility at an affordable cost for horse owners who need a place to keep their horse(s). It will also offer excellent onsite care and related services. Executive Summary Jo Miller will own and manage Miller Stables, a boarding facility in the south Columbia, Missouri, area. Not all horse owners—or people who would like to own a horse—live on farms; these people need a place to keep their horse(s) that is physically safe for the animals and that offers necessary daily care for horses. Miller Stables will provide stalls and pasture, feed, water, and any necessary related care for horses whose owners currently do not have a place to house their horse or who are not satisfied with the boarding facility they are currently using. Goals and Objectives • To have 10 horses by the end of the first year of business, 15 by the end of the second, and 20 (capacity) by the end of the third


To develop a reputation as a friendly, high–quality boarding facility in the Columbia area

Company History Miller Stables was founded by Jo Miller in 1995 in Jefferson City, Missouri. Jo started by boarding three horses; by 2005 she had built her business to its capacity with 12 horses and a waiting list of clients. Jo and her husband Steve relocated to Columbia in 2009 due to Steve’s obtaining employment at the University of Missouri. Jo would like to use the knowledge and experience she gained during the 14 years she owned and operated the stables in Jefferson City to establish a similar facility in the Columbia area.
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INDUSTRY AND MARKET
Industry Analysis According to the American Horse Council, the horse industry has grown 55 percent since 2000 and represents $39 billion in related revenues. The horse population has also increased—33 percent over the same time period—and is now 9.2 million. Specific statistics for Missouri show that there 281,000 horses in the state; 70 percent are used for showing and recreation. About 125,100 Missourians are involved in the horse industry in some way. A specific breed—the Missouri Fox Trotter—originated in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri in the late 1940s and continues to be a popular breed around the country. Market Analysis The market for Miller Stables includes the following:
• • •

Horse owners in the Columbia area, especially the south Individuals and families who would like to own horses but do not have the proper facilities Horse owners who currently board their horse at a facility with which they are dissatisfied

Contrary to popular belief, horse ownership is not an elite activity enjoyed only the wealthy. The American Horse Council reports that approximately 34 percent of horse owners nationwide have a household income of less than $50,000. Only 28 percent have an annual income of over $100,000. Most (46 percent) horse owners have an annual income of between $25,000 and $75,000. Thus the target market is not limited to those in high income brackets. Columbia’s population is approximately 94,000, and median household income $42,163.

Competition The following facilities offer similar services to Miller Stables:
• • •

Columbia Equestrian Center Brenda Benner Stables Palmer Stables

All of these are located north of Columbia city limits. Miller Stables will be the only organized horse boarding facility in the southern area.

PERSONNEL
Management Jo Miller has a bachelor of science degree in equestrian science from Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri. She owned and operated a boarding facility in the Jefferson City area for 14 years, so she has both the knowledge of horses required as well as the acumen to manage the day–to–day business operations. Staffing Miller Stables will employ two part–time people to help clean stalls; feed, water, and turn out horses; and perform other related duties as needed. Because Columbia is home to three four–year colleges, one of which is known nationwide for its equestrian program (Stephens College), Jo expects no problems finding college students to work these jobs, especially if they are recruited from the equestrian program at Stephens, where many in the program are looking for hands–on experience in a stable in preparation for their future employment. The first year, stable hands will be paid $10 an hour and work 15 hours a week. As the business grows, additional staff will be hired.
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Professional and Advisory Support The following people and institutions will support the business:
• • • • • •

Banker: Paula Jones, Callaway Bank, 1515 West Broadway, Columbia Accountant: Tina Morgan, Accounting Plus, 400 I–70 Drive, Columbia Insurance Agent: Stephanie Williams, State Farm, 1700 Providence Road, Columbia Attorney: George Johnston, Johnston &? Associates, 2710 Stadium Drive, Columbia Veterinarian: David Parker, University of Missouri Equine Center, 3000 Highway 63, Columbia Farrier: Chris Mitchell, 3200 Rt. K, Columbia

GROWTH STRATEGY
Although initially Miller will provide boarding services only, after the first three years of business it will add other related services based on consumer demand. These could include horseback riding lessons, horse rental, and/or horse training. Jo Miller has the skills and knowledge required to incorporate these add–ons into the business and will do so based on what seems to draw the highest demand. This level of demand will be easy to determine from being aware of and listening to clients’ and others’ comments about the facility and what other services they would like to see offered. The extra services offered will also be determined by what the competitors provide and whether there is enough demand to justify adding the service.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
Description Miller Stables will provide the following facilities:
• • • • • •

60 acres pasture 60 x 100 foot indoor arena 100 x 200 foot lighted outdoor arena Space for horse trailer parking Easy access to Rockbridge State Park New barn

The new barn will include:
• • • • •

24 12 x 12 foot stalls, each with an automatic waterer, bedding, fan, and salt block Large tack room with lockers Full bathroom and dressing room Air–conditioned and heated lounge with tables/chairs and vending machine Wash bay

Services include:
• •

Daily turn out Daily stall cleaning
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• •

Twice–daily feeding (grain and hay) Other services (grooming, vet visit, lunging) as requested

Unique Features/Niche Miller Stables has the following advantages:


Miller Stables is in an ideal location for a horse facility because it is adjacent to Rockbridge State Park, which covers about 2,000 acres and contains 15 miles of trails. Trail riding is a popular activity for many horse owners in mid–Missouri, and often boarding facilities do not have access to trails but rather are located on highways or other roadways not suitable for riding. Miller is located only 2 miles south of Columbia city limits off Route K and is an easy and quick drive for horse owners living in the south part of town. Miller will be the only organized horse boarding facility in south Columbia. Because Jo Miller lives on site, the horses under her care have 24–hour supervision, a factor that many horse owners consider important for their horses’ safety and health. The barn in which the horses will be stalled is relatively new, built in 2006, and thus does not have safety and convenience issues that older barns may have. Miller has 60 acres of pasture, which are divided into twelve 5–acre paddocks, and two horses will be turned out for grazing on each paddock. Having only two horses per tract reduces the chances of them getting kicked, bitten, or otherwise hurt, as often happens in a herd, yet provides them with the same–species companionship that horses desire. Horses will be turned out to pasture for most of the day. Other stables do not turn the horses out and keep them confined in a stall a majority of the time. This can lead to cribbing, chewing wood, weaving, and other behavioral problems that can harm a horse’s health. Horses were made to live outside, and although keeping them in a stall can protect them from weather and injury, as well as provide easy access for owners, it can also deprive horses of exercise, companionship, and fresh air. Miller Stables offers the owner the convenience of having the horse accessible while keeping the best interests of the horse in mind. No one likes spending half of his or her planned riding time chasing a horse around the pasture trying to catch it. Clients may call ahead when planning a trip to the stables, and Jo will bring his/her horse up from pasture and have it stalled so that the horse is available when the owner arrives. All fencing is made of plastic pipe, which enhances aesthetics while reducing chances of injury to the horses. Clients will be happy to find not one strand of barbed wire—a fencing material used often for horses but notorious for causing injury—on the property.



• •











Pricing The cost for full board, which includes stall cleaning, once a day turn out, and feed (grain once a day year–round and twice a day in the winter, a quality mix of alfalfa and timothy hay in the winter) is $300 per month. This is comparable to competitors who provide similar services.
Board will be due on the first of every month. After the fifth of the month, a $10 late fee will be charged for every five days board is not paid. These conditions are listed in the contract the boarder signs with Miller.
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MARKETING AND SALES
Advertising and Promotion Word–of–mouth is the best way to advertise in this business, but to gain a client base Miller will use the following methods of promotion:
• •

Website with list of services and fees, photos, customer testimonials Brochures, to be placed in local tack shops, feed stores, and western clothing stores

In addition, signs will be placed at the entrance to the property.

Cost Start–up advertising costs will consist of printing 100 brochures and is estimated to be $250. Image Miller Stables’ will advertise itself as ‘‘The Perfect Place for You and Your Horse’’ and strive to emphasize the advantages of its location, Jo’s experience and friendliness, and the quality of the facilities.

OPERATIONS
Customers Targeted customers include horse owners and those who would like to own horses but have no place to keep them who live on the south end of Columbia, as well as horse owners in other parts of town who are dissatisfied with their current boarding facility and find it worth the drive to Miller. The average client is female, ages 15 to 30, with a household income of more than $50,000. Although males are also welcome, girls and women are more likely to board horses. Columbia’s population is about 94,000, and the median age of residents is 26.8. Forty–two percent of households earn more than $50,000 a year. Suppliers Suppliers include the following:
• • • •

Feed: Bourne Feed &? Supply, 411 I–70 Drive SE, Columbia Hay: Robert Coats Farm, 1200 High Point Lane, Columbia Hay (Back–Up): John Jacobs, 5600 Route E, Columbia Horse Care Supplies: MFA Inc., 780 Route B, Columbia

Equipment Equipment includes the following:
• • • • • • • • •

Tractor Pick–up truck Horse trailer Automatic waterers for stalls Fans for stalls Miscellaneous tack (halters, lead ropes, blankets) Wheelbarrows, shovels, pitchforks, brooms, buckets Water tanks and heaters for paddocks Fencing equipment
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Hours Miller Stables will be accessible to horse owners 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Facility and Location Miller Stables is located at 4040 South Turtle Creek Lane, Columbia, Missouri. All necessary physical requirements, including barn, indoor arena, outdoor arena, and owners’ home are already existing on site. Additional fencing will need to be installed to create the 5–acre paddocks. Legal Environment Miller Stables will use State Farm Insurance Company to purchase all necessary liability insurance. County health and environmental codes will be followed strictly.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Because the Millers have already purchased the property and use it as their primary residence, the cost of the home, acreage, and outbuildings is not included in the total investment amount needed. Jo also owns some of the necessary equipment due to her previous involvement in the industry; she plans to obtain a business loan to fund the remainder.

Start Up Expenses
Start-Up Costs
Already purchased $750,000 $ 15,000 $ 25,000 $ 8,000 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Capital requirements Property, including home Tractor Pick-up truck Horse trailer Automatic watering system Fans Extra tack Stall-cleaning equipment Water tanks and heaters Fencing Furniture, fixtures for lounge Starting inventory: Salt blocks Starting inventory: Grain Starting inventory: Hay Starting inventory: Bedding Insurance Entrance signs Parking lot preparation Advertising Totals:

Need to fund $ $ $ $ 0 0 0 0

$ 7,000 $ 500 $ 2,000 $ 500

$ 1,000 $10,000 $ 2,000 $ $ $ $ $ $ 100 500 300 500 500 500

$ 1,000 $ 250 $26,650

$798,000

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Earnings Earnings estimates below are based on boarding 10 horses the first year, 15 the second, and 20 the third.
Earnings
1st Year Net sales Less expenses: Business loan payment Feed/hay/bedding/salt Salaries Repairs and maintenance Vehicle expenses Insurance Total expenses Net profit before taxes $ 3,600 $15,000 $15,600 $ 1,000 $ 500 $ 1,000 $36,700 $ 700 $ 3,600 $22,500 $20,800 $ 1,500 $ 1,000 $ 1,500 $50,900 $ 3,100 $ 3,600 $30,000 $26,000 $ 2,000 $ 1,500 $ 2,000 $65,100 $ 6,900 $36,000 2nd Year $54,000 3rd Year $72,000

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Wine Storage
W i n e P o r t f o l i o I n c.

217 East Broad Street West Hampton, New York 11977 Laura Becker
Wine Portfolio Inc. stores wine for wine auction houses, wine distributors, and private wine collectors.

BUSINESS OBJECTIVE AND DESCRIPTION
Wine Portfolio’s objective is to broaden the appeal of its state-of-the-art wine storage facility. The company will continue to build strong relationships with wine auction houses and wine distributors that conduct business in the New York Area. In addition, the company is building a portfolio of customers who purchase and store their wine in a professional manner. This requires storing wine in a temperature-controlled environment that is constantly being monitored. Wine Portfolio provides firstrate customer service to customers including state-of-the-art inventory management systems; pick up and delivery of wines; and the buying and selling of wines on a consignment basis.

MISSION STATEMENT
Wine Portfolio was created to take advantage of the need for a facility to store wine in a professional manner. The company stores wine for its commercial and private customers; and allows customers to monitor wine portfolios via inventory management systems. The business objective is to be the premier wine storage company within the United States.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The wine storage business focuses on building an inventory of wine, and creating value added products for clients. Revenue for the business is generated by charging a monthly fee for each bottle that is stored at one of the storage facilities. Bottles that differ in size from the standard 750 ML variety incur additional fees. The business also generates revenue from retrieving wines from distributors or vineyards. Deliveries of wines to customers help to generate income as well. Business growth is based on developing relationships throughout the wine community, which includes: wine auction houses, wine distributors (foreign and domestic) and wine collectors. As growth of wine consumption moves throughout the globe, the wine trade and wine transactions will grow in tandem. Growth of outsourcing wine storage by restaurants should also continue to grow.
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There are two types of storage facilities: comingled wine which is generally for larger commercial use; and private wine storage (personal wine lockers) that is generally for smaller, private wine collectors. Wine Portfolio manages a comingled wine storage facility which provides full service to customers including wine monitoring, pick up, delivery, inventory management systems and buying and selling of wines on consignment.

BUSINESS OVERVIEW
Wine Portfolio is a commercial wine storage facility which provides storage and maintenance for comingled wines from various owners in a climate-controlled storage facility. This means that the wine is stored in a large room and there are no separate wine lockers for clients to visit. The business is a fullservice offering meaning that all activity regarding the wine is taken care of by the operator of the facility. This includes turning the wine, viewing the wine or retrieving the wine. Inventory-management software for customers is provided as well. Storage facilities such as Wine Portfolio’s operate within large urban areas that are wine distribution centers. Cities such as New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Chicago are strong candidates for comingled wine storage facilities such as this. This setup is also preferred in other large cities where the commercial space leases are at a premium. The alternative to this type of comingled storage facility for wine collectors is to store wine in a storage facility that allows for individual wine space and the owners manage and maintain their own collection (that is, a personal locker type of experience). This type of individually-managed facility allows customers to store wine in a climate-controlled space and act as the sole operator of the wine. Inventory management software can be supplied, but the responsibility of monitoring the wine is the clients. These facilities are preferred in some circumstances because it allows free access to the wine that is stored and still provides a professional environment to store wine. This type of facility will be preferred mainly by private wine collections, and less by the auction houses and distributors.

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
The growth of the wine storage industry is directly tied to the supply and demand for premium wines. Premium wines, for consumption or trade, are generally stored in a professional wine cellar or a professionally built home or business cellar. During the beginning of the current decade, wine storage has grown side by side with the increase in growth of premium wines. Wines from major terrier areas of France, Italy, Australia and the United States have grown substantially in value over the past five years. Even during the current economic crisis, premium wines purchases made in 2003 have more than doubled in value. The wine market in the United States, in terms of consumption, is forecasted to grow at a compound annual growth rate of about 7.7%, and 4% in value and volume terms between 2008 and 2012. As global economies begin to recover, many economists believe that prices for hard assets and commodities will increase substantially. Wine has become commoditized, and should benefit from the flood of capital that central banks are distributing. The trading of wine has also increased over the past 10 years. As trading and auctions of wine continue to branch out across the United States and the globe, the need for professional storage of wine will grow as well. Auction houses such as Christie, Sotheby’s, Ackerman and Morrel, and Zachy’s all store wines that will be auctioned in professional storage facilities. The table below is a list of wine auction houses.
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Wine Auction Houses
Wine investor score 94 Buyers premium 19.5% 17% 18.5% 17% 19.5% 18% 19.5% 0% 19% Seller's premium 0% Negotiable Negotiable Negotiable Negotiable 0% Negotiable Negotiable Negotiable Minimum consignment Negotiable Negotiable Negotiable Negotiable Negotiable $2,000 Negotiable Negotiable Negotiable Auctions per year 8 7 10 5 5 4 6 12 9 $20 $25 $25 $15 $16 $ 0 $30 $ 80 $ 50 $123 $ 0 $160 $190 Cost of catalogue (single) $20 Cost of catalogue (year) $150

Auction house Acker Merrall & Condit Bonhams and Butterfields Christies Edward Roberts International Hart Davis Hart Morrell & Company Sothebys The Chicago Wine Company Zachys

City New York San Francisco New York/ Los Angeles Chicago/ San Francisco Chicago New York New York Chicago New York/ Los Angeles

URL View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website

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MARKET ANALYSIS
The climate-control wine storage business is estimated to have revenues of approximately $113 million dollars per year according to ‘‘Vino Veritas.’’ Climate-controlled storage makes up approximately .05 percent of the 1.6 billion square feet of storage on the market. This market is estimated to expand by 26 percent over the next 3 to 5 years. There is opportunity in both large urban communities, as well as, wealthy smaller towns within the United States. The current market environment has been positive for the storage business. Current clients have continued to keep their wine in one location. Since the business is an annuity performance business with repetitive income, this has been a positive. The storage facilities are also taking business away from home storage units. A three hundred bottle temperature-controlled unit sells for approximately $4,000. Storage costs for three hundred bottles would be $500 dollars per year. During difficult financial times, professional storage facilities create better short-term value. The barriers to entry within the wine storage business are relatively low. Securing a facility that will accommodate a temperature-controlled environment will be the largest expense. Most facilities are located in low rent areas. There will be some customization necessary which will depend on the business model employed. The basics needed will be to provide a space that can be temperaturecontrolled at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, humidity controlled at approximately 70%, with minimal light exposure, and have little to no vibrations. The owners of the business will also need access to a refrigerated truck to receive and deliver wine from customers assuming this is a service that will be provided.

Competition The competition within the industry will be from companies that provide one of the two forms of service. There are very few companies that offer a comingled wine storage experience, along with a personal locker experience. A combined storage facility would offer the best of both worlds. The comingled storage facility usually offers a state-of-the-art inventory management system, along with top notch customer service. Some of these firms will also purchase or consign to sell your inventory. Vinfolio, a San Francisco wine storage facility, is a large comingled storage facility that offers inventory management, as well as, purchasing and sales options. The Wine Cellarage, a Bronx NY storage facility, is an example of a facility that offers storage and inventory, but does not offer consignment arrangements.
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Existing Wine Storage Options
Wine investor score

Company 55 Degrees Adventures in Wine Brix Wine Vault Desert Wine Cellars Eastside Wine Storage El Camino Wine Storage Guarantee Wine Storage Kent Certified Wine LA Fine Arts & Wine Storage Co. Legend Cellars Marin Wine Vaults Morgan Manhatten Napa Valley Wine Storage Napa Wine Lockers Portland Wine Storage Seattle Wine Storage Strongbox Wine Cellar The Wine Cellarage The Wine Storage Cave Vintage Wine Warehouse West Palm Wine

URL View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website View website

State CA CA NY AZ WA CA NY IL CA CA CA NY CA CA OR WA IL NY NY NY FL

City St Helena San Francisco Brooklyn Scottsdale Seattle San Luis Obispo New York Chicago Los Angeles Irvine San Raphael New York Napa Napa Portland Seattle Chicago Bronx Kingston New York Tampa

Cost/case/ month — — — — — — — — — — $3.14 — — $2.43 — $1.74 — — — — —

PERSONNEL
The wine storage business is similar in many ways to most other storage businesses. Making money will depend on the owner’s ability to secure an inexpensive lease in a large enough space and create revenues from storing wine. Direct expenses from personnel are low. Companies that comingle wine in one large storage facility need two people to be available to handle the operation. Managing inventory, which includes moving the inventory, and accounting for the inventory are the skills needed to provide a basic service. Additionally, the owners will need to perform bookkeeping, minor contract or insurance work and logistic or transportation work.

STRATEGIES
The wine storage business has two basic strategies. The first is a comingled storage facility that requires a large storage facility and a very strong inventory management system. This strategy is customer-oriented and has multiple business lines. The second strategy is a personal storage facility. This strategy is more similar to a standard storage business and requires minimal day to day interaction. Both strategies are viable on their own, but definitely can be combined to create a formidable business.

Comingled Storage Facility Finding a large space where your lease is relatively low cost, is the first step in building a storage business using this strategy. Preferably, the storage space should be below ground. Below ground facilities have a natural cooling environment, and there is less of a need for heavy air conditioning or heat.
A case of wine is approximately one square foot, or half a cubic foot. With storage bins there are approximately two cases that call be stored using each cubic foot. A storage facility with 14 foot ceilings would be able to house twenty cases within a square foot of space. The revenue for storage
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range from $2.5 to $4 dollars per case which implies revenue from storage is between $50 to $80 dollars per square foot. There are a number of different inventory management systems that can be purchased or leased. One example is Uncorked, which is $249 per year and it includes 2.7 million wines in its database as well as wine reviews. The comingled facility as a stand alone business works well in large urban areas where space is at a premium. Delivery of wine to customers, as well as, a pickup service is a must. There is also a need to create a simple web site that will allow your customers to view the inventory of wine within the facility. The interior of the facility is open with multiple large storage bins, with levels to store wine. The practicality of storage at a comingled facility is much more important than how the storage facility is viewed.

Personal Locker Storage Facility The business strategy is similar to personalized storage space. The owner will need to create different types of wine lockers that are different in size. This strategy will require some customization to create individual spaces that clients will deposit and retrieve their wine inventory. Most of these spaces have wood interiors, and can store between 200 and 15,000 bottles. Personal wine storage spaces can fluctuate depending on the area of the country they are located in. Small wine storage can be as low as $500 dollars per year for 36 cubic feet, to as high as $6,000 per year for large rooms according to the The Wine Hotel in Los Angeles.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
Each business line (comingled and personal lockers) will have specific products and services.

Comingled Wine Storage The comingled wine storage facility will allow customers to ship wine from different regions of the country and the world to the facility based on specific state and local laws. The wine will be stored and inventoried. Clients will be able to view their wine within 48 hours of arrival to the facility. Taking digital pictures of the wine is a service that will be available. Customers will be able to request a delivery or schedule a pick up of their wine. This facility will offer shipping services of wine to almost anywhere in the world. The inventory system will also place an estimated value on the wine. If a client would like to consign the wine for sale, the facility will take on short term guaranteed sales as well as long term consignments. The guaranteed price will be a percentage of the estimate retail value of the wine minus a 20% commission. The long-term consigned price is a price designated by the customer. The customer will in turn pay a fee of 20% as commission for the sale of the wine. Personal Locker Wine Storage The personalized wine locker service is a locked temperature and climate-controlled environment. The area is secure and there will always be a person watching the facility. There will also be video cameras recording everyone who enters and exits the facility. Wine will be delivered and retrieved by the owners of the wine. This facility will offer a wine inventory system that will be leased to the customers. Taking inventory of the wine will be performed only by the owner of the wine or persons with permission that have access to the wine.
A niche within the industry is having a combined facility that allows customers to have private lockers as well as a comingled account. Facilities can create value by offering a client a pricing structure where they can pay for either product in advance at a discount. Payment up front for one year has the advantage of receiving a
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10% discount. Two year upfront payments will receive a 15% discount. Month to month payment requires a credit card to be on file. The minimum contract is six months, and each service offers a two year guaranteed lease.

MARKETING AND SALES
The Marketing and Sales effort will focus on multiple groups. The comingled facility will focus its marketing effort on distributors, auction houses, large retail sellers and private collectors with large collections of wine. Advertising the product will take place in magazines that focus on wine such as, The Wine Spectator, The Wine Enthusiast, and Food and Wine. It will also be important to develop relationships with some of the wine producers in areas of California, Washington State, and Oregon. The marketing effort for personalized wine spaces will be targeted to many medium and smaller wine retailers, restaurants, and wine private collectors. It is important as well to advertise in the same major wine magazines.

OPERATIONS
The operational hours for the comingled facility will be slightly longer than normal business hours. The hours of 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. will allow the facility to receive all packages that will be delivered, and send all necessary items for a given business day. It will also be important to be open on Saturdays to allow customers to retrieve wine if necessary. The operating house for the personalized spaces will be from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. These hours will allow individuals the time to retrieve any wines they need over a broad period of time. Restaurants will also be able to retrieve wine if needed over a long time horizon.

Location The comingled facility should be located within 60 miles of a major urban area. Locations around New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, Miami, Las Vegas will support this type of service. The personalized facility will be able to flourish in many smaller cities and suburban areas. Licensing Neither ype of facility will need a liquor license unless the facility is planning on offering consignment of wine.

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
Revenues and expenses are broken out into two distinct services. The comingled service will have revenues based on attaining 500 cases of wine for storage. Additional revenues of $5,000 will be produced from delivery and retrieval of wines. Costs are broken down into lease costs, construction, climate control, advertising, legal, accounting and truck leasing. The second and third year’s revenues are based on 2,000 cases of wine and 5,000 cases of wine respectively. Expenses are fixed over years two and three. Revenues for the personal storage space are based on 40 cubic foot spaces that will be provided. The first year is based on 30 spaces leased. The second and third years are based on 100 and 200 spaces leased.
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Comingled Wine Storage Facility
Year 1 Revenue Storage Delivery Total revenue Expenses Construction Building lease—$4,000/month Air control—$500/month Advertising—$300/month Legal Accounting Truck lease Total expenses Net profit $ 20,000.00 $ 48,000.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 3,600.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 88,600.00 ($ 35,600.00) $ — $ 48,000.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 3,600.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 68,600.00 $ 90,400.00 $ — $ 48,000.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 3,600.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 68,600.00 $148,400.00 $ 48,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $ 53,000.00 $144,000.00 $ 15,000.00 $159,000.00 $ 192,000.00 $ 25,000.00 $ 217,000.00 Year 2 Year 3

Assumptions: Year 1: 500 cases of wine Year 2: 2,000 cases of wine Year 3: 5,000 cases of wine Lease: 3,000 square feet/60,000 cubic feet—$4,000/month

Personal Locker Wine Storage Facility
Year 1 Revenue Expenses Construction Building lease—$1,500/month Air control—$200/month Advertising—$200/month Legal Accounting Total expenses Net profit Assumptions: Year 1: 30 Year 2: 100 lockers Year 3: 200 lockers Space: 40 cubic feet provided per locker Lease: 1,000 square feet, 20,000 cubic feet $ 20,000.00 $ 18,000.00 $ 2,400.00 $ 2,400.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ 47,800.00 ($32,800.00) $ — $18,000.00 $ 2,400.00 $ 2,400.00 $ 3,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $27,800.00 $22,200.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ — 18,000.00 2,400.00 2,400.00 3,000.00 2,000.00 $ 15,000.00 Year 2 $50,000.00 Year 3 $100,000.00

$ 27,800.00 $ 72,200.00

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Business Plan Template

Business Plan Template
USING THIS TEMPLATE
A business plan carefully spells out a company’s projected course of action over a period of time, usually the first two to three years after the start-up. In addition, banks, lenders, and other investors examine the information and financial documentation before deciding whether or not to finance a new business venture. Therefore, a business plan is an essential tool in obtaining financing and should describe the business itself in detail as well as all important factors influencing the company, including the market, industry, competition, operations and management policies, problem solving strategies, financial resources and needs, and other vital information. The plan enables the business owner to anticipate costs, plan for difficulties, and take advantage of opportunities, as well as design and implement strategies that keep the company running as smoothly as possible. This template has been provided as a model to help you construct your own business plan. Please keep in mind that there is no single acceptable format for a business plan, and that this template is in no way comprehensive, but serves as an example. The business plans provided in this section are fictional and have been used by small business agencies as models for clients to use in compiling their own business plans.

GENERIC BUSINESS PLAN
Main headings included below are topics that should be covered in a comprehensive business plan. They include:

Business Summary
Purpose Provides a brief overview of your business, succinctly highlighting the main ideas of your plan. Includes
• • • • •

Name and Type of Business Description of Product/Service Business History and Development Location Market

• • • • •

Competition Management Financial Information Business Strengths and Weaknesses Business Growth

Table of Contents
Purpose Organized in an Outline Format, the Table of Contents illustrates the selection and arrangement of information contained in your plan.

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Includes
• •

Topic Headings and Subheadings Page Number References

Business History and Industry Outlook
Purpose Examines the conception and subsequent development of your business within an industry specific context. Includes
• • • •



Start-up Information Owner/Key Personnel Experience Location Development Problems and Solutions Investment/Funding Information

• • • • •

Future Plans and Goals Market Trends and Statistics Major Competitors Product/Service Advantages National, Regional, and Local Economic Impact

Product/Service
Purpose Introduces, defines, and details the product and/or service that inspired the information of your business. Includes
• • • •

Unique Features Niche Served Market Comparison Stage of Product/Service Development

• • • • •

Production Facilities, Equipment, and Labor Financial Requirements Product/Service Life Cycle Future Growth

Market Examination
Purpose Assessment of product/service applications in relation to consumer buying cycles. Includes
• • • • •

Target Market Consumer Buying Habits Product/Service Applications Consumer Reactions Market Factors and Trends

• • • • •

Penetration of the Market Market Share Research and Studies Cost Sales Volume and Goals

Competition
Purpose Analysis of Competitors in the Marketplace. Includes
• • •

Competitor Information Product/Service Comparison Market Niche





Product/Service Strengths and Weaknesses Future Product/Service Development

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Marketing
Business Plan Template

Purpose Identifies promotion and sales strategies for your product/service. Includes
• • • • •

Product/Service Sales Appeal Special and Unique Features Identification of Customers Sales and Marketing Staff Sales Cycles



• • •

Type of Advertising/ Promotion Pricing Competition Customer Services

Operations
Purpose Traces product/service development from production/inception to the market environment. Includes
• • •

Cost Effective Production Methods Facility Location

• • •

Equipment Labor Future Expansion

Administration and Management
Purpose Offers a statement of your management philosophy with an in-depth focus on processes and procedures. Includes
• • • • •

Management Philosophy Structure of Organization Reporting System Methods of Communication Employee Skills and Training

• • •



Employee Needs and Compensation Work Environment Management Policies and Procedures Roles and Responsibilities

Key Personnel
Purpose Describes the unique backgrounds of principle employees involved in business. Includes




Owner(s)/Employee Education and Experience Positions and Roles

• • •

Benefits and Salary Duties and Responsibilities Objectives and Goals

Potential Problems and Solutions
Purpose Discussion of problem solving strategies that change issues into opportunities. Includes
• • •

Risks Litigation Future Competition

• •

Economic Impact Problem Solving Skills

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Financial Information
Purpose Secures needed funding and assistance through worksheets and projections detailing financial plans, methods of repayment, and future growth opportunities. Includes
• • • •

Financial Statements Bank Loans Methods of Repayment Tax Returns

• • • •

Start-up Costs Projected Income (3 years) Projected Cash Flow (3 Years) Projected Balance Statements (3 years)

Appendices
Purpose Supporting documents used to enhance your business proposal. Includes


• • • •

Photographs of product, equipment, facilities, etc. Copyright/Trademark Documents Legal Agreements Marketing Materials Research and or Studies

• • • • •

Operation Schedules Organizational Charts Job Descriptions Resumes Additional Financial Documentation

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Business Plan Template

Fictional Food Distributor
Commercial Foods, Inc.
This plan demonstrates how a partnership can have a positive impact on a new business. It demonstrates how two individuals can carve a niche in the specialty foods market by offering gourmet foods to upscale restaurants and fine hotels. This plan is fictional and has not been used to gain funding from a bank or other lending institution.

3003 Avondale Ave. Knoxville, TN 37920

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
Commercial Foods, Inc. seeks a loan of $75,000 to establish a new business. This sum, together with $5,000 equity investment by the principals, will be used as follows:
• • • • • •

Merchandise inventory $25,000 Office fixture/equipment $12,000 Warehouse equipment $14,000 One delivery truck $10,000 Working capital $39,000 Total $100,000

DESCRIPTION OF THE BUSINESS
Commercial Foods, Inc. will be a distributor of specialty food service products to hotels and upscale restaurants in the geographical area of a 50 mile radius of Knoxville. Richard Roberts will direct the sales effort and John Williams will manage the warehouse operation and the office. One delivery truck will be used initially with a second truck added in the third year. We expect to begin operation of the business within 30 days after securing the requested financing.

MANAGEMENT
A. Richard Roberts is a native of Memphis, Tennessee. He is a graduate of Memphis State University with a Bachelor’s degree from the School of Business. After graduation, he worked for a major manufacturer of specialty food service products as a detail sales person for five years, and, for the past three years, he has served as a product sales manager for this firm.
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B. John Williams is a native of Nashville, Tennessee. He holds a B.S. Degree in Food Technology from the University of Tennessee. His career includes five years as a product development chemist in gourmet food products and five years as operations manager for a food service distributor. Both men are healthy and energetic. Their backgrounds complement each other, which will ensure the success of Commercial Foods, Inc. They will set policies together and personnel decisions will be made jointly. Initial salaries for the owners will be $1,000 per month for the first few years. The spouses of both principals are successful in the business world and earn enough to support the families. They have engaged the services of Foster Jones, CPA, and William Hale, Attorney, to assist them in an advisory capacity.

PERSONNEL
The firm will employ one delivery truck driver at a wage of $8.00 per hour. One office worker will be employed at $7.50 per hour. One part-time employee will be used in the office at $5.00 per hour. The driver will load and unload his own trucks. Mr. Williams will assist in the warehouse operation as needed to assist one stock person at $7.00 per hour. An additional delivery truck and driver will be added the third year.

LOCATION
The firm will lease a 20,000 square foot building at 3003 Avondale Ave., in Knoxville, which contains warehouse and office areas equipped with two-door truck docks. The annual rental is $9,000. The building was previously used as a food service warehouse and very little modification to the building will be required.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
The firm will offer specialty food service products such as soup bases, dessert mixes, sauce bases, pastry mixes, spices, and flavors, normally used by upscale restaurants and nice hotels. We are going after a niche in the market with high quality gourmet products. There is much less competition in this market than in standard run of the mill food service products. Through their work experiences, the principals have contacts with supply sources and with local chefs.

THE MARKET
We know from our market survey that there are over 200 hotels and upscale restaurants in the area we plan to serve. Customers will be attracted by a direct sales approach. We will offer samples of our products and product application data on use of our products in the finished prepared foods. We will cultivate the chefs in these establishments. The technical background of John Williams will be especially useful here.

COMPETITION
We find that we will be only distributor in the area offering a full line of gourmet food service products. Other foodservice distributors offer only a few such items in conjunction with their standard product

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line. Our survey shows that many of the chefs are ordering products from Atlanta and Memphis because of a lack of adequate local supply.

Business Plan Template

SUMMARY
Commercial Foods, Inc. will be established as a foodservice distributor of specialty food in Knoxville. The principals, with excellent experience in the industry, are seeking a $75,000 loan to establish the business. The principals are investing $25,000 as equity capital. The business will be set up as an S Corporation with each principal owning 50% of the common stock in the corporation.

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Business Plan Template

Fictional Hardware Store
Oshkosh Hardware, Inc.
The following plan outlines how a small hardware store can survive competition from large discount chains by offering products and providing expert advice in the use of any product it sells. This plan is fictional and has not been used to gain funding from a bank or other lending institution.

123 Main St. Oshkosh, WI 54901

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Oshkosh Hardware, Inc. is a new corporation that is going to establish a retail hardware store in a strip mall in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The store will sell hardware of all kinds, quality tools, paint, and housewares. The business will make revenue and a profit by servicing its customers not only with needed hardware but also with expert advice in the use of any product it sells. Oshkosh Hardware, Inc. will be operated by its sole shareholder, James Smith. The company will have a total of four employees. It will sell its products in the local market. Customers will buy our products because we will provide free advice on the use of all of our products and will also furnish a full refund warranty. Oshkosh Hardware, Inc. will sell its products in the Oshkosh store staffed by three sales representatives. No additional employees will be needed to achieve its short and long range goals. The primary short range goal is to open the store by October 1, 1994. In order to achieve this goal a lease must be signed by July 1, 1994 and the complete inventory ordered by August 1, 1994. Mr. James Smith will invest $30,000 in the business. In addition, the company will have to borrow $150,000 during the first year to cover the investment in inventory, accounts receivable, and furniture and equipment. The company will be profitable after six months of operation and should be able to start repayment of the loan in the second year.

THE BUSINESS
The business will sell hardware of all kinds, quality tools, paint, and housewares. We will purchase our products from three large wholesale buying groups. In general our customers are homeowners who do their own repair and maintenance, hobbyists, and housewives. Our business is unique in that we will have a complete line of all hardware items and will be able to get special orders by overnight delivery. The business makes revenue and profits by servicing our customers not only with needed hardware but also with expert advice in the use of any product we sell. Our major costs for bringing our products to market are cost of merchandise of 36%, salaries of $45,000, and occupancy costs of $60,000.
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Oshkosh Hardware, Inc.’s retail outlet will be located at 1524 Frontage Road, which is in a newly developed retail center of Oshkosh. Our location helps facilitate accessibility from all parts of town and reduces our delivery costs. The store will occupy 7500 square feet of space. The major equipment involved in our business is counters and shelving, a computer, a paint mixing machine, and a truck.

THE MARKET
Oshkosh Hardware, Inc. will operate in the local market. There are 15,000 potential customers in this market area. We have three competitors who control approximately 98% of the market at present. We feel we can capture 25% of the market within the next four years. Our major reason for believing this is that our staff is technically competent to advise our customers in the correct use of all products we sell. After a careful market analysis, we have determined that approximately 60% of our customers are men and 40% are women. The percentage of customers that fall into the following age categories are: Under 16: 0% 17-21: 5% 22-30: 30% 31-40: 30% 41-50: 20% 51-60: 10% 61-70: 5% Over 70: 0% The reasons our customers prefer our products is our complete knowledge of their use and our full refund warranty. We get our information about what products our customers want by talking to existing customers. There seems to be an increasing demand for our product. The demand for our product is increasing in size based on the change in population characteristics.

SALES
At Oshkosh Hardware, Inc. we will employ three sales people and will not need any additional personnel to achieve our sales goals. These salespeople will need several years experience in home repair and power tool usage. We expect to attract 30% of our customers from newspaper ads, 5% of our customers from local directories, 5% of our customers from the yellow pages, 10% of our customers from family and friends, and 50% of our customers from current customers. The most cost effect source will be current customers. In general our industry is growing.

MANAGEMENT
We would evaluate the quality of our management staff as being excellent. Our manager is experienced and very motivated to achieve the various sales and quality assurance objectives we have set. We will use a management information system that produces key inventory, quality assurance, and sales data on a
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weekly basis. All data is compared to previously established goals for that week, and deviations are the primary focus of the management staff.

Business Plan Template

GOALS IMPLEMENTATION
The short term goals of our business are: 1. 2. 3. Open the store by October 1, 1994 Reach our breakeven point in two months Have sales of $100,000 in the first six months

In order to achieve our first short term goal we must: 1. 2. Sign the lease by July 1, 1994 Order a complete inventory by August 1, 1994

In order to achieve our second short term goal we must: 1. 2. Advertise extensively in Sept. and Oct. Keep expenses to a minimum

In order to achieve our third short term goal we must: 1. 2. Promote power tool sales for the Christmas season Keep good customer traffic in Jan. and Feb.

The long term goals for our business are: 1. 2. 3. Obtain sales volume of $600,000 in three years Become the largest hardware dealer in the city Open a second store in Fond du Lac

The most important thing we must do in order to achieve the long term goals for our business is to develop a highly profitable business with excellent cash flow.

FINANCE
Oshkosh Hardware, Inc. Faces some potential threats or risks to our business. They are discount house competition. We believe we can avoid or compensate for this by providing quality products complimented by quality advice on the use of every product we sell. The financial projections we have prepared are located at the end of this document.

JOB DESCRIPTION-GENERAL MANAGER
The General Manager of the business of the corporation will be the president of the corporation. He will be responsible for the complete operation of the retail hardware store which is owned by the corporation. A detailed description of his duties and responsibilities is as follows.

Sales Train and supervise the three sales people. Develop programs to motivate and compensate these employees. Coordinate advertising and sales promotion effects to achieve sales totals as outlined in budget. Oversee purchasing function and inventory control procedures to insure adequate merchandise at all times at a reasonable cost.
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Finance Prepare monthly and annual budgets. Secure adequate line of credit from local banks. Supervise office personnel to insure timely preparation of records, statements, all government reports, control of receivables and payables, and monthly financial statements.
Administration Perform duties as required in the areas of personnel, building leasing and maintenance, licenses and permits, and public relations.

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Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants
A listing of Associations and Consultants of interest to entrepreneurs, followed by the ten Small Business Administration Regional Offices, Small Business Development Centers, Service Corps of Retired Executives offices, and Venture Capital and Finance Companies.

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Associations
This section contains a listing of associations and other agencies of interest to the small business owner. Entries are listed alphabetically by organization name. American Business Women’s Association 9100 Ward Pkwy. PO Box 8728 Kansas City, MO 64114-0728 (800)228-0007 E-mail: abwa@abwa.org Website: http://www.abwa.org Jeanne Banks, National President American Franchisee Association 53 W Jackson Blvd., Ste. 1157 Chicago, IL 60604 (312)431-0545 E-mail: info@franchisee.org Website: http://www.franchisee.org Susan P. Kezios, President American Independent Business Alliance 222 S Black Ave. Bozeman, MT 59715 (406)582-1255 E-mail: info@amiba.net Website: http://www.amiba.net Jennifer Rockne, Director American Small Businesses Association 206 E College St., Ste. 201 Grapevine, TX 76051 800-942-2722 E-mail: info@asbaonline.org Website: http://www.asbaonline.org/ American Women’s Economic Development Corporation 216 East 45th St., 10th Floor New York, NY 10017 (917)368-6100

Fax: (212)986-7114 E-mail: info@awed.org Website: http://www.awed.org Roseanne Antonucci, Exec. Dir. Association for Enterprise Opportunity 1601 N Kent St., Ste. 1101 Arlington, VA 22209 (703)841-7760 Fax: (703)841-7748 E-mail: aeo@assoceo.org Website: http://www.micro enterpriseworks.org Bill Edwards, Exec.Dir. Association of Small Business Development Centers c/o Don Wilson 8990 Burke Lake Rd. Burke, VA 22015 (703)764-9850 Fax: (703)764-1234 E-mail: info@asbdc-us.org Website: http://www.asbdc-us.org Don Wilson, Pres./CEO BEST Employers Association 2505 McCabe Way Irvine, CA 92614 (949)253-4080 800-433-0088 Fax: (714)553-0883 E-mail: info@bestlife.com Website: http://www.bestlife.com Donald R. Lawrenz, CEO Center for Family Business PO Box 24219 Cleveland, OH 44124 (440)460-5409 E-mail: grummi@aol.com Dr. Leon A. Danco, Chm.

Coalition for Government Procurement 1990 M St. NW, Ste. 400 Washington, DC 20036 (202)331-0975 E-mail: info@thecgp.org Website: http://www.coalgovpro.org Paul Caggiano, Pres. Employers of America PO Box 1874 Mason City, IA 50402-1874 (641)424-3187 800-728-3187 Fax: (641)424-1673 E-mail: employer@employerhelp.org Website: http://www.employerhelp.org Jim Collison, Pres. Family Firm Institute 200 Lincoln St., Ste. 201 Boston, MA 02111 (617)482-3045 Fax: (617)482-3049 E-mail: ffi@ffi.org Website: http://www.ffi.org Judy L. Green, Ph.D., Exec.Dir. Independent Visually Impaired Enterprisers 500 S 3rd St., Apt. H Burbank, CA 91502 (818)238-9321 E-mail: abazyn@bazyn communications.com http://www.acb.org/affiliates Adris Bazyn, Pres. International Association for Business Organizations 3 Woodthorn Ct., Ste. 12 Owings Mills, MD 21117 (410)581-1373 E-mail: nahbb@msn.com Rudolph Lewis, Exec. Officer

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International Council for Small Business The George Washington University School of Business and Public Management 2115 G St. NW, Ste. 403 Washington, DC 20052 (202)994-0704 Fax: (202)994-4930 E-mail: icsb@gwu.edu Website: http://www.icsb.org Susan G. Duffy. Admin. International Small Business Consortium 3309 Windjammer St. Norman, OK 73072 E-mail: sb@isbc.com Website: http://www.isbc.com Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership 4801 Rockhill Rd. Kansas City, MO 64110-2046 (816)932-1000 E-mail: info@kauffman.org Website: http://www.entreworld.org National Alliance for Fair Competition 3 Bethesda Metro Center, Ste. 1100 Bethesda, MD 20814 (410)235-7116 Fax: (410)235-7116 E-mail: ampesq@aol.com Tony Ponticelli, Exec.Dir. National Association for the Self-Employed PO Box 612067 DFW Airport Dallas, TX 75261-2067 (800)232-6273 E-mail: mpetron@nase.org Website: http://www.nase.org Robert Hughes, Pres. National Association of Business Leaders 4132 Shoreline Dr., Ste. J & H Earth City, MO 63045 Fax: (314)298-9110 E-mail: nabl@nabl.com Website: http://www.nabl.com/ Gene Blumenthal, Contact National Association of Private Enterprise PO Box 15550 Long Beach, CA 90815 888-224-0953 Fax: (714)844-4942 Website: http://www.napeonline.net Laura Squiers, Exec.Dir. National Association of Small Business Investment Companies 666 11th St. NW, Ste. 750 Washington, DC 20001 (202)628-5055 Fax: (202)628-5080 E-mail: nasbic@nasbic.org Website: http://www.nasbic.org Lee W. Mercer, Pres. National Business Association PO Box 700728 5151 Beltline Rd., Ste. 1150 Dallas, TX 75370 (972)458-0900 800-456-0440 Fax: (972)960-9149 E-mail: info@nationalbusiness.org Website: http://www.national business.org Raj Nisankarao, Pres. National Business Owners Association PO Box 111 Stuart, VA 24171 (276)251-7500 (866)251-7505 Fax: (276)251-2217 E-mail: membershipservices@nboa.org Website: http://www.rvmdb.com.nboa Paul LaBarr, Pres. National Center for Fair Competition PO Box 220 Annandale, VA 22003 (703)280-4622 Fax: (703)280-0942 E-mail: kentonp1@aol.com Kenton Pattie, Pres. National Family Business Council 1640 W. Kennedy Rd. Lake Forest, IL 60045 (847)295-1040 Fax: (847)295-1898 E-mail: lmsnfbc@email.msn.com Jogn E. Messervey, Pres. National Federation of Independent Business 53 Century Blvd., Ste. 250 Nashville, TN 37214 (615)872-5800 800-NFIBNOW Fax: (615)872-5353 Website: http://www.nfib.org Jack Faris, Pres. and CEO National Small Business Association 1156 15th St. NW, Ste. 1100 Washington, DC 20005 (202)293-8830 800-345-6728 Fax: (202)872-8543 E-mail: press@nsba.biz Website: http://www.nsba.biz Rob Yunich, Dir. of Communications PUSH Commercial Division 930 E 50th St. Chicago, IL 60615-2702 (773)373-3366 Fax: (773)373-3571 E-mail: info@rainbowpush.org Website: http://www.rainbowpush.org Rev. Willie T. Barrow, Co-Chm. Research Institute for Small and Emerging Business 722 12th St. NW Washington, DC 20005 (202)628-8382 Fax: (202)628-8392 E-mail: info@riseb.org Website: http://www.riseb.org Allan Neece, Jr., Chm. Sales Professionals USA PO Box 149 Arvada, CO 80001 (303)534-4937 888-736-7767 E-mail: salespro@salesprofessionalsusa.com Website: http://www.salesprofessionalsusa.com Sharon Herbert, Natl. Pres. Score Association - Service Corps of Retired Executives 409 3rd St. SW, 6th Fl. Washington, DC 20024 (202)205-6762 800-634-0245 Fax: (202)205-7636 E-mail: media@score.org Website: http://www.score.org W. Kenneth Yancey, Jr., CEO Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council 1920 L St. NW, Ste. 200 Washington, DC 20036 (202)785-0238 Fax: (202)822-8118 E-mail: membership@sbec.org Website: http://www.sbecouncil.org Karen Kerrigan, Pres./CEO

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Small Business in Telecommunications 1331 H St. NW, Ste. 500 Washington, DC 20005 (202)347-4511 Fax: (202)347-8607 E-mail: sbt@sbthome.org Website: http://www.sbthome.org Lonnie Danchik, Chm. Small Business Legislative Council 1010 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Ste. 540 Washington, DC 20005 (202)639-8500 Fax: (202)296-5333 E-mail: email@sblc.org Website: http://www.sblc.org John Satagaj, Pres. Small Business Service Bureau 554 Main St. PO Box 15014 Worcester, MA 01615-0014 (508)756-3513 800-343-0939 Fax: (508)770-0528 E-mail: membership@sbsb.com Website: http://www.sbsb.com Francis R. Carroll, Pres. Small Publishers Association of North America 1618 W COlorado Ave. Colorado Springs, CO 80904 (719)475-1726 Fax: (719)471-2182 E-mail: span@spannet.org Website: http://www.spannet.org Scott Flora, Exec. Dir. SOHO America PO Box 941 Hurst, TX 76053-0941 800-495-SOHO E-mail: soho@1sas.com Website: http://www.soho.org Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation 915 Broadway, 17th Fl. New York, NY 10010 (212)473-0255 Fax: (212)473-0357 E-mail: info@seedco.org Website: http://www.seedco.org William Grinker, CEO Support Services Alliance 107 Prospect St. Schoharie, NY 12157 800-836-4772 E-mail: info@ssamembers.com Website: http://www.ssainfo.com Steve COle, Pres. United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship 975 University Ave., No. 3260 Madison, WI 53706 (608)262-9982 Fax: (608)263-0818 E-mail: jgillman@wisc.edu Website: http://www.ususbe.org Joan Gillman, Exec. Dir. E-mail: inquiry@sri.bc.ca Website: http://www.sri.com Andrew R. De Boda Consulting 1523 Milford Ave. Coquitlam, BC, Canada V3J 2V9 (604)936-4527 Fax: (604)936-4527 E-mail: deboda@intergate.bc.ca Website: http://www.ourworld. compuserve.com/homepages/deboda The Sage Group Ltd. 980 - 355 Burrard St. 744 W Haistings, Ste. 410 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6C 1A5 (604)669-9269 Fax: (604)669-6622 Tikkanen-Bradley 1345 Nelson St., Ste. 202 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6E 1J8 (604)669-0583 E-mail: webmaster@tikkanen bradley.com Website: http://www.tikkanenbradley.com

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Consultants
This section contains a listing of consultants specializing in small business development. It is arranged alphabetically by country, then by state or province, then by city, then by firm name.

Canada
Alberta
Common Sense Solutions 3405 16A Ave. Edmonton, AB, Canada (403)465-7330 Fax: (403)465-7380 E-mail: gcoulson@comsense solutions.com Website: http://www.comsensesolutions. com Varsity Consulting Group School of Business University of Alberta Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R6 (780)492-2994 Fax: (780)492-5400 Website: http://www.bus.ualberta.ca/vcg Viro Hospital Consulting 42 Commonwealth Bldg., 9912 - 106 St. NW Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 1C5 (403)425-3871 Fax: (403)425-3871 E-mail: rpb@freenet.edmonton.ab.ca

Ontario
The Cynton Co. 17 Massey St. Brampton, ON, Canada L6S 2V6 (905)792-7769 Fax: (905)792-8116 E-mail: cynton@home.com Website: http://www.cynton.com Begley & Associates RR 6 Cambridge, ON, Canada N1R 5S7 (519)740-3629 Fax: (519)740-3629 E-mail: begley@in.on.ca Website: http://www.in.on.ca/~begley/ index.htm CRO Engineering Ltd. 1895 William Hodgins Ln. Carp, ON, Canada K0A 1L0 (613)839-1108 Fax: (613)839-1406 E-mail: J.Grefford@ieee.ca Website: http://www.geocities.com/ WallStreet/District/7401/ Task Enterprises Box 69, RR 2 Hamilton Flamborough, ON, Canada L8N 2Z7 (905)659-0153 Fax: (905)659-0861

British Columbia
SRI Strategic Resources Inc. 4330 Kingsway, Ste. 1600 Burnaby, BC, Canada V5H 4G7 (604)435-0627 Fax: (604)435-2782

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HST Group Ltd. 430 Gilmour St. Ottawa, ON, Canada K2P 0R8 (613)236-7303 Fax: (613)236-9893 Harrison Associates BCE Pl. 181 Bay St., Ste. 3740 PO Box 798 Toronto, ON, Canada M5J 2T3 (416)364-5441 Fax: (416)364-2875 TCI Convergence Ltd. Management Consultants 99 Crown’s Ln. Toronto, ON, Canada M5R 3P4 (416)515-4146 Fax: (416)515-2097 E-mail: tci@inforamp.net Website: http://tciconverge.com/ index.1.html Ken Wyman & Associates Inc. 64B Shuter St., Ste. 200 Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 1B1 (416)362-2926 Fax: (416)362-3039 E-mail: kenwyman@compuserve.com JPL Business Consultants 82705 Metter Rd. Wellandport, ON, Canada L0R 2J0 (905)386-7450 Fax: (905)386-7450 E-mail: plamarch@freenet.npiec.on.ca E-mail: gerald.rekve@corporate managementconsultant.com Website: http://www.Corporate managementconsultants.com Gerald Rekve (602)395-1001 Fax: (602)604-8180 Comgate Telemanagement Ltd. 706 E Bell Rd., Ste. 105 Phoenix, AZ 85022 (602)485-5708 Fax: (602)485-5709 E-mail: comgate@netzone.com Website: http://www.comgate.com Moneysoft Inc. 1 E Camelback Rd. #550 Phoenix, AZ 85012 Free: 800-966-7797 E-mail: mbray@moneysoft.com Harvey C. Skoog PO Box 26439 Prescott Valley, AZ 86312 (520)772-1714 Fax: (520)772-2814 LMC Services 8711 E Pinnacle Peak Rd., No. 340 Scottsdale, AZ 85255-3555 (602)585-7177 Fax: (602)585-5880 E-mail: louws@earthlink.com Sauerbrun Technology Group Ltd. 7979 E Princess Dr., Ste. 5 Scottsdale, AZ 85255-5878 (602)502-4950 Fax: (602)502-4292 E-mail: info@sauerbrun.com Website: http://www.sauerbrun.com Gary L. McLeod PO Box 230 Sonoita, AZ 85637 Fax: (602)455-5661 Van Cleve Associates 6932 E 2nd St. Tucson, AZ 85710 (520)296-2587 Fax: (520)296-3358

United states
Alabama
Business Planning Inc. 300 Office Park Dr. Birmingham, AL 35223-2474 (205)870-7090 Fax: (205)870-7103 Tradebank of Eastern Alabama 546 Broad St., Ste. 3 Gadsden, AL 35901 (205)547-8700 Fax: (205)547-8718 E-mail: mansion@webex.com Website: http://www.webex.com/~tea

Alaska
AK Business Development Center 3335 Arctic Blvd., Ste. 203 Anchorage, AK 99503 (907)562-0335 Free: 800-478-3474 Fax: (907)562-6988 E-mail: abdc@gci.net Website: http://www.abdc.org Business Matters PO Box 287 Fairbanks, AK 99707 (907)452-5650

Quebec
The Zimmar Consulting Partnership Inc. Westmount PO Box 98 Montreal, QC, Canada H3Z 2T1 (514)484-1459 Fax: (514)484-3063

Arizona
Carefree Direct Marketing Corp. 8001 E Serene St. PO Box 3737 Carefree, AZ 85377-3737 (480)488-4227 Fax: (480)488-2841 Trans Energy Corp. 1739 W 7th Ave. Mesa, AZ 85202 (480)827-7915 Fax: (480)967-6601 E-mail: aha@clean-air.org Website: http://www.clean-air.org CMAS 5125 N 16th St. Phoenix, AZ 85016

Saskatchewan
Trimension Group No. 104-110 Research Dr. Innovation Place, SK, Canada S7N 3R3 (306)668-2560 Fax: (306)975-1156 E-mail: trimension@trimension.ca Website: http://www.trimension.ca Corporate Management Consultants 40 Government Road - PO Box 185 Prud Homme, SK, Canada, SOK 3K0 (306)654-4569

California
Acumen Group Inc. (650)949-9349 Fax: (650)949-4845 E-mail: acumen-g@ix.netcom.com Website: http://pw2.netcom.com/~janed/ acumen.html On-line Career and Management Consulting 420 Central Ave., No. 314 Alameda, CA 94501

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(510)864-0336 Fax: (510)864-0336 E-mail: career@dnai.com Website: http://www.dnai.com/~career Career Paths-Thomas E. Church & Associates Inc. PO Box 2439 Aptos, CA 95001 (408)662-7950 Fax: (408)662-7955 E-mail: church@ix.netcom.com Website: http://www.careerpaths-tom.com Keck & Co. Business Consultants 410 Walsh Rd. Atherton, CA 94027 (650)854-9588 Fax: (650)854-7240 E-mail: info@keckco.com Website: http://www.keckco.com Ben W. Laverty III, PhD, REA, CEI 4909 Stockdale Hwy., Ste. 132 Bakersfield, CA 93309 (661)283-8300 Free: 800-833-0373 Fax: (661)283-8313 E-mail: cstc@cstcsafety.com Website: http://www.cstcsafety.com/cstc Lindquist Consultants-Venture Planning 225 Arlington Ave. Berkeley, CA 94707 (510)524-6685 Fax: (510)527-6604 Larson Associates PO Box 9005 Brea, CA 92822 (714)529-4121 Fax: (714)572-3606 E-mail: ray@consultlarson.com Website: http://www.consultlarson.com Kremer Management Consulting PO Box 500 Carmel, CA 93921 (408)626-8311 Fax: (408)624-2663 E-mail: ddkremer@aol.com W and J PARTNERSHIP PO Box 2499 18876 Edwin Markham Dr. Castro Valley, CA 94546 (510)583-7751 Fax: (510)583-7645 E-mail: wamorgan@wjpartnership.com Website: http://www.wjpartnership.com JB Associates 21118 Gardena Dr. Cupertino, CA 95014 (408)257-0214 Fax: (408)257-0216 E-mail: semarang@sirius.com House Agricultural Consultants PO Box 1615 Davis, CA 95617-1615 (916)753-3361 Fax: (916)753-0464 E-mail: infoag@houseag.com Website: http://www.houseag.com/ 3C Systems Co. 16161 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 815 Encino, CA 91436 (818)907-1302 Fax: (818)907-1357 E-mail: mark@3CSysCo.com Website: http://www.3CSysCo.com Technical Management Consultants 3624 Westfall Dr. Encino, CA 91436-4154 (818)784-0626 Fax: (818)501-5575 E-mail: tmcrs@aol.com RAINWATER-GISH & Associates, Business Finance & Development 317 3rd St., Ste. 3 Eureka, CA 95501 (707)443-0030 Fax: (707)443-5683 Global Tradelinks 451 Pebble Beach Pl. Fullerton, CA 92835 (714)441-2280 Fax: (714)441-2281 E-mail: info@globaltradelinks.com Website: http://www.globaltradelinks.com Strategic Business Group 800 Cienaga Dr. Fullerton, CA 92835-1248 (714)449-1040 Fax: (714)525-1631 Burnes Consulting 20537 Wolf Creek Rd. Grass Valley, CA 95949 (530)346-8188 Free: 800-949-9021 Fax: (530)346-7704 E-mail: kent@burnesconsulting.com Website: http://www.burnesconsulting.com Pioneer Business Consultants 9042 Garfield Ave., Ste. 312 Huntington Beach, CA 92646 (714)964-7600 Beblie, Brandt & Jacobs Inc. 16 Technology, Ste. 164 Irvine, CA 92618 (714)450-8790 Fax: (714)450-8799 E-mail: darcy@bbjinc.com Website: http://198.147.90.26 Fluor Daniel Inc. 3353 Michelson Dr. Irvine, CA 92612-0650 (949)975-2000 Fax: (949)975-5271 E-mail: sales.consulting@fluordaniel.com Website: http://www.fluordanielconsulting. com MCS Associates 18300 Von Karman, Ste. 710 Irvine, CA 92612 (949)263-8700 Fax: (949)263-0770 E-mail: info@mcsassociates.com Website: http://www.mcsassociates.com Inspired Arts Inc. 4225 Executive Sq., Ste. 1160 La Jolla, CA 92037 (619)623-3525 Free: 800-851-4394 Fax: (619)623-3534 E-mail: info@inspiredarts.com Website: http://www.inspiredarts.com The Laresis Companies PO Box 3284 La Jolla, CA 92038 (619)452-2720 Fax: (619)452-8744 RCL & Co. PO Box 1143 737 Pearl St., Ste. 201 La Jolla, CA 92038 (619)454-8883 Fax: (619)454-8880 Comprehensive Business Services 3201 Lucas Cir. Lafayette, CA 94549 (925)283-8272 Fax: (925)283-8272 The Ribble Group 27601 Forbes Rd., Ste. 52 Laguna Niguel, CA 92677

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(714)582-1085 Fax: (714)582-6420 E-mail: ribble@deltanet.com Norris Bernstein, CMC 9309 Marina Pacifica Dr. N Long Beach, CA 90803 (562)493-5458 Fax: (562)493-5459 E-mail: norris@ctecomputer.com Website: http://foodconsultants.com/ bernstein/ Horizon Consulting Services 1315 Garthwick Dr. Los Altos, CA 94024 (415)967-0906 Fax: (415)967-0906 Brincko Associates Inc. 1801 Avenue of the Stars, Ste. 1054 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310)553-4523 Fax: (310)553-6782 Rubenstein/Justman Management Consultants 2049 Century Park E, 24th Fl. Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310)282-0800 Fax: (310)282-0400 E-mail: info@rjmc.net Website: http://www.rjmc.net F.J. Schroeder & Associates 1926 Westholme Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310)470-2655 Fax: (310)470-6378 E-mail: fjsacons@aol.com Website: http://www.mcninet.com/ GlobalLook/Fjschroe.html Western Management Associates 5959 W Century Blvd., Ste. 565 Los Angeles, CA 90045-6506 (310)645-1091 Free: (888)788-6534 Fax: (310)645-1092 E-mail: gene@cfoforrent.com Website: http://www.cfoforrent.com Darrell Sell and Associates Los Gatos, CA 95030 (408)354-7794 E-mail: darrell@netcom.com Leslie J. Zambo 3355 Michael Dr. Marina, CA 93933 (408)384-7086 Fax: (408)647-4199 E-mail: 104776.1552@compuserve.com Marketing Services Management PO Box 1377 Martinez, CA 94553 (510)370-8527 Fax: (510)370-8527 E-mail: markserve@biotechnet.com William M. Shine Consulting Service PO Box 127 Moraga, CA 94556-0127 (510)376-6516 Palo Alto Management Group Inc. 2672 Bayshore Pky., Ste. 701 Mountain View, CA 94043 (415)968-4374 Fax: (415)968-4245 E-mail: mburwen@pamg.com BizplanSource 1048 Irvine Ave., Ste. 621 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Free: 888-253-0974 Fax: 800-859-8254 E-mail: info@bizplansource.com Website: http://www.bizplansource.com Adam Greengrass, President The Market Connection 4020 Birch St., Ste. 203 Newport Beach, CA 92660 (714)731-6273 Fax: (714)833-0253 Muller Associates PO Box 7264 Newport Beach, CA 92658 (714)646-1169 Fax: (714)646-1169 International Health Resources PO Box 329 North San Juan, CA 95960-0329 (530)292-1266 Fax: (530)292-1243 Website: http://www.futureof healthcare.com NEXUS - Consultants to Management PO Box 1531 Novato, CA 94948 (415)897-4400 Fax: (415)898-2252 E-mail: jimnexus@aol.com Aerospcace.Org PO Box 28831 Oakland, CA 94604-8831 (510)530-9169 Fax: (510)530-3411 Website: http://www.aerospace.org Intelequest Corp. 722 Gailen Ave. Palo Alto, CA 94303 (415)968-3443 Fax: (415)493-6954 E-mail: frits@iqix.com McLaughlin & Associates 66 San Marino Cir. Rancho Mirage, CA 92270 (760)321-2932 Fax: (760)328-2474 E-mail: jackmcla@msn.com Carrera Consulting Group, a division of Maximus 2110 21st St., Ste. 400 Sacramento, CA 95818 (916)456-3300 Fax: (916)456-3306 E-mail: central@carreraconsulting.com Website: http://www.carreraconsulting.com Bay Area Tax Consultants and Bayhill Financial Consultants 1150 Bayhill Dr., Ste. 1150 San Bruno, CA 94066-3004 (415)952-8786 Fax: (415)588-4524 E-mail: baytax@compuserve.com Website: http://www.baytax.com/ AdCon Services, LLC 8871 Hillery Dr. Dan Diego, CA 92126 (858)433-1411 E-mail: adam@adconservices.com Website: http://www.adconservices.com Adam Greengrass California Business Incubation Network 101 W Broadway, No. 480 San Diego, CA 92101 (619)237-0559 Fax: (619)237-0521 G.R. Gordetsky Consultants Inc. 11414 Windy Summit Pl. San Diego, CA 92127 (619)487-4939 Fax: (619)487-5587 E-mail: gordet@pacbell.net Freeman, Sullivan & Co. 131 Steuart St., Ste. 500 San Francisco, CA 94105 (415)777-0707

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Free: 800-777-0737 Fax: (415)777-2420 Website: http://www.fsc-research.com Ideas Unlimited 2151 California St., Ste. 7 San Francisco, CA 94115 (415)931-0641 Fax: (415)931-0880 Russell Miller Inc. 300 Montgomery St., Ste. 900 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)956-7474 Fax: (415)398-0620 E-mail: rmi@pacbell.net Website: http://www.rmisf.com PKF Consulting 425 California St., Ste. 1650 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)421-5378 Fax: (415)956-7708 E-mail: callahan@pkfc.com Website: http://www.pkfonline.com Welling & Woodard Inc. 1067 Broadway San Francisco, CA 94133 (415)776-4500 Fax: (415)776-5067 Highland Associates 16174 Highland Dr. San Jose, CA 95127 (408)272-7008 Fax: (408)272-4040 ORDIS Inc. 6815 Trinidad Dr. San Jose, CA 95120-2056 (408)268-3321 Free: 800-446-7347 Fax: (408)268-3582 E-mail: ordis@ordis.com Website: http://www.ordis.com Stanford Resources Inc. 20 Great Oaks Blvd., Ste. 200 San Jose, CA 95119 (408)360-8400 Fax: (408)360-8410 E-mail: sales@stanfordsources.com Website: http://www.stanfordresources.com Technology Properties Ltd. Inc. PO Box 20250 San Jose, CA 95160 (408)243-9898 Fax: (408)296-6637 E-mail: sanjose@tplnet.com Helfert Associates 1777 Borel Pl., Ste. 508 San Mateo, CA 94402-3514 (650)377-0540 Fax: (650)377-0472 Mykytyn Consulting Group Inc. 185 N Redwood Dr., Ste. 200 San Rafael, CA 94903 (415)491-1770 Fax: (415)491-1251 E-mail: info@mcgi.com Website: http://www.mcgi.com Omega Management Systems Inc. 3 Mount Darwin Ct. San Rafael, CA 94903-1109 (415)499-1300 Fax: (415)492-9490 E-mail: omegamgt@ix.netcom.com The Information Group Inc. 4675 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 100 Santa Clara, CA 95051 (408)985-7877 Fax: (408)985-2945 E-mail: dvincent@tig-usa.com Website: http://www.tig-usa.com Cast Management Consultants 1620 26th St., Ste. 2040N Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310)828-7511 Fax: (310)453-6831 Cuma Consulting Management Box 724 Santa Rosa, CA 95402 (707)785-2477 Fax: (707)785-2478 The E-Myth Academy 131B Stony Cir., Ste. 2000 Santa Rosa, CA 95401 (707)569-5600 Free: 800-221-0266 Fax: (707)569-5700 E-mail: info@e-myth.com Website: http://www.e-myth.com Reilly, Connors & Ray 1743 Canyon Rd. Spring Valley, CA 91977 (619)698-4808 Fax: (619)460-3892 E-mail: davidray@adnc.com Management Consultants Sunnyvale, CA 94087-4700 (408)773-0321 RJR Associates 1639 Lewiston Dr. Sunnyvale, CA 94087 (408)737-7720 E-mail: bobroy@rjrassoc.com Website: http://www.rjrassoc.com Schwafel Associates 333 Cobalt Way, Ste. 21 Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (408)720-0649 Fax: (408)720-1796 E-mail: schwafel@ricochet.net Website: http://www.patca.org Staubs Business Services 23320 S Vermont Ave. Torrance, CA 90502-2940 (310)830-9128 Fax: (310)830-9128 E-mail: Harry_L_Staubs@Lamg.com Out of Your Mind . . . and Into the Marketplace 13381 White Sands Dr. Tustin, CA 92780-4565 (714)544-0248 Free: 800-419-1513 Fax: (714)730-1414 E-mail: lpinson@aol.com Website: http://www.business-plan.com Independent Research Services PO Box 2426 Van Nuys, CA 91404-2426 (818)993-3622 Ingman Company Inc. 7949 Woodley Ave., Ste. 120 Van Nuys, CA 91406-1232 (818)375-5027 Fax: (818)894-5001 Innovative Technology Associates 3639 E Harbor Blvd., Ste. 203E Ventura, CA 93001 (805)650-9353 Grid Technology Associates 20404 Tufts Cir. Walnut, CA 91789 (909)444-0922 Fax: (909)444-0922 E-mail: grid_technology@msn.com Ridge Consultants Inc. 100 Pringle Ave., Ste. 580 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 (925)274-1990 Fax: (510)274-1956 E-mail: info@ridgecon.com Website: http://www.ridgecon.com

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Bell Springs Publishing PO Box 1240 Willits, CA 95490 (707)459-6372 E-mail: bellsprings@sabernet Website: http://www.bellsprings.com Hutchinson Consulting and Appraisal 23245 Sylvan St., Ste. 103 Woodland Hills, CA 91367 (818)888-8175 Free: 800-977-7548 Fax: (818)888-8220 E-mail: r.f.hutchinson-cpa@worldnet. att.net (303)988-6695 Fax: (303)988-6739 E-mail: ael1@classic.msn.com The Vincent Company Inc. 200 Union Blvd., Ste. 210 Lakewood, CO 80228 (303)989-7271 Free: 800-274-0733 Fax: (303)989-7570 E-mail: vincent@vincentco.com Website: http://www.vincentco.com Johnson & West Management Consultants Inc. 7612 S Logan Dr. Littleton, CO 80122 (303)730-2810 Fax: (303)730-3219 Western Capital Holdings Inc. 10050 E Applwood Dr. Parker, CO 80138 (303)841-1022 Fax: (303)770-1945 Fax: (203)624-7599 E-mail: Alovinsphd@aol.com Website: http://www.lovinsgroup.com JC Ventures Inc. 4 Arnold St. Old Greenwich, CT 06870-1203 (203)698-1990 Free: 800-698-1997 Fax: (203)698-2638 Charles L. Hornung Associates 52 Ned’s Mountain Rd. Ridgefield, CT 06877 (203)431-0297 Manus 100 Prospect St., S Tower Stamford, CT 06901 (203)326-3880 Free: 800-445-0942 Fax: (203)326-3890 E-mail: manus1@aol.com Website: http://www.RightManus.com RealBusinessPlans.com 156 Westport Rd. Wilton, CT 06897 (914)837-2886 E-mail: ct@realbusinessplans.com Website: http://www.RealBusinessPlans.com Tony Tecce

Colorado
Sam Boyer & Associates 4255 S Buckley Rd., No. 136 Aurora, CO 80013 Free: 800-785-0485 Fax: (303)766-8740 E-mail: samboyer@samboyer.com Website: http://www.samboyer.com/ Ameriwest Business Consultants Inc. PO Box 26266 Colorado Springs, CO 80936 (719)380-7096 Fax: (719)380-7096 E-mail: email@abchelp.com Website: http://www.abchelp.com GVNW Consulting Inc. 2270 La Montana Way Colorado Springs, CO 80936 (719)594-5800 Fax: (719)594-5803 Website: http://www.gvnw.com M-Squared Inc. 755 San Gabriel Pl. Colorado Springs, CO 80906 (719)576-2554 Fax: (719)576-2554 Thornton Financial FNIC 1024 Centre Ave., Bldg. E Fort Collins, CO 80526-1849 (970)221-2089 Fax: (970)484-5206 TenEyck Associates 1760 Cherryville Rd. Greenwood Village, CO 80121-1503 (303)758-6129 Fax: (303)761-8286 Associated Enterprises Ltd. 13050 W Ceder Dr., Unit 11 Lakewood, CO 80228

Connecticut
Stratman Group Inc. 40 Tower Ln. Avon, CT 06001-4222 (860)677-2898 Free: 800-551-0499 Fax: (860)677-8210 Cowherd Consulting Group Inc. 106 Stephen Mather Rd. Darien, CT 06820 (203)655-2150 Fax: (203)655-6427 Greenwich Associates 8 Greenwich Office Park Greenwich, CT 06831-5149 (203)629-1200 Fax: (203)629-1229 E-mail: lisa@greenwich.com Website: http://www.greenwich.com Follow-up News 185 Pine St., Ste. 818 Manchester, CT 06040 (860)647-7542 Free: 800-708-0696 Fax: (860)646-6544 E-mail: Followupnews@aol.com Lovins & Associates Consulting 309 Edwards St. New Haven, CT 06511 (203)787-3367

Delaware
Focus Marketing 61-7 Habor Dr. Claymont, DE 19703 (302)793-3064 Daedalus Ventures Ltd. PO Box 1474 Hockessin, DE 19707 (302)239-6758 Fax: (302)239-9991 E-mail: daedalus@mail.del.net The Formula Group PO Box 866 Hockessin, DE 19707 (302)456-0952 Fax: (302)456-1354 E-mail: formula@netaxs.com Selden Enterprises Inc. 2502 Silverside Rd., Ste. 1 Wilmington, DE 19810-3740 (302)529-7113 Fax: (302)529-7442 E-mail: selden2@bellatlantic.net Website: http://www.seldenenterprises.com

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District of Columbia
Bruce W. McGee and Associates 7826 Eastern Ave. NW, Ste. 30 Washington, DC 20012 (202)726-7272 Fax: (202)726-2946 McManis Associates Inc. 1900 K St. NW, Ste. 700 Washington, DC 20006 (202)466-7680 Fax: (202)872-1898 Website: http://www.mcmanis-mmi.com Smith, Dawson & Andrews Inc. 1000 Connecticut Ave., Ste. 302 Washington, DC 20036 (202)835-0740 Fax: (202)775-8526 E-mail: webmaster@sda-inc.com Website: http://www.sda-inc.com

Fax: (954)720-2815 E-mail: easands@aol.com Website: http://www.ericsandsconsultig.com Professional Planning Associates, Inc. 1975 E. Sunrise Blvd. Suite 607 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304 (954)764-5204 Fax: 954-463-4172 E-mail: Mgoldstein@proplana.com Website: http://proplana.com Michael Goldstein, President Host Media Corp. 3948 S 3rd St., Ste. 191 Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250 (904)285-3239 Fax: (904)285-5618 E-mail: msconsulting@compuserve.com Website: http://www.media servicesgroup.com William V. Hall 1925 Brickell, Ste. D-701 Miami, FL 33129 (305)856-9622 Fax: (305)856-4113 E-mail: williamvhall@compuserve.com F.A. McGee Inc. 800 Claughton Island Dr., Ste. 401 Miami, FL 33131 (305)377-9123 Taxplan Inc. Mirasol International Ctr. 2699 Collins Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33140 (305)538-3303 T.C. Brown & Associates 8415 Excalibur Cir., Apt. B1 Naples, FL 34108 (941)594-1949 Fax: (941)594-0611 E-mail: tcater@naples.net.com RLA International Consulting 713 Lagoon Dr. North Palm Beach, FL 33408 (407)626-4258 Fax: (407)626-5772 Comprehensive Franchising Inc. 2465 Ridgecrest Ave. Orange Park, FL 32065 (904)272-6567 Free: 800-321-6567 Fax: (904)272-6750 E-mail: theimp@cris.com Website: http://www.franchise411.com

Hunter G. Jackson Jr. - Consulting Environmental Physicist PO Box 618272 Orlando, FL 32861-8272 (407)295-4188 E-mail: hunterjackson@juno.com F. Newton Parks 210 El Brillo Way Palm Beach, FL 33480 (561)833-1727 Fax: (561)833-4541 Avery Business Development Services 2506 St. Michel Ct. Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (904)285-6033 Fax: (904)285-6033 Strategic Business Planning Co. PO Box 821006 South Florida, FL 33082-1006 (954)704-9100 Fax: (954)438-7333 E-mail: info@bizplan.com Website: http://www.bizplan.com Dufresne Consulting Group Inc. 10014 N Dale Mabry, Ste. 101 Tampa, FL 33618-4426 (813)264-4775 Fax: (813)264-9300 Website: http://www.dcgconsult.com Agrippa Enterprises Inc. PO Box 175 Venice, FL 34284-0175 (941)355-7876 E-mail: webservices@agrippa.com Website: http://www.agrippa.com Center for Simplified Strategic Planning Inc. PO Box 3324 Vero Beach, FL 32964-3324 (561)231-3636 Fax: (561)231-1099 Website: http://www.cssp.com

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Florida
BackBone, Inc. 20404 Hacienda Court Boca Raton, FL 33498 (561)470-0965 Fax: 516-908-4038 E-mail: BPlans@backboneinc.com Website: http://www.backboneinc.com Charles Epstein, President Whalen & Associates Inc. 4255 Northwest 26 Ct. Boca Raton, FL 33434 (561)241-5950 Fax: (561)241-7414 E-mail: drwhalen@ix.netcom.com E.N. Rysso & Associates 180 Bermuda Petrel Ct. Daytona Beach, FL 32119 (386)760-3028 E-mail: erysso@aol.com Virtual Technocrats LLC 560 Lavers Circle, #146 Delray Beach, FL 33444 (561)265-3509 E-mail: josh@virtualtechnocrats.com; info@virtualtechnocrats.com Website: http://www.virtualtechnocrats. com Josh Eikov, Managing Director Eric Sands Consulting Services 6193 Rock Island Rd., Ste. 412 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33319 (954)721-4767

Georgia
Marketing Spectrum Inc. 115 Perimeter Pl., Ste. 440 Atlanta, GA 30346 (770)395-7244 Fax: (770)393-4071 Business Ventures Corp. 1650 Oakbrook Dr., Ste. 405 Norcross, GA 30093 (770)729-8000 Fax: (770)729-8028

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Informed Decisions Inc. 100 Falling Cheek Sautee Nacoochee, GA 30571 (706)878-1905 Fax: (706)878-1802 E-mail: skylake@compuserve.com Tom C. Davis & Associates, P.C. 3189 Perimeter Rd. Valdosta, GA 31602 (912)247-9801 Fax: (912)244-7704 E-mail: mail@tcdcpa.com Website: http://www.tcdcpa.com/ FMS Consultants 5801 N Sheridan Rd., Ste. 3D Chicago, IL 60660 (773)561-7362 Fax: (773)561-6274 Grant Thornton 800 1 Prudential Plz. 130 E Randolph St. Chicago, IL 60601 (312)856-0001 Fax: (312)861-1340 E-mail: gtinfo@gt.com Website: http://www.grantthornton.com Kingsbury International Ltd. 5341 N Glenwood Ave. Chicago, IL 60640 (773)271-3030 Fax: (773)728-7080 E-mail: jetlag@mcs.com Website: http://www.kingbiz.com MacDougall & Blake Inc. 1414 N Wells St., Ste. 311 Chicago, IL 60610-1306 (312)587-3330 Fax: (312)587-3699 E-mail: jblake@compuserve.com James C. Osburn Ltd. 6445 N. Western Ave., Ste. 304 Chicago, IL 60645 (773)262-4428 Fax: (773)262-6755 E-mail: osburnltd@aol.com Tarifero & Tazewell Inc. 211 S Clark Chicago, IL 60690 (312)665-9714 Fax: (312)665-9716 Human Energy Design Systems 620 Roosevelt Dr. Edwardsville, IL 62025 (618)692-0258 Fax: (618)692-0819 China Business Consultants Group 931 Dakota Cir. Naperville, IL 60563 (630)778-7992 Fax: (630)778-7915 E-mail: cbcq@aol.com Center for Workforce Effectiveness 500 Skokie Blvd., Ste. 222 Northbrook, IL 60062 (847)559-8777 Fax: (847)559-8778 E-mail: office@cwelink.com Website: http://www.cwelink.com Smith Associates 1320 White Mountain Dr. Northbrook, IL 60062 (847)480-7200 Fax: (847)480-9828 Francorp Inc. 20200 Governors Dr. Olympia Fields, IL 60461 (708)481-2900 Free: 800-372-6244 Fax: (708)481-5885 E-mail: francorp@aol.com Website: http://www.francorpinc.com Camber Business Strategy Consultants 1010 S Plum Tree Ct Palatine, IL 60078-0986 (847)202-0101 Fax: (847)705-7510 E-mail: camber@ameritech.net Partec Enterprise Group 5202 Keith Dr. Richton Park, IL 60471 (708)503-4047 Fax: (708)503-9468 Rockford Consulting Group Ltd. Century Plz., Ste. 206 7210 E State St. Rockford, IL 61108 (815)229-2900 Free: 800-667-7495 Fax: (815)229-2612 E-mail: rligus@RockfordConsulting.com Website: http://www.Rockford Consulting.com RSM McGladrey Inc. 1699 E Woodfield Rd., Ste. 300 Schaumburg, IL 60173-4969 (847)413-6900 Fax: (847)517-7067 Website: http://www.rsmmcgladrey.com A.D. Star Consulting 320 Euclid Winnetka, IL 60093 (847)446-7827 Fax: (847)446-7827 E-mail: startwo@worldnet.att.net

Illinois
TWD and Associates 431 S Patton Arlington Heights, IL 60005 (847)398-6410 Fax: (847)255-5095 E-mail: tdoo@aol.com Management Planning Associates Inc. 2275 Half Day Rd., Ste. 350 Bannockburn, IL 60015-1277 (847)945-2421 Fax: (847)945-2425 Phil Faris Associates 86 Old Mill Ct. Barrington, IL 60010 (847)382-4888 Fax: (847)382-4890 E-mail: pfaris@meginsnet.net Seven Continents Technology 787 Stonebridge Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 (708)577-9653 Fax: (708)870-1220 Grubb & Blue Inc. 2404 Windsor Pl. Champaign, IL 61820 (217)366-0052 Fax: (217)356-0117 ACE Accounting Service Inc. 3128 N Bernard St. Chicago, IL 60618 (773)463-7854 Fax: (773)463-7854 AON Consulting Worldwide 200 E Randolph St., 10th Fl. Chicago, IL 60601 (312)381-4800 Free: 800-438-6487 Fax: (312)381-0240 Website: http://www.aon.com

Indiana
Modular Consultants Inc. 3109 Crabtree Ln. Elkhart, IN 46514

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(219)264-5761 Fax: (219)264-5761 E-mail: sasabo5313@aol.com Midwest Marketing Research PO Box 1077 Goshen, IN 46527 (219)533-0548 Fax: (219)533-0540 E-mail: 103365.654@compuserve Ketchum Consulting Group 8021 Knue Rd., Ste. 112 Indianapolis, IN 46250 (317)845-5411 Fax: (317)842-9941 MDI Management Consulting 1519 Park Dr. Munster, IN 46321 (219)838-7909 Fax: (219)838-7909

Maine
Edgemont Enterprises PO Box 8354 Portland, ME 04104 (207)871-8964 Fax: (207)871-8964 Pan Atlantic Consultants 5 Milk St. Portland, ME 04101 (207)871-8622 Fax: (207)772-4842 E-mail: pmurphy@maine.rr.com Website: http://www.panatlantic.net

Swartz Consulting PO Box 4301 Crofton, MD 21114-4301 (301)262-6728 Software Solutions International Inc. 9633 Duffer Way Gaithersburg, MD 20886 (301)330-4136 Fax: (301)330-4136 Strategies Inc. 8 Park Center Ct., Ste. 200 Owings Mills, MD 21117 (410)363-6669 Fax: (410)363-1231 E-mail: strategies@strat1.com Website: http://www.strat1.com Hammer Marketing Resources 179 Inverness Rd. Severna Park, MD 21146 (410)544-9191 Fax: (305)675-3277 E-mail: info@gohammer.com Website: http://www.gohammer.com Andrew Sussman & Associates 13731 Kretsinger Smithsburg, MD 21783 (301)824-2943 Fax: (301)824-2943

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Maryland
Clemons & Associates Inc. 5024-R Campbell Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21236 (410)931-8100 Fax: (410)931-8111 E-mail: info@clemonsmgmt.com Website: http://www.clemonsmgmt.com Imperial Group Ltd. 305 Washington Ave., Ste. 204 Baltimore, MD 21204-6009 (410)337-8500 Fax: (410)337-7641 Leadership Institute 3831 Yolando Rd. Baltimore, MD 21218 (410)366-9111 Fax: (410)243-8478 E-mail: behconsult@aol.com Burdeshaw Associates Ltd. 4701 Sangamore Rd. Bethesda, MD 20816-2508 (301)229-5800 Fax: (301)229-5045 E-mail: jstacy@burdeshaw.com Website: http://www.burdeshaw.com Michael E. Cohen 5225 Pooks Hill Rd., Ste. 1119 S Bethesda, MD 20814 (301)530-5738 Fax: (301)530-2988 E-mail: mecohen@crosslink.net World Development Group Inc. 5272 River Rd., Ste. 650 Bethesda, MD 20816-1405 (301)652-1818 Fax: (301)652-1250 E-mail: wdg@has.com Website: http://www.worlddg.com

Iowa
McCord Consulting Group Inc. 4533 Pine View Dr. NE PO Box 11024 Cedar Rapids, IA 52410 (319)378-0077 Fax: (319)378-1577 E-mail: smmccord@hom.com Website: http://www.mccordgroup.com Management Solutions L.C. 3815 Lincoln Pl. Dr. Des Moines, IA 50312 (515)277-6408 Fax: (515)277-3506 E-mail: wasunimers@uswest.net Grandview Marketing 15 Red Bridge Dr. Sioux City, IA 51104 (712)239-3122 Fax: (712)258-7578 E-mail: eandrews@pionet.net

Massachusetts
Geibel Marketing and Public Relations PO Box 611 Belmont, MA 02478-0005 (617)484-8285 Fax: (617)489-3567 E-mail: jgeibel@geibelpr.com Website: http://www.geibelpr.com Bain & Co. 2 Copley Pl. Boston, MA 02116 (617)572-2000 Fax: (617)572-2427 E-mail: corporate.inquiries@bain.com Website: http://www.bain.com Mehr & Co. 62 Kinnaird St. Cambridge, MA 02139 (617)876-3311 Fax: (617)876-3023 E-mail: mehrco@aol.com Monitor Company Inc. 2 Canal Park Cambridge, MA 02141

Kansas
Assessments in Action 513A N Mur-Len Olathe, KS 66062 (913)764-6270 Free: (888)548-1504 Fax: (913)764-6495 E-mail: lowdene@qni.com Website: http://www.assessmentsin-action.com

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(617)252-2000 Fax: (617)252-2100 Website: http://www.monitor.com Information & Research Associates PO Box 3121 Framingham, MA 01701 (508)788-0784 Walden Consultants Ltd. 252 Pond St. Hopkinton, MA 01748 (508)435-4882 Fax: (508)435-3971 Website: http://www.waldencon sultants.com Jeffrey D. Marshall 102 Mitchell Rd. Ipswich, MA 01938-1219 (508)356-1113 Fax: (508)356-2989 Consulting Resources Corp. 6 Northbrook Park Lexington, MA 02420 (781)863-1222 Fax: (781)863-1441 E-mail: res@consultingresources.net Website: http://www.consulting resources.net Planning Technologies Group L.L.C. 92 Hayden Ave. Lexington, MA 02421 (781)778-4678 Fax: (781)861-1099 E-mail: ptg@plantech.com Website: http://www.plantech.com Kalba International Inc. 23 Sandy Pond Rd. Lincoln, MA 01773 (781)259-9589 Fax: (781)259-1460 E-mail: info@kalbainternational.com Website: http://www.kalbainter national.com VMB Associates Inc. 115 Ashland St. Melrose, MA 02176 (781)665-0623 Fax: (425)732-7142 E-mail: vmbinc@aol.com The Company Doctor 14 Pudding Stone Ln. Mendon, MA 01756 (508)478-1747 Fax: (508)478-0520 Data and Strategies Group Inc. 190 N Main St. Natick, MA 01760 (508)653-9990 Fax: (508)653-7799 E-mail: dsginc@dsggroup.com Website: http://www.dsggroup.com The Enterprise Group 73 Parker Rd. Needham, MA 02494 (617)444-6631 Fax: (617)433-9991 E-mail: lsacco@world.std.com Website: http://www.enterprise-group.com PSMJ Resources Inc. 10 Midland Ave. Newton, MA 02458 (617)965-0055 Free: 800-537-7765 Fax: (617)965-5152 E-mail: psmj@tiac.net Website: http://www.psmj.com Scheur Management Group Inc. 255 Washington St., Ste. 100 Newton, MA 02458-1611 (617)969-7500 Fax: (617)969-7508 E-mail: smgnow@scheur.com Website: http://www.scheur.com I.E.E.E., Boston Section 240 Bear Hill Rd., 202B Waltham, MA 02451-1017 (781)890-5294 Fax: (781)890-5290 Business Planning and Consulting Services 20 Beechwood Ter. Wellesley, MA 02482 (617)237-9151 Fax: (617)237-9151 G.G.W. and Associates 1213 Hampton Jackson, MI 49203 (517)782-2255 Fax: (517)782-2255 Altamar Group Ltd. 6810 S Cedar, Ste. 2-B Lansing, MI 48911 (517)694-0910 Free: 800-443-2627 Fax: (517)694-1377 Sheffieck Consultants Inc. 23610 Greening Dr. Novi, MI 48375-3130 (248)347-3545 Fax: (248)347-3530 E-mail: cfsheff@concentric.net Rehmann, Robson PC 5800 Gratiot Saginaw, MI 48605 (517)799-9580 Fax: (517)799-0227 Website: http://www.rrpc.com Francis & Co. 17200 W 10 Mile Rd., Ste. 207 Southfield, MI 48075 (248)559-7600 Fax: (248)559-5249 Private Ventures Inc. 16000 W 9 Mile Rd., Ste. 504 Southfield, MI 48075 (248)569-1977 Free: 800-448-7614 Fax: (248)569-1838 E-mail: pventuresi@aol.com JGK Associates 14464 Kerner Dr. Sterling Heights, MI 48313 (810)247-9055 Fax: (248)822-4977 E-mail: kozlowski@home.com

Michigan
Walter Frederick Consulting 1719 South Blvd. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (313)662-4336 Fax: (313)769-7505 Fox Enterprises 6220 W Freeland Rd. Freeland, MI 48623 (517)695-9170 Fax: (517)695-9174 E-mail: foxjw@concentric.net Website: http://www.cris.com/~foxjw

Minnesota
Health Fitness Corp. 3500 W 80th St., Ste. 130 Bloomington, MN 55431 (612)831-6830 Fax: (612)831-7264 Consatech Inc. PO Box 1047 Burnsville, MN 55337 (612)953-1088 Fax: (612)435-2966

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Robert F. Knotek 14960 Ironwood Ct. Eden Prairie, MN 55346 (612)949-2875 DRI Consulting 7715 Stonewood Ct. Edina, MN 55439 (612)941-9656 Fax: (612)941-2693 E-mail: dric@dric.com Website: http://www.dric.com Markin Consulting 12072 87th Pl. N Maple Grove, MN 55369 (612)493-3568 Fax: (612)493-5744 E-mail: markin@markinconsulting.com Website: http://www.markin consulting.com Minnesota Cooperation Office for Small Business & Job Creation Inc. 5001 W 80th St., Ste. 825 Minneapolis, MN 55437 (612)830-1230 Fax: (612)830-1232 E-mail: mncoop@msn.com Website: http://www.mnco.org Enterprise Consulting Inc. PO Box 1111 Minnetonka, MN 55345 (612)949-5909 Fax: (612)906-3965 Amdahl International 724 1st Ave. SW Rochester, MN 55902 (507)252-0402 Fax: (507)252-0402 E-mail: amdahl@best-service.com Website: http://www.wp.com/amdahl_int Power Systems Research 1365 Corporate Center Curve, 2nd Fl. St. Paul, MN 55121 (612)905-8400 Free: (888)625-8612 Fax: (612)454-0760 E-mail: Barb@Powersys.com Website: http://www.powersys.com E-mail: humph@bpdev.demon.co.uk Website: http://www.bpdev.demon.co.uk CFO Service 10336 Donoho St. Louis, MO 63131 (314)750-2940 E-mail: jskae@cfoservice.com Website: http://www.cfoservice.com (908)500-4155 Fax: (908)766-0780 E-mail: info@bedminstergroup.com Website: http://www.bedminster group.com Fax: (202)806-1777 Terry Strong, Acting Regional Dir. Delta Planning Inc. PO Box 425 Denville, NJ 07834 (913)625-1742 Free: 800-672-0762 Fax: (973)625-3531 E-mail: DeltaP@worldnet.att.net Website: http://deltaplanning.com Kumar Associates Inc. 1004 Cumbermeade Rd. Fort Lee, NJ 07024 (201)224-9480 Fax: (201)585-2343 E-mail: mail@kumarassociates.com Website: http://kumarassociates.com John Hall & Company Inc. PO Box 187 Glen Ridge, NJ 07028 (973)680-4449 Fax: (973)680-4581 E-mail: jhcompany@aol.com Market Focus PO Box 402 Maplewood, NJ 07040 (973)378-2470 Fax: (973)378-2470 E-mail: mcss66@marketfocus.com Vanguard Communications Corp. 100 American Rd. Morris Plains, NJ 07950 (973)605-8000 Fax: (973)605-8329 Website: http://www.vanguard.net/ ConMar International Ltd. 1901 US Hwy. 130 North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (732)940-8347 Fax: (732)274-1199 KLW New Products 156 Cedar Dr. Old Tappan, NJ 07675 (201)358-1300 Fax: (201)664-2594 E-mail: lrlarsen@usa.net Website: http://www.klwnew products.com Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Nebraska
International Management Consulting Group Inc. 1309 Harlan Dr., Ste. 205 Bellevue, NE 68005 (402)291-4545 Free: 800-665-IMCG Fax: (402)291-4343 E-mail: imcg@neonramp.com Website: http://www.mgtcon sulting.com Heartland Management Consulting Group 1904 Barrington Pky. Papillion, NE 68046 (402)339-2387 Fax: (402)339-1319

Nevada
The DuBois Group 865 Tahoe Blvd., Ste. 108 Incline Village, NV 89451 (775)832-0550 Free: 800-375-2935 Fax: (775)832-0556 E-mail: DuBoisGrp@aol.com

New Hampshire
Wolff Consultants 10 Buck Rd. Hanover, NH 03755 (603)643-6015 BPT Consulting Associates Ltd. 12 Parmenter Rd., Ste. B-6 Londonderry, NH 03053 (603)437-8484 Free: (888)278-0030 Fax: (603)434-5388 E-mail: bptcons@tiac.net Website: http://www.bptconsulting.com

Missouri
Business Planning and Development Corp. 4030 Charlotte St. Kansas City, MO 64110 (816)753-0495

New Jersey
Bedminster Group Inc. 1170 Rte. 22 E Bridgewater, NJ 08807

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PA Consulting Group 315A Enterprise Dr. Plainsboro, NJ 08536 (609)936-8300 Fax: (609)936-8811 E-mail: info@paconsulting.com Website: http://www.pa-consulting.com Aurora Marketing Management Inc. 66 Witherspoon St., Ste. 600 Princeton, NJ 08542 (908)904-1125 Fax: (908)359-1108 E-mail: aurora2@voicenet.com Website: http://www.auroramarketing.net Smart Business Supersite 88 Orchard Rd., CN-5219 Princeton, NJ 08543 (908)321-1924 Fax: (908)321-5156 E-mail: irv@smartbiz.com Website: http://www.smartbiz.com Tracelin Associates 1171 Main St., Ste. 6K Rahway, NJ 07065 (732)381-3288 Schkeeper Inc. 130-6 Bodman Pl. Red Bank, NJ 07701 (732)219-1965 Fax: (732)530-3703 Henry Branch Associates 2502 Harmon Cove Twr. Secaucus, NJ 07094 (201)866-2008 Fax: (201)601-0101 E-mail: hbranch161@home.com Robert Gibbons & Company Inc. 46 Knoll Rd. Tenafly, NJ 07670-1050 (201)871-3933 Fax: (201)871-2173 E-mail: crisisbob@aol.com PMC Management Consultants Inc. 6 Thistle Ln. Three Bridges, NJ 08887-0332 (908)788-1014 Free: 800-PMC-0250 Fax: (908)806-7287 E-mail: int@pmc-management.com Website: http://www.pmcmanagement.com R.W. Bankart & Associates 20 Valley Ave., Ste. D-2 Westwood, NJ 07675-3607 (201)664-7672 Samani International Enterprises, Marions Panyaught Consultancy 2028 Parsons Flushing, NY 11357-3436 (917)287-8087 Fax: 800-873-8939 E-mail: vjp2@biostrategist.com Website: http://www.biostrategist.com Marketing Resources Group 71-58 Austin St. Forest Hills, NY 11375 (718)261-8882 Mangabay Business Plans & Development Subsidiary of Innis Asset Allocation 125-10 Queens Blvd., Ste. 2202 Kew Gardens, NY 11415 (905)527-1947 Fax: 509-472-1935 E-mail: mangabay@mangabay.com Website: http://www.mangabay.com Lee Toh, Managing Partner ComputerEase Co. 1301 Monmouth Ave. Lakewood, NY 08701 (212)406-9464 Fax: (914)277-5317 E-mail: crawfordc@juno.com Boice Dunham Group 30 W 13th St. New York, NY 10011 (212)924-2200 Fax: (212)924-1108 Elizabeth Capen 27 E 95th St. New York, NY 10128 (212)427-7654 Fax: (212)876-3190 Haver Analytics 60 E 42nd St., Ste. 2424 New York, NY 10017 (212)986-9300 Fax: (212)986-5857 E-mail: data@haver.com Website: http://www.haver.com The Jordan, Edmiston Group Inc. 150 E 52nd Ave., 18th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)754-0710 Fax: (212)754-0337 KPMG International 345 Park Ave. New York, NY 10154-0102 (212)758-9700

New Mexico
Vondle & Associates Inc. 4926 Calle de Tierra, NE Albuquerque, NM 87111 (505)292-8961 Fax: (505)296-2790 E-mail: vondle@aol.com InfoNewMexico 2207 Black Hills Rd., NE Rio Rancho, NM 87124 (505)891-2462 Fax: (505)896-8971

New York
Powers Research and Training Institute PO Box 78 Bayville, NY 11709 (516)628-2250 Fax: (516)628-2252 E-mail: powercocch@compuserve.com Website: http://www.nancypowers.com Consortium House 296 Wittenberg Rd. Bearsville, NY 12409 (845)679-8867 Fax: (845)679-9248 E-mail: eugenegs@aol.com Website: http://www.chpub.com Progressive Finance Corp. 3549 Tiemann Ave. Bronx, NY 10469 (718)405-9029 Free: 800-225-8381 Fax: (718)405-1170 Wave Hill Associates Inc. 2621 Palisade Ave., Ste. 15-C Bronx, NY 10463 (718)549-7368 Fax: (718)601-9670 E-mail: pepper@compuserve.com Management Insight 96 Arlington Rd. Buffalo, NY 14221 (716)631-3319 Fax: (716)631-0203 E-mail: michalski@foodservice insight.com Website: http://www.foodservice insight.com

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Fax: (212)758-9819 Website: http://www.kpmg.com Mahoney Cohen Consulting Corp. 111 W 40th St., 12th Fl. New York, NY 10018 (212)490-8000 Fax: (212)790-5913 Management Practice Inc. 342 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10173-1230 (212)867-7948 Fax: (212)972-5188 Website: http://www.mpiweb.com Moseley Associates Inc. 342 Madison Ave., Ste. 1414 New York, NY 10016 (212)213-6673 Fax: (212)687-1520 Practice Development Counsel 60 Sutton Pl. S New York, NY 10022 (212)593-1549 Fax: (212)980-7940 E-mail: pwhaserot@pdcounsel.com Website: http://www.pdcounsel.com Unique Value International Inc. 575 Madison Ave., 10th Fl. New York, NY 10022-1304 (212)605-0590 Fax: (212)605-0589 The Van Tulleken Co. 126 E 56th St. New York, NY 10022 (212)355-1390 Fax: (212)755-3061 E-mail: newyork@vantulleken.com Vencon Management Inc. 301 W 53rd St. New York, NY 10019 (212)581-8787 Fax: (212)397-4126 Website: http://www.venconinc.com Werner International Inc. 55 E 52nd, 29th Fl. New York, NY 10055 (212)909-1260 Fax: (212)909-1273 E-mail: richard.downing@rgh.com Website: http://www.wernertex.com Zimmerman Business Consulting Inc. 44 E 92nd St., Ste. 5-B New York, NY 10128 (212)860-3107 Fax: (212)860-7730 E-mail: ljzzbci@aol.com Website: http://www.zbcinc.com Overton Financial 7 Allen Rd. Peekskill, NY 10566 (914)737-4649 Fax: (914)737-4696 Stromberg Consulting 2500 Westchester Ave. Purchase, NY 10577 (914)251-1515 Fax: (914)251-1562 E-mail: strategy@stromberg_consul ting.com Website: http://www.stromberg_ consulting.com Innovation Management Consulting Inc. 209 Dewitt Rd. Syracuse, NY 13214-2006 (315)425-5144 Fax: (315)445-8989 E-mail: missonneb@axess.net M. Clifford Agress 891 Fulton St. Valley Stream, NY 11580 (516)825-8955 Fax: (516)825-8955 Destiny Kinal Marketing Consultancy 105 Chemung St. Waverly, NY 14892 (607)565-8317 Fax: (607)565-4083 Valutis Consulting Inc. 5350 Main St., Ste. 7 Williamsville, NY 14221-5338 (716)634-2553 Fax: (716)634-2554 E-mail: valutis@localnet.com Website: http://www.valutisconsulting.com Charlotte, NC 28202-4000 (704)376-5484 Fax: (704)376-5485 E-mail: consult@norelli.com Website: http://www.norelli.com

North Dakota
Center for Innovation 4300 Dartmouth Dr. PO Box 8372 Grand Forks, ND 58202 (701)777-3132 Fax: (701)777-2339 E-mail: bruce@innovators.net Website: http://www.innovators.net Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Ohio
Transportation Technology Services 208 Harmon Rd. Aurora, OH 44202 (330)562-3596 Empro Systems Inc. 4777 Red Bank Expy., Ste. 1 Cincinnati, OH 45227-1542 (513)271-2042 Fax: (513)271-2042 Alliance Management International Ltd. 1440 Windrow Ln. Cleveland, OH 44147-3200 (440)838-1922 Fax: (440)838-0979 E-mail: bgruss@amiltd.com Website: http://www.amiltd.com Bozell Kamstra Public Relations 1301 E 9th St., Ste. 3400 Cleveland, OH 44114 (216)623-1511 Fax: (216)623-1501 E-mail: jfeniger@cleveland.bozellk amstra.com Website: http://www.bozellk amstra.com Cory Dillon Associates 111 Schreyer Pl. E Columbus, OH 43214 (614)262-8211 Fax: (614)262-3806 Holcomb Gallagher Adams 300 Marconi, Ste. 303 Columbus, OH 43215 (614)221-3343 Fax: (614)221-3367 E-mail: riadams@acme.freenet.oh.us

North Carolina
Best Practices L.L.C. 6320 Quadrangle Dr., Ste. 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 (919)403-0251 Fax: (919)403-0144 E-mail: best@best:in/class Website: http://www.best-in-class.com Norelli & Co. Bank of America Corporate Ctr. 100 N Tyron St., Ste. 5160

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Young & Associates PO Box 711 Kent, OH 44240 (330)678-0524 Free: 800-525-9775 Fax: (330)678-6219 E-mail: online@younginc.com Website: http://www.younginc.com Robert A. Westman & Associates 8981 Inversary Dr. SE Warren, OH 44484-2551 (330)856-4149 Fax: (330)856-2564 Huntingdon Valley, PA 19006-3509 (215)657-9550 GRA Inc. 115 West Ave., Ste. 201 Jenkintown, PA 19046 (215)884-7500 Fax: (215)884-1385 E-mail: gramail@gra-inc.com Website: http://www.gra-inc.com Mifflin County Industrial Development Corp. Mifflin County Industrial Plz. 6395 SR 103 N Bldg. 50 Lewistown, PA 17044 (717)242-0393 Fax: (717)242-1842 E-mail: mcide@acsworld.net Autech Products 1289 Revere Rd. Morrisville, PA 19067 (215)493-3759 Fax: (215)493-9791 E-mail: autech4@yahoo.com Advantage Associates 434 Avon Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15228 (412)343-1558 Fax: (412)362-1684 E-mail: ecocba1@aol.com Regis J. Sheehan & Associates Pittsburgh, PA 15220 (412)279-1207 James W. Davidson Company Inc. 23 Forest View Rd. Wallingford, PA 19086 (610)566-1462

South Carolina
Aquafood Business Associates PO Box 13267 Charleston, SC 29422 (843)795-9506 Fax: (843)795-9477 E-mail: rraba@aol.com Profit Associates Inc. PO Box 38026 Charleston, SC 29414 (803)763-5718 Fax: (803)763-5719 E-mail: bobrog@awod.com Website: http://www.awod.com/gallery/ business/proasc Strategic Innovations International 12 Executive Ct. Lake Wylie, SC 29710 (803)831-1225 Fax: (803)831-1177 E-mail: stratinnov@aol.com Website: http://www. strategicinnovations.com Minus Stage Box 4436 Rock Hill, SC 29731 (803)328-0705 Fax: (803)329-9948

Oklahoma
Innovative Partners L.L.C. 4900 Richmond Sq., Ste. 100 Oklahoma City, OK 73118 (405)840-0033 Fax: (405)843-8359 E-mail: ipartners@juno.com

Oregon
INTERCON - The International Converting Institute 5200 Badger Rd. Crooked River Ranch, OR 97760 (541)548-1447 Fax: (541)548-1618 E-mail: johnbowler@ crookedriverranch.com Talbott ARM HC 60, Box 5620 Lakeview, OR 97630 (541)635-8587 Fax: (503)947-3482 Management Technology Associates Ltd. 2768 SW Sherwood Dr, Ste. 105 Portland, OR 97201-2251 (503)224-5220 Fax: (503)224-5334 E-mail: lcuster@mta-ltd.com Website: http://www.mgmt-tech.com

Tennessee
Daniel Petchers & Associates 8820 Fernwood CV Germantown, TN 38138 (901)755-9896 Business Choices 1114 Forest Harbor, Ste. 300 Hendersonville, TN 37075-9646 (615)822-8692 Free: 800-737-8382 Fax: (615)822-8692 E-mail: bz-ch@juno.com RCFA Healthcare Management Services L.L.C. 9648 Kingston Pke., Ste. 8 Knoxville, TN 37922 (865)531-0176 Free: 800-635-4040 Fax: (865)531-0722 E-mail: info@rcfa.com Website: http://www.rcfa.com Growth Consultants of America 3917 Trimble Rd. Nashville, TN 37215

Puerto Rico
Diego Chevere & Co. Metro Parque 7, Ste. 204 Metro Office Caparra Heights, PR 00920 (787)774-9595 Fax: (787)774-9566 E-mail: dcco@coqui.net Manuel L. Porrata and Associates 898 Munoz Rivera Ave., Ste. 201 San Juan, PR 00927 (787)765-2140 Fax: (787)754-3285 E-mail: m_porrata@manuelporrata.com Website: http://manualporrata.com

Pennsylvania
Healthscope Inc. 400 Lancaster Ave. Devon, PA 19333 (610)687-6199 Fax: (610)687-6376 E-mail: health@voicenet.com Website: http://www.healthscope.net/ Elayne Howard & Associates Inc. 3501 Masons Mill Rd., Ste. 501

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(615)383-0550 Fax: (615)269-8940 E-mail: 70244.451@compuserve.com ReGENERATION Partners 3838 Oak Lawn Ave. Dallas, TX 75219 (214)559-3999 Free: 800-406-1112 E-mail: info@regeneration-partner.com Website: http://www.regenerationpartners.com High Technology Associates - Division of Global Technologies Inc. 1775 St. James Pl., Ste. 105 Houston, TX 77056 (713)963-9300 Fax: (713)963-8341 E-mail: hta@infohwy.com MasterCOM 103 Thunder Rd. Kerrville, TX 78028 (830)895-7990 Fax: (830)443-3428 E-mail: jmstubblefield@master training.com Website: http://www.mastertraining.com PROTEC 4607 Linden Pl. Pearland, TX 77584 (281)997-9872 Fax: (281)997-9895 E-mail: p.oman@ix.netcom.com Alpha Quadrant Inc. 10618 Auldine San Antonio, TX 78230 (210)344-3330 Fax: (210)344-8151 E-mail: mbussone@sbcglobal.net Website:http://www.a-quadrant.com Michele Bussone Bastian Public Relations 614 San Dizier San Antonio, TX 78232 (210)404-1839 E-mail: lisa@bastianpr.com Website: http://www.bastianpr.com Lisa Bastian CBC Business Strategy Development Consultants PO Box 690365 San Antonio, TX 78269 (210)696-8000 Free: 800-927-BSDC Fax: (210)696-8000 Tom Welch, CPC 6900 San Pedro Ave., Ste. 147 San Antonio, TX 78216-6207 (210)737-7022 Fax: (210)737-7022 E-mail: bplan@iamerica.net Website: http://www.moneywords.com

Texas
Integrated Cost Management Systems Inc. 2261 Brookhollow Plz. Dr., Ste. 104 Arlington, TX 76006 (817)633-2873 Fax: (817)633-3781 E-mail: abm@icms.net Website: http://www.icms.net Lori Williams 1000 Leslie Ct. Arlington, TX 76012 (817)459-3934 Fax: (817)459-3934 Business Resource Software Inc. 2013 Wells Branch Pky., Ste. 305 Austin, TX 78728 Free: 800-423-1228 Fax: (512)251-4401 E-mail: info@brs-inc.com Website: http://www.brs-inc.com Erisa Adminstrative Services Inc. 12325 Hymeadow Dr., Bldg. 4 Austin, TX 78750-1847 (512)250-9020 Fax: (512)250-9487 Website: http://www.cserisa.com R. Miller Hicks & Co. 1011 W 11th St. Austin, TX 78703 (512)477-7000 Fax: (512)477-9697 E-mail: millerhicks@rmhicks.com Website: http://www.rmhicks.com Pragmatic Tactics Inc. 3303 Westchester Ave. College Station, TX 77845 (409)696-5294 Free: 800-570-5294 Fax: (409)696-4994 E-mail: ptactics@aol.com Website: http://www.ptatics.com Perot Systems 12404 Park Central Dr. Dallas, TX 75251 (972)340-5000 Free: 800-688-4333 Fax: (972)455-4100 E-mail: corp.comm@ps.net Website: http://www.perotsystems.com

Utah
Business Management Resource PO Box 521125 Salt Lake City, UT 84152-1125 (801)272-4668 Fax: (801)277-3290 E-mail: pingfong@worldnet.att.net

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Virginia
Tindell Associates 209 Oxford Ave. Alexandria, VA 22301 (703)683-0109 Fax: 703-783-0219 E-mail: scott@tindell.net Website: http://www.tindell.net Scott Lockett, President Elliott B. Jaffa 2530-B S Walter Reed Dr. Arlington, VA 22206 (703)931-0040 E-mail: thetrainingdoctor@excite.com Website: http://www.tregistry.com/ jaffa.htm Koach Enterprises - USA 5529 N 18th St. Arlington, VA 22205 (703)241-8361 Fax: (703)241-8623 Federal Market Development 5650 Chapel Run Ct. Centreville, VA 20120-3601 (703)502-8930 Free: 800-821-5003 Fax: (703)502-8929 Huff, Stuart & Carlton 2107 Graves Mills Rd., Ste. C Forest, VA 24551 (804)316-9356 Free: (888)316-9356 Fax: (804)316-9357 Website: http://www.wealthmgt.net AMX International Inc. 1420 Spring Hill Rd. , Ste. 600 McLean, VA 22102-3006 (703)690-4100 Fax: (703)643-1279 E-mail: amxmail@amxi.com Website: http://www.amxi.com

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Charles Scott Pugh (Investor) 4101 Pittaway Dr. Richmond, VA 23235-1022 (804)560-0979 Fax: (804)560-4670 John C. Randall and Associates Inc. PO Box 15127 Richmond, VA 23227 (804)746-4450 Fax: (804)730-8933 E-mail: randalljcx@aol.com Website: http://www.johncrandall.com McLeod & Co. 410 1st St. Roanoke, VA 24011 (540)342-6911 Fax: (540)344-6367 Website: http://www.mcleodco.com/ Salzinger & Company Inc. 8000 Towers Crescent Dr., Ste. 1350 Vienna, VA 22182 (703)442-5200 Fax: (703)442-5205 E-mail: info@salzinger.com Website: http://www.salzinger.com The Small Business Counselor 12423 Hedges Run Dr., Ste. 153 Woodbridge, VA 22192 (703)490-6755 Fax: (703)490-1356 Independent Automotive Training Services PO Box 334 Kirkland, WA 98083 (425)822-5715 E-mail: ltunney@autosvccon.com Website: http://www.autosvccon.com Kahle Associate Inc. 6203 204th Dr. NE Redmond, WA 98053 (425)836-8763 Fax: (425)868-3770 E-mail: randykahle@kahleassociates.com Website: http://www.kahleassociates.com Dan Collin 3419 Wallingord Ave N, No. 2 Seattle, WA 98103 (206)634-9469 E-mail: dc@dancollin.com Website: http://members.home.net/ dcollin/ ECG Management Consultants Inc. 1111 3rd Ave., Ste. 2700 Seattle, WA 98101-3201 (206)689-2200 Fax: (206)689-2209 E-mail: ecg@ecgmc.com Website: http://www.ecgmc.com Northwest Trade Adjustment Assistance Center 900 4th Ave., Ste. 2430 Seattle, WA 98164-1001 (206)622-2730 Free: 800-667-8087 Fax: (206)622-1105 E-mail: matchingfunds@nwtaac.org Website: http://www.taacenters.org Business Planning Consultants S 3510 Ridgeview Dr. Spokane, WA 99206 (509)928-0332 Fax: (509)921-0842 E-mail: bpci@nextdim.com Website: http://www.BusinessandMarketingPlans.com Christopher Clay

Wisconsin
White & Associates Inc. 5349 Somerset Ln. S Greenfield, WI 53221 (414)281-7373 Fax: (414)281-7006 E-mail: wnaconsult@aol.com

Small business administration regional offices
This section contains a listing of Small Business Administration offices arranged numerically by region. Service areas are provided. Contact the appropriate office for a referral to the nearest field office, or visit the Small Business Administration online at www.sba.gov.

Region 1
U.S. Small Business Administration Region I Office 10 Causeway St., Ste. 812 Boston, MA 02222-1093 Phone: (617)565-8415 Fax: (617)565-8420 Serves Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

Washington
Burlington Consultants 10900 NE 8th St., Ste. 900 Bellevue, WA 98004 (425)688-3060 Fax: (425)454-4383 E-mail: partners@burlingt onconsultants.com Website: http://www.burlington consultants.com Perry L. Smith Consulting 800 Bellevue Way NE, Ste. 400 Bellevue, WA 98004-4208 (425)462-2072 Fax: (425)462-5638 St. Charles Consulting Group 1420 NW Gilman Blvd. Issaquah, WA 98027 (425)557-8708 Fax: (425)557-8731 E-mail: info@stcharlesconsulting.com Website: http://www.stcharlescon sulting.com

Region 2
U.S. Small Business Administration Region II Office 26 Federal Plaza, Ste. 3108 New York, NY 10278 Phone: (212)264-1450 Fax: (212)264-0038 Serves New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

West Virginia
Stanley & Associates Inc./ BusinessandMarketingPlans.com 1687 Robert C. Byrd Dr. Beckley, WV 25801 (304)252-0324 Free: 888-752-6720 Fax: (304)252-0470 E-mail: cclay@charterinternet.com

Region 3
U.S. Small Business Administration Region III Office Robert N C Nix Sr. Federal Building 900 Market St., 5th Fl. Philadelphia, PA 19107 (215)580-2807 Serves Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

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Region 4
U.S. Small Business Administration Region IV Office 233 Peachtree St. NE Harris Tower 1800 Atlanta, GA 30303 Phone: (404)331-4999 Fax: (404)331-2354 Serves Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Region 9
U.S. Small Business Administration Region IX Office 330 N Brand Blvd., Ste. 1270 Glendale, CA 91203-2304 Phone: (818)552-3434 Fax: (818)552-3440 Serves American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

American Samoa
American Samoa SBDC AMERICAN SAMOA COMMUNITY COLLEGE P.O. Box 2609 Pago Pago, American Samoa 96799 Phone: 011-684-699-4830 Fax: 011-684-699-6132 E-Mail: htalex@att.net Mr. Herbert Thweatt, Director

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Arizona Region 10
U.S. Small Business Administration Region X Office 2401 Fourth Ave., Ste. 400 Seattle, WA 98121 Phone: (206)553-5676 Fax: (206)553-4155 Serves Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Arizona SBDC MARICOPA COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 2411 West 14th Street, Suite 132 Tempe, AZ 85281 Phone: 480-731-8720 Fax: 480-731-8729 E-Mail: mike.york@domail. maricopa.edu Website: http://www.dist.maricopa. edu.sbdc Mr. Michael York, State Director

Region 5
U.S. Small Business Administration Region V Office 500 W. Madison St. Citicorp Center, Ste. 1240 Chicago, IL 60661-2511 Phone: (312)353-0357 Fax: (312)353-3426 Serves Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

Region 6
U.S. Small Business Administration Region VI Office 4300 Amon Carter Blvd., Ste. 108 Fort Worth, TX 76155 Phone: (817)684-5581 Fax: (817)684-5588 Serves Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Small business development centers
This section contains a listing of all Small Business Development Centers, organized alphabetically by state/U.S. territory, then by city, then by agency name.

Arkansas
Arkansas SBDC UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 2801 South University Avenue Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-324-9043 Fax: 501-324-9049 E-Mail: jmroderick@ualr.edu Website: http://asbdc.ualr.edu Ms. Janet M. Roderick, State Director

Alabama
Alabama SBDC UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 2800 Milan Court Suite 124 Birmingham, AL 35211-6908 Phone: 205-943-6750 Fax: 205-943-6752 E-Mail: wcampbell@provost.uab.edu Website: http://www.asbdc.org Mr. William Campbell Jr, State Director

Region 7
U.S. Small Business Administration Region VII Office 323 W. 8th St., Ste. 307 Kansas City, MO 64105-1500 Phone: (816)374-6380 Fax: (816)374-6339 Serves Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska.

California
California - San Francisco SBDC Northern California SBDC Lead Center HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY Office of Economic Development 1 Harpst Street 2006A, Siemens Hall Arcata, CA, 95521 Phone: 707-826-3922 Fax: 707-826-3206 E-Mail: gainer@humboldt.edu Ms. Margaret A. Gainer, Regional Director California - Sacramento SBDC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY CHICO Chico, CA 95929-0765 Phone: 530-898-4598 Fax: 530-898-4734

Alaska
Alaska SBDC UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE 430 West Seventh Avenue, Suite 110 Anchorage, AK 99501 Phone: 907-274 -7232 Fax: 907-274-9524 E-Mail: anerw@uaa.alaska.edu Website: http://www.aksbdc.org Ms. Jean R. Wall, State Director

Region 8
U.S. Small Business Administration Region VIII Office 721 19th St., Ste. 400 Denver, CO 80202 Phone: (303)844-0500 Fax: (303)844-0506 Serves Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.

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E-Mail: dripke@csuchico.edu Website: http://gsbdc.csuchico.edu Mr. Dan Ripke, Interim Regional Director California - San Diego SBDC SOUTHWESTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT 900 Otey Lakes Road Chula Vista, CA 91910 Phone: 619-482-6388 Fax: 619-482-6402 E-Mail: dtrujillo@swc.cc.ca.us Website: http://www.sbditc.org Ms. Debbie P. Trujillo, Regional Director California - Fresno SBDC UC Merced Lead Center UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED 550 East Shaw, Suite 105A Fresno, CA 93710 Phone: 559-241-6590 Fax: 559-241-7422 E-Mail: crosander@ucmerced.edu Website: http://sbdc.ucmerced.edu Mr. Chris Rosander, State Director California - Santa Ana SBDC Tri-County Lead SBDC CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY FULLERTON 800 North State College Boulevard, LH640 Fullerton, CA 92834 Phone: 714-278-2719 Fax: 714-278-7858 E-Mail: vpham@fullerton.edu Website: http://www.leadsbdc.org Ms. Vi Pham, Lead Center Director California - Los Angeles Region SBDC LONG BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT 3950 Paramount Boulevard, Ste 101 Lakewood, CA 90712 Phone: 562-938-5004 Fax: 562-938-5030 E-Mail: ssloan@lbcc.edu Ms. Sheneui Sloan, Interim Lead Center Director Website: http://www.state.co.us/oed/sbdc Ms. Kelly Manning, State Director Website: http://www.sbdc.uga.edu Mr. Allan Adams, Interim State Director

Connecticut
Connecticut SBDC UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT 1376 Storrs Road, Unit 4094 Storrs, CT 06269-1094 Phone: 860-870-6370 Fax: 860-870-6374 E-Mail: richard.cheney@uconn.edu Website: http://www.sbdc.uconn.edu Mr. Richard Cheney, Interim State Director

Guam
Guam Small Business Development Center UNIVERSITY OF GUAM Pacific Islands SBDC P.O. Box 5014 - U.O.G. Station Mangilao, GU 96923 Phone: 671-735-2590 Fax: 671-734-2002 E-mail: casey@pacificsbdc.com Website: http://www.uog.edu/sbdc Mr. Casey Jeszenka, Director

Delaware
Delaware SBDC DELAWARE TECHNOLOGY PARK 1 Innovation Way, Suite 301 Newark, DE 19711 Phone: 302-831-2747 Fax: 302-831-1423 E-Mail: Clinton.tymes@mvs.udel.edu Website: http://www.delawaresbdc.org Mr. Clinton Tymes, State Director

Hawaii
Hawaii SBDC UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII - HILO 308 Kamehameha Avenue, Suite 201 Hilo, HI 96720 Phone: 808-974-7515 Fax: 808-974-7683 E-Mail: darrylm@interpac.net Website: http://www.hawaii-sbdc.org Mr. Darryl Mleynek, State Director

District of Columbia
District of Columbia SBDC HOWARD UNIVERSITY 2600 6th Street, NW Room 128 Washington, DC 20059 Phone: 202-806-1550 Fax: 202-806-1777 E-Mail: hturner@howard.edu Website: http://www.dcsbdc.com/ Mr. Henry Turner, Executive Director

Idaho
Idaho SBDC BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725 Phone: 208-426-3799 Fax: 208-426-3877 E-mail: jhogge@boisestate.edu Website: http://www.idahosbdc.org Mr. Jim Hogge, State Director

Florida
Florida SBDC UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA 401 East Chase Street, Suite 100 Pensacola, FL 32502 Phone: 850-473-7800 Fax: 850-473-7813 E-Mail: jcartwri@uwf.edu Website: http://www.floridasbdc.com Mr. Jerry Cartwright, State Director

Illinois
Illinois SBDC DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY 620 E. Adams, S-4 Springfield, IL 62701 Phone: 217-524-5700 Fax: 217-524-0171 E-mail: mpatrilli@ildceo.net Website: http://www.ilsbdc.biz Mr. Mark Petrilli, State Director

Colorado
Colorado SBDC OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1625 Broadway, Suite 170 Denver, CO 80202 Phone: 303-892-3864 Fax: 303-892-3848 E-Mail: Kelly.Manning@state.co.us

Georgia
Georgia SBDC UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 1180 East Broad Street Athens, GA 30602 Phone: 706-542-6762 Fax: 706-542-6776 E-mail: aadams@sbdc.uga.edu

Indiana
Indiana SBDC INDIANA ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION One North Capitol, Suite 900 Indianapolis, IN 46204

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Phone: 317-234-8872 Fax: 317-232-8874 E-mail: dtrocha@isbdc.org Website: http://www.isbdc.org Ms. Debbie Bishop Trocha, State Director

Maine
Maine SBDC UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE 96 Falmouth Street P.O. Box 9300 Portland, ME 04103 Phone: 207-780-4420 Fax: 207-780-4810 E-mail: jrmassaua@maine.edu Website: http://www.mainesbdc.org Mr. John Massaua, State Director

E-mail: michael.myhre@state.mn.us Website: http://www.mnsbdc.com Mr. Michael Myhre, State Director

Mississippi
Mississippi SBDC UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI B-19 Jeanette Phillips Drive P.O. Box 1848 University, MS 38677 Phone: 662-915-5001 Fax: 662-915-5650 E-mail: wgurley@olemiss.edu Website: http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/ mssbdc Mr. Doug Gurley, Jr., State Director Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Iowa
Iowa SBDC IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY 340 Gerdin Business Bldg. Ames, IA 50011-1350 Phone: 515-294-2037 Fax: 515-294-6522 E-mail: jonryan@iastate.edu Website: http://www.iabusnet.org Mr. Jon Ryan, State Director

Maryland
Maryland SBDC UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 7100 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 401 College Park, MD 20742 Phone: 301-403-8300 Fax: 301-403-8303 E-mail: rsprow@mdsbdc.umd.edu Website: http://www.mdsbdc.umd.edu Ms. Renee Sprow, State Director

Kansas
Kansas SBDC FORT HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY 214 SW Sixth Street, Suite 301 Topeka, KS 66603 Phone: 785-296-6514 Fax: 785-291-3261 E-mail: ksbdc.wkearns@fhsu.edu Website: http://www.fhsu.edu/ksbdc Mr. Wally Kearns, State Director

Missouri
Missouri SBDC UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 1205 University Avenue, Suite 300 Columbia, MO 65211 Phone: 573-882-1348 Fax: 573-884-4297 E-mail: summersm@missouri.edu Website: http://www.mo-sbdc.org/ index.shtml Mr. Max Summers, State Director

Massachusetts
Massachusetts SBDC UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS School of Management, Room 205 Amherst, MA 01003-4935 Phone: 413-545-6301 Fax: 413-545-1273 E-mail: gep@msbdc.umass.edu Website: http://msbdc.som.umass.edu Ms. Georgianna Parkin, State Director

Kentucky
Kentucky SBDC UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 225 Gatton College of Business Economics Building Lexington, KY 40506-0034 Phone: 859-257-7668 Fax: 859-323-1907 E-mail: lrnaug0@pop.uky.edu Website: http://www.ksbdc.org Ms. Becky Naugle, State Director

Montana
Montana SBDC DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 301 South Park Avenue, Room 114 / P.O. Box 200505 Helena, MT 59620 Phone: 406-841-2746 Fax: 406-444-1872 E-mail: adesch@state.mt.us Website: http://commerce.state.mt.us/ brd/BRD_SBDC.html Ms. Ann Desch, State Director

Michigan
Michigan SBTDC GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY 510 West Fulton Avenue Grand Rapids, MI 49504 Phone: 616-331-7485 Fax: 616-331-7389 E-mail: lopuckic@gvsu.edu Website: http://www.misbtdc.org Ms. Carol Lopucki, State Director

Louisiana
Louisiana SBDC UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA MONROE College of Business Administration 700 University Avenue Monroe, LA 71209 Phone: 318-342-5506 Fax: 318-342-5510 E-mail: wilkerson@ulm.edu Website: http://www.lsbdc.org Ms. Mary Lynn Wilkerson, State Director

Nebraska
Nebraska SBDC UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA OMAHA 60th & Dodge Street, CBA Room 407 Omaha, NE 68182 Phone: 402-554-2521 Fax: 402-554-3473 E-mail: rbernier@unomaha.edu Website: http://nbdc.unomaha.edu Mr. Robert Bernier, State Director

Minnesota
Minnesota SBDC MINNESOTA SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER 1st National Bank Building 332 Minnesota Street, Suite E200 St. Paul, MN 55101-1351 Phone: 651-297-5773 Fax: 651-296-5287

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Nevada
Nevada SBDC UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA - RENO Reno College of Business Administration, Room 411 Reno, NV 89557-0100 Phone: 775-784-1717 Fax: 775-784-4337 E-mail: males@unr.edu Website: http://www.nsbdc.org Mr. Sam Males, State Director

North Carolina
North Carolina SBDTC UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 5 West Hargett Street, Suite 600 Raleigh, NC 27601 Phone: 919-715-7272 Fax: 919-715-7777 E-mail: sdaugherty@sbtdc.org Website: http://www.sbtdc.org Mr. Scott Daugherty, State Director

Website: http://www.bizcenter.org Mr. William Carter, State Director

Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania SBDC UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA The Wharton School 3733 Spruce Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-6374 Phone: 215-898-1219 Fax: 215-573-2135 E-mail: ghiggins@wharton.upenn.edu Website: http://pasbdc.org Mr. Gregory Higgins, State Director

North Dakota
North Dakota SBDC UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA 1600 E. Century Avenue, Suite 2 Bismarck, ND 58503 Phone: 701-328-5375 Fax: 701-328-5320 E-mail: christine.martin@und.nodak.edu Website: http://www.ndsbdc.org Ms. Christine Martin-Goldman, State Director

New Hampshire
New Hampshire SBDC UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 108 McConnell Hall Durham, NH 03824-3593 Phone: 603-862-4879 Fax: 603-862-4876 E-mail: Mary.Collins@unh.edu Website: http://www.nhsbdc.org Ms. Mary Collins, State Director

Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico SBDC INTER-AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 416 Ponce de Leon Avenue, Union Plaza, Seventh Floor Hato Rey, PR 00918 Phone: 787-763-6811 Fax: 787-763-4629 E-mail: cmarti@prsbdc.org Website: http://www.prsbdc.org Ms. Carmen Marti, Executive Director

New Jersey
New Jersey SBDC RUTGERS UNIVERSITY 49 Bleeker Street Newark, NJ 07102-1993 Phone: 973-353-5950 Fax: 973-353-1110 E-mail: bhopper@njsbdc.com Website: http://www.njsbdc.com/home Ms. Brenda Hopper, State Director

Ohio
Ohio SBDC OHIO DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT 77 South High Street Columbus, OH 43216 Phone: 614-466-5102 Fax: 614-466-0829 E-mail: mabraham@odod.state.oh.us Website: http://www.ohiosbdc.org Ms. Michele Abraham, State Director

Rhode Island
Rhode Island SBDC BRYANT UNIVERSITY 1150 Douglas Pike Smithfield, RI 02917 Phone: 401-232-6923 Fax: 401-232-6933 E-mail: adawson@bryant.edu Website: http://www.risbdc.org Ms. Diane Fournaris, Interim State Director

New Mexico
New Mexico SBDC SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 6401 Richards Avenue Santa Fe, NM 87505 Phone: 505-428-1362 Fax: 505-471-9469 E-mail: rmiller@santa-fe.cc.nm.us Website: http://www.nmsbdc.org Mr. Roy Miller, State Director

Oklahoma
Oklahoma SBDC SOUTHEAST OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY 517 University, Box 2584, Station A Durant, OK 74701 Phone: 580-745-7577 Fax: 580-745-7471 E-mail: gpennington@sosu.edu Website: http://www.osbdc.org Mr. Grady Pennington, State Director

South Carolina
South Carolina SBDC UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA College of Business Administration 1710 College Street Columbia, SC 29208 Phone: 803-777-4907 Fax: 803-777-4403 E-mail: lenti@moore.sc.edu Website: http://scsbdc.moore.sc.edu Mr. John Lenti, State Director

New York
New York SBDC STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SUNY Plaza, S-523 Albany, NY 12246 Phone: 518-443-5398 Fax: 518-443-5275 E-mail: j.king@nyssbdc.org Website: http://www.nyssbdc.org Mr. Jim King, State Director

Oregon
Oregon SBDC LANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 99 West Tenth Avenue, Suite 390 Eugene, OR 97401-3021 Phone: 541-463-5250 Fax: 541-345-6006 E-mail: carterb@lanecc.edu

South Dakota
South Dakota SBDC UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 414 East Clark Street, Patterson Hall Vermillion, SD 57069

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Phone: 605-677-6256 Fax: 605-677-5427 E-mail: jshemmin@usd.edu Website: http://www.sdsbdc.org Mr. John S. Hemmingstad, State Director E-mail: albert.salgado@utsa.edu Website: http://www.iedtexas.org Mr. Alberto Salgado, Region Director Phone: 509-358-7765 Fax: 509-358-7764 E-mail: barogers@wsu.edu Website: http://www.wsbdc.org Mr. Brett Rogers, State Director

Utah
Utah SBDC SALT LAKE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 9750 South 300 West Sandy, UT 84070 Phone: 801-957-3493 Fax: 801-957-3488 E-mail: Greg.Panichello@slcc.edu Website:http://www.slcc.edu/sbdc Mr. Greg Panichello, State Director

Tennessee
Tennessee SBDC TENNESSEE BOARD OF REGENTS 1415 Murfressboro Road, Suite 540 Nashville, TN 37217-2833 Phone: 615-898-2745 Fax: 615-893-7089 E-mail: pgeho@mail.tsbdc.org Website: http://www.tsbdc.org Mr. Patrick Geho, State Director

West Virginia
West Virginia SBDC WEST VIRGINIA DEVELOPMENT OFFICE Capital Complex, Building 6, Room 652 Charleston, WV 25301 Phone: 304-558-2960 Fax: 304-558-0127 E-mail: csalyer@wvsbdc.org Website: http://www.wvsbdc.org Mr. Conley Salyor, State Director Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Vermont
Vermont SBDC VERMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE PO Box 188, 1 Main Street Randolph Center, VT 05061-0188 Phone: 802-728-9101 Fax: 802-728-3026 E-mail: lquillen@vtc.edu Website: http://www.vtsbdc.org Ms. Lenae Quillen-Blume, State Director

Texas
Texas-North SBDC DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE 1402 Corinth Street Dallas, TX 75215 Phone: 214-860-5835 Fax: 214-860-5813 E-mail: emk9402@dcccd.edu Website: http://www.ntsbdc.org Ms. Liz Klimback, Region Director Texas-Houston SBDC UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON 2302 Fannin, Suite 200 Houston, TX 77002 Phone: 713-752-8425 Fax: 713-756-1500 E-mail: fyoung@uh.edu Website: http://sbdcnetwork.uh.edu Mr. Mike Young, Executive Director Texas-NW SBDC TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY 2579 South Loop 289, Suite 114 Lubbock, TX 79423 Phone: 806-745-3973 Fax: 806-745-6207 E-mail: c.bean@nwtsbdc.org Website: http://www.nwtsbdc.org Mr. Craig Bean, Executive Director Texas-South-West Texas Border Region SBDC UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS - SAN ANTONIO 501 West Durango Boulevard San Antonio, TX 78207-4415 Phone: 210-458-2742 Fax: 210-458-2464

Wisconsin
Wisconsin SBDC UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 432 North Lake Street, Room 423 Madison, WI 53706 Phone: 608-263-7794 Fax: 608-263-7830 E-mail: erica.kauten@uwex.edu Website: http://www.wisconsinsbdc.org Ms. Erica Kauten, State Director

Virgin Islands
Virgin Islands SBDC UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS 8000 Nisky Center, Suite 720 St. Thomas, VI 00802-5804 Phone: 340-776-3206 Fax: 340-775-3756 E-mail: wbush@webmail.uvi.edu Website: http://rps.uvi.edu/SBDC Mr. Warren Bush, State Director

Wyoming
Wyoming SBDC UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING P.O. Box 3922 Laramie, WY 82071-3922 Phone: 307-766-3505 Fax: 307-766-3406 E-mail: DDW@uwyo.edu Website: http://www.uwyo.edu/sbdc Ms. Debbie Popp, Acting State Director

Virginia
Virginia SBDC GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY 4031 University Drive, Suite 200 Fairfax, VA 22030-3409 Phone: 703-277-7727 Fax: 703-352-8515 E-mail: jkeenan@gmu.edu Website: http://www.virginiasbdc.org Ms. Jody Keenan, Director

Service corps of retired executives (score) offices
This section contains a listing of all SCORE offices organized alphabetically by state/U.S. territory, then by city, then by agency name.

Washington Alabama
Washington SBDC WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY 534 E. Trent Avenue P.O. Box 1495 Spokane, WA 99210-1495 SCORE Office (Northeast Alabama) 1330 Quintard Ave. Anniston, AL 36202 (256)237-3536

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SCORE Office (North Alabama) 901 South 15th St, Rm. 201 Birmingham, AL 35294-2060 (205)934-6868 Fax: (205)934-0538 SCORE Office (Baldwin County) 29750 Larry Dee Cawyer Dr. Daphne, AL 36526 (334)928-5838 SCORE Office (Shoals) 612 S. COurt Florence, AL 35630 (256)764-4661 Fax: (256)766-9017 E-mail: shoals@shoalschamber.com SCORE Office (Mobile) 600 S Court St. Mobile, AL 36104 (334)240-6868 Fax: (334)240-6869 SCORE Office (Alabama Capitol City) 600 S. Court St. Montgomery, AL 36104 (334)240-6868 Fax: (334)240-6869 SCORE Office (East Alabama) 601 Ave. A Opelika, AL 36801 (334)745-4861 E-mail: score636@hotmail.com Website: http://www.angelfire.com/sc/ score636/ SCORE Office (Tuscaloosa) 2200 University Blvd. Tuscaloosa, AL 35402 (205)758-7588 SCORE Office (East Valley) Federal Bldg., Rm. 104 26 N. MacDonald St. Mesa, AZ 85201 (602)379-3100 Fax: (602)379-3143 E-mail: 402@aol.com Website: http://www.scorearizona. org/mesa/ SCORE Office (Phoenix) 2828 N. Central Ave., Ste. 800 Central & One Thomas Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602)640-2329 Fax: (602)640-2360 E-mail: e-mail@SCORE-phoenix.org Website: http://www.score-phoenix.org/ SCORE Office (Prescott Arizona) 1228 Willow Creek Rd., Ste. 2 Prescott, AZ 86301 (520)778-7438 Fax: (520)778-0812 E-mail: score@northlink.com Website: http://www.scorearizona.org/ prescott/ SCORE Office (Tucson) 110 E. Pennington St. Tucson, AZ 85702 (520)670-5008 Fax: (520)670-5011 E-mail: score@azstarnet.com Website: http://www.scorearizona.org/ tucson/ SCORE Office (Yuma) 281 W. 24th St., Ste. 116 Yuma, AZ 85364 (520)314-0480 E-mail: score@C2i2.com Website: http://www.scorearizona. org/yuma SCORE Office (Garland County) Grand & Ouachita PO Box 6012 Hot Springs Village, AR 71902 (501)321-1700 SCORE Office (Little Rock) 2120 Riverfront Dr., Rm. 100 Little Rock, AR 72202-1747 (501)324-5893 Fax: (501)324-5199 SCORE Office (Southeast Arkansas) 121 W. 6th Pine Bluff, AR 71601 (870)535-7189 Fax: (870)535-1643

California
SCORE Office (Golden Empire) 1706 Chester Ave., No. 200 Bakersfield, CA 93301 (805)322-5881 Fax: (805)322-5663 SCORE Office (Greater Chico Area) 1324 Mangrove St., Ste. 114 Chico, CA 95926 (916)342-8932 Fax: (916)342-8932 SCORE Office (Concord) 2151-A Salvio St., Ste. B Concord, CA 94520 (510)685-1181 Fax: (510)685-5623 SCORE Office (Covina) 935 W. Badillo St. Covina, CA 91723 (818)967-4191 Fax: (818)966-9660 SCORE Office (Rancho Cucamonga) 8280 Utica, Ste. 160 Cucamonga, CA 91730 (909)987-1012 Fax: (909)987-5917 SCORE Office (Culver City) PO Box 707 Culver City, CA 90232-0707 (310)287-3850 Fax: (310)287-1350 SCORE Office (Danville) 380 Diablo Rd., Ste. 103 Danville, CA 94526 (510)837-4400

Alaska
SCORE Office (Anchorage) 510 L St., Ste. 310 Anchorage, AK 99501 (907)271-4022 Fax: (907)271-4545

Arkansas
SCORE Office (South Central) 201 N. Jackson Ave. El Dorado, AR 71730-5803 (870)863-6113 Fax: (870)863-6115 SCORE Office (Ozark) Fayetteville, AR 72701 (501)442-7619 SCORE Office (Northwest Arkansas) Glenn Haven Dr., No. 4 Ft. Smith, AR 72901 (501)783-3556

Arizona
SCORE Office (Lake Havasu) 10 S. Acoma Blvd. Lake Havasu City, AZ 86403 (520)453-5951 E-mail: SCORE@ctaz.com Website: http://www.scorearizona.org/ lake_havasu/

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SCORE Office (Downey) 11131 Brookshire Ave. Downey, CA 90241 (310)923-2191 Fax: (310)864-0461 SCORE Office (El Cajon) 109 Rea Ave. El Cajon, CA 92020 (619)444-1327 Fax: (619)440-6164 SCORE Office (El Centro) 1100 Main St. El Centro, CA 92243 (619)352-3681 Fax: (619)352-3246 SCORE Office (Escondido) 720 N. Broadway Escondido, CA 92025 (619)745-2125 Fax: (619)745-1183 SCORE Office (Fairfield) 1111 Webster St. Fairfield, CA 94533 (707)425-4625 Fax: (707)425-0826 SCORE Office (Fontana) 17009 Valley Blvd., Ste. B Fontana, CA 92335 (909)822-4433 Fax: (909)822-6238 SCORE Office (Foster City) 1125 E. Hillsdale Blvd. Foster City, CA 94404 (415)573-7600 Fax: (415)573-5201 SCORE Office (Fremont) 2201 Walnut Ave., Ste. 110 Fremont, CA 94538 (510)795-2244 Fax: (510)795-2240 SCORE Office (Central California) 2719 N. Air Fresno Dr., Ste. 200 Fresno, CA 93727-1547 (559)487-5605 Fax: (559)487-5636 SCORE Office (Gardena) 1204 W. Gardena Blvd. Gardena, CA 90247 (310)532-9905 Fax: (310)515-4893 SCORE Office (Lompoc) 330 N. Brand Blvd., Ste. 190 Glendale, CA 91203-2304 (818)552-3206 Fax: (818)552-3323 SCORE Office (Los Angeles) 330 N. Brand Blvd., Ste. 190 Glendale, CA 91203-2304 (818)552-3206 Fax: (818)552-3323 SCORE Office (Glendora) 131 E. Foothill Blvd. Glendora, CA 91740 (818)963-4128 Fax: (818)914-4822 SCORE Office (Grover Beach) 177 S. 8th St. Grover Beach, CA 93433 (805)489-9091 Fax: (805)489-9091 SCORE Office (Hawthorne) 12477 Hawthorne Blvd. Hawthorne, CA 90250 (310)676-1163 Fax: (310)676-7661 SCORE Office (Hayward) 22300 Foothill Blvd., Ste. 303 Hayward, CA 94541 (510)537-2424 SCORE Office (Hemet) 1700 E. Florida Ave. Hemet, CA 92544-4679 (909)652-4390 Fax: (909)929-8543 SCORE Office (Hesperia) 16367 Main St. PO Box 403656 Hesperia, CA 92340 (619)244-2135 SCORE Office (Holloster) 321 San Felipe Rd., No. 11 Hollister, CA 95023 SCORE Office (Hollywood) 7018 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, CA 90028 (213)469-8311 Fax: (213)469-2805 SCORE Office (Indio) 82503 Hwy. 111 PO Drawer TTT Indio, CA 92202 (619)347-0676 SCORE Office (Inglewood) 330 Queen St. Inglewood, CA 90301 (818)552-3206 SCORE Office (La Puente) 218 N. Grendanda St. D. La Puente, CA 91744 (818)330-3216 Fax: (818)330-9524 Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants SCORE Office (La Verne) 2078 Bonita Ave. La Verne, CA 91750 (909)593-5265 Fax: (714)929-8475 SCORE Office (Lake Elsinore) 132 W. Graham Ave. Lake Elsinore, CA 92530 (909)674-2577 SCORE Office (Lakeport) PO Box 295 Lakeport, CA 95453 (707)263-5092 SCORE Office (Lakewood) 5445 E. Del Amo Blvd., Ste. 2 Lakewood, CA 90714 (213)920-7737 SCORE Office (Long Beach) 1 World Trade Center Long Beach, CA 90831 SCORE Office (Los Alamitos) 901 W. Civic Center Dr., Ste. 160 Los Alamitos, CA 90720 SCORE Office (Los Altos) 321 University Ave. Los Altos, CA 94022 (415)948-1455 SCORE Office (Manhattan Beach) PO Box 3007 Manhattan Beach, CA 90266 (310)545-5313 Fax: (310)545-7203 SCORE Office (Merced) 1632 N. St. Merced, CA 95340 (209)725-3800 Fax: (209)383-4959 SCORE Office (Milpitas) 75 S. Milpitas Blvd., Ste. 205 Milpitas, CA 95035 (408)262-2613 Fax: (408)262-2823

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SCORE Office (Yosemite) 1012 11th St., Ste. 300 Modesto, CA 95354 (209)521-9333 SCORE Office (Montclair) 5220 Benito Ave. Montclair, CA 91763 SCORE Office (Monterey Bay) 380 Alvarado St. PO Box 1770 Monterey, CA 93940-1770 (408)649-1770 SCORE Office (Moreno Valley) 25480 Alessandro Moreno Valley, CA 92553 SCORE Office (Morgan Hill) 25 W. 1st St. PO Box 786 Morgan Hill, CA 95038 (408)779-9444 Fax: (408)778-1786 SCORE Office (Morro Bay) 880 Main St. Morro Bay, CA 93442 (805)772-4467 SCORE Office (Mountain View) 580 Castro St. Mountain View, CA 94041 (415)968-8378 Fax: (415)968-5668 SCORE Office (Napa) 1556 1st St. Napa, CA 94559 (707)226-7455 Fax: (707)226-1171 SCORE Office (North Hollywood) 5019 Lankershim Blvd. North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818)552-3206 SCORE Office (Northridge) 8801 Reseda Blvd. Northridge, CA 91324 (818)349-5676 SCORE Office (Novato) 807 De Long Ave. Novato, CA 94945 (415)897-1164 Fax: (415)898-9097 SCORE Office (East Bay) 519 17th St. Oakland, CA 94612 (510)273-6611 Fax: (510)273-6015 E-mail: webmaster@eastbayscore.org Website: http://www.eastbayscore.org SCORE Office (Oceanside) 928 N. Coast Hwy. Oceanside, CA 92054 (619)722-1534 SCORE Office (Ontario) 121 West B. St. Ontario, CA 91762 Fax: (714)984-6439 SCORE Office (Oxnard) PO Box 867 Oxnard, CA 93032 (805)385-8860 Fax: (805)487-1763 SCORE Office (Pacifica) 450 Dundee Way, Ste. 2 Pacifica, CA 94044 (415)355-4122 SCORE Office (Palm Desert) 72990 Hwy. 111 Palm Desert, CA 92260 (619)346-6111 Fax: (619)346-3463 SCORE Office (Palm Springs) 650 E. Tahquitz Canyon Way Ste. D Palm Springs, CA 92262-6706 (760)320-6682 Fax: (760)323-9426 SCORE Office (Lakeside) 2150 Low Tree Palmdale, CA 93551 (805)948-4518 Fax: (805)949-1212 SCORE Office (Palo Alto) 325 Forest Ave. Palo Alto, CA 94301 (415)324-3121 Fax: (415)324-1215 SCORE Office (Pasadena) 117 E. Colorado Blvd., Ste. 100 Pasadena, CA 91105 (818)795-3355 Fax: (818)795-5663 SCORE Office (Paso Robles) 1225 Park St. Paso Robles, CA 93446-2234 (805)238-0506 Fax: (805)238-0527 SCORE Office (Petaluma) 799 Baywood Dr., Ste. 3 Petaluma, CA 94954 (707)762-2785 Fax: (707)762-4721 SCORE Office (Pico Rivera) 9122 E. Washington Blvd. Pico Rivera, CA 90660 SCORE Office (Pittsburg) 2700 E. Leland Rd. Pittsburg, CA 94565 (510)439-2181 Fax: (510)427-1599 SCORE Office (Pleasanton) 777 Peters Ave. Pleasanton, CA 94566 (510)846-9697 SCORE Office (Monterey Park) 485 N. Garey Pomona, CA 91769 SCORE Office (Pomona) 485 N. Garey Ave. Pomona, CA 91766 (909)622-1256 SCORE Office (Antelope Valley) 4511 West Ave. M-4 Quartz Hill, CA 93536 (805)272-0087 E-mail: avscore@ptw.com Website: http://www.score.av.org/ SCORE Office (Shasta) 737 Auditorium Dr. Redding, CA 96099 (916)225-2770 SCORE Office (Redwood City) 1675 Broadway Redwood City, CA 94063 (415)364-1722 Fax: (415)364-1729 SCORE Office (Richmond) 3925 MacDonald Ave. Richmond, CA 94805 SCORE Office (Ridgecrest) PO Box 771 Ridgecrest, CA 93555 (619)375-8331 Fax: (619)375-0365 SCORE Office (Riverside) 3685 Main St., Ste. 350 Riverside, CA 92501 (909)683-7100

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SCORE Office (Sacramento) 9845 Horn Rd., 260-B Sacramento, CA 95827 (916)361-2322 Fax: (916)361-2164 E-mail: sacchapter@directcon.net SCORE Office (Salinas) PO Box 1170 Salinas, CA 93902 (408)424-7611 Fax: (408)424-8639 SCORE Office (Inland Empire) 777 E. Rialto Ave. Purchasing San Bernardino, CA 92415-0760 (909)386-8278 SCORE Office (San Carlos) San Carlos Chamber of Commerce PO Box 1086 San Carlos, CA 94070 (415)593-1068 Fax: (415)593-9108 SCORE Office (Encinitas) 550 W. C St., Ste. 550 San Diego, CA 92101-3540 (619)557-7272 Fax: (619)557-5894 SCORE Office (San Diego) 550 West C. St., Ste. 550 San Diego, CA 92101-3540 (619)557-7272 Fax: (619)557-5894 Website: http://www.scoresandiego.org SCORE Office (Menlo Park) 1100 Merrill St. San Francisco, CA 94105 (415)325-2818 Fax: (415)325-0920 SCORE Office (San Francisco) 455 Market St., 6th Fl. San Francisco, CA 94105 (415)744-6827 Fax: (415)744-6750 E-mail: sfscore@sfscore. Website: http://www.sfscore.com SCORE Office (San Gabriel) 401 W. Las Tunas Dr. San Gabriel, CA 91776 (818)576-2525 Fax: (818)289-2901 SCORE Office (San Jose) Deanza College 208 S. 1st. St., Ste. 137 San Jose, CA 95113 (408)288-8479 Fax: (408)535-5541 SCORE Office (Silicon Valley) 84 W. Santa Clara St., Ste. 100 San Jose, CA 95113 (408)288-8479 Fax: (408)535-5541 E-mail: info@svscore.org Website: http://www.svscore.org SCORE Office (San Luis Obispo) 3566 S. Hiquera, No. 104 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (805)547-0779 SCORE Office (San Mateo) 1021 S. El Camino, 2nd Fl. San Mateo, CA 94402 (415)341-5679 SCORE Office (San Pedro) 390 W. 7th St. San Pedro, CA 90731 (310)832-7272 SCORE Office (Orange County) 200 W. Santa Anna Blvd., Ste. 700 Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714)550-7369 Fax: (714)550-0191 Website: http://www.score114.org SCORE Office (Santa Barbara) 3227 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93130 (805)563-0084 SCORE Office (Central Coast) 509 W. Morrison Ave. Santa Maria, CA 93454 (805)347-7755 SCORE Office (Santa Maria) 614 S. Broadway Santa Maria, CA 93454-5111 (805)925-2403 Fax: (805)928-7559 SCORE Office (Santa Monica) 501 Colorado, Ste. 150 Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310)393-9825 Fax: (310)394-1868 SCORE Office (Santa Rosa) 777 Sonoma Ave., Rm. 115E Santa Rosa, CA 95404 (707)571-8342 Fax: (707)541-0331 Website: http://www.pressdemo.com/ community/score/score.html SCORE Office (Scotts Valley) 4 Camp Evers Ln. Scotts Valley, CA 95066 (408)438-1010 Fax: (408)438-6544 SCORE Office (Simi Valley) 40 W. Cochran St., Ste. 100 Simi Valley, CA 93065 (805)526-3900 Fax: (805)526-6234 SCORE Office (Sonoma) 453 1st St. E Sonoma, CA 95476 (707)996-1033 SCORE Office (Los Banos) 222 S. Shepard St. Sonora, CA 95370 (209)532-4212 SCORE Office (Tuolumne County) 39 North Washington St. Sonora, CA 95370 (209)588-0128 E-mail: score@mlode.com SCORE Office (South San Francisco) 445 Market St., Ste. 6th Fl. South San Francisco, CA 94105 (415)744-6827 Fax: (415)744-6812 SCORE Office (Stockton) 401 N. San Joaquin St., Rm. 215 Stockton, CA 95202 (209)946-6293 SCORE Office (Taft) 314 4th St. Taft, CA 93268 (805)765-2165 Fax: (805)765-6639 SCORE Office (Conejo Valley) 625 W. Hillcrest Dr. Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 (805)499-1993 Fax: (805)498-7264 SCORE Office (Torrance) 3400 Torrance Blvd., Ste. 100 Torrance, CA 90503 (310)540-5858 Fax: (310)540-7662

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SCORE Office (Truckee) PO Box 2757 Truckee, CA 96160 (916)587-2757 Fax: (916)587-2439 SCORE Office (Visalia) 113 S. M St, Tulare, CA 93274 (209)627-0766 Fax: (209)627-8149 SCORE Office (Upland) 433 N. 2nd Ave. Upland, CA 91786 (909)931-4108 SCORE Office (Vallejo) 2 Florida St. Vallejo, CA 94590 (707)644-5551 Fax: (707)644-5590 SCORE Office (Van Nuys) 14540 Victory Blvd. Van Nuys, CA 91411 (818)989-0300 Fax: (818)989-3836 SCORE Office (Ventura) 5700 Ralston St., Ste. 310 Ventura, CA 93001 (805)658-2688 Fax: (805)658-2252 E-mail: scoreven@jps.net Website: http://www.jps.net/scoreven SCORE Office (Vista) 201 E. Washington St. Vista, CA 92084 (619)726-1122 Fax: (619)226-8654 SCORE Office (Watsonville) PO Box 1748 Watsonville, CA 95077 (408)724-3849 Fax: (408)728-5300 SCORE Office (West Covina) 811 S. Sunset Ave. West Covina, CA 91790 (818)338-8496 Fax: (818)960-0511 SCORE Office (Westlake) 30893 Thousand Oaks Blvd. Westlake Village, CA 91362 (805)496-5630 Fax: (818)991-1754

Colorado
SCORE Office (Colorado Springs) 2 N. Cascade Ave., Ste. 110 Colorado Springs, CO 80903 (719)636-3074 Website: http://www.cscc.org/score02/ index.html SCORE Office (Denver) US Custom’s House, 4th Fl. 721 19th St. Denver, CO 80201-0660 (303)844-3985 Fax: (303)844-6490 E-mail: score62@csn.net Website: http://www.sni.net/score62 SCORE Office (Tri-River) 1102 Grand Ave. Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 (970)945-6589 SCORE Office (Grand Junction) 2591 B & 3/4 Rd. Grand Junction, CO 81503 (970)243-5242 SCORE Office (Gunnison) 608 N. 11th Gunnison, CO 81230 (303)641-4422 SCORE Office (Montrose) 1214 Peppertree Dr. Montrose, CO 81401 (970)249-6080 SCORE Office (Pagosa Springs) PO Box 4381 Pagosa Springs, CO 81157 (970)731-4890 SCORE Office (Rifle) 0854 W. Battlement Pky., Apt. C106 Parachute, CO 81635 (970)285-9390 SCORE Office (Pueblo) 302 N. Santa Fe Pueblo, CO 81003 (719)542-1704 Fax: (719)542-1624 E-mail: mackey@iex.net Website: http://www.pueblo.org/score SCORE Office (Ridgway) 143 Poplar Pl. Ridgway, CO 81432 SCORE Office (Silverton) PO Box 480

Silverton, CO 81433 (303)387-5430 SCORE Office (Minturn) PO Box 2066 Vail, CO 81658 (970)476-1224

Connecticut
SCORE Office (Greater Bridgeport) 230 Park Ave. Bridgeport, CT 06601-0999 (203)576-4369 Fax: (203)576-4388 SCORE Office (Bristol) 10 Main St. 1st. Fl. Bristol, CT 06010 (203)584-4718 Fax: (203)584-4722 SCORE office (Greater Danbury) 246 Federal Rd. Unit LL2, Ste. 7 Brookfield, CT 06804 (203)775-1151 SCORE Office (Greater Danbury) 246 Federal Rd., Unit LL2, Ste. 7 Brookfield, CT 06804 (203)775-1151 SCORE Office (Eastern Connecticut) Administration Bldg., Rm. 313 PO 625 61 Main St. (Chapter 579) Groton, CT 06475 (203)388-9508 SCORE Office (Greater Hartford County) 330 Main St. Hartford, CT 06106 (860)548-1749 Fax: (860)240-4659 Website: http://www.score56.org SCORE Office (Manchester) 20 Hartford Rd. Manchester, CT 06040 (203)646-2223 Fax: (203)646-5871 SCORE Office (New Britain) 185 Main St., Ste. 431 New Britain, CT 06051 (203)827-4492 Fax: (203)827-4480 SCORE Office (New Haven) 25 Science Pk., Bldg. 25, Rm. 366

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New Haven, CT 06511 (203)865-7645 SCORE Office (Fairfield County) 24 Beldon Ave., 5th Fl. Norwalk, CT 06850 (203)847-7348 Fax: (203)849-9308 SCORE Office (Old Saybrook) 146 Main St. Old Saybrook, CT 06475 (860)388-9508 SCORE Office (Simsbury) Box 244 Simsbury, CT 06070 (203)651-7307 Fax: (203)651-1933 SCORE Office (Torrington) 23 North Rd. Torrington, CT 06791 (203)482-6586 Washington, DC 20043 (202)606-4000 Fax: (202)606-4225 E-mail: dcscore@hotmail.com Website: http://www.scoredc.org/ (305)887-1515 Fax: (305)887-2453 SCORE Office (Daytona Beach) 921 Nova Rd., Ste. A Holly Hills, FL 32117 (904)255-6889 Fax: (904)255-0229 E-mail: score87@dbeach.com SCORE Office (South Broward) 3475 Sheridian St., Ste. 203 Hollywood, FL 33021 (305)966-8415 SCORE Office (Citrus County) 5 Poplar Ct. Homosassa, FL 34446 (352)382-1037 SCORE Office (Jacksonville) 7825 Baymeadows Way, Ste. 100-B Jacksonville, FL 32256 (904)443-1911 Fax: (904)443-1980 E-mail: scorejax@juno.com Website: http://www.scorejax.org/ SCORE Office (Jacksonville Satellite) 3 Independent Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32256 (904)366-6600 Fax: (904)632-0617 SCORE Office (Central Florida) 5410 S. Florida Ave., No. 3 Lakeland, FL 33801 (941)687-5783 Fax: (941)687-6225 SCORE Office (Lakeland) 100 Lake Morton Dr. Lakeland, FL 33801 (941)686-2168 SCORE Office (St. Petersburg) 800 W. Bay Dr., Ste. 505 Largo, FL 33712 (813)585-4571 SCORE Office (Leesburg) 9501 US Hwy. 441 Leesburg, FL 34788-8751 (352)365-3556 Fax: (352)365-3501 SCORE Office (Cocoa) 1600 Farno Rd., Unit 205 Melbourne, FL 32935 (407)254-2288

Florida
SCORE Office (Desota County Chamber of Commerce) 16 South Velucia Ave. Arcadia, FL 34266 (941)494-4033 SCORE Office (Suncoast/Pinellas) Airport Business Ctr. 4707 - 140th Ave. N, No. 311 Clearwater, FL 33755 (813)532-6800 Fax: (813)532-6800 SCORE Office (DeLand) 336 N. Woodland Blvd. DeLand, FL 32720 (904)734-4331 Fax: (904)734-4333 SCORE Office (South Palm Beach) 1050 S. Federal Hwy., Ste. 132 Delray Beach, FL 33483 (561)278-7752 Fax: (561)278-0288 SCORE Office (Ft. Lauderdale) Federal Bldg., Ste. 123 299 E. Broward Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 (954)356-7263 Fax: (954)356-7145 SCORE Office (Southwest Florida) The Renaissance 8695 College Pky., Ste. 345 & 346 Ft. Myers, FL 33919 (941)489-2935 Fax: (941)489-1170 SCORE Office (Treasure Coast) Professional Center, Ste. 2 3220 S. US, No. 1 Ft. Pierce, FL 34982 (561)489-0548 SCORE Office (Gainesville) 101 SE 2nd Pl., Ste. 104 Gainesville, FL 32601 (904)375-8278 SCORE Office (Hialeah Dade Chamber) 59 W. 5th St. Hialeah, FL 33010

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Delaware
SCORE Office (Dover) Treadway Towers PO Box 576 Dover, DE 19903 (302)678-0892 Fax: (302)678-0189 SCORE Office (Lewes) PO Box 1 Lewes, DE 19958 (302)645-8073 Fax: (302)645-8412 SCORE Office (Milford) 204 NE Front St. Milford, DE 19963 (302)422-3301 SCORE Office (Wilmington) 824 Market St., Ste. 610 Wilmington, DE 19801 (302)573-6652 Fax: (302)573-6092 Website: http://www.scoredelaware.com

District of Columbia
SCORE Office (George Mason University) 409 3rd St. SW, 4th Fl. Washington, DC 20024 800-634-0245 SCORE Office (Washington DC) 1110 Vermont Ave. NW, 9th Fl.

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SCORE Office (Melbourne) Melbourne Professional Complex 1600 Sarno, Ste. 205 Melbourne, FL 32935 (407)254-2288 Fax: (407)245-2288 SCORE Office (Merritt Island) 1600 Sarno Rd., Ste. 205 Melbourne, FL 32935 (407)254-2288 Fax: (407)254-2288 SCORE Office (Space Coast) Melbourn Professional Complex 1600 Sarno, Ste. 205 Melbourne, FL 32935 (407)254-2288 Fax: (407)254-2288 SCORE Office (Dade) 49 NW 5th St. Miami, FL 33128 (305)371-6889 Fax: (305)374-1882 E-mail: score@netrox.net Website: http://www.netrox.net/~score/ SCORE Office (Naples of Collier) International College 2654 Tamiami Trl. E Naples, FL 34112 (941)417-1280 Fax: (941)417-1281 E-mail: score@naples.net Website: http://www.naples.net/clubs/ score/index.htm SCORE Office (Pasco County) 6014 US Hwy. 19, Ste. 302 New Port Richey, FL 34652 (813)842-4638 SCORE Office (Southeast Volusia) 115 Canal St. New Smyrna Beach, FL 32168 (904)428-2449 Fax: (904)423-3512 SCORE Office (Ocala) 110 E. Silver Springs Blvd. Ocala, FL 34470 (352)629-5959 Clay County SCORE Office Clay County Chamber of Commerce 1734 Kingsdey Ave. PO Box 1441 Orange Park, FL 32073 (904)264-2651 Fax: (904)269-0363 SCORE Office (Orlando) 80 N. Hughey Ave. Rm. 445 Federal Bldg. Orlando, FL 32801 (407)648-6476 Fax: (407)648-6425 SCORE Office (Emerald Coast) 19 W. Garden St., No. 325 Pensacola, FL 32501 (904)444-2060 Fax: (904)444-2070 SCORE Office (Charlotte County) 201 W. Marion Ave., Ste. 211 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 (941)575-1818 E-mail: score@gls3c.com Website: http://www.charlotteflorida.com/business/scorepg01.htm SCORE Office (St. Augustine) 1 Riberia St. St. Augustine, FL 32084 (904)829-5681 Fax: (904)829-6477 SCORE Office (Bradenton) 2801 Fruitville, Ste. 280 Sarasota, FL 34237 (813)955-1029 SCORE Office (Manasota) 2801 Fruitville Rd., Ste. 280 Sarasota, FL 34237 (941)955-1029 Fax: (941)955-5581 E-mail: score116@gte.net Website: http://www.score-suncoast.org/ SCORE Office (Tallahassee) 200 W. Park Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32302 (850)487-2665 SCORE Office (Hillsborough) 4732 Dale Mabry Hwy. N, Ste. 400 Tampa, FL 33614-6509 (813)870-0125 SCORE Office (Lake Sumter) 122 E. Main St. Tavares, FL 32778-3810 (352)365-3556 SCORE Office (Titusville) 2000 S. Washington Ave. Titusville, FL 32780 (407)267-3036 Fax: (407)264-0127 SCORE Office (Venice) 257 N. Tamiami Trl. Venice, FL 34285 (941)488-2236 Fax: (941)484-5903 SCORE Office (Palm Beach) 500 Australian Ave. S, Ste. 100 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561)833-1672 Fax: (561)833-1712 SCORE Office (Wildwood) 103 N. Webster St. Wildwood, FL 34785

Georgia
SCORE Office (Atlanta) Harris Tower, Suite 1900 233 Peachtree Rd., NE Atlanta, GA 30309 (404)347-2442 Fax: (404)347-1227 SCORE Office (Augusta) 3126 Oxford Rd. Augusta, GA 30909 (706)869-9100 SCORE Office (Columbus) School Bldg. PO Box 40 Columbus, GA 31901 (706)327-3654 SCORE Office (Dalton-Whitfield) 305 S. Thorton Ave. Dalton, GA 30720 (706)279-3383 SCORE Office (Gainesville) PO Box 374 Gainesville, GA 30503 (770)532-6206 Fax: (770)535-8419 SCORE Office (Macon) 711 Grand Bldg. Macon, GA 31201 (912)751-6160 SCORE Office (Brunswick) 4 Glen Ave. St. Simons Island, GA 31520 (912)265-0620 Fax: (912)265-0629 SCORE Office (Savannah) 111 E. Liberty St., Ste. 103 Savannah, GA 31401 (912)652-4335

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Fax: (912)652-4184 E-mail: info@scoresav.org Website: http://www.coastalempire.com/ score/index.htm SCORE Office (Bensenville) 1050 Busse Hwy. Suite 100 Bensenville, IL 60106 (708)350-2944 Fax: (708)350-2979 SCORE Office (Central Illinois) 402 N. Hershey Rd. Bloomington, IL 61704 (309)644-0549 Fax: (309)663-8270 E-mail: webmaster@central-illinoisscore.org Website: http://www.central-illinoisscore.org/ SCORE Office (Southern Illinois) 150 E. Pleasant Hill Rd. Box 1 Carbondale, IL 62901 (618)453-6654 Fax: (618)453-5040 SCORE Office (Chicago) Northwest Atrium Ctr. 500 W. Madison St., No. 1250 Chicago, IL 60661 (312)353-7724 Fax: (312)886-5688 Website: http://www.mcs.net/~bic/ SCORE Office (Chicago–Oliver Harvey College) Pullman Bldg. 1000 E. 11th St., 7th Fl. Chicago, IL 60628 Fax: (312)468-8086 SCORE Office (Danville) 28 W. N. Street Danville, IL 61832 (217)442-7232 Fax: (217)442-6228 SCORE Office (Decatur) Milliken University 1184 W. Main St. Decatur, IL 62522 (217)424-6297 Fax: (217)424-3993 E-mail: charding@mail.millikin.edu Website: http://www.millikin.edu/ academics/Tabor/score.html SCORE Office (Downers Grove) 925 Curtis Downers Grove, IL 60515 (708)968-4050 Fax: (708)968-8368 SCORE Office (Elgin) 24 E. Chicago, 3rd Fl. PO Box 648 Elgin, IL 60120 (847)741-5660 Fax: (847)741-5677 SCORE Office (Freeport Area) 26 S. Galena Ave. Freeport, IL 61032 (815)233-1350 Fax: (815)235-4038 SCORE Office (Galesburg) 292 E. Simmons St. PO Box 749 Galesburg, IL 61401 (309)343-1194 Fax: (309)343-1195 SCORE Office (Glen Ellyn) 500 Pennsylvania Glen Ellyn, IL 60137 (708)469-0907 Fax: (708)469-0426 SCORE Office (Greater Alton) Alden Hall 5800 Godfrey Rd. Godfrey, IL 62035-2466 (618)467-2280 Fax: (618)466-8289 Website: http://www.altonweb.com/ score/ SCORE Office (Grayslake) 19351 W. Washington St. Grayslake, IL 60030 (708)223-3633 Fax: (708)223-9371 SCORE Office (Harrisburg) 303 S. Commercial Harrisburg, IL 62946-1528 (618)252-8528 Fax: (618)252-0210 SCORE Office (Joliet) 100 N. Chicago Joliet, IL 60432 (815)727-5371 Fax: (815)727-5374 SCORE Office (Kankakee) 101 S. Schuyler Ave. Kankakee, IL 60901 (815)933-0376 Fax: (815)933-0380 SCORE Office (Macomb) 216 Seal Hall, Rm. 214

Guam
SCORE Office (Guam) Pacific News Bldg., Rm. 103 238 Archbishop Flores St. Agana, GU 96910-5100 (671)472-7308

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Hawaii
SCORE Office (Hawaii, Inc.) 1111 Bishop St., Ste. 204 PO Box 50207 Honolulu, HI 96813 (808)522-8132 Fax: (808)522-8135 E-mail: hnlscore@juno.com SCORE Office (Kahului) 250 Alamaha, Unit N16A Kahului, HI 96732 (808)871-7711 SCORE Office (Maui, Inc.) 590 E. Lipoa Pkwy., Ste. 227 Kihei, HI 96753 (808)875-2380

Idaho
SCORE Office (Treasure Valley) 1020 Main St., No. 290 Boise, ID 83702 (208)334-1696 Fax: (208)334-9353 SCORE Office (Eastern Idaho) 2300 N. Yellowstone, Ste. 119 Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (208)523-1022 Fax: (208)528-7127

Illinois
SCORE Office (Fox Valley) 40 W. Downer Pl. PO Box 277 Aurora, IL 60506 (630)897-9214 Fax: (630)897-7002 SCORE Office (Greater Belvidere) 419 S. State St. Belvidere, IL 61008 (815)544-4357 Fax: (815)547-7654

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Macomb, IL 61455 (309)298-1128 Fax: (309)298-2520 SCORE Office (Matteson) 210 Lincoln Mall Matteson, IL 60443 (708)709-3750 Fax: (708)503-9322 SCORE Office (Mattoon) 1701 Wabash Ave. Mattoon, IL 61938 (217)235-5661 Fax: (217)234-6544 SCORE Office (Quad Cities) 622 19th St. Moline, IL 61265 (309)797-0082 Fax: (309)757-5435 E-mail: score@qconline.com Website: http://www.qconline.com/ business/score/ SCORE Office (Naperville) 131 W. Jefferson Ave. Naperville, IL 60540 (708)355-4141 Fax: (708)355-8355 SCORE Office (Northbrook) 2002 Walters Ave. Northbrook, IL 60062 (847)498-5555 Fax: (847)498-5510 SCORE Office (Palos Hills) 10900 S. 88th Ave. Palos Hills, IL 60465 (847)974-5468 Fax: (847)974-0078 SCORE Office (Peoria) 124 SW Adams, Ste. 300 Peoria, IL 61602 (309)676-0755 Fax: (309)676-7534 SCORE Office (Prospect Heights) 1375 Wolf Rd. Prospect Heights, IL 60070 (847)537-8660 Fax: (847)537-7138 SCORE Office (Quincy Tri-State) 300 Civic Center Plz., Ste. 245 Quincy, IL 62301 (217)222-8093 Fax: (217)222-3033 SCORE Office (River Grove) 2000 5th Ave. River Grove, IL 60171 (708)456-0300 Fax: (708)583-3121 SCORE Office (Northern Illinois) 515 N. Court St. Rockford, IL 61103 (815)962-0122 Fax: (815)962-0122 SCORE Office (St. Charles) 103 N. 1st Ave. St. Charles, IL 60174-1982 (847)584-8384 Fax: (847)584-6065 SCORE Office (Springfield) 511 W. Capitol Ave., Ste. 302 Springfield, IL 62704 (217)492-4416 Fax: (217)492-4867 SCORE Office (Sycamore) 112 Somunak St. Sycamore, IL 60178 (815)895-3456 Fax: (815)895-0125 SCORE Office (University) Hwy. 50 & Stuenkel Rd. Ste. C3305 University Park, IL 60466 (708)534-5000 Fax: (708)534-8457 (812)738-2137 Fax: (812)738-6438 SCORE Office (Crown Point) Old Courthouse Sq. Ste. 206 PO Box 43 Crown Point, IN 46307 (219)663-1800 SCORE Office (Elkhart) 418 S. Main St. Elkhart, IN 46515 (219)293-1531 Fax: (219)294-1859 SCORE Office (Evansville) 1100 W. Lloyd Expy., Ste. 105 Evansville, IN 47708 (812)426-6144 SCORE Office (Fort Wayne) 1300 S. Harrison St. Ft. Wayne, IN 46802 (219)422-2601 Fax: (219)422-2601 SCORE Office (Gary) 973 W. 6th Ave., Rm. 326 Gary, IN 46402 (219)882-3918 SCORE Office (Hammond) 7034 Indianapolis Blvd. Hammond, IN 46324 (219)931-1000 Fax: (219)845-9548 SCORE Office (Indianapolis) 429 N. Pennsylvania St., Ste. 100 Indianapolis, IN 46204-1873 (317)226-7264 Fax: (317)226-7259 E-mail: inscore@indy.net Website: http://www.scoreindianapolis.org/ SCORE Office (Jasper) PO Box 307 Jasper, IN 47547-0307 (812)482-6866 SCORE Office (Kokomo/Howard Counties) 106 N. Washington St. Kokomo, IN 46901 (765)457-5301 Fax: (765)452-4564 SCORE Office (Logansport) 300 E. Broadway, Ste. 103 Logansport, IN 46947 (219)753-6388

Indiana
SCORE Office (Anderson) 205 W. 11th St. Anderson, IN 46015 (317)642-0264 SCORE Office (Bloomington) Star Center 216 W. Allen Bloomington, IN 47403 (812)335-7334 E-mail: wtfische@indiana.edu Website: http://www.brainfreezemedia. com/score527/ SCORE Office (South East Indiana) 500 Franklin St. Box 29 Columbus, IN 47201 (812)379-4457 SCORE Office (Corydon) 310 N. Elm St. Corydon, IN 47112

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SCORE Office (Madison) 301 E. Main St. Madison, IN 47250 (812)265-3135 Fax: (812)265-2923 SCORE Office (Marengo) Rt. 1 Box 224D Marengo, IN 47140 Fax: (812)365-2793 SCORE Office (Marion/Grant Counties) 215 S. Adams Marion, IN 46952 (765)664-5107 SCORE Office (Merrillville) 255 W. 80th Pl. Merrillville, IN 46410 (219)769-8180 Fax: (219)736-6223 SCORE Office (Michigan City) 200 E. Michigan Blvd. Michigan City, IN 46360 (219)874-6221 Fax: (219)873-1204 SCORE Office (South Central Indiana) 4100 Charleston Rd. New Albany, IN 47150-9538 (812)945-0066 SCORE Office (Rensselaer) 104 W. Washington Rensselaer, IN 47978 SCORE Office (Salem) 210 N. Main St. Salem, IN 47167 (812)883-4303 Fax: (812)883-1467 SCORE Office (South Bend) 300 N. Michigan St. South Bend, IN 46601 (219)282-4350 E-mail: chair@southbend-score.org Website: http://www.southbend-score.org/ SCORE Office (Valparaiso) 150 Lincolnway Valparaiso, IN 46383 (219)462-1105 Fax: (219)469-5710 SCORE Office (Vincennes) 27 N. 3rd PO Box 553 Vincennes, IN 47591 (812)882-6440 Fax: (812)882-6441 SCORE Office (Wabash) PO Box 371 Wabash, IN 46992 (219)563-1168 Fax: (219)563-6920 SCORE Office (Keokuk) 401 Main St. Pierce Bldg., No. 1 Keokuk, IA 52632 (319)524-5055 SCORE Office (Central Iowa) Fisher Community College 709 S. Center Marshalltown, IA 50158 (515)753-6645 SCORE Office (River City) 15 West State St. Mason City, IA 50401 (515)423-5724 SCORE Office (South Central) SBDC, Indian Hills Community College 525 Grandview Ave. Ottumwa, IA 52501 (515)683-5127 Fax: (515)683-5263 SCORE Office (Dubuque) 10250 Sundown Rd. Peosta, IA 52068 (319)556-5110 SCORE Office (Southwest Iowa) 614 W. Sheridan Shenandoah, IA 51601 (712)246-3260 SCORE Office (Sioux City) Federal Bldg. 320 6th St. Sioux City, IA 51101 (712)277-2324 Fax: (712)277-2325 SCORE Office (Iowa Lakes) 122 W. 5th St. Spencer, IA 51301 (712)262-3059 SCORE Office (Vista) 119 W. 6th St. Storm Lake, IA 50588 (712)732-3780 SCORE Office (Waterloo) 215 E. 4th Waterloo, IA 50703 (319)233-8431

Iowa
SCORE Office (Burlington) Federal Bldg. 300 N. Main St. Burlington, IA 52601 (319)752-2967 SCORE Office (Cedar Rapids) 2750 1st Ave. NE, Ste 350 Cedar Rapids, IA 52401-1806 (319)362-6405 Fax: (319)362-7861 E:mail: score@scorecr.org Website: http://www.scorecr.org SCORE Office (Illowa) 333 4th Ave. S Clinton, IA 52732 (319)242-5702 SCORE Office (Council Bluffs) 7 N. 6th St. Council Bluffs, IA 51502 (712)325-1000 SCORE Office (Northeast Iowa) 3404 285th St. Cresco, IA 52136 (319)547-3377 SCORE Office (Des Moines) Federal Bldg., Rm. 749 210 Walnut St. Des Moines, IA 50309-2186 (515)284-4760 SCORE Office (Ft. Dodge) Federal Bldg., Rm. 436 205 S. 8th St. Ft. Dodge, IA 50501 (515)955-2622 SCORE Office (Independence) 110 1st. St. east Independence, IA 50644 (319)334-7178 Fax: (319)334-7179 SCORE Office (Iowa City) 210 Federal Bldg. PO Box 1853 Iowa City, IA 52240-1853 (319)338-1662

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Kansas
SCORE Office (Southwest Kansas) 501 W. Spruce Dodge City, KS 67801 (316)227-3119

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SCORE Office (Emporia) 811 Homewood Emporia, KS 66801 (316)342-1600 SCORE Office (Golden Belt) 1307 Williams Great Bend, KS 67530 (316)792-2401 SCORE Office (Hays) PO Box 400 Hays, KS 67601 (913)625-6595 SCORE Office (Hutchinson) 1 E. 9th St. Hutchinson, KS 67501 (316)665-8468 Fax: (316)665-7619 SCORE Office (Southeast Kansas) 404 Westminster Pl. PO Box 886 Independence, KS 67301 (316)331-4741 SCORE Office (McPherson) 306 N. Main PO Box 616 McPherson, KS 67460 (316)241-3303 SCORE Office (Salina) 120 Ash St. Salina, KS 67401 (785)243-4290 Fax: (785)243-1833 SCORE Office (Topeka) 1700 College Topeka, KS 66621 (785)231-1010 SCORE Office (Wichita) 100 E. English, Ste. 510 Wichita, KS 67202 (316)269-6273 Fax: (316)269-6499 SCORE Office (Ark Valley) 205 E. 9th St. Winfield, KS 67156 (316)221-1617 SCORE Office (Bowling Green) 812 State St. PO Box 51 Bowling Green, KY 42101 (502)781-3200 Fax: (502)843-0458 SCORE Office (Tri-Lakes) 508 Barbee Way Danville, KY 40422-1548 (606)231-9902 SCORE Office (Glasgow) 301 W. Main St. Glasgow, KY 42141 (502)651-3161 Fax: (502)651-3122 SCORE Office (Hazard) B & I Technical Center 100 Airport Gardens Rd. Hazard, KY 41701 (606)439-5856 Fax: (606)439-1808 SCORE Office (Lexington) 410 W. Vine St., Ste. 290, Civic C Lexington, KY 40507 (606)231-9902 Fax: (606)253-3190 E-mail: scorelex@uky.campus.mci.net SCORE Office (Louisville) 188 Federal Office Bldg. 600 Dr. Martin L. King Jr. Pl. Louisville, KY 40202 (502)582-5976 SCORE Office (Madisonville) 257 N. Main Madisonville, KY 42431 (502)825-1399 Fax: (502)825-1396 SCORE Office (Paducah) Federal Office Bldg. 501 Broadway, Rm. B-36 Paducah, KY 42001 (502)442-5685 (504)381-7130 Fax: (504)336-4306 SCORE Office (North Shore) 2 W. Thomas Hammond, LA 70401 (504)345-4457 Fax: (504)345-4749 SCORE Office (Lafayette) 804 St. Mary Blvd. Lafayette, LA 70505-1307 (318)233-2705 Fax: (318)234-8671 E-mail: score302@aol.com SCORE Office (Lake Charles) 120 W. Pujo St. Lake Charles, LA 70601 (318)433-3632 SCORE Office (New Orleans) 365 Canal St., Ste. 3100 New Orleans, LA 70130 (504)589-2356 Fax: (504)589-2339 SCORE Office (Shreveport) 400 Edwards St. Shreveport, LA 71101 (318)677-2536 Fax: (318)677-2541

Maine
SCORE Office (Augusta) 40 Western Ave. Augusta, ME 04330 (207)622-8509 SCORE Office (Bangor) Peabody Hall, Rm. 229 One College Cir. Bangor, ME 04401 (207)941-9707 SCORE Office (Central & Northern Arroostock) 111 High St. Caribou, ME 04736 (207)492-8010 Fax: (207)492-8010 SCORE Office (Penquis) South St. Dover Foxcroft, ME 04426 (207)564-7021 SCORE Office (Maine Coastal) Mill Mall Box 1105 Ellsworth, ME 04605-1105

Louisiana
SCORE Office (Central Louisiana) 802 3rd St. Alexandria, LA 71309 (318)442-6671 SCORE Office (Baton Rouge) 564 Laurel St. PO Box 3217 Baton Rouge, LA 70801

Kentucky
SCORE Office (Ashland) PO Box 830 Ashland, KY 41105 (606)329-8011 Fax: (606)325-4607

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(207)667-5800 E-mail: score@arcadia.net SCORE Office (Lewiston-Auburn) BIC of Maine-Bates Mill Complex 35 Canal St. Lewiston, ME 04240-7764 (207)782-3708 Fax: (207)783-7745 SCORE Office (Portland) 66 Pearl St., Rm. 210 Portland, ME 04101 (207)772-1147 Fax: (207)772-5581 E-mail: Score53@score.maine.org Website: http://www.score.maine.org/ chapter53/ SCORE Office (Western Mountains) 255 River St. PO Box 252 Rumford, ME 04257-0252 (207)369-9976 SCORE Office (Oxford Hills) 166 Main St. South Paris, ME 04281 (207)743-0499 SCORE Office (Bowie) 6670 Race Track Rd. Bowie, MD 20715 (301)262-0920 Fax: (301)262-0921 SCORE Office (Dorchester County) 203 Sunburst Hwy. Cambridge, MD 21613 (410)228-3575 SCORE Office (Upper Shore) 210 Marlboro Ave. Easton, MD 21601 (410)822-4606 Fax: (410)822-7922 SCORE Office (Frederick County) 43A S. Market St. Frederick, MD 21701 (301)662-8723 Fax: (301)846-4427 SCORE Office (Gaithersburg) 9 Park Ave. Gaithersburg, MD 20877 (301)840-1400 Fax: (301)963-3918 SCORE Office (Glen Burnie) 103 Crain Hwy. SE Glen Burnie, MD 21061 (410)766-8282 Fax: (410)766-9722 SCORE Office (Hagerstown) 111 W. Washington St. Hagerstown, MD 21740 (301)739-2015 Fax: (301)739-1278 SCORE Office (Laurel) 7901 Sandy Spring Rd. Ste. 501 Laurel, MD 20707 (301)725-4000 Fax: (301)725-0776 SCORE Office (Salisbury) 300 E. Main St. Salisbury, MD 21801 (410)749-0185 Fax: (410)860-9925 SCORE Office (Boston) 10 Causeway St., Rm. 265 Boston, MA 02222-1093 (617)565-5591 Fax: (617)565-5598 E-mail: boston-score-20@worldnet.att.net Website: http://www.scoreboston.org/ SCORE office (Bristol/Plymouth County) 53 N. 6th St., Federal Bldg. Bristol, MA 02740 (508)994-5093 SCORE Office (SE Massachusetts) 60 School St. Brockton, MA 02401 (508)587-2673 Fax: (508)587-1340 Website: http://www.metrosouth chamber.com/score.html SCORE Office (North Adams) 820 N. State Rd. Cheshire, MA 01225 (413)743-5100 SCORE Office (Clinton Satellite) 1 Green St. Clinton, MA 01510 Fax: (508)368-7689 SCORE Office (Greenfield) PO Box 898 Greenfield, MA 01302 (413)773-5463 Fax: (413)773-7008 SCORE Office (Haverhill) 87 Winter St. Haverhill, MA 01830 (508)373-5663 Fax: (508)373-8060 SCORE Office (Hudson Satellite) PO Box 578 Hudson, MA 01749 (508)568-0360 Fax: (508)568-0360 SCORE Office (Cape Cod) Independence Pk., Ste. 5B 270 Communications Way Hyannis, MA 02601 (508)775-4884 Fax: (508)790-2540 SCORE Office (Lawrence) 264 Essex St. Lawrence, MA 01840 (508)686-0900 Fax: (508)794-9953 Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Maryland
SCORE Office (Southern Maryland) 2525 Riva Rd., Ste. 110 Annapolis, MD 21401 (410)266-9553 Fax: (410)573-0981 E-mail: score390@aol.com Website: http://members.aol.com/ score390/index.htm SCORE Office (Baltimore) The City Crescent Bldg., 6th Fl. 10 S. Howard St. Baltimore, MD 21201 (410)962-2233 Fax: (410)962-1805 SCORE Office (Bel Air) 108 S. Bond St. Bel Air, MD 21014 (410)838-2020 Fax: (410)893-4715 SCORE Office (Bethesda) 7910 Woodmont Ave., Ste. 1204 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301)652-4900 Fax: (301)657-1973

Massachusetts
SCORE Office (NE Massachusetts) 100 Cummings Ctr., Ste. 101 K Beverly, MA 01923 (978)922-9441 Website: http://www1.shore.net/~score/

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SCORE Office (Leominster Satellite) 110 Erdman Way Leominster, MA 01453 (508)840-4300 Fax: (508)840-4896 SCORE Office (Bristol/Plymouth Counties) 53 N. 6th St., Federal Bldg. New Bedford, MA 02740 (508)994-5093 SCORE Office (Newburyport) 29 State St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (617)462-6680 SCORE Office (Pittsfield) 66 West St. Pittsfield, MA 01201 (413)499-2485 SCORE Office (Haverhill-Salem) 32 Derby Sq. Salem, MA 01970 (508)745-0330 Fax: (508)745-3855 SCORE Office (Springfield) 1350 Main St. Federal Bldg. Springfield, MA 01103 (413)785-0314 SCORE Office (Carver) 12 Taunton Green, Ste. 201 Taunton, MA 02780 (508)824-4068 Fax: (508)824-4069 SCORE Office (Worcester) 33 Waldo St. Worcester, MA 01608 (508)753-2929 Fax: (508)754-8560 (616)962-4076 Fax: (616)962-6309 SCORE Office (Cadillac) 222 Lake St. Cadillac, MI 49601 (616)775-9776 Fax: (616)768-4255 SCORE Office (Detroit) 477 Michigan Ave., Rm. 515 Detroit, MI 48226 (313)226-7947 Fax: (313)226-3448 SCORE Office (Flint) 708 Root Rd., Rm. 308 Flint, MI 48503 (810)233-6846 SCORE Office (Grand Rapids) 111 Pearl St. NW Grand Rapids, MI 49503-2831 (616)771-0305 Fax: (616)771-0328 E-mail: scoreone@iserv.net Website: http://www.iserv.net/~ scoreone/ SCORE Office (Holland) 480 State St. Holland, MI 49423 (616)396-9472 SCORE Office (Jackson) 209 East Washington PO Box 80 Jackson, MI 49204 (517)782-8221 Fax: (517)782-0061 SCORE Office (Kalamazoo) 345 W. Michigan Ave. Kalamazoo, MI 49007 (616)381-5382 Fax: (616)384-0096 E-mail: score@nucleus.net SCORE Office (Lansing) 117 E. Allegan PO Box 14030 Lansing, MI 48901 (517)487-6340 Fax: (517)484-6910 SCORE Office (Livonia) 15401 Farmington Rd. Livonia, MI 48154 (313)427-2122 Fax: (313)427-6055 SCORE Office (Madison Heights) 26345 John R Madison Heights, MI 48071 (810)542-5010 Fax: (810)542-6821 SCORE Office (Monroe) 111 E. 1st Monroe, MI 48161 (313)242-3366 Fax: (313)242-7253 SCORE Office (Mt. Clemens) 58 S/B Gratiot Mt. Clemens, MI 48043 (810)463-1528 Fax: (810)463-6541 SCORE Office (Muskegon) PO Box 1087 230 Terrace Plz. Muskegon, MI 49443 (616)722-3751 Fax: (616)728-7251 SCORE Office (Petoskey) 401 E. Mitchell St. Petoskey, MI 49770 (616)347-4150 SCORE Office (Pontiac) Executive Office Bldg. 1200 N. Telegraph Rd. Pontiac, MI 48341 (810)975-9555 SCORE Office (Pontiac) PO Box 430025 Pontiac, MI 48343 (810)335-9600 SCORE Office (Port Huron) 920 Pinegrove Ave. Port Huron, MI 48060 (810)985-7101 SCORE Office (Rochester) 71 Walnut Ste. 110 Rochester, MI 48307 (810)651-6700 Fax: (810)651-5270 SCORE Office (Saginaw) 901 S. Washington Ave. Saginaw, MI 48601 (517)752-7161 Fax: (517)752-9055 SCORE Office (Upper Peninsula) 2581 I-75 Business Spur Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783 (906)632-3301

Michigan
SCORE Office (Allegan) PO Box 338 Allegan, MI 49010 (616)673-2479 SCORE Office (Ann Arbor) 425 S. Main St., Ste. 103 Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (313)665-4433 SCORE Office (Battle Creek) 34 W. Jackson Ste. 4A Battle Creek, MI 49017-3505

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SCORE Office (Southfield) 21000 W. 10 Mile Rd. Southfield, MI 48075 (810)204-3050 Fax: (810)204-3099 SCORE Office (Traverse City) 202 E. Grandview Pkwy. PO Box 387 Traverse City, MI 49685 (616)947-5075 Fax: (616)946-2565 SCORE Office (Warren) 30500 Van Dyke, Ste. 118 Warren, MI 48093 (810)751-3939 Box 999 Mankato, MN 56001 (507)345-4519 Fax: (507)345-4451 Website: http://www.scoreminn.org/ SCORE Office (Minneapolis) North Plaza Bldg., Ste. 51 5217 Wayzata Blvd. Minneapolis, MN 55416 (612)591-0539 Fax: (612)544-0436 Website: http://www.scoreminn.org/ SCORE Office (Owatonna) PO Box 331 Owatonna, MN 55060 (507)451-7970 Fax: (507)451-7972 SCORE Office (Red Wing) 2000 W. Main St., Ste. 324 Red Wing, MN 55066 (612)388-4079 SCORE Office (Southeastern Minnesota) 220 S. Broadway, Ste. 100 Rochester, MN 55901 (507)288-1122 Fax: (507)282-8960 Website: http://www.scoreminn.org/ SCORE Office (Brainerd) St. Cloud, MN 56301 SCORE Office (Central Area) 1527 Northway Dr. St. Cloud, MN 56301 (320)240-1332 Fax: (320)255-9050 Website: http://www.scoreminn.org/ SCORE Office (St. Paul) 350 St. Peter St., No. 295 Lowry Professional Bldg. St. Paul, MN 55102 (651)223-5010 Fax: (651)223-5048 Website: http://www.scoreminn.org/ SCORE Office (Winona) Box 870 Winona, MN 55987 (507)452-2272 Fax: (507)454-8814 SCORE Office (Worthington) 1121 3rd Ave. Worthington, MN 56187 (507)372-2919 Fax: (507)372-2827

Mississippi
SCORE Office (Delta) 915 Washington Ave. PO Box 933 Greenville, MS 38701 (601)378-3141 SCORE Office (Gulfcoast) 1 Government Plaza 2909 13th St., Ste. 203 Gulfport, MS 39501 (228)863-0054 SCORE Office (Jackson) 1st Jackson Center, Ste. 400 101 W. Capitol St. Jackson, MS 39201 (601)965-5533 SCORE Office (Meridian) 5220 16th Ave. Meridian, MS 39305 (601)482-4412 Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Minnesota
SCORE Office (Aitkin) Aitkin, MN 56431 (218)741-3906 SCORE Office (Albert Lea) 202 N. Broadway Ave. Albert Lea, MN 56007 (507)373-7487 SCORE Office (Austin) PO Box 864 Austin, MN 55912 (507)437-4561 Fax: (507)437-4869 SCORE Office (South Metro) Ames Business Ctr. 2500 W. County Rd., No. 42 Burnsville, MN 55337 (612)898-5645 Fax: (612)435-6972 E-mail: southmetro@scoreminn.org Website: http://www.scoreminn.org/ southmetro/ SCORE Office (Duluth) 1717 Minnesota Ave. Duluth, MN 55802 (218)727-8286 Fax: (218)727-3113 E-mail: duluth@scoreminn.org Website: http://www.scoreminn.org SCORE Office (Fairmont) PO Box 826 Fairmont, MN 56031 (507)235-5547 Fax: (507)235-8411 SCORE Office (Southwest Minnesota) 112 Riverfront St.

Missouri
SCORE Office (Lake of the Ozark) University Extension 113 Kansas St. PO Box 1405 Camdenton, MO 65020 (573)346-2644 Fax: (573)346-2694 E-mail: score@cdoc.net Website: http://sites.cdoc.net/score/ Chamber of Commerce (Cape Girardeau) PO Box 98 Cape Girardeau, MO 63702-0098 (314)335-3312 SCORE Office (Mid-Missouri) 1705 Halstead Ct. Columbia, MO 65203 (573)874-1132 SCORE Office (Ozark-Gateway) 1486 Glassy Rd. Cuba, MO 65453-1640 (573)885-4954 SCORE Office (Kansas City) 323 W. 8th St., Ste. 104 Kansas City, MO 64105 (816)374-6675 Fax: (816)374-6692 E-mail: SCOREBIC@AOL.COM Website: http://www.crn.org/score/

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SCORE Office (Sedalia) Lucas Place 323 W. 8th St., Ste.104 Kansas City, MO 64105 (816)374-6675 SCORE office (Tri-Lakes) PO Box 1148 Kimberling, MO 65686 (417)739-3041 SCORE Office (Tri-Lakes) HCRI Box 85 Lampe, MO 65681 (417)858-6798 SCORE Office (Mexico) 111 N. Washington St. Mexico, MO 65265 (314)581-2765 SCORE Office (Southeast Missouri) Rte. 1, Box 280 Neelyville, MO 63954 (573)989-3577 SCORE office (Poplar Bluff Area) 806 Emma St. Poplar Bluff, MO 63901 (573)686-8892 SCORE Office (St. Joseph) 3003 Frederick Ave. St. Joseph, MO 64506 (816)232-4461 SCORE Office (St. Louis) 815 Olive St., Rm. 242 St. Louis, MO 63101-1569 (314)539-6970 Fax: (314)539-3785 E-mail: info@stlscore.org Website: http://www.stlscore.org/ SCORE Office (Lewis & Clark) 425 Spencer Rd. St. Peters, MO 63376 (314)928-2900 Fax: (314)928-2900 E-mail: score01@mail.win.org SCORE Office (Springfield) 620 S. Glenstone, Ste. 110 Springfield, MO 65802-3200 (417)864-7670 Fax: (417)864-4108 SCORE office (Southeast Kansas) 1206 W. First St. Webb City, MO 64870 (417)673-3984

Montana
SCORE Office (Billings) 815 S. 27th St. Billings, MT 59101 (406)245-4111 SCORE Office (Bozeman) 1205 E. Main St. Bozeman, MT 59715 (406)586-5421 SCORE Office (Butte) 1000 George St. Butte, MT 59701 (406)723-3177 SCORE Office (Great Falls) 710 First Ave. N Great Falls, MT 59401 (406)761-4434 E-mail: scoregtf@in.tch.com SCORE Office (Havre, Montana) 518 First St. Havre, MT 59501 (406)265-4383 SCORE Office (Helena) Federal Bldg. 301 S. Park Helena, MT 59626-0054 (406)441-1081 SCORE Office (Kalispell) 2 Main St. Kalispell, MT 59901 (406)756-5271 Fax: (406)752-6665 SCORE Office (Missoula) 723 Ronan Missoula, MT 59806 (406)327-8806 E-mail: score@safeshop.com Website: http://missoula.bigsky.net/ score/

SCORE Office (Lincoln) 8800 O St. Lincoln, NE 68520 (402)437-2409 SCORE Office (Panhandle) 150549 CR 30 Minatare, NE 69356 (308)632-2133 Website: http://www.tandt.com/ SCORE SCORE Office (Norfolk) 3209 S. 48th Ave. Norfolk, NE 68106 (402)564-2769 SCORE Office (North Platte) 3301 W. 2nd St. North Platte, NE 69101 (308)532-4466 SCORE Office (Omaha) 11145 Mill Valley Rd. Omaha, NE 68154 (402)221-3606 Fax: (402)221-3680 E-mail: infoctr@ne.uswest.net Website: http://www.tandt.com/score/

Nevada
SCORE Office (Incline Village) 969 Tahoe Blvd. Incline Village, NV 89451 (702)831-7327 Fax: (702)832-1605 SCORE Office (Carson City) 301 E. Stewart PO Box 7527 Las Vegas, NV 89125 (702)388-6104 SCORE Office (Las Vegas) 300 Las Vegas Blvd. S, Ste. 1100 Las Vegas, NV 89101 (702)388-6104 SCORE Office (Northern Nevada) SBDC, College of Business Administration Univ. of Nevada Reno, NV 89557-0100 (702)784-4436 Fax: (702)784-4337

Nebraska
SCORE Office (Columbus) Columbus, NE 68601 (402)564-2769 SCORE Office (Fremont) 92 W. 5th St. Fremont, NE 68025 (402)721-2641 SCORE Office (Hastings) Hastings, NE 68901 (402)463-3447

New Hampshire
SCORE Office (North Country) PO Box 34

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Berlin, NH 03570 (603)752-1090 SCORE Office (Concord) 143 N. Main St., Rm. 202A PO Box 1258 Concord, NH 03301 (603)225-1400 Fax: (603)225-1409 SCORE Office (Dover) 299 Central Ave. Dover, NH 03820 (603)742-2218 Fax: (603)749-6317 SCORE Office (Monadnock) 34 Mechanic St. Keene, NH 03431-3421 (603)352-0320 SCORE Office (Lakes Region) 67 Water St., Ste. 105 Laconia, NH 03246 (603)524-9168 SCORE Office (Upper Valley) Citizens Bank Bldg., Rm. 310 20 W. Park St. Lebanon, NH 03766 (603)448-3491 Fax: (603)448-1908 E-mail: billt@valley.net Website: http://www.valley.net/~score/ SCORE Office (Merrimack Valley) 275 Chestnut St., Rm. 618 Manchester, NH 03103 (603)666-7561 Fax: (603)666-7925 SCORE Office (Mt. Washington Valley) PO Box 1066 North Conway, NH 03818 (603)383-0800 SCORE Office (Seacoast) 195 Commerce Way, Unit-A Portsmouth, NH 03801-3251 (603)433-0575 SCORE Office (Chester) 5 Old Mill Rd. Chester, NJ 07930 (908)879-7080 SCORE Office (Greater Princeton) 4 A George Washington Dr. Cranbury, NJ 08512 (609)520-1776 SCORE Office (Freehold) 36 W. Main St. Freehold, NJ 07728 (908)462-3030 Fax: (908)462-2123 SCORE Office (North West) Picantinny Innovation Ctr. 3159 Schrader Rd. Hamburg, NJ 07419 (973)209-8525 Fax: (973)209-7252 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com Website: http://www.nj-score.org/ SCORE Office (Monmouth) 765 Newman Springs Rd. Lincroft, NJ 07738 (908)224-2573 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com Website: http://www.nj-score.org/ SCORE Office (Manalapan) 125 Symmes Dr. Manalapan, NJ 07726 (908)431-7220 SCORE Office (Jersey City) 2 Gateway Ctr., 4th Fl. Newark, NJ 07102 (973)645-3982 Fax: (973)645-2375 SCORE Office (Newark) 2 Gateway Center, 15th Fl. Newark, NJ 07102-5553 (973)645-3982 Fax: (973)645-2375 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com Website: http://www.nj-score.org SCORE Office (Bergen County) 327 E. Ridgewood Ave. Paramus, NJ 07652 (201)599-6090 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com Website: http://www.nj-score.org/ SCORE Office (Pennsauken) 4900 Rte. 70 Pennsauken, NJ 08109 (609)486-3421 SCORE Office (Southern New Jersey) 4900 Rte. 70 Pennsauken, NJ 08109 (609)486-3421 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com Website: http://www.nj-score.org/ SCORE Office (Greater Princeton) 216 Rockingham Row Princeton Forrestal Village Princeton, NJ 08540 (609)520-1776 Fax: (609)520-9107 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com Website: http://www.nj-score.org/ SCORE Office (Shrewsbury) Hwy. 35 Shrewsbury, NJ 07702 (908)842-5995 Fax: (908)219-6140 SCORE Office (Ocean County) 33 Washington St. Toms River, NJ 08754 (732)505-6033 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com Website: http://www.nj-score.org/ SCORE Office (Wall) 2700 Allaire Rd. Wall, NJ 07719 (908)449-8877 SCORE Office (Wayne) 2055 Hamburg Tpke. Wayne, NJ 07470 (201)831-7788 Fax: (201)831-9112

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

New Mexico
SCORE Office (Albuquerque) 525 Buena Vista, SE Albuquerque, NM 87106 (505)272-7999 Fax: (505)272-7963 SCORE Office (Las Cruces) Loretto Towne Center 505 S. Main St., Ste. 125 Las Cruces, NM 88001 (505)523-5627 Fax: (505)524-2101 E-mail: score.397@zianet.com SCORE Office (Roswell) Federal Bldg., Rm. 237

New Jersey
SCORE Office (Somerset) Paritan Valley Community College, Rte. 28 Branchburg, NJ 08807 (908)218-8874 E-mail: nj-score@grizbiz.com. Website: http://www.nj-score.org/

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Roswell, NM 88201 (505)625-2112 Fax: (505)623-2545 SCORE Office (Santa Fe) Montoya Federal Bldg. 120 Federal Place, Rm. 307 Santa Fe, NM 87501 (505)988-6302 Fax: (505)988-6300 Geneva, NY 14456 (315)789-1776 Fax: (315)789-3993 SCORE Office (Glens Falls) 84 Broad St. Glens Falls, NY 12801 (518)798-8463 Fax: (518)745-1433 SCORE Office (Orange County) 40 Matthews St. Goshen, NY 10924 (914)294-8080 Fax: (914)294-6121 SCORE Office (Huntington Area) 151 W. Carver St. Huntington, NY 11743 (516)423-6100 SCORE Office (Tompkins County) 904 E. Shore Dr. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)273-7080 SCORE Office (Long Island City) 120-55 Queens Blvd. Jamaica, NY 11424 (718)263-8961 Fax: (718)263-9032 SCORE Office (Chatauqua) 101 W. 5th St. Jamestown, NY 14701 (716)484-1103 SCORE Office (Westchester) 2 Caradon Ln. Katonah, NY 10536 (914)948-3907 Fax: (914)948-4645 E-mail: score@w-w-w.com Website: http://w-w-w.com/score/ SCORE Office (Queens County) Queens Borough Hall 120-55 Queens Blvd. Rm. 333 Kew Gardens, NY 11424 (718)263-8961 Fax: (718)263-9032 SCORE Office (Brookhaven) 3233 Rte. 112 Medford, NY 11763 (516)451-6563 Fax: (516)451-6925 SCORE Office (Melville) 35 Pinelawn Rd., Rm. 207-W Melville, NY 11747 (516)454-0771 SCORE Office (Nassau County) 400 County Seat Dr., No. 140 Mineola, NY 11501 (516)571-3303 E-mail: Counse1998@aol.com Website: http://members.aol.com/ Counse1998/Default.htm SCORE Office (Mt. Vernon) 4 N. 7th Ave. Mt. Vernon, NY 10550 (914)667-7500 SCORE Office (New York) 26 Federal Plz., Rm. 3100 New York, NY 10278 (212)264-4507 Fax: (212)264-4963 E-mail: score1000@erols.com Website: http://users.erols.com/ score-nyc/ SCORE Office (Newburgh) 47 Grand St. Newburgh, NY 12550 (914)562-5100 SCORE Office (Owego) 188 Front St. Owego, NY 13827 (607)687-2020 SCORE Office (Peekskill) 1 S. Division St. Peekskill, NY 10566 (914)737-3600 Fax: (914)737-0541 SCORE Office (Penn Yan) 2375 Rte. 14A Penn Yan, NY 14527 (315)536-3111 SCORE Office (Dutchess) 110 Main St. Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 (914)454-1700 SCORE Office (Rochester) 601 Keating Federal Bldg., Rm. 410 100 State St. Rochester, NY 14614 (716)263-6473 Fax: (716)263-3146 Website: http://www.ggw.org/score/ SCORE Office (Saranac Lake) 30 Main St. Saranac Lake, NY 12983 (315)448-0415

New York
SCORE Office (Northeast) 1 Computer Dr. S Albany, NY 12205 (518)446-1118 Fax: (518)446-1228 SCORE Office (Auburn) 30 South St. PO Box 675 Auburn, NY 13021 (315)252-7291 SCORE Office (South Tier Binghamton) Metro Center, 2nd Fl. 49 Court St. PO Box 995 Binghamton, NY 13902 (607)772-8860 SCORE Office (Queens County City) 12055 Queens Blvd., Rm. 333 Borough Hall, NY 11424 (718)263-8961 SCORE Office (Buffalo) Federal Bldg., Rm. 1311 111 W. Huron St. Buffalo, NY 14202 (716)551-4301 Website: http://www2.pcom.net/score/ buf45.html SCORE Office (Canandaigua) Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 113 S. Main St. Canandaigua, NY 14424 (716)394-4400 Fax: (716)394-4546 SCORE Office (Chemung) 333 E. Water St., 4th Fl. Elmira, NY 14901 (607)734-3358 SCORE Office (Geneva) Chamber of Commerce Bldg. PO Box 587

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SCORE Office (Suffolk) 286 Main St. Setauket, NY 11733 (516)751-3886 SCORE Office (Staten Island) 130 Bay St. Staten Island, NY 10301 (718)727-1221 SCORE Office (Ulster) Clinton Bldg., Rm. 107 Stone Ridge, NY 12484 (914)687-5035 Fax: (914)687-5015 Website: http://www.scoreulster.org/ SCORE Office (Syracuse) 401 S. Salina, 5th Fl. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315)471-9393 SCORE Office (Utica) SUNY Institute of Technology, Route 12 Utica, NY 13504-3050 (315)792-7553 SCORE Office (Watertown) 518 Davidson St. Watertown, NY 13601 (315)788-1200 Fax: (315)788-8251 Charlotte, NC 28202 (704)344-6576 Fax: (704)344-6769 E-mail: CharlotteSCORE47@AOL.com Website: http://www.charweb.org/ business/score/ SCORE Office (Durham) 411 W. Chapel Hill St. Durham, NC 27707 (919)541-2171 SCORE Office (Gastonia) PO Box 2168 Gastonia, NC 28053 (704)864-2621 Fax: (704)854-8723 SCORE Office (Greensboro) 400 W. Market St., Ste. 103 Greensboro, NC 27401-2241 (910)333-5399 SCORE Office (Henderson) PO Box 917 Henderson, NC 27536 (919)492-2061 Fax: (919)430-0460 SCORE Office (Hendersonville) Federal Bldg., Rm. 108 W. 4th Ave. & Church St. Hendersonville, NC 28792 (828)693-8702 E-mail: score@circle.net Website: http://www.wncguide.com/ score/Welcome.html SCORE Office (Unifour) PO Box 1828 Hickory, NC 28603 (704)328-6111 SCORE Office (High Point) 1101 N. Main St. High Point, NC 27262 (336)882-8625 Fax: (336)889-9499 SCORE Office (Outer Banks) Collington Rd. and Mustain Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948 (252)441-8144 SCORE Office (Down East) 312 S. Front St., Ste. 6 New Bern, NC 28560 (252)633-6688 Fax: (252)633-9608 SCORE Office (Kinston) PO Box 95 New Bern, NC 28561 (919)633-6688 SCORE Office (Raleigh) Century Post Office Bldg., Ste. 306 300 Federal St. Mall Raleigh, NC 27601 (919)856-4739 E-mail: jendres@ibm.net Website: http://www.intrex.net/score96/ score96.htm SCORE Office (Sanford) 1801 Nash St. Sanford, NC 27330 (919)774-6442 Fax: (919)776-8739 SCORE Office (Sandhills Area) 1480 Hwy. 15-501 PO Box 458 Southern Pines, NC 28387 (910)692-3926 SCORE Office (Wilmington) Corps of Engineers Bldg. 96 Darlington Ave., Ste. 207 Wilmington, NC 28403 (910)815-4576 Fax: (910)815-4658

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

North Dakota
SCORE Office (Bismarck-Mandan) 700 E. Main Ave., 2nd Fl. PO Box 5509 Bismarck, ND 58506-5509 (701)250-4303 SCORE Office (Fargo) 657 2nd Ave., Rm. 225 Fargo, ND 58108-3083 (701)239-5677 SCORE Office (Upper Red River) 4275 Technology Dr., Rm. 156 Grand Forks, ND 58202-8372 (701)777-3051 SCORE Office (Minot) 100 1st St. SW Minot, ND 58701-3846 (701)852-6883 Fax: (701)852-6905

North Carolina
SCORE office (Asheboro) 317 E. Dixie Dr. Asheboro, NC 27203 (336)626-2626 Fax: (336)626-7077 SCORE Office (Asheville) Federal Bldg., Rm. 259 151 Patton Asheville, NC 28801-5770 (828)271-4786 Fax: (828)271-4009 SCORE Office (Chapel Hill) 104 S. Estes Dr. PO Box 2897 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 (919)967-7075 SCORE Office (Coastal Plains) PO Box 2897 Chapel Hill, NC 27515 (919)967-7075 Fax: (919)968-6874 SCORE Office (Charlotte) 200 N. College St., Ste. A-2015

Ohio
SCORE Office (Akron) 1 Cascade Plz., 7th Fl. Akron, OH 44308

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(330)379-3163 Fax: (330)379-3164 SCORE Office (Ashland) Gill Center 47 W. Main St. Ashland, OH 44805 (419)281-4584 SCORE Office (Canton) 116 Cleveland Ave. NW, Ste. 601 Canton, OH 44702-1720 (330)453-6047 SCORE Office (Chillicothe) 165 S. Paint St. Chillicothe, OH 45601 (614)772-4530 SCORE Office (Cincinnati) Ameritrust Bldg., Rm. 850 525 Vine St. Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513)684-2812 Fax: (513)684-3251 Website: http://www.score. chapter34.org/ SCORE Office (Cleveland) Eaton Center, Ste. 620 1100 Superior Ave. Cleveland, OH 44114-2507 (216)522-4194 Fax: (216)522-4844 SCORE Office (Columbus) 2 Nationwide Plz., Ste. 1400 Columbus, OH 43215-2542 (614)469-2357 Fax: (614)469-2391 E-mail: info@scorecolumbus.org Website: http://www.scorecolumbus.org/ SCORE Office (Dayton) Dayton Federal Bldg., Rm. 505 200 W. Second St. Dayton, OH 45402-1430 (513)225-2887 Fax: (513)225-7667 SCORE Office (Defiance) 615 W. 3rd St. PO Box 130 Defiance, OH 43512 (419)782-7946 SCORE Office (Findlay) 123 E. Main Cross St. PO Box 923 Findlay, OH 45840 (419)422-3314 SCORE Office (Lima) 147 N. Main St. Lima, OH 45801 (419)222-6045 Fax: (419)229-0266 SCORE Office (Mansfield) 55 N. Mulberry St. Mansfield, OH 44902 (419)522-3211 SCORE Office (Marietta) Thomas Hall Marietta, OH 45750 (614)373-0268 SCORE Office (Medina) County Administrative Bldg. 144 N. Broadway Medina, OH 44256 (216)764-8650 SCORE Office (Licking County) 50 W. Locust St. Newark, OH 43055 (614)345-7458 SCORE Office (Salem) 2491 State Rte. 45 S Salem, OH 44460 (216)332-0361 SCORE Office (Tiffin) 62 S. Washington St. Tiffin, OH 44883 (419)447-4141 Fax: (419)447-5141 SCORE Office (Toledo) 608 Madison Ave, Ste. 910 Toledo, OH 43624 (419)259-7598 Fax: (419)259-6460 SCORE Office (Heart of Ohio) 377 W. Liberty St. Wooster, OH 44691 (330)262-5735 Fax: (330)262-5745 SCORE Office (Youngstown) 306 Williamson Hall Youngstown, OH 44555 (330)746-2687 SCORE Office (Ardmore) 410 W. Main Ardmore, OK 73401 (580)226-2620 SCORE Office (Northeast Oklahoma) 210 S. Main Grove, OK 74344 (918)787-2796 Fax: (918)787-2796 E-mail: Score595@greencis.net SCORE Office (Lawton) 4500 W. Lee Blvd., Bldg. 100, Ste. 107 Lawton, OK 73505 (580)353-8727 Fax: (580)250-5677 SCORE Office (Oklahoma City) 210 Park Ave., No. 1300 Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405)231-5163 Fax: (405)231-4876 E-mail: score212@usa.net SCORE Office (Stillwater) 439 S. Main Stillwater, OK 74074 (405)372-5573 Fax: (405)372-4316 SCORE Office (Tulsa) 616 S. Boston, Ste. 406 Tulsa, OK 74119 (918)581-7462 Fax: (918)581-6908 Website: http://www.ionet.net/~tulscore/

Oregon
SCORE Office (Bend) 63085 N. Hwy. 97 Bend, OR 97701 (541)923-2849 Fax: (541)330-6900 SCORE Office (Willamette) 1401 Willamette St. PO Box 1107 Eugene, OR 97401-4003 (541)465-6600 Fax: (541)484-4942 SCORE Office (Florence) 3149 Oak St. Florence, OR 97439 (503)997-8444 Fax: (503)997-8448 SCORE Office (Southern Oregon) 33 N. Central Ave., Ste. 216

Oklahoma
SCORE Office (Anadarko) PO Box 366 Anadarko, OK 73005 (405)247-6651

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Medford, OR 97501 (541)776-4220 E-mail: pgr134f@prodigy.com SCORE Office (Portland) 1515 SW 5th Ave., Ste. 1050 Portland, OR 97201 (503)326-3441 Fax: (503)326-2808 E-mail: gr134@prodigy.com SCORE Office (Salem) 416 State St. (corner of Liberty) Salem, OR 97301 (503)370-2896 SCORE Office (Bucks County) 409 Hood Blvd. Fairless Hills, PA 19030 (215)943-8850 Fax: (215)943-7404 SCORE Office (Hanover) 146 Broadway Hanover, PA 17331 (717)637-6130 Fax: (717)637-9127 SCORE Office (Harrisburg) 100 Chestnut, Ste. 309 Harrisburg, PA 17101 (717)782-3874 SCORE Office (East Montgomery County) Baederwood Shopping Center 1653 The Fairways, Ste. 204 Jenkintown, PA 19046 (215)885-3027 SCORE Office (Kittanning) 2 Butler Rd. Kittanning, PA 16201 (412)543-1305 Fax: (412)543-6206 SCORE Office (Lancaster) 118 W. Chestnut St. Lancaster, PA 17603 (717)397-3092 SCORE Office (Westmoreland County) 300 Fraser Purchase Rd. Latrobe, PA 15650-2690 (412)539-7505 Fax: (412)539-1850 SCORE Office (Lebanon) 252 N. 8th St. PO Box 899 Lebanon, PA 17042-0899 (717)273-3727 Fax: (717)273-7940 SCORE Office (Lewistown) 3 W. Monument Sq., Ste. 204 Lewistown, PA 17044 (717)248-6713 Fax: (717)248-6714 SCORE Office (Delaware County) 602 E. Baltimore Pike Media, PA 19063 (610)565-3677 Fax: (610)565-1606 SCORE Office (Milton Area) 112 S. Front St. Milton, PA 17847 (717)742-7341 Fax: (717)792-2008 SCORE Office (Mon-Valley) 435 Donner Ave. Monessen, PA 15062 (412)684-4277 Fax: (412)684-7688 SCORE Office (Monroeville) William Penn Plaza 2790 Mosside Blvd., Ste. 295 Monroeville, PA 15146 (412)856-0622 Fax: (412)856-1030 SCORE Office (Airport Area) 986 Brodhead Rd. Moon Township, PA 15108-2398 (412)264-6270 Fax: (412)264-1575 SCORE Office (Northeast) 8601 E. Roosevelt Blvd. Philadelphia, PA 19152 (215)332-3400 Fax: (215)332-6050 SCORE Office (Philadelphia) 1315 Walnut St., Ste. 500 Philadelphia, PA 19107 (215)790-5050 Fax: (215)790-5057 E-mail: score46@bellatlantic.net Website: http://www.pgweb.net/score46/ SCORE Office (Pittsburgh) 1000 Liberty Ave., Rm. 1122 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412)395-6560 Fax: (412)395-6562 SCORE Office (Tri-County) 801 N. Charlotte St. Pottstown, PA 19464 (610)327-2673 SCORE Office (Reading) 601 Penn St. Reading, PA 19601 (610)376-3497 SCORE Office (Scranton) Oppenheim Bldg. 116 N. Washington Ave., Ste. 650 Scranton, PA 18503 (717)347-4611 Fax: (717)347-4611 SCORE Office (Central Pennsylvania) 200 Innovation Blvd., Ste. 242-B State College, PA 16803 Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Pennsylvania
SCORE Office (Altoona-Blair) 1212 12th Ave. Altoona, PA 16601-3493 (814)943-8151 SCORE Office (Lehigh Valley) Rauch Bldg. 37 Lehigh University 621 Taylor St. Bethlehem, PA 18015 (610)758-4496 Fax: (610)758-5205 SCORE Office (Butler County) 100 N. Main St. PO Box 1082 Butler, PA 16003 (412)283-2222 Fax: (412)283-0224 SCORE Office (Harrisburg) 4211 Trindle Rd. Camp Hill, PA 17011 (717)761-4304 Fax: (717)761-4315 SCORE Office (Cumberland Valley) 75 S. 2nd St. Chambersburg, PA 17201 (717)264-2935 SCORE Office (Monroe CountyStroudsburg) 556 Main St. East Stroudsburg, PA 18301 (717)421-4433 SCORE Office (Erie) 120 W. 9th St. Erie, PA 16501 (814)871-5650 Fax: (814)871-7530

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(814)234-9415 Fax: (814)238-9686 Website: http://countrystore.org/ business/score.htm SCORE Office (Monroe-Stroudsburg) 556 Main St. Stroudsburg, PA 18360 (717)421-4433 SCORE Office (Uniontown) Federal Bldg. Pittsburg St. PO Box 2065 DTS Uniontown, PA 15401 (412)437-4222 E-mail: uniontownscore@lcsys.net SCORE Office (Warren County) 315 2nd Ave. Warren, PA 16365 (814)723-9017 SCORE Office (Waynesboro) 323 E. Main St. Waynesboro, PA 17268 (717)762-7123 Fax: (717)962-7124 SCORE Office (Chester County) Government Service Center, Ste. 281 601 Westtown Rd. West Chester, PA 19382-4538 (610)344-6910 Fax: (610)344-6919 E-mail: score@locke.ccil.org SCORE Office (Wilkes-Barre) 7 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd. Wilkes Barre, PA 18702-5241 (717)826-6502 Fax: (717)826-6287 SCORE Office (North Central Pennsylvania) 240 W. 3rd St., Rm. 227 PO Box 725 Williamsport, PA 17703 (717)322-3720 Fax: (717)322-1607 E-mail: score234@mail.csrlink.net Website: http://www.lycoming.org/ score/ SCORE Office (York) Cyber Center 2101 Pennsylvania Ave. York, PA 17404 (717)845-8830 Fax: (717)854-9333

Puerto Rico
SCORE Office (Puerto Rico & Virgin Islands) PO Box 12383-96 San Juan, PR 00914-0383 (787)726-8040 Fax: (787)726-8135

Anderson, SC 29621 (864)224-0453 SCORE Office (Coastal) 284 King St. Charleston, SC 29401 (803)727-4778 Fax: (803)853-2529 SCORE Office (Midlands) Strom Thurmond Bldg., Rm. 358 1835 Assembly St., Rm 358 Columbia, SC 29201 (803)765-5131 Fax: (803)765-5962 Website: http://www.scoremid lands.org/ SCORE Office (Piedmont) Federal Bldg., Rm. B-02 300 E. Washington St. Greenville, SC 29601 (864)271-3638 SCORE Office (Greenwood) PO Drawer 1467 Greenwood, SC 29648 (864)223-8357 SCORE Office (Hilton Head Island) 52 Savannah Trail Hilton Head, SC 29926 (803)785-7107 Fax: (803)785-7110 SCORE Office (Grand Strand) 937 Broadway Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 (803)918-1079 Fax: (803)918-1083 E-mail: score381@aol.com SCORE Office (Spartanburg) PO Box 1636 Spartanburg, SC 29304 (864)594-5000 Fax: (864)594-5055

Rhode Island
SCORE Office (Barrington) 281 County Rd. Barrington, RI 02806 (401)247-1920 Fax: (401)247-3763 SCORE Office (Woonsocket) 640 Washington Hwy. Lincoln, RI 02865 (401)334-1000 Fax: (401)334-1009 SCORE Office (Wickford) 8045 Post Rd. North Kingstown, RI 02852 (401)295-5566 Fax: (401)295-8987 SCORE Office (J.G.E. Knight) 380 Westminster St. Providence, RI 02903 (401)528-4571 Fax: (401)528-4539 Website: http://www.riscore.org SCORE Office (Warwick) 3288 Post Rd. Warwick, RI 02886 (401)732-1100 Fax: (401)732-1101 SCORE Office (Westerly) 74 Post Rd. Westerly, RI 02891 (401)596-7761 800-732-7636 Fax: (401)596-2190

South Dakota
SCORE Office (West River) Rushmore Plz. Civic Ctr. 444 Mount Rushmore Rd., No. 209 Rapid City, SD 57701 (605)394-5311 E-mail: score@gwtc.net SCORE Office (Sioux Falls) First Financial Center 110 S. Phillips Ave., Ste. 200 Sioux Falls, SD 57104-6727

South Carolina
SCORE Office (Aiken) PO Box 892 Aiken, SC 29802 (803)641-1111 800-542-4536 Fax: (803)641-4174 SCORE Office (Anderson) Anderson Mall 3130 N. Main St.

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(605)330-4231 Fax: (605)330-4231 SCORE Office (Maryville) 201 S. Washington St. Maryville, TN 37804-5728 (423)983-2241 800-525-6834 Fax: (423)984-1386 SCORE Office (Memphis) Federal Bldg., Ste. 390 167 N. Main St. Memphis, TN 38103 (901)544-3588 SCORE Office (Nashville) 50 Vantage Way, Ste. 201 Nashville, TN 37228-1500 (615)736-7621 (214)828-2471 Fax: (214)821-8033 SCORE Office (El Paso) 10 Civic Center Plaza El Paso, TX 79901 (915)534-0541 Fax: (915)534-0513 SCORE Office (Bedford) 100 E. 15th St., Ste. 400 Ft. Worth, TX 76102 (817)871-6002 SCORE Office (Ft. Worth) 100 E. 15th St., No. 24 Ft. Worth, TX 76102 (817)871-6002 Fax: (817)871-6031 E-mail: fwbac@onramp.net SCORE Office (Garland) 2734 W. Kingsley Rd. Garland, TX 75041 (214)271-9224 SCORE Office (Granbury Chamber of Commerce) 416 S. Morgan Granbury, TX 76048 (817)573-1622 Fax: (817)573-0805 SCORE Office (Lower Rio Grande Valley) 222 E. Van Buren, Ste. 500 Harlingen, TX 78550 (956)427-8533 Fax: (956)427-8537 SCORE Office (Houston) 9301 Southwest Fwy., Ste. 550 Houston, TX 77074 (713)773-6565 Fax: (713)773-6550 SCORE Office (Irving) 3333 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 100 Irving, TX 75062 (214)252-8484 Fax: (214)252-6710 SCORE Office (Lubbock) 1205 Texas Ave., Rm. 411D Lubbock, TX 79401 (806)472-7462 Fax: (806)472-7487 SCORE Office (Midland) Post Office Annex 200 E. Wall St., Rm. P121 Midland, TX 79701 (915)687-2649 Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Tennessee
SCORE Office (Chattanooga) Federal Bldg., Rm. 26 900 Georgia Ave. Chattanooga, TN 37402 (423)752-5190 Fax: (423)752-5335 SCORE Office (Cleveland) PO Box 2275 Cleveland, TN 37320 (423)472-6587 Fax: (423)472-2019 SCORE Office (Upper Cumberland Center) 1225 S. Willow Ave. Cookeville, TN 38501 (615)432-4111 Fax: (615)432-6010 SCORE Office (Unicoi County) PO Box 713 Erwin, TN 37650 (423)743-3000 Fax: (423)743-0942 SCORE Office (Greeneville) 115 Academy St. Greeneville, TN 37743 (423)638-4111 Fax: (423)638-5345 SCORE Office (Jackson) 194 Auditorium St. Jackson, TN 38301 (901)423-2200 SCORE Office (Northeast Tennessee) 1st Tennessee Bank Bldg. 2710 S. Roan St., Ste. 584 Johnson City, TN 37601 (423)929-7686 Fax: (423)461-8052 SCORE Office (Kingsport) 151 E. Main St. Kingsport, TN 37662 (423)392-8805 SCORE Office (Greater Knoxville) Farragot Bldg., Ste. 224 530 S. Gay St. Knoxville, TN 37902 (423)545-4203 E-mail: scoreknox@ntown.com Website: http://www.scoreknox.org/

Texas
SCORE Office (Abilene) 2106 Federal Post Office and Court Bldg. Abilene, TX 79601 (915)677-1857 SCORE Office (Austin) 2501 S. Congress Austin, TX 78701 (512)442-7235 Fax: (512)442-7528 SCORE Office (Golden Triangle) 450 Boyd St. Beaumont, TX 77704 (409)838-6581 Fax: (409)833-6718 SCORE Office (Brownsville) 3505 Boca Chica Blvd., Ste. 305 Brownsville, TX 78521 (210)541-4508 SCORE Office (Brazos Valley) 3000 Briarcrest, Ste. 302 Bryan, TX 77802 (409)776-8876 E-mail: 102633.2612@compuserve.com SCORE Office (Cleburne) Watergarden Pl., 9th Fl., Ste. 400 Cleburne, TX 76031 (817)871-6002 SCORE Office (Corpus Christi) 651 Upper North Broadway, Ste. 654 Corpus Christi, TX 78477 (512)888-4322 Fax: (512)888-3418 SCORE Office (Dallas) 6260 E. Mockingbird Dallas, TX 75214-2619

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SCORE Office (Orange) 1012 Green Ave. Orange, TX 77630-5620 (409)883-3536 800-528-4906 Fax: (409)886-3247 SCORE Office (Plano) 1200 E. 15th St. PO Drawer 940287 Plano, TX 75094-0287 (214)424-7547 Fax: (214)422-5182 SCORE Office (Port Arthur) 4749 Twin City Hwy., Ste. 300 Port Arthur, TX 77642 (409)963-1107 Fax: (409)963-3322 SCORE Office (Richardson) 411 Belle Grove Richardson, TX 75080 (214)234-4141 800-777-8001 Fax: (214)680-9103 SCORE Office (San Antonio) Federal Bldg., Rm. A527 727 E. Durango San Antonio, TX 78206 (210)472-5931 Fax: (210)472-5935 SCORE Office (Texarkana State College) 819 State Line Ave. Texarkana, TX 75501 (903)792-7191 Fax: (903)793-4304 SCORE Office (East Texas) RTDC 1530 SSW Loop 323, Ste. 100 Tyler, TX 75701 (903)510-2975 Fax: (903)510-2978 SCORE Office (Waco) 401 Franklin Ave. Waco, TX 76701 (817)754-8898 Fax: (817)756-0776 Website: http://www.brc-waco.com/ SCORE Office (Wichita Falls) Hamilton Bldg. 900 8th St. Wichita Falls, TX 76307 (940)723-2741 Fax: (940)723-8773

Utah
SCORE Office (Northern Utah) 160 N. Main Logan, UT 84321 (435)746-2269 SCORE Office (Ogden) 1701 E. Windsor Dr. Ogden, UT 84604 (801)629-8613 E-mail: score158@netscape.net SCORE Office (Central Utah) 1071 E. Windsor Dr. Provo, UT 84604 (801)373-8660 SCORE Office (Southern Utah) 225 South 700 East St. George, UT 84770 (435)652-7751 SCORE Office (Salt Lake) 310 S Main St. Salt Lake City, UT 84101 (801)746-2269 Fax: (801)746-2273

SCORE Office (St. Thomas-St. John) Federal Bldg., Rm. 21 Veterans Dr. St. Thomas, VI 00801 (809)774-8530

Virginia
SCORE Office (Arlington) 2009 N. 14th St., Ste. 111 Arlington, VA 22201 (703)525-2400 SCORE Office (Blacksburg) 141 Jackson St. Blacksburg, VA 24060 (540)552-4061 SCORE Office (Bristol) 20 Volunteer Pkwy. Bristol, VA 24203 (540)989-4850 SCORE Office (Central Virginia) 1001 E. Market St., Ste. 101 Charlottesville, VA 22902 (804)295-6712 Fax: (804)295-7066 SCORE Office (Alleghany Satellite) 241 W. Main St. Covington, VA 24426 (540)962-2178 Fax: (540)962-2179 SCORE Office (Central Fairfax) 3975 University Dr., Ste. 350 Fairfax, VA 22030 (703)591-2450 SCORE Office (Falls Church) PO Box 491 Falls Church, VA 22040 (703)532-1050 Fax: (703)237-7904 SCORE Office (Glenns) Glenns Campus Box 287 Glenns, VA 23149 (804)693-9650 SCORE Office (Peninsula) 6 Manhattan Sq. PO Box 7269 Hampton, VA 23666 (757)766-2000 Fax: (757)865-0339 E-mail: score100@seva.net SCORE Office (Tri-Cities) 108 N. Main St.

Vermont
SCORE Office (Champlain Valley) Winston Prouty Federal Bldg. 11 Lincoln St., Rm. 106 Essex Junction, VT 05452 (802)951-6762 SCORE Office (Montpelier) 87 State St., Rm. 205 PO Box 605 Montpelier, VT 05601 (802)828-4422 Fax: (802)828-4485 SCORE Office (Marble Valley) 256 N. Main St. Rutland, VT 05701-2413 (802)773-9147 SCORE Office (Northeast Kingdom) 20 Main St. PO Box 904 St. Johnsbury, VT 05819 (802)748-5101

Virgin Islands
SCORE Office (St. Croix) United Plaza Shopping Center PO Box 4010, Christiansted St. Croix, VI 00822 (809)778-5380

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Hopewell, VA 23860 (804)458-5536 SCORE Office (Lynchburg) Federal Bldg. 1100 Main St. Lynchburg, VA 24504-1714 (804)846-3235 SCORE Office (Greater Prince William) 8963 Center St Manassas, VA 20110 (703)368-4813 Fax: (703)368-4733 SCORE Office (Martinsvile) 115 Broad St. Martinsville, VA 24112-0709 (540)632-6401 Fax: (540)632-5059 SCORE Office (Hampton Roads) Federal Bldg., Rm. 737 200 Grandby St. Norfolk, VA 23510 (757)441-3733 Fax: (757)441-3733 E-mail: scorehr60@juno.com SCORE Office (Norfolk) Federal Bldg., Rm. 737 200 Granby St. Norfolk, VA 23510 (757)441-3733 Fax: (757)441-3733 SCORE Office (Virginia Beach) Chamber of Commerce 200 Grandby St., Rm 737 Norfolk, VA 23510 (804)441-3733 SCORE Office (Radford) 1126 Norwood St. Radford, VA 24141 (540)639-2202 SCORE Office (Richmond) Federal Bldg. 400 N. 8th St., Ste. 1150 PO Box 10126 Richmond, VA 23240-0126 (804)771-2400 Fax: (804)771-8018 E-mail: scorechapter12@yahoo.com Website: http://www.cvco.org/score/ SCORE Office (Roanoke) Federal Bldg., Rm. 716 250 Franklin Rd. Roanoke, VA 24011 (540)857-2834 Fax: (540)857-2043 E-mail: scorerva@juno.com Website: http://hometown.aol.com/ scorerv/Index.html SCORE Office (Fairfax) 8391 Old Courthouse Rd., Ste. 300 Vienna, VA 22182 (703)749-0400 SCORE Office (Greater Vienna) 513 Maple Ave. West Vienna, VA 22180 (703)281-1333 Fax: (703)242-1482 SCORE Office (Shenandoah Valley) 301 W. Main St. Waynesboro, VA 22980 (540)949-8203 Fax: (540)949-7740 E-mail: score427@intelos.net SCORE Office (Williamsburg) 201 Penniman Rd. Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757)229-6511 E-mail: wacc@williamsburgcc.com SCORE Office (Northern Virginia) 1360 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Winchester, VA 22601 (540)662-4118 SCORE Office (Puyallup) 322 2nd St. SW PO Box 1298 Puyallup, WA 98371 (206)845-6755 Fax: (206)848-6164 SCORE Office (Seattle) 1200 6th Ave., Ste. 1700 Seattle, WA 98101 (206)553-7320 Fax: (206)553-7044 E-mail: score55@aol.com Website: http://www.scn.org/civic/scoreonline/index55.html SCORE Office (Spokane) 801 W. Riverside Ave., No. 240 Spokane, WA 99201 (509)353-2820 Fax: (509)353-2600 E-mail: score@dmi.net Website: http://www.dmi.net/score/ SCORE Office (Clover Park) PO Box 1933 Tacoma, WA 98401-1933 (206)627-2175 SCORE Office (Tacoma) 1101 Pacific Ave. Tacoma, WA 98402 (253)274-1288 Fax: (253)274-1289 SCORE Office (Fort Vancouver) 1701 Broadway, S-1 Vancouver, WA 98663 (360)699-1079 SCORE Office (Walla Walla) 500 Tausick Way Walla Walla, WA 99362 (509)527-4681 SCORE Office (Mid-Columbia) 1113 S. 14th Ave. Yakima, WA 98907 (509)574-4944 Fax: (509)574-2943 Website: http://www.ellensburg.com/~ score/

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Washington
SCORE Office (Gray’s Harbor) 506 Duffy St. Aberdeen, WA 98520 (360)532-1924 Fax: (360)533-7945 SCORE Office (Bellingham) 101 E. Holly St. Bellingham, WA 98225 (360)676-3307 SCORE Office (Everett) 2702 Hoyt Ave. Everett, WA 98201-3556 (206)259-8000 SCORE Office (Gig Harbor) 3125 Judson St. Gig Harbor, WA 98335 (206)851-6865 SCORE Office (Kennewick) PO Box 6986 Kennewick, WA 99336 (509)736-0510

West Virginia
SCORE Office (Charleston) 1116 Smith St. Charleston, WV 25301 (304)347-5463 E-mail: score256@juno.com

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SCORE Office (Virginia Street) 1116 Smith St., Ste. 302 Charleston, WV 25301 (304)347-5463 SCORE Office (Marion County) PO Box 208 Fairmont, WV 26555-0208 (304)363-0486 SCORE Office (Upper Monongahela Valley) 1000 Technology Dr., Ste. 1111 Fairmont, WV 26555 (304)363-0486 E-mail: score537@hotmail.com SCORE Office (Huntington) 1101 6th Ave., Ste. 220 Huntington, WV 25701-2309 (304)523-4092 SCORE Office (Wheeling) 1310 Market St. Wheeling, WV 26003 (304)233-2575 Fax: (304)233-1320 SCORE Office (Janesville) 20 S. Main St., Ste. 11 PO Box 8008 Janesville, WI 53547 (608)757-3160 Fax: (608)757-3170 SCORE Office (La Crosse) 712 Main St. La Crosse, WI 54602-0219 (608)784-4880 SCORE Office (Madison) 505 S. Rosa Rd. Madison, WI 53719 (608)441-2820 SCORE Office (Manitowoc) 1515 Memorial Dr. PO Box 903 Manitowoc, WI 54221-0903 (414)684-5575 Fax: (414)684-1915 SCORE Office (Milwaukee) 310 W. Wisconsin Ave., Ste. 425 Milwaukee, WI 53203 (414)297-3942 Fax: (414)297-1377 SCORE Office (Central Wisconsin) 1224 Lindbergh Ave. Stevens Point, WI 54481 (715)344-7729 SCORE Office (Superior) Superior Business Center Inc. 1423 N. 8th St. Superior, WI 54880 (715)394-7388 Fax: (715)393-7414 SCORE Office (Waukesha) 223 Wisconsin Ave. Waukesha, WI 53186-4926 (414)542-4249 SCORE Office (Wausau) 300 3rd St., Ste. 200 Wausau, WI 54402-6190 (715)845-6231 SCORE Office (Wisconsin Rapids) 2240 Kingston Rd. Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54494 (715)423-1830 Casper, WY 82602 (307)261-6529 Fax: (307)261-6530

Venture capital & financing companies
This section contains a listing of financing and loan companies in the United States and Canada. These listing are arranged alphabetically by country, then by state or province, then by city, then by organization name.

Canada
Alberta
Launchworks Inc. 1902J 11th St., S.E. Calgary, AB, Canada T2G 3G2 (403)269-1119 Fax: (403)269-1141 Website: http://www.launchworks.com Native Venture Capital Company, Inc. 21 Artist View Point, Box 7 Site 25, RR 12 Calgary, AB, Canada T3E 6W3 (903)208-5380 Miralta Capital Inc. 4445 Calgary Trail South 888 Terrace Plaza Alberta Edmonton, AB, Canada T6H 5R7 (780)438-3535 Fax: (780)438-3129 Vencap Equities Alberta Ltd. 10180-101st St., Ste. 1980 Edmonton, AB, Canada T5J 3S4 (403)420-1171 Fax: (403)429-2541

Wisconsin
SCORE Office (Fox Cities) 227 S. Walnut St. Appleton, WI 54913 (920)734-7101 Fax: (920)734-7161 SCORE Office (Beloit) 136 W. Grand Ave., Ste. 100 PO Box 717 Beloit, WI 53511 (608)365-8835 Fax: (608)365-9170 SCORE Office (Eau Claire) Federal Bldg., Rm. B11 510 S. Barstow St. Eau Claire, WI 54701 (715)834-1573 E-mail: score@ecol.net Website: http://www.ecol.net/~score/ SCORE Office (Fond du Lac) 207 N. Main St. Fond du Lac, WI 54935 (414)921-9500 Fax: (414)921-9559 SCORE Office (Green Bay) 835 Potts Ave. Green Bay, WI 54304 (414)496-8930 Fax: (414)496-6009

British Columbia
Discovery Capital 5th Fl., 1199 West Hastings Vancouver, BC, Canada V6E 3T5 (604)683-3000 Fax: (604)662-3457 E-mail: info@discoverycapital.com Website: http://www.discoverycapital.com Greenstone Venture Partners 1177 West Hastings St. Ste. 400 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6E 2K3 (604)717-1977 Fax: (604)717-1976 Website: http://www.greenstonevc.com

Wyoming
SCORE Office (Casper) Federal Bldg., No. 2215 100 East B St.

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Growthworks Capital 2600-1055 West Georgia St. Box 11170 Royal Centre Vancouver, BC, Canada V6E 3R5 (604)895-7259 Fax: (604)669-7605 Website: http://www.wofund.com MDS Discovery Venture Management, Inc. 555 W. Eighth Ave., Ste. 305 Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1C6 (604)872-8464 Fax: (604)872-2977 E-mail: info@mds-ventures.com Ventures West Management Inc. 1285 W. Pender St., Ste. 280 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6E 4B1 (604)688-9495 Fax: (604)687-2145 Website: http://www.ventureswest.com South Tower, Ste. 3120 Toronto, ON, Canada M5J 2J2 (416)815-0078 Fax: (416)941-1073 Website: http://www.bcecapital.com Castlehill Ventures 55 University Ave., Ste. 500 Toronto, ON, Canada M5J 2H7 (416)862-8574 Fax: (416)862-8875 CCFL Mezzanine Partners of Canada 70 University Ave. Ste. 1450 Toronto, ON, Canada M5J 2M4 (416)977-1450 Fax: (416)977-6764 E-mail: info@ccfl.com Website: http://www.ccfl.com Celtic House International 100 Simcoe St., Ste. 100 Toronto, ON, Canada M5H 3G2 (416)542-2436 Fax: (416)542-2435 Website: http://www.celtic-house.com Clairvest Group Inc. 22 St. Clair Ave. East Ste. 1700 Toronto, ON, Canada M4T 2S3 (416)925-9270 Fax: (416)925-5753 Crosbie & Co., Inc. One First Canadian Place 9th Fl. PO Box 116 Toronto, ON, Canada M5X 1A4 (416)362-7726 Fax: (416)362-3447 E-mail: info@crosbieco.com Website: http://www.crosbieco.com Drug Royalty Corp. Eight King St. East Ste. 202 Toronto, ON, Canada M5C 1B5 (416)863-1865 Fax: (416)863-5161 Grieve, Horner, Brown & Asculai 8 King St. E, Ste. 1704 Toronto, ON, Canada M5C 1B5 (416)362-7668 Fax: (416)362-7660 Jefferson Partners 77 King St. West Ste. 4010 PO Box 136 Toronto, ON, Canada M5K 1H1 (416)367-1533 Fax: (416)367-5827 Website: http://www.jefferson.com J.L. Albright Venture Partners Canada Trust Tower, 161 Bay St. Ste. 4440 PO Box 215 Toronto, ON, Canada M5J 2S1 (416)367-2440 Fax: (416)367-4604 Website: http://www.jlaventures.com McLean Watson Capital Inc. One First Canadian Place Ste. 1410 PO Box 129 Toronto, ON, Canada M5X 1A4 (416)363-2000 Fax: (416)363-2010 Website: http://www.mcleanwatson.com Middlefield Capital Fund One First Canadian Place 85th Fl. PO Box 192 Toronto, ON, Canada M5X 1A6 (416)362-0714 Fax: (416)362-7925 Website: http://www.middlefield.com Mosaic Venture Partners 24 Duncan St. Ste. 300 Toronto, ON, Canada M5V 3M6 (416)597-8889 Fax: (416)597-2345 Onex Corp. 161 Bay St. PO Box 700 Toronto, ON, Canada M5J 2S1 (416)362-7711 Fax: (416)362-5765 Penfund Partners Inc. 145 King St. West Ste. 1920 Toronto, ON, Canada M5H 1J8 (416)865-0300 Fax: (416)364-6912 Website: http://www.penfund.com Primaxis Technology Ventures Inc. 1 Richmond St. West, 8th Fl. Toronto, ON, Canada M5H 3W4 (416)313-5210 Fax: (416)313-5218 Website: http://www.primaxis.com

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Nova Scotia
ACF Equity Atlantic Inc. Purdy’s Wharf Tower II Ste. 2106 Halifax, NS, Canada B3J 3R7 (902)421-1965 Fax: (902)421-1808 Montgomerie, Huck & Co. 146 Bluenose Dr. PO Box 538 Lunenburg, NS, Canada B0J 2C0 (902)634-7125 Fax: (902)634-7130

Ontario
IPS Industrial Promotion Services Ltd. 60 Columbia Way, Ste. 720 Markham, ON, Canada L3R 0C9 (905)475-9400 Fax: (905)475-5003 Betwin Investments Inc. Box 23110 Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Canada P6A 6W6 (705)253-0744 Fax: (705)253-0744 Bailey & Company, Inc. 594 Spadina Ave. Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 2H4 (416)921-6930 Fax: (416)925-4670 BCE Capital 200 Bay St.

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Priveq Capital Funds 240 Duncan Mill Rd., Ste. 602 Toronto, ON, Canada M3B 3P1 (416)447-3330 Fax: (416)447-3331 E-mail: priveq@sympatico.ca Roynat Ventures 40 King St. West, 26th Fl. Toronto, ON, Canada M5H 1H1 (416)933-2667 Fax: (416)933-2783 Website: http://www.roynatcapital.com Tera Capital Corp. 366 Adelaide St. East, Ste. 337 Toronto, ON, Canada M5A 3X9 (416)368-1024 Fax: (416)368-1427 Working Ventures Canadian Fund Inc. 250 Bloor St. East, Ste. 1600 Toronto, ON, Canada M4W 1E6 (416)934-7718 Fax: (416)929-0901 Website: http://www.workingventures.ca (514)877-3800 Fax: (514)875-6415 Speirs Consultants Inc. 365 Stanstead Montreal, QC, Canada H3R 1X5 (514)342-3858 Fax: (514)342-1977 Tecnocap Inc. 4028 Marlowe Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3M2 (514)483-6009 Fax: (514)483-6045 Website: http://www.technocap.com Telsoft Ventures 1000, Rue de la Gauchetiere Quest, 25eme Etage Montreal, QC, Canada H3B 4W5 (514)397-8450 Fax: (514)397-8451 21st Century Health Ventures One Health South Pkwy. Birmingham, AL 35243 (256)268-6250 Fax: (256)970-8928 FJC Growth Capital Corp. 200 W. Side Sq., Ste. 340 Huntsville, AL 35801 (256)922-2918 Fax: (256)922-2909 Hickory Venture Capital Corp. 301 Washington St. NW Suite 301 Huntsville, AL 35801 (256)539-1931 Fax: (256)539-5130 E-mail: hvcc@hvcc.com Website: http://www.hvcc.com Southeastern Technology Fund 7910 South Memorial Pkwy., Ste. F Huntsville, AL 35802 (256)883-8711 Fax: (256)883-8558 Cordova Ventures 4121 Carmichael Rd., Ste. 301 Montgomery, AL 36106 (334)271-6011 Fax: (334)260-0120 Website: http://www.cordova ventures.com Small Business Clinic of Alabama/AG Bartholomew & Associates PO Box 231074 Montgomery, AL 36123-1074 (334)284-3640

Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Government Growth Fund 1801 Hamilton St., Ste. 1210 Canada Trust Tower Regina, SK, Canada S4P 4B4 (306)787-2994 Fax: (306)787-2086

Quebec
Altamira Capital Corp. 202 University Niveau de Maisoneuve, Bur. 201 Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2A5 (514)499-1656 Fax: (514)499-9570 Federal Business Development Bank Venture Capital Division Five Place Ville Marie, Ste. 600 Montreal, QC, Canada H3B 5E7 (514)283-1896 Fax: (514)283-5455 Hydro-Quebec Capitech Inc. 75 Boul, Rene Levesque Quest Montreal, QC, Canada H2Z 1A4 (514)289-4783 Fax: (514)289-5420 Website: http://www.hqcapitech.com Investissement Desjardins 2 complexe Desjardins C.P. 760 Montreal, QC, Canada H5B 1B8 (514)281-7131 Fax: (514)281-7808 Website: http://www.desjardins.com/id Marleau Lemire Inc. One Place Ville-Marie, Ste. 3601 Montreal, QC, Canada H3B 3P2

United states
Alabama
FHL Capital Corp. 600 20th Street North Suite 350 Birmingham, AL 35203 (205)328-3098 Fax: (205)323-0001 Harbert Management Corp. One Riverchase Pkwy. South Birmingham, AL 35244 (205)987-5500 Fax: (205)987-5707 Website: http://www.harbert.net Jefferson Capital Fund PO Box 13129 Birmingham, AL 35213 (205)324-7709 Private Capital Corp. 100 Brookwood Pl., 4th Fl. Birmingham, AL 35209 (205)879-2722 Fax: (205)879-5121

Arizona
Miller Capital Corp. 4909 E. McDowell Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (602)225-0504 Fax: (602)225-9024 Website: http://www.themiller group.com The Columbine Venture Funds 9449 North 90th St., Ste. 200 Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (602)661-9222 Fax: (602)661-6262 Koch Ventures 17767 N. Perimeter Dr., Ste. 101 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 (480)419-3600

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Fax: (480)419-3606 Website: http://www.kochventures.com McKee & Co. 7702 E. Doubletree Ranch Rd. Suite 230 Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (480)368-0333 Fax: (480)607-7446 Merita Capital Ltd. 7350 E. Stetson Dr., Ste. 108-A Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480)947-8700 Fax: (480)947-8766 Valley Ventures / Arizona Growth Partners L.P. 6720 N. Scottsdale Rd., Ste. 208 Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480)661-6600 Fax: (480)661-6262 Estreetcapital.com 660 South Mill Ave., Ste. 315 Tempe, AZ 85281 (480)968-8400 Fax: (480)968-8480 Website: http://www.estreetcapital.com Coronado Venture Fund PO Box 65420 Tucson, AZ 85728-5420 (520)577-3764 Fax: (520)299-8491 Alpine Technology Ventures 20300 Stevens Creek Boulevard, Ste. 495 Cupertino, CA 95014 (408)725-1810 Fax: (408)725-1207 Website: http://www.alpineventures.com Bay Partners 10600 N. De Anza Blvd. Cupertino, CA 95014-2031 (408)725-2444 Fax: (408)446-4502 Website: http://www.baypartners.com Novus Ventures 20111 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 130 Cupertino, CA 95014 (408)252-3900 Fax: (408)252-1713 Website: http://www.novusventures.com Triune Capital 19925 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 200 Cupertino, CA 95014 (310)284-6800 Fax: (310)284-3290 Acorn Ventures 268 Bush St., Ste. 2829 Daly City, CA 94014 (650)994-7801 Fax: (650)994-3305 Website: http://www.acornventures.com Digital Media Campus 2221 Park Place El Segundo, CA 90245 (310)426-8000 Fax: (310)426-8010 E-mail: info@thecampus.com Website: http://www.digital mediacampus.com BankAmerica Ventures / BA Venture Partners 950 Tower Ln., Ste. 700 Foster City, CA 94404 (650)378-6000 Fax: (650)378-6040 Website: http:// www.baventurepartners.com Starting Point Partners 666 Portofino Lane Foster City, CA 94404 (650)722-1035 Website: http://www.startingpoint partners.com Opportunity Capital Partners 2201 Walnut Ave., Ste. 210 Fremont, CA 94538 (510)795-7000 Fax: (510)494-5439 Website: http://www.ocpcapital.com Imperial Ventures Inc. 9920 S. La Cienega Boulevar, 14th Fl. Inglewood, CA 90301 (310)417-5409 Fax: (310)338-6115 Ventana Global (Irvine) 18881 Von Karman Ave., Ste. 1150 Irvine, CA 92612 (949)476-2204 Fax: (949)752-0223 Website: http://www.ventanaglobal.com Integrated Consortium Inc. 50 Ridgecrest Rd. Kentfield, CA 94904 (415)925-0386 Fax: (415)461-2726 Enterprise Partners 979 Ivanhoe Ave., Ste. 550 La Jolla, CA 92037 (858)454-8833 Fax: (858)454-2489 Website: http://www.epvc.com Domain Associates 28202 Cabot Rd., Ste. 200 Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 (949)347-2446 Fax: (949)347-9720 Website: http://www.domainvc.com Cascade Communications Ventures 60 E. Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Ste. 300 Larkspur, CA 94939 (415)925-6500 Fax: (415)925-6501 Allegis Capital One First St., Ste. Two Los Altos, CA 94022 (650)917-5900 Fax: (650)917-5901 Website: http://www.allegiscapital.com Aspen Ventures 1000 Fremont Ave., Ste. 200 Los Altos, CA 94024 (650)917-5670 Fax: (650)917-5677 Website: http://www.aspenventures.com AVI Capital L.P. 1 First St., Ste. 2 Los Altos, CA 94022

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Arkansas
Arkansas Capital Corp. 225 South Pulaski St. Little Rock, AR 72201 (501)374-9247 Fax: (501)374-9425 Website: http://www.arcapital.com

California
Sundance Venture Partners, L.P. 100 Clocktower Place, Ste. 130 Carmel, CA 93923 (831)625-6500 Fax: (831)625-6590 Westar Capital (Costa Mesa) 949 South Coast Dr., Ste. 650 Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (714)481-5160 Fax: (714)481-5166 E-mail: mailbox@westarcapital.com Website: http://www.westarcapital.com

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(650)949-9862 Fax: (650)949-8510 Website: http://www.avicapital.com Bastion Capital Corp. 1999 Avenue of the Stars, Ste. 2960 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310)788-5700 Fax: (310)277-7582 E-mail: ga@bastioncapital.com Website: http://www.bastioncapital.com Davis Group PO Box 69953 Los Angeles, CA 90069-0953 (310)659-6327 Fax: (310)659-6337 Developers Equity Corp. 1880 Century Park East, Ste. 211 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (213)277-0300 Far East Capital Corp. 350 S. Grand Ave., Ste. 4100 Los Angeles, CA 90071 (213)687-1361 Fax: (213)617-7939 E-mail: free@fareastnationalbank.com Kline Hawkes & Co. 11726 San Vicente Blvd., Ste. 300 Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310)442-4700 Fax: (310)442-4707 Website: http://www.klinehawkes.com Lawrence Financial Group 701 Teakwood PO Box 491773 Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310)471-4060 Fax: (310)472-3155 Riordan Lewis & Haden 300 S. Grand Ave., 29th Fl. Los Angeles, CA 90071 (213)229-8500 Fax: (213)229-8597 Union Venture Corp. 445 S. Figueroa St., 9th Fl. Los Angeles, CA 90071 (213)236-4092 Fax: (213)236-6329 Wedbush Capital Partners 1000 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213)688-4545 Fax: (213)688-6642 Website: http://www.wedbush.com Advent International Corp. 2180 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 420 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)233-7500 Fax: (650)233-7515 Website: http://www.adventinter national.com Altos Ventures 2882 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 100 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)234-9771 Fax: (650)233-9821 Website: http://www.altosvc.com Applied Technology 1010 El Camino Real, Ste. 300 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (415)326-8622 Fax: (415)326-8163 APV Technology Partners 535 Middlefield, Ste. 150 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)327-7871 Fax: (650)327-7631 Website: http://www.apvtp.com August Capital Management 2480 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 101 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)234-9900 Fax: (650)234-9910 Website: http://www.augustcap.com Baccharis Capital Inc. 2420 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 100 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)324-6844 Fax: (650)854-3025 Benchmark Capital 2480 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 200 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-8180 Fax: (650)854-8183 E-mail: info@benchmark.com Website: http://www.benchmark.com Bessemer Venture Partners (Menlo Park) 535 Middlefield Rd., Ste. 245 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)853-7000 Fax: (650)853-7001 Website: http://www.bvp.com The Cambria Group 1600 El Camino Real Rd., Ste. 155 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)329-8600 Fax: (650)329-8601 Website: http://www.cambriagroup.com Canaan Partners 2884 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 115 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-8092 Fax: (650)854-8127 Website: http://www.canaan.com Capstone Ventures 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. One, Ste. 290 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-2523 Fax: (650)854-9010 Website: http://www.capstonevc.com Comdisco Venture Group (Silicon Valley) 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 155 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-9484 Fax: (650)854-4026 Commtech International 535 Middlefield Rd., Ste. 200 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)328-0190 Fax: (650)328-6442 Compass Technology Partners 1550 El Camino Real, Ste. 275 Menlo Park, CA 94025-4111 (650)322-7595 Fax: (650)322-0588 Website: http://www.compass techpartners.com Convergence Partners 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 235 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-3010 Fax: (650)854-3015 Website: http://www.conver gencepartners.com The Dakota Group PO Box 1025 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)853-0600 Fax: (650)851-4899 E-mail: info@dakota.com Delphi Ventures 3000 Sand Hill Rd. Bldg. One, Ste. 135 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-9650 Fax: (650)854-2961 Website: http://www.delphiventures.com

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El Dorado Ventures 2884 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 121 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-1200 Fax: (650)854-1202 Website: http://www.eldorado ventures.com Glynn Ventures 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 4, Ste. 235 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-2215 Indosuez Ventures 2180 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 450 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-0587 Fax: (650)323-5561 Website: http://www.indosuez ventures.com Institutional Venture Partners 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 2, Ste. 290 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-0132 Fax: (650)854-5762 Website: http://www.ivp.com Interwest Partners (Menlo Park) 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 3, Ste. 255 Menlo Park, CA 94025-7112 (650)854-8585 Fax: (650)854-4706 Website: http://www.interwest.com Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (Menlo Park) 2750 Sand Hill Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)233-2750 Fax: (650)233-0300 Website: http://www.kpcb.com Magic Venture Capital LLC 1010 El Camino Real, Ste. 300 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)325-4149 Matrix Partners 2500 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 113 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-3131 Fax: (650)854-3296 Website: http://www.matrixpartners.com Mayfield Fund 2800 Sand Hill Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-5560 Fax: (650)854-5712 Website: http://www.mayfield.com McCown De Leeuw and Co. (Menlo Park) 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 3, Ste. 290 Menlo Park, CA 94025-7111 (650)854-6000 Fax: (650)854-0853 Website: http://www.mdcpartners.com Menlo Ventures 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 4, Ste. 100 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-8540 Fax: (650)854-7059 Website: http://www.menloventures.com Merrill Pickard Anderson & Eyre 2480 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 200 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-8600 Fax: (650)854-0345 New Enterprise Associates (Menlo Park) 2490 Sand Hill Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-9499 Fax: (650)854-9397 Website: http://www.nea.com Onset Ventures 2400 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 150 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)529-0700 Fax: (650)529-0777 Website: http://www.onset.com Paragon Venture Partners 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 275 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-8000 Fax: (650)854-7260 Pathfinder Venture Capital Funds (Menlo Park) 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 3, Ste. 255 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-0650 Fax: (650)854-4706 Rocket Ventures 3000 Sandhill Rd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 170 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)561-9100 Fax: (650)561-9183 Website: http://www.rocketventures.com Sequoia Capital 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 4, Ste. 280 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-3927 Fax: (650)854-2977 E-mail: sequoia@sequioacap.com Website: http://www.sequoiacap.com Sierra Ventures 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 4, Ste. 210 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-1000 Fax: (650)854-5593 Website: http://www.sierraventures.com Sigma Partners 2884 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 121 Menlo Park, CA 94025-7022 (650)853-1700 Fax: (650)853-1717 E-mail: info@sigmapartners.com Website: http://www.sigmapartners.com Sprout Group (Menlo Park) 3000 Sand Hill Rd. Bldg. 3, Ste. 170 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)234-2700 Fax: (650)234-2779 Website: http://www.sproutgroup.com TA Associates (Menlo Park) 70 Willow Rd., Ste. 100 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)328-1210 Fax: (650)326-4933 Website: http://www.ta.com Thompson Clive & Partners Ltd. 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 185 Menlo Park, CA 94025-7102 (650)854-0314 Fax: (650)854-0670 E-mail: mail@tcvc.com Website: http://www.tcvc.com Trinity Ventures Ltd. 3000 Sand Hill Rd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 240 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-9500 Fax: (650)854-9501 Website: http://www.trinityventures.com U.S. Venture Partners 2180 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 300 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)854-9080 Fax: (650)854-3018 Website: http://www.usvp.com USVP-Schlein Marketing Fund 2180 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 300 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (415)854-9080 Fax: (415)854-3018 Website: http://www.usvp.com

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Venrock Associates 2494 Sand Hill Rd., Ste. 200 Menlo Park, CA 94025 (650)561-9580 Fax: (650)561-9180 Website: http://www.venrock.com Brad Peery Capital Inc. 145 Chapel Pkwy. Mill Valley, CA 94941 (415)389-0625 Fax: (415)389-1336 Dot Edu Ventures 650 Castro St., Ste. 270 Mountain View, CA 94041 (650)575-5638 Fax: (650)325-5247 Website: http://www.dotedu ventures.com Forrest, Binkley & Brown 840 Newport Ctr. Dr., Ste. 480 Newport Beach, CA 92660 (949)729-3222 Fax: (949)729-3226 Website: http://www.fbbvc.com Marwit Capital LLC 180 Newport Center Dr., Ste. 200 Newport Beach, CA 92660 (949)640-6234 Fax: (949)720-8077 Website: http://www.marwit.com Kaiser Permanente / National Venture Development 1800 Harrison St., 22nd Fl. Oakland, CA 94612 (510)267-4010 Fax: (510)267-4036 Website: http://www.kpventures.com Nu Capital Access Group, Ltd. 7677 Oakport St., Ste. 105 Oakland, CA 94621 (510)635-7345 Fax: (510)635-7068 Inman and Bowman 4 Orinda Way, Bldg. D, Ste. 150 Orinda, CA 94563 (510)253-1611 Fax: (510)253-9037 Accel Partners (San Francisco) 428 University Ave. Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)614-4800 Fax: (650)614-4880 Website: http://www.accel.com Advanced Technology Ventures 485 Ramona St., Ste. 200 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)321-8601 Fax: (650)321-0934 Website: http://www.atvcapital.com Anila Fund 400 Channing Ave. Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)833-5790 Fax: (650)833-0590 Website: http://www.anila.com Asset Management Company Venture Capital 2275 E. Bayshore, Ste. 150 Palo Alto, CA 94303 (650)494-7400 Fax: (650)856-1826 E-mail: postmaster@assetman.com Website: http://www.assetman.com BancBoston Capital / BancBoston Ventures 435 Tasso St., Ste. 250 Palo Alto, CA 94305 (650)470-4100 Fax: (650)853-1425 Website: http://www.bancboston capital.com Charter Ventures 525 University Ave., Ste. 1400 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)325-6953 Fax: (650)325-4762 Website: http://www.charterventures.com Communications Ventures 505 Hamilton Avenue, Ste. 305 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)325-9600 Fax: (650)325-9608 Website: http://www.comven.com HMS Group 2468 Embarcadero Way Palo Alto, CA 94303-3313 (650)856-9862 Fax: (650)856-9864 Jafco America Ventures, Inc. 505 Hamilton Ste. 310 Palto Alto, CA 94301 (650)463-8800 Fax: (650)463-8801 Website: http://www.jafco.com New Vista Capital 540 Cowper St., Ste. 200 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)329-9333 Fax: (650)328-9434 E-mail: fgreene@nvcap.com Website: http://www.nvcap.com Norwest Equity Partners (Palo Alto) 245 Lytton Ave., Ste. 250 Palo Alto, CA 94301-1426 (650)321-8000 Fax: (650)321-8010 Website: http://www.norwestvp.com Oak Investment Partners 525 University Ave., Ste. 1300 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)614-3700 Fax: (650)328-6345 Website: http://www.oakinv.com Patricof & Co. Ventures, Inc. (Palo Alto) 2100 Geng Rd., Ste. 150 Palo Alto, CA 94303 (650)494-9944 Fax: (650)494-6751 Website: http://www.patricof.com RWI Group 835 Page Mill Rd. Palo Alto, CA 94304 (650)251-1800 Fax: (650)213-8660 Website: http://www.rwigroup.com Summit Partners (Palo Alto) 499 Hamilton Ave., Ste. 200 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)321-1166 Fax: (650)321-1188 Website: http://www.summit partners.com Sutter Hill Ventures 755 Page Mill Rd., Ste. A-200 Palo Alto, CA 94304 (650)493-5600 Fax: (650)858-1854 E-mail: shv@shv.com Vanguard Venture Partners 525 University Ave., Ste. 600 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)321-2900 Fax: (650)321-2902 Website: http://www.vanguard ventures.com Venture Growth Associates 2479 East Bayshore St., Ste. 710 Palo Alto, CA 94303

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(650)855-9100 Fax: (650)855-9104 Worldview Technology Partners 435 Tasso St., Ste. 120 Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650)322-3800 Fax: (650)322-3880 Website: http://www.worldview.com Draper, Fisher, Jurvetson / Draper Associates 400 Seaport Ct., Ste.250 Redwood City, CA 94063 (415)599-9000 Fax: (415)599-9726 Website: http://www.dfj.com Gabriel Venture Partners 350 Marine Pkwy., Ste. 200 Redwood Shores, CA 94065 (650)551-5000 Fax: (650)551-5001 Website: http://www.gabrielvp.com Hallador Venture Partners, L.L.C. 740 University Ave., Ste. 110 Sacramento, CA 95825-6710 (916)920-0191 Fax: (916)920-5188 E-mail: chris@hallador.com Emerald Venture Group 12396 World Trade Dr., Ste. 116 San Diego, CA 92128 (858)451-1001 Fax: (858)451-1003 Website: http://www.emerald venture.com Forward Ventures 9255 Towne Centre Dr. San Diego, CA 92121 (858)677-6077 Fax: (858)452-8799 E-mail: info@forwardventure.com Website: http://www.forward venture.com Idanta Partners Ltd. 4660 La Jolla Village Dr., Ste. 850 San Diego, CA 92122 (619)452-9690 Fax: (619)452-2013 Website: http://www.idanta.com Kingsbury Associates 3655 Nobel Dr., Ste. 490 San Diego, CA 92122 (858)677-0600 Fax: (858)677-0800 Kyocera International Inc. Corporate Development 8611 Balboa Ave. San Diego, CA 92123 (858)576-2600 Fax: (858)492-1456 Sorrento Associates, Inc. 4370 LaJolla Village Dr., Ste. 1040 San Diego, CA 92122 (619)452-3100 Fax: (619)452-7607 Website: http://www.sorrento ventures.com Western States Investment Group 9191 Towne Ctr. Dr., Ste. 310 San Diego, CA 92122 (619)678-0800 Fax: (619)678-0900 Aberdare Ventures One Embarcadero Center, Ste. 4000 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415)392-7442 Fax: (415)392-4264 Website: http://www.aberdare.com Acacia Venture Partners 101 California St., Ste. 3160 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415)433-4200 Fax: (415)433-4250 Website: http://www.acaciavp.com Access Venture Partners 319 Laidley St. San Francisco, CA 94131 (415)586-0132 Fax: (415)392-6310 Website: http://www.access venturepartners.com Alta Partners One Embarcadero Center, Ste. 4050 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415)362-4022 Fax: (415)362-6178 E-mail: alta@altapartners.com Website: http://www.altapartners.com Bangert Dawes Reade Davis & Thom 220 Montgomery St., Ste. 424 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)954-9900 Fax: (415)954-9901 E-mail: bdrdt@pacbell.net Berkeley International Capital Corp. 650 California St., Ste. 2800 San Francisco, CA 94108-2609 (415)249-0450 Fax: (415)392-3929 Website: http://www.berkeleyvc.com Blueprint Ventures LLC 456 Montgomery St., 22nd Fl. San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)901-4000 Fax: (415)901-4035 Website: http://www.blue printventures.com Blumberg Capital Ventures 580 Howard St., Ste. 401 San Francisco, CA 94105 (415)905-5007 Fax: (415)357-5027 Website: http://www.blumbergcapital.com Burr, Egan, Deleage, and Co. (San Francisco) 1 Embarcadero Center, Ste. 4050 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415)362-4022 Fax: (415)362-6178 Burrill & Company 120 Montgomery St., Ste. 1370 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)743-3160 Fax: (415)743-3161 Website: http://www.burrillandco.com CMEA Ventures 235 Montgomery St., Ste. 920 San Francisco, CA 94401 (415)352-1520 Fax: (415)352-1524 Website: http://www.cmeaventures.com Crocker Capital 1 Post St., Ste. 2500 San Francisco, CA 94101 (415)956-5250 Fax: (415)959-5710 Dominion Ventures, Inc. 44 Montgomery St., Ste. 4200 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)362-4890 Fax: (415)394-9245 Dorset Capital Pier 1 Bay 2 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415)398-7101 Fax: (415)398-7141 Website: http://www.dorsetcapital.com

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Gatx Capital Four Embarcadero Center, Ste. 2200 San Francisco, CA 94904 (415)955-3200 Fax: (415)955-3449 IMinds 135 Main St., Ste. 1350 San Francisco, CA 94105 (415)547-0000 Fax: (415)227-0300 Website: http://www.iminds.com LF International Inc. 360 Post St., Ste. 705 San Francisco, CA 94108 (415)399-0110 Fax: (415)399-9222 Website: http://www.lfvc.com Newbury Ventures 535 Pacific Ave., 2nd Fl. San Francisco, CA 94133 (415)296-7408 Fax: (415)296-7416 Website: http://www.newburyven.com Quest Ventures (San Francisco) 333 Bush St., Ste. 1750 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)782-1414 Fax: (415)782-1415 Robertson-Stephens Co. 555 California St., Ste. 2600 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)781-9700 Fax: (415)781-2556 Website: http://www.omegaad ventures.com Rosewood Capital, L.P. One Maritime Plaza, Ste. 1330 San Francisco, CA 94111-3503 (415)362-5526 Fax: (415)362-1192 Website: http://www.rosewoodvc.com Ticonderoga Capital Inc. 555 California St., No. 4950 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415)296-7900 Fax: (415)296-8956 21st Century Internet Venture Partners Two South Park 2nd Floor San Francisco, CA 94107 (415)512-1221 Fax: (415)512-2650 Website: http://www.21vc.com VK Ventures 600 California St., Ste.1700 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415)391-5600 Fax: (415)397-2744 Walden Group of Venture Capital Funds 750 Battery St., Seventh Floor San Francisco, CA 94111 (415)391-7225 Fax: (415)391-7262 Acer Technology Ventures 2641 Orchard Pkwy. San Jose, CA 95134 (408)433-4945 Fax: (408)433-5230 Authosis 226 Airport Pkwy., Ste. 405 San Jose, CA 95110 (650)814-3603 Website: http://www.authosis.com Western Technology Investment 2010 N. First St., Ste. 310 San Jose, CA 95131 (408)436-8577 Fax: (408)436-8625 E-mail: mktg@westerntech.com Drysdale Enterprises 177 Bovet Rd., Ste. 600 San Mateo, CA 94402 (650)341-6336 Fax: (650)341-1329 E-mail: drysdale@aol.com Greylock 2929 Campus Dr., Ste. 400 San Mateo, CA 94401 (650)493-5525 Fax: (650)493-5575 Website: http://www.greylock.com Technology Funding 2000 Alameda de las Pulgas, Ste. 250 San Mateo, CA 94403 (415)345-2200 Fax: (415)345-1797 2M Invest Inc. 1875 S. Grant St. Suite 750 San Mateo, CA 94402 (650)655-3765 Fax: (650)372-9107 E-mail: 2minfo@2minvest.com Website: http://www.2minvest.com Phoenix Growth Capital Corp. 2401 Kerner Blvd. San Rafael, CA 94901 (415)485-4569 Fax: (415)485-4663 NextGen Partners LLC 1705 East Valley Rd. Santa Barbara, CA 93108 (805)969-8540 Fax: (805)969-8542 Website: http://www.nextgen partners.com Denali Venture Capital 1925 Woodland Ave. Santa Clara, CA 95050 (408)690-4838 Fax: (408)247-6979 E-mail: wael@denaliventurecapital.com Website: http://www.denali venturecapital.com Dotcom Ventures LP 3945 Freedom Circle, Ste. 740 Santa Clara, CA 95045 (408)919-9855 Fax: (408)919-9857 Website: http://www.dotcom venturesatl.com Silicon Valley Bank 3003 Tasman Santa Clara, CA 95054 (408)654-7400 Fax: (408)727-8728 Al Shugart International 920 41st Ave. Santa Cruz, CA 95062 (831)479-7852 Fax: (831)479-7852 Website: http://www.alshugart.com Leonard Mautner Associates 1434 Sixth St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (213)393-9788 Fax: (310)459-9918 Palomar Ventures 100 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 450 Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310)260-6050 Fax: (310)656-4150 Website: http://www.palomar ventures.com Medicus Venture Partners 12930 Saratoga Ave., Ste. D8 Saratoga, CA 95070

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(408)447-8600 Fax: (408)447-8599 Website: http://www.medicusvc.com Redleaf Venture Management 14395 Saratoga Ave., Ste. 130 Saratoga, CA 95070 (408)868-0800 Fax: (408)868-0810 E-mail: nancy@redleaf.com Website: http://www.redleaf.com Artemis Ventures 207 Second St., Ste. E 3rd Fl. Sausalito, CA 94965 (415)289-2500 Fax: (415)289-1789 Website: http://www.artemisventures.com Deucalion Venture Partners 19501 Brooklime Sonoma, CA 95476 (707)938-4974 Fax: (707)938-8921 Windward Ventures PO Box 7688 Thousand Oaks, CA 91359-7688 (805)497-3332 Fax: (805)497-9331 National Investment Management, Inc. 2601 Airport Dr., Ste.210 Torrance, CA 90505 (310)784-7600 Fax: (310)784-7605 Southern California Ventures 406 Amapola Ave. Ste. 125 Torrance, CA 90501 (310)787-4381 Fax: (310)787-4382 Sandton Financial Group 21550 Oxnard St., Ste. 300 Woodland Hills, CA 91367 (818)702-9283 Woodside Fund 850 Woodside Dr. Woodside, CA 94062 (650)368-5545 Fax: (650)368-2416 Website: http://www.woodsidefund.com (303)440-4055 Fax: (303)440-4636 Dean & Associates 4362 Apple Way Boulder, CO 80301 Fax: (303)473-9900 Roser Ventures LLC 1105 Spruce St. Boulder, CO 80302 (303)443-6436 Fax: (303)443-1885 Website: http://www.roserventures.com Sequel Venture Partners 4430 Arapahoe Ave., Ste. 220 Boulder, CO 80303 (303)546-0400 Fax: (303)546-9728 E-mail: tom@sequelvc.com Website: http://www.sequelvc.com New Venture Resources 445C E. Cheyenne Mtn. Blvd. Colorado Springs, CO 80906-4570 (719)598-9272 Fax: (719)598-9272 The Centennial Funds 1428 15th St. Denver, CO 80202-1318 (303)405-7500 Fax: (303)405-7575 Website: http://www.centennial.com Rocky Mountain Capital Partners 1125 17th St., Ste. 2260 Denver, CO 80202 (303)291-5200 Fax: (303)291-5327 Sandlot Capital LLC 600 South Cherry St., Ste. 525 Denver, CO 80246 (303)893-3400 Fax: (303)893-3403 Website: http://www.sandlotcapital.com Wolf Ventures 50 South Steele St., Ste. 777 Denver, CO 80209 (303)321-4800 Fax: (303)321-4848 E-mail: businessplan@wolf ventures.com Website: http://www.wolfventures.com The Columbine Venture Funds 5460 S. Quebec St., Ste. 270 Englewood, CO 80111 (303)694-3222 Fax: (303)694-9007 Investment Securities of Colorado, Inc. 4605 Denice Dr. Englewood, CO 80111 (303)796-9192 Kinship Partners 6300 S. Syracuse Way, Ste. 484 Englewood, CO 80111 (303)694-0268 Fax: (303)694-1707 E-mail: block@vailsys.com Boranco Management, L.L.C. 1528 Hillside Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80524-1969 (970)221-2297 Fax: (970)221-4787 Aweida Ventures 890 West Cherry St., Ste. 220 Louisville, CO 80027 (303)664-9520 Fax: (303)664-9530 Website: http://www.aweida.com Access Venture Partners 8787 Turnpike Dr., Ste. 260 Westminster, CO 80030 (303)426-8899 Fax: (303)426-8828 Medmax Ventures LP 1 Northwestern Dr., Ste. 203 Bloomfield, CT 06002 (860)286-2960 Fax: (860)286-9960 James B. Kobak & Co. Four Mansfield Place Darien, CT 06820 (203)656-3471 Fax: (203)655-2905 Orien Ventures 1 Post Rd. Fairfield, CT 06430 (203)259-9933 Fax: (203)259-5288 ABP Acquisition Corporation 115 Maple Ave. Greenwich, CT 06830 (203)625-8287 Fax: (203)447-6187 Catterton Partners 9 Greenwich Office Park Greenwich, CT 06830 (203)629-4901 Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Colorado
Colorado Venture Management Ste. 300 Boulder, CO 80301

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Fax: (203)629-4903 Website: http://www.cpequity.com Consumer Venture Partners 3 Pickwick Plz. Greenwich, CT 06830 (203)629-8800 Fax: (203)629-2019 Insurance Venture Partners 31 Brookside Dr., Ste. 211 Greenwich, CT 06830 (203)861-0030 Fax: (203)861-2745 The NTC Group Three Pickwick Plaza Ste. 200 Greenwich, CT 06830 (203)862-2800 Fax: (203)622-6538 Regulus International Capital Co., Inc. 140 Greenwich Ave. Greenwich, CT 06830 (203)625-9700 Fax: (203)625-9706 Axiom Venture Partners City Place II 185 Asylum St., 17th Fl. Hartford, CT 06103 (860)548-7799 Fax: (860)548-7797 Website: http://www.axiomventures.com Conning Capital Partners City Place II 185 Asylum St. Hartford, CT 06103-4105 (860)520-1289 Fax: (860)520-1299 E-mail: pe@conning.com Website: http://www.conning.com First New England Capital L.P. 100 Pearl St. Hartford, CT 06103 (860)293-3333 Fax: (860)293-3338 E-mail: info@firstnewenglandcapital.com Website: http://www.firstnewengland capital.com Northeast Ventures One State St., Ste. 1720 Hartford, CT 06103 (860)547-1414 Fax: (860)246-8755 Windward Holdings 38 Sylvan Rd. Madison, CT 06443 (203)245-6870 Fax: (203)245-6865 Advanced Materials Partners, Inc. 45 Pine St. PO Box 1022 New Canaan, CT 06840 (203)966-6415 Fax: (203)966-8448 E-mail: wkb@amplink.com RFE Investment Partners 36 Grove St. New Canaan, CT 06840 (203)966-2800 Fax: (203)966-3109 Website: http://www.rfeip.com Connecticut Innovations, Inc. 999 West St. Rocky Hill, CT 06067 (860)563-5851 Fax: (860)563-4877 E-mail: pamela.hartley@ctin novations.com Website: http://www.ctinnovations.com Canaan Partners 105 Rowayton Ave. Rowayton, CT 06853 (203)855-0400 Fax: (203)854-9117 Website: http://www.canaan.com Landmark Partners, Inc. 10 Mill Pond Ln. Simsbury, CT 06070 (860)651-9760 Fax: (860)651-8890 Website: http:// www.landmarkpartners.com Sweeney & Company PO Box 567 Southport, CT 06490 (203)255-0220 Fax: (203)255-0220 E-mail: sweeney@connix.com Baxter Associates, Inc. PO Box 1333 Stamford, CT 06904 (203)323-3143 Fax: (203)348-0622 Beacon Partners Inc. 6 Landmark Sq., 4th Fl. Stamford, CT 06901-2792 (203)359-5776 Fax: (203)359-5876 Collinson, Howe, and Lennox, LLC 1055 Washington Blvd., 5th Fl. Stamford, CT 06901 (203)324-7700 Fax: (203)324-3636 E-mail: info@chlmedical.com Website: http://www.chlmedical.com Prime Capital Management Co. 550 West Ave. Stamford, CT 06902 (203)964-0642 Fax: (203)964-0862 Saugatuck Capital Co. 1 Canterbury Green Stamford, CT 06901 (203)348-6669 Fax: (203)324-6995 Website: http://www.sauga tuckcapital.com Soundview Financial Group Inc. 22 Gatehouse Rd. Stamford, CT 06902 (203)462-7200 Fax: (203)462-7350 Website: http://www.sndv.com TSG Ventures, L.L.C. 177 Broad St., 12th Fl. Stamford, CT 06901 (203)406-1500 Fax: (203)406-1590 Whitney & Company 177 Broad St. Stamford, CT 06901 (203)973-1400 Fax: (203)973-1422 Website: http://www.jhwhitney.com Cullinane & Donnelly Venture Partners L.P. 970 Farmington Ave. West Hartford, CT 06107 (860)521-7811 The Crestview Investment and Financial Group 431 Post Rd. E, Ste. 1 Westport, CT 06880-4403 (203)222-0333 Fax: (203)222-0000 Marketcorp Venture Associates, L.P. (MCV) 274 Riverside Ave. Westport, CT 06880

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(203)222-3030 Fax: (203)222-3033 Oak Investment Partners (Westport) 1 Gorham Island Westport, CT 06880 (203)226-8346 Fax: (203)227-0372 Website: http://www.oakinv.com Oxford Bioscience Partners 315 Post Rd. W Westport, CT 06880-5200 (203)341-3300 Fax: (203)341-3309 Website: http://www.oxbio.com Prince Ventures (Westport) 25 Ford Rd. Westport, CT 06880 (203)227-8332 Fax: (203)226-5302 LTI Venture Leasing Corp. 221 Danbury Rd. Wilton, CT 06897 (203)563-1100 Fax: (203)563-1111 Website: http://www.ltileasing.com Core Capital Partners 901 15th St., NW 9th Fl. Washington, DC 20005 (202)589-0090 Fax: (202)589-0091 Website: http://www.core-capital.com Next Point Partners 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Ste. 900 Washington, DC 20004 (202)661-8703 Fax: (202)434-7400 E-mail: mf@nextpoint.vc Website: http://www.nextpointvc.com Telecommunications Development Fund 2020 K. St. NW Ste. 375 Washington, DC 20006 (202)293-8840 Fax: (202)293-8850 Website: http://www.tdfund.com Wachtel & Co., Inc. 1101 4th St. NW Washington, DC 20005-5680 (202)898-1144 Winslow Partners LLC 1300 Connecticut Ave. NW Washington, DC 20036-1703 (202)530-5000 Fax: (202)530-5010 E-mail: winslow@winslowpartners.com Women’s Growth Capital Fund 1054 31st St., NW Ste. 110 Washington, DC 20007 (202)342-1431 Fax: (202)341-1203 Website: http://www.wgcf.com Sigma Capital Corp. 22668 Caravelle Circle Boca Raton, FL 33433 (561)368-9783 North American Business Development Co., L.L.C. 111 East Las Olas Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301 (305)463-0681 Fax: (305)527-0904 Website: http:// www.northamericanfund.com Chartwell Capital Management Co. Inc. 1 Independent Dr., Ste. 3120 Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904)355-3519 Fax: (904)353-5833 E-mail: info@chartwellcap.com CEO Advisors 1061 Maitland Center Commons Ste. 209 Maitland, FL 32751 (407)660-9327 Fax: (407)660-2109 Henry & Co. 8201 Peters Rd., Ste. 1000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954)797-7400 Avery Business Development Services 2506 St. Michel Ct. Ponte Vedra, FL 32082 (904)285-6033 New South Ventures 5053 Ocean Blvd. Sarasota, FL 34242 (941)358-6000 Fax: (941)358-6078 Website: http://www.newsouth ventures.com Venture Capital Management Corp. PO Box 2626 Satellite Beach, FL 32937 (407)777-1969 Florida Capital Venture Ltd. 325 Florida Bank Plaza 100 W. Kennedy Blvd. Tampa, FL 33602 (813)229-2294 Fax: (813)229-2028 Quantum Capital Partners 339 South Plant Ave. Tampa, FL 33606 (813)250-1999 Fax: (813)250-1998 Website: http://www.quantum capitalpartners.com South Atlantic Venture Fund 614 W. Bay St. Tampa, FL 33606-2704 (813)253-2500 Fax: (813)253-2360 E-mail: venture@southatlantic.com Website: http://www.southatlantic.com LM Capital Corp. 120 S. Olive, Ste. 400 West Palm Beach, FL 33401

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Delaware
Blue Rock Capital 5803 Kennett Pike, Ste. A Wilmington, DE 19807 (302)426-0981 Fax: (302)426-0982 Website: http://www.bluerockcapital.com

District of Columbia
Allied Capital Corp. 1919 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, DC 20006-3434 (202)331-2444 Fax: (202)659-2053 Website: http://www.alliedcapital.com Atlantic Coastal Ventures, L.P. 3101 South St. NW Washington, DC 20007 (202)293-1166 Fax: (202)293-1181 Website: http://www.atlanticcv.com Columbia Capital Group, Inc. 1660 L St. NW, Ste. 308 Washington, DC 20036 (202)775-8815 Fax: (202)223-0544

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(561)833-9700 Fax: (561)655-6587 Website: http://www.lmcapital securities.com (404)237-6222 Fax: (404)261-1578 Five Paces 3400 Peachtree Rd., Ste. 200 Atlanta, GA 30326 (404)439-8300 Fax: (404)439-8301 Website: http://www.fivepaces.com Frontline Capital, Inc. 3475 Lenox Rd., Ste. 400 Atlanta, GA 30326 (404)240-7280 Fax: (404)240-7281 Fuqua Ventures LLC 1201 W. Peachtree St. NW, Ste. 5000 Atlanta, GA 30309 (404)815-4500 Fax: (404)815-4528 Website: http://www.fuquaventures.com Noro-Moseley Partners 4200 Northside Pkwy., Bldg. 9 Atlanta, GA 30327 (404)233-1966 Fax: (404)239-9280 Website: http://www.noro-moseley.com Renaissance Capital Corp. 34 Peachtree St. NW, Ste. 2230 Atlanta, GA 30303 (404)658-9061 Fax: (404)658-9064 River Capital, Inc. Two Midtown Plaza 1360 Peachtree St. NE, Ste. 1430 Atlanta, GA 30309 (404)873-2166 Fax: (404)873-2158 State Street Bank & Trust Co. 3414 Peachtree Rd. NE, Ste. 1010 Atlanta, GA 30326 (404)364-9500 Fax: (404)261-4469 UPS Strategic Enterprise Fund 55 Glenlake Pkwy. NE Atlanta, GA 30328 (404)828-8814 Fax: (404)828-8088 E-mail: jcacyce@ups.com Website: http://www.ups.com/sef/ sef_home Wachovia 191 Peachtree St. NE, 26th Fl. Atlanta, GA 30303 (404)332-1000 Fax: (404)332-1392 Website: http://www.wachovia.com/wca Brainworks Ventures 4243 Dunwoody Club Dr. Chamblee, GA 30341 (770)239-7447 First Growth Capital Inc. Best Western Plaza, Ste. 105 PO Box 815 Forsyth, GA 31029 (912)781-7131 Financial Capital Resources, Inc. 21 Eastbrook Bend, Ste. 116 Peachtree City, GA 30269 (404)487-6650

Georgia
Venture First Associates 4811 Thornwood Dr. Acworth, GA 30102 (770)928-3733 Fax: (770)928-6455 Alliance Technology Ventures 8995 Westside Pkwy., Ste. 200 Alpharetta, GA 30004 (678)336-2000 Fax: (678)336-2001 E-mail: info@atv.com Website: http://www.atv.com Cordova Ventures 2500 North Winds Pkwy., Ste. 475 Alpharetta, GA 30004 (678)942-0300 Fax: (678)942-0301 Website: http://www.cordovaventures. com Advanced Technology Development Fund 1000 Abernathy, Ste. 1420 Atlanta, GA 30328-5614 (404)668-2333 Fax: (404)668-2333 CGW Southeast Partners 12 Piedmont Center, Ste. 210 Atlanta, GA 30305 (404)816-3255 Fax: (404)816-3258 Website: http://www.cgwlp.com Cyberstarts 1900 Emery St., NW 3rd Fl. Atlanta, GA 30318 (404)267-5000 Fax: (404)267-5200 Website: http://www.cyberstarts.com EGL Holdings, Inc. 10 Piedmont Center, Ste. 412 Atlanta, GA 30305 (404)949-8300 Fax: (404)949-8311 Equity South 1790 The Lenox Bldg. 3399 Peachtree Rd. NE Atlanta, GA 30326

Hawaii
HMS Hawaii Management Partners Davies Pacific Center 841 Bishop St., Ste. 860 Honolulu, HI 96813 (808)545-3755 Fax: (808)531-2611

Idaho
Sun Valley Ventures 160 Second St. Ketchum, ID 83340 (208)726-5005 Fax: (208)726-5094

Illinois
Open Prairie Ventures 115 N. Neil St., Ste. 209 Champaign, IL 61820 (217)351-7000 Fax: (217)351-7051 E-mail: inquire@openprairie.com Website: http://www.openprairie.com ABN AMRO Private Equity 208 S. La Salle St., 10th Fl. Chicago, IL 60604 (312)855-7079 Fax: (312)553-6648 Website: http://www.abnequity.com Alpha Capital Partners, Ltd. 122 S. Michigan Ave., Ste. 1700 Chicago, IL 60603 (312)322-9800 Fax: (312)322-9808 E-mail: acp@alphacapital.com

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Ameritech Development Corp. 30 S. Wacker Dr., 37th Fl. Chicago, IL 60606 (312)750-5083 Fax: (312)609-0244 Apex Investment Partners 225 W. Washington, Ste. 1450 Chicago, IL 60606 (312)857-2800 Fax: (312)857-1800 E-mail: apex@apexvc.com Website: http://www.apexvc.com Arch Venture Partners 8725 W. Higgins Rd., Ste. 290 Chicago, IL 60631 (773)380-6600 Fax: (773)380-6606 Website: http://www.archventure.com The Bank Funds 208 South LaSalle St., Ste. 1680 Chicago, IL 60604 (312)855-6020 Fax: (312)855-8910 Batterson Venture Partners 303 W. Madison St., Ste. 1110 Chicago, IL 60606-3309 (312)269-0300 Fax: (312)269-0021 Website: http://www.battersonvp.com William Blair Capital Partners, L.L.C. 222 W. Adams St., Ste. 1300 Chicago, IL 60606 (312)364-8250 Fax: (312)236-1042 E-mail: privateequity@wmblair.com Website: http://www.wmblair.com Bluestar Ventures 208 South LaSalle St., Ste. 1020 Chicago, IL 60604 (312)384-5000 Fax: (312)384-5005 Website: http://www.bluestarventures.com The Capital Strategy Management Co. 233 S. Wacker Dr. Box 06334 Chicago, IL 60606 (312)444-1170 DN Partners 77 West Wacker Dr., Ste. 4550 Chicago, IL 60601 (312)332-7960 Fax: (312)332-7979 Dresner Capital Inc. 29 South LaSalle St., Ste. 310 Chicago, IL 60603 (312)726-3600 Fax: (312)726-7448 Eblast Ventures LLC 11 South LaSalle St., 5th Fl. Chicago, IL 60603 (312)372-2600 Fax: (312)372-5621 Website: http://www.eblastventures.com Essex Woodlands Health Ventures, L.P. 190 S. LaSalle St., Ste. 2800 Chicago, IL 60603 (312)444-6040 Fax: (312)444-6034 Website: http://www.essexwood lands.com First Analysis Venture Capital 233 S. Wacker Dr., Ste. 9500 Chicago, IL 60606 (312)258-1400 Fax: (312)258-0334 Website: http://www.firstanalysis.com Frontenac Co. 135 S. LaSalle St., Ste.3800 Chicago, IL 60603 (312)368-0044 Fax: (312)368-9520 Website: http://www.frontenac.com GTCR Golder Rauner, LLC 6100 Sears Tower Chicago, IL 60606 (312)382-2200 Fax: (312)382-2201 Website: http://www.gtcr.com High Street Capital LLC 311 South Wacker Dr., Ste. 4550 Chicago, IL 60606 (312)697-4990 Fax: (312)697-4994 Website: http://www.highstr.com IEG Venture Management, Inc. 70 West Madison Chicago, IL 60602 (312)644-0890 Fax: (312)454-0369 Website: http://www.iegventure.com JK&B Capital 180 North Stetson, Ste. 4500 Chicago, IL 60601 (312)946-1200 Fax: (312)946-1103 E-mail: gspencer@jkbcapital.com Website: http://www.jkbcapital.com Kettle Partners L.P. 350 W. Hubbard, Ste. 350 Chicago, IL 60610 (312)329-9300 Fax: (312)527-4519 Website: http://www.kettlevc.com Lake Shore Capital Partners 20 N. Wacker Dr., Ste. 2807 Chicago, IL 60606 (312)803-3536 Fax: (312)803-3534 LaSalle Capital Group Inc. 70 W. Madison St., Ste. 5710 Chicago, IL 60602 (312)236-7041 Fax: (312)236-0720 Linc Capital, Inc. 303 E. Wacker Pkwy., Ste. 1000 Chicago, IL 60601 (312)946-2670 Fax: (312)938-4290 E-mail: bdemars@linccap.com Madison Dearborn Partners, Inc. 3 First National Plz., Ste. 3800 Chicago, IL 60602 (312)895-1000 Fax: (312)895-1001 E-mail: invest@mdcp.com Website: http://www.mdcp.com Mesirow Private Equity Investments Inc. 350 N. Clark St. Chicago, IL 60610 (312)595-6950 Fax: (312)595-6211 Website: http://www.meisrow financial.com Mosaix Ventures LLC 1822 North Mohawk Chicago, IL 60614 (312)274-0988 Fax: (312)274-0989 Website: http://www.mosaix ventures.com Nesbitt Burns 111 West Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60603 (312)416-3855 Fax: (312)765-8000 Website: http://www.harrisbank.com

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Polestar Capital, Inc. 180 N. Michigan Ave., Ste. 1905 Chicago, IL 60601 (312)984-9090 Fax: (312)984-9877 E-mail: wl@polestarvc.com Website: http://www.polestarvc.com Prince Ventures (Chicago) 10 S. Wacker Dr., Ste. 2575 Chicago, IL 60606-7407 (312)454-1408 Fax: (312)454-9125 Prism Capital 444 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 60611 (312)464-7900 Fax: (312)464-7915 Website: http://www.prismfund.com Third Coast Capital 900 N. Franklin St., Ste. 700 Chicago, IL 60610 (312)337-3303 Fax: (312)337-2567 E-mail: manic@earthlink.com Website: http://www.third coastcapital.com Thoma Cressey Equity Partners 4460 Sears Tower, 92nd Fl. 233 S. Wacker Dr. Chicago, IL 60606 (312)777-4444 Fax: (312)777-4445 Website: http://www.thomacressey.com Tribune Ventures 435 N. Michigan Ave., Ste. 600 Chicago, IL 60611 (312)527-8797 Fax: (312)222-5993 Website: http://www.tribuneventures.com Wind Point Partners (Chicago) 676 N. Michigan Ave., Ste. 330 Chicago, IL 60611 (312)649-4000 Website: http://www.wppartners.com Marquette Venture Partners 520 Lake Cook Rd., Ste. 450 Deerfield, IL 60015 (847)940-1700 Fax: (847)940-1724 Website: http://www.marquette ventures.com Duchossois Investments Limited, LLC 845 Larch Ave. Elmhurst, IL 60126 (630)530-6105 Fax: (630)993-8644 Website: http://www.duchtec.com Evanston Business Investment Corp. 1840 Oak Ave. Evanston, IL 60201 (847)866-1840 Fax: (847)866-1808 E-mail: t-parkinson@nwu.com Website: http://www.ebic.com Inroads Capital Partners L.P. 1603 Orrington Ave., Ste. 2050 Evanston, IL 60201-3841 (847)864-2000 Fax: (847)864-9692 The Cerulean Fund/WGC Enterprises 1701 E. Lake Ave., Ste. 170 Glenview, IL 60025 (847)657-8002 Fax: (847)657-8168 Ventana Financial Resources, Inc. 249 Market Sq. Lake Forest, IL 60045 (847)234-3434 Beecken, Petty & Co. 901 Warrenville Rd., Ste. 205 Lisle, IL 60532 (630)435-0300 Fax: (630)435-0370 E-mail: hep@bpcompany.com Website: http://www.bpcompany.com Allstate Private Equity 3075 Sanders Rd., Ste. G5D Northbrook, IL 60062-7127 (847)402-8247 Fax: (847)402-0880 KB Partners 1101 Skokie Blvd., Ste. 260 Northbrook, IL 60062-2856 (847)714-0444 Fax: (847)714-0445 E-mail: keith@kbpartners.com Website: http://www.kbpartners.com Transcap Associates Inc. 900 Skokie Blvd., Ste. 210 Northbrook, IL 60062 (847)753-9600 Fax: (847)753-9090 Graystone Venture Partners, L.L.C. / Portage Venture Partners One Northfield Plaza, Ste. 530 Northfield, IL 60093 (847)446-9460 Fax: (847)446-9470 Website: http://www.portage ventures.com Motorola Inc. 1303 E. Algonquin Rd. Schaumburg, IL 60196-1065 (847)576-4929 Fax: (847)538-2250 Website: http://www.mot.com/mne

Indiana
Irwin Ventures LLC 500 Washington St. Columbus, IN 47202 (812)373-1434 Fax: (812)376-1709 Website: http://www.irwinventures.com Cambridge Venture Partners 4181 East 96th St., Ste. 200 Indianapolis, IN 46240 (317)814-6192 Fax: (317)944-9815 CID Equity Partners One American Square, Ste. 2850 Box 82074 Indianapolis, IN 46282 (317)269-2350 Fax: (317)269-2355 Website: http://www.cidequity.com Gazelle Techventures 6325 Digital Way, Ste. 460 Indianapolis, IN 46278 (317)275-6800 Fax: (317)275-1101 Website: http://www.gazellevc.com Monument Advisors Inc. Bank One Center/Circle 111 Monument Circle, Ste. 600 Indianapolis, IN 46204-5172 (317)656-5065 Fax: (317)656-5060 Website: http://www.monumentadv.com MWV Capital Partners 201 N. Illinois St., Ste. 300 Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317)237-2323 Fax: (317)237-2325 Website: http://www.mwvcapital.com First Source Capital Corp. 100 North Michigan St. PO Box 1602 South Bend, IN 46601

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(219)235-2180 Fax: (219)235-2227 E-mail: ktec@ktec.com Website: http://www.ktec.com (207)780-0904 Fax: (207)780-0913

Iowa
Allsop Venture Partners 118 Third Ave. SE, Ste. 837 Cedar Rapids, IA 52401 (319)368-6675 Fax: (319)363-9515 InvestAmerica Investment Advisors, Inc. 101 2nd St. SE, Ste. 800 Cedar Rapids, IA 52401 (319)363-8249 Fax: (319)363-9683 Pappajohn Capital Resources 2116 Financial Center Des Moines, IA 50309 (515)244-5746 Fax: (515)244-2346 Website: http://www.pappajohn.com Berthel Fisher & Company Planning Inc. 701 Tama St. PO Box 609 Marion, IA 52302 (319)497-5700 Fax: (319)497-4244

Kentucky
Kentucky Highlands Investment Corp. 362 Old Whitley Rd. London, KY 40741 (606)864-5175 Fax: (606)864-5194 Website: http://www.khic.org Chrysalis Ventures, L.L.C. 1850 National City Tower Louisville, KY 40202 (502)583-7644 Fax: (502)583-7648 E-mail: bobsany@chrysalisventures.com Website: http://www.chrysalis ventures.com Humana Venture Capital 500 West Main St. Louisville, KY 40202 (502)580-3922 Fax: (502)580-2051 E-mail: gemont@humana.com George Emont, Director Summit Capital Group, Inc. 6510 Glenridge Park Pl., Ste. 8 Louisville, KY 40222 (502)332-2700

Maryland
Annapolis Ventures LLC 151 West St., Ste. 302 Annapolis, MD 21401 (443)482-9555 Fax: (443)482-9565 Website: http://www.annapolis ventures.com Delmag Ventures 220 Wardour Dr. Annapolis, MD 21401 (410)267-8196 Fax: (410)267-8017 Website: http://www.delmag ventures.com Abell Venture Fund 111 S. Calvert St., Ste. 2300 Baltimore, MD 21202 (410)547-1300 Fax: (410)539-6579 Website: http://www.abell.org ABS Ventures (Baltimore) 1 South St., Ste. 2150 Baltimore, MD 21202 (410)895-3895 Fax: (410)895-3899 Website: http://www.absventures.com Anthem Capital, L.P. 16 S. Calvert St., Ste. 800 Baltimore, MD 21202-1305 (410)625-1510 Fax: (410)625-1735 Website: http://www.anthemcapital.com Catalyst Ventures 1119 St. Paul St. Baltimore, MD 21202 (410)244-0123 Fax: (410)752-7721 Maryland Venture Capital Trust 217 E. Redwood St., Ste. 2200 Baltimore, MD 21202 (410)767-6361 Fax: (410)333-6931 New Enterprise Associates (Baltimore) 1119 St. Paul St. Baltimore, MD 21202 (410)244-0115 Fax: (410)752-7721 Website: http://www.nea.com

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Kansas
Enterprise Merchant Bank 7400 West 110th St., Ste. 560 Overland Park, KS 66210 (913)327-8500 Fax: (913)327-8505 Kansas Venture Capital, Inc. (Overland Park) 6700 Antioch Plz., Ste. 460 Overland Park, KS 66204 (913)262-7117 Fax: (913)262-3509 E-mail: jdalton@kvci.com Child Health Investment Corp. 6803 W. 64th St., Ste. 208 Shawnee Mission, KS 66202 (913)262-1436 Fax: (913)262-1575 Website: http://www.chca.com Kansas Technology Enterprise Corp. 214 SW 6th, 1st Fl. Topeka, KS 66603-3719 (785)296-5272 Fax: (785)296-1160

Louisiana
Bank One Equity Investors, Inc. 451 Florida St. Baton Rouge, LA 70801 (504)332-4421 Fax: (504)332-7377 Advantage Capital Partners LLE Tower 909 Poydras St., Ste. 2230 New Orleans, LA 70112 (504)522-4850 Fax: (504)522-4950 Website: http://www.advantagecap.com

Maine
CEI Ventures / Coastal Ventures LP 2 Portland Fish Pier, Ste. 201 Portland, ME 04101 (207)772-5356 Fax: (207)772-5503 Website: http://www.ceiventures.com Commwealth Bioventures, Inc. 4 Milk St. Portland, ME 04101

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T. Rowe Price Threshold Partnerships 100 E. Pratt St., 8th Fl. Baltimore, MD 21202 (410)345-2000 Fax: (410)345-2800 Spring Capital Partners 16 W. Madison St. Baltimore, MD 21201 (410)685-8000 Fax: (410)727-1436 E-mail: mailbox@springcap.com Arete Corporation 3 Bethesda Metro Ctr., Ste. 770 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301)657-6268 Fax: (301)657-6254 Website: http://www.aretemicrogen.com Embryon Capital 7903 Sleaford Place Bethesda, MD 20814 (301)656-6837 Fax: (301)656-8056 Potomac Ventures 7920 Norfolk Ave., Ste. 1100 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301)215-9240 Website: http://www.potomac ventures.com Toucan Capital Corp. 3 Bethesda Metro Center, Ste. 700 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301)961-1970 Fax: (301)961-1969 Website: http://www.toucancapital.com Kinetic Ventures LLC 2 Wisconsin Cir., Ste. 620 Chevy Chase, MD 20815 (301)652-8066 Fax: (301)652-8310 Website: http://www.kineticventures.com Boulder Ventures Ltd. 4750 Owings Mills Blvd. Owings Mills, MD 21117 (410)998-3114 Fax: (410)356-5492 Website: http://www.boulderventures.com Grotech Capital Group 9690 Deereco Rd., Ste. 800 Timonium, MD 21093 (410)560-2000 Fax: (410)560-1910 Website: http://www.grotech.com

Massachusetts
Adams, Harkness & Hill, Inc. 60 State St. Boston, MA 02109 (617)371-3900 Advent International 75 State St., 29th Fl. Boston, MA 02109 (617)951-9400 Fax: (617)951-0566 Website: http://www.adventiner national.com American Research and Development 30 Federal St. Boston, MA 02110-2508 (617)423-7500 Fax: (617)423-9655 Ascent Venture Partners 255 State St., 5th Fl. Boston, MA 02109 (617)270-9400 Fax: (617)270-9401 E-mail: info@ascentvp.com Website: http://www.ascentvp.com Atlas Venture 222 Berkeley St. Boston, MA 02116 (617)488-2200 Fax: (617)859-9292 Website: http://www.atlasventure.com Axxon Capital 28 State St., 37th Fl. Boston, MA 02109 (617)722-0980 Fax: (617)557-6014 Website: http://www.axxoncapital.com BancBoston Capital/BancBoston Ventures 175 Federal St., 10th Fl. Boston, MA 02110 (617)434-2509 Fax: (617)434-6175 Website: http:// www.bancbostoncapital.com Boston Capital Ventures Old City Hall 45 School St. Boston, MA 02108 (617)227-6550 Fax: (617)227-3847 E-mail: info@bcv.com Website: http://www.bcv.com

Boston Financial & Equity Corp. 20 Overland St. PO Box 15071 Boston, MA 02215 (617)267-2900 Fax: (617)437-7601 E-mail: debbie@bfec.com Boston Millennia Partners 30 Rowes Wharf Boston, MA 02110 (617)428-5150 Fax: (617)428-5160 Website: http://www.millennia partners.com Bristol Investment Trust 842A Beacon St. Boston, MA 02215-3199 (617)566-5212 Fax: (617)267-0932 Brook Venture Management LLC 50 Federal St., 5th Fl. Boston, MA 02110 (617)451-8989 Fax: (617)451-2369 Website: http://www.brookventure.com Burr, Egan, Deleage, and Co. (Boston) 200 Clarendon St., Ste. 3800 Boston, MA 02116 (617)262-7770 Fax: (617)262-9779 Cambridge/Samsung Partners One Exeter Plaza Ninth Fl. Boston, MA 02116 (617)262-4440 Fax: (617)262-5562 Chestnut Street Partners, Inc. 75 State St., Ste. 2500 Boston, MA 02109 (617)345-7220 Fax: (617)345-7201 E-mail: chestnut@chestnutp.com Claflin Capital Management, Inc. 10 Liberty Sq., Ste. 300 Boston, MA 02109 (617)426-6505 Fax: (617)482-0016 Website: http://www.claflincapital.com Copley Venture Partners 99 Summer St., Ste. 1720 Boston, MA 02110 (617)737-1253 Fax: (617)439-0699

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Corning Capital / Corning Technology Ventures 121 High Street, Ste. 400 Boston, MA 02110 (617)338-2656 Fax: (617)261-3864 Website: http://www.corningventures.com Downer & Co. 211 Congress St. Boston, MA 02110 (617)482-6200 Fax: (617)482-6201 E-mail: cdowner@downer.com Website: http://www.downer.com Fidelity Ventures 82 Devonshire St. Boston, MA 02109 (617)563-6370 Fax: (617)476-9023 Website: http://www.fidelityventures.com Greylock Management Corp. (Boston) 1 Federal St. Boston, MA 02110-2065 (617)423-5525 Fax: (617)482-0059 Gryphon Ventures 222 Berkeley St., Ste.1600 Boston, MA 02116 (617)267-9191 Fax: (617)267-4293 E-mail: all@gryphoninc.com Halpern, Denny & Co. 500 Boylston St. Boston, MA 02116 (617)536-6602 Fax: (617)536-8535 Harbourvest Partners, LLC 1 Financial Center, 44th Fl. Boston, MA 02111 (617)348-3707 Fax: (617)350-0305 Website: http://www.hvpllc.com Highland Capital Partners 2 International Pl. Boston, MA 02110 (617)981-1500 Fax: (617)531-1550 E-mail: info@hcp.com Website: http://www.hcp.com Lee Munder Venture Partners John Hancock Tower T-53 200 Clarendon St. Boston, MA 02103 (617)380-5600 Fax: (617)380-5601 Website: http://www.leemunder.com M/C Venture Partners 75 State St., Ste. 2500 Boston, MA 02109 (617)345-7200 Fax: (617)345-7201 Website: http://www.mcventure partners.com Massachusetts Capital Resources Co. 420 Boylston St. Boston, MA 02116 (617)536-3900 Fax: (617)536-7930 Massachusetts Technology Development Corp. (MTDC) 148 State St. Boston, MA 02109 (617)723-4920 Fax: (617)723-5983 E-mail: jhodgman@mtdc.com Website: http://www.mtdc.com New England Partners One Boston Place, Ste. 2100 Boston, MA 02108 (617)624-8400 Fax: (617)624-8999 Website: http://www.nepartners.com North Hill Ventures Ten Post Office Square 11th Fl. Boston, MA 02109 (617)788-2112 Fax: (617)788-2152 Website: http://www.northhill ventures.com OneLiberty Ventures 150 Cambridge Park Dr. Boston, MA 02140 (617)492-7280 Fax: (617)492-7290 Website: http://www.oneliberty.com Schroder Ventures Life Sciences 60 State St., Ste. 3650 Boston, MA 02109 (617)367-8100 Fax: (617)367-1590 Website: http://www.shroderventures.com Shawmut Capital Partners 75 Federal St., 18th Fl. Boston, MA 02110 (617)368-4900 Fax: (617)368-4910 Website: http://www.shawmutcapital.com Solstice Capital LLC 15 Broad St., 3rd Fl. Boston, MA 02109 (617)523-7733 Fax: (617)523-5827 E-mail: solticecapital@solcap.com Spectrum Equity Investors One International Pl., 29th Fl. Boston, MA 02110 (617)464-4600 Fax: (617)464-4601 Website: http://www.spectrumequity.com Spray Venture Partners One Walnut St. Boston, MA 02108 (617)305-4140 Fax: (617)305-4144 Website: http://www.sprayventure.com The Still River Fund 100 Federal St., 29th Fl. Boston, MA 02110 (617)348-2327 Fax: (617)348-2371 Website: http://www.stillriverfund.com Summit Partners 600 Atlantic Ave., Ste. 2800 Boston, MA 02210-2227 (617)824-1000 Fax: (617)824-1159 Website: http://www.summitpartners.com TA Associates, Inc. (Boston) High Street Tower 125 High St., Ste. 2500 Boston, MA 02110 (617)574-6700 Fax: (617)574-6728 Website: http://www.ta.com TVM Techno Venture Management 101 Arch St., Ste. 1950 Boston, MA 02110 (617)345-9320 Fax: (617)345-9377 E-mail: info@tvmvc.com Website: http://www.tvmvc.com UNC Ventures 64 Burough St. Boston, MA 02130-4017 (617)482-7070 Fax: (617)522-2176

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Venture Investment Management Company (VIMAC) 177 Milk St. Boston, MA 02190-3410 (617)292-3300 Fax: (617)292-7979 E-mail: bzeisig@vimac.com Website: http://www.vimac.com MDT Advisers, Inc. 125 Cambridge Park Dr. Cambridge, MA 02140-2314 (617)234-2200 Fax: (617)234-2210 Website: http://www.mdtai.com TTC Ventures One Main St., 6th Fl. Cambridge, MA 02142 (617)528-3137 Fax: (617)577-1715 E-mail: info@ttcventures.com Zero Stage Capital Co. Inc. 101 Main St., 17th Fl. Cambridge, MA 02142 (617)876-5355 Fax: (617)876-1248 Website: http://www.zerostage.com Atlantic Capital 164 Cushing Hwy. Cohasset, MA 02025 (617)383-9449 Fax: (617)383-6040 E-mail: info@atlanticcap.com Website: http://www.atlanticcap.com Seacoast Capital Partners 55 Ferncroft Rd. Danvers, MA 01923 (978)750-1300 Fax: (978)750-1301 E-mail: gdeli@seacoastcapital.com Website: http://www.seacoast capital.com Sage Management Group 44 South Street PO Box 2026 East Dennis, MA 02641 (508)385-7172 Fax: (508)385-7272 E-mail: sagemgt@capecod.net Applied Technology 1 Cranberry Hill Lexington, MA 02421-7397 (617)862-8622 Fax: (617)862-8367 Royalty Capital Management 5 Downing Rd. Lexington, MA 02421-6918 (781)861-8490 Argo Global Capital 210 Broadway, Ste. 101 Lynnfield, MA 01940 (781)592-5250 Fax: (781)592-5230 Website: http://www.gsmcapital.com Industry Ventures 6 Bayne Lane Newburyport, MA 01950 (978)499-7606 Fax: (978)499-0686 Website: http:// www.industryventures.com Softbank Capital Partners 10 Langley Rd., Ste. 202 Newton Center, MA 02459 (617)928-9300 Fax: (617)928-9305 E-mail: clax@bvc.com Advanced Technology Ventures (Boston) 281 Winter St., Ste. 350 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)290-0707 Fax: (781)684-0045 E-mail: info@atvcapital.com Website: http://www.atvcapital.com Castile Ventures 890 Winter St., Ste. 140 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)890-0060 Fax: (781)890-0065 Website: http://www.castileventures.com Charles River Ventures 1000 Winter St., Ste. 3300 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)487-7060 Fax: (781)487-7065 Website: http://www.crv.com Comdisco Venture Group (Waltham) Totton Pond Office Center 400-1 Totten Pond Rd. Waltham, MA 02451 (617)672-0250 Fax: (617)398-8099 Marconi Ventures 890 Winter St., Ste. 310 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)839-7177 Fax: (781)522-7477 Website: http://www.marconi.com Matrix Partners Bay Colony Corporate Center 1000 Winter St., Ste.4500 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)890-2244 Fax: (781)890-2288 Website: http://www.matrix partners.com North Bridge Venture Partners 950 Winter St. Ste. 4600 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)290-0004 Fax: (781)290-0999 E-mail: eta@nbvp.com Polaris Venture Partners Bay Colony Corporate Ctr. 1000 Winter St., Ste. 3500 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)290-0770 Fax: (781)290-0880 E-mail: partners@polarisventures.com Website: http://www.polar isventures.com Seaflower Ventures Bay Colony Corporate Ctr. 1000 Winter St. Ste. 1000 Waltham, MA 02451 (781)466-9552 Fax: (781)466-9553 E-mail: moot@seaflower.com Website: http://www.seaflower.com Ampersand Ventures 55 William St., Ste. 240 Wellesley, MA 02481 (617)239-0700 Fax: (617)239-0824 E-mail: info@ampersandventures.com Website: http://www.ampersand ventures.com Battery Ventures (Boston) 20 William St., Ste. 200 Wellesley, MA 02481 (781)577-1000 Fax: (781)577-1001 Website: http://www.battery.com Commonwealth Capital Ventures, L.P. 20 William St., Ste.225 Wellesley, MA 02481 (781)237-7373 Fax: (781)235-8627 Website: http://www.ccvlp.com

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Fowler, Anthony & Company 20 Walnut St. Wellesley, MA 02481 (781)237-4201 Fax: (781)237-7718 Gemini Investors 20 William St. Wellesley, MA 02481 (781)237-7001 Fax: (781)237-7233 Grove Street Advisors Inc. 20 William St., Ste. 230 Wellesley, MA 02481 (781)263-6100 Fax: (781)263-6101 Website: http://www.groves treetadvisors.com Mees Pierson Investeringsmaat B.V. 20 William St., Ste. 210 Wellesley, MA 02482 (781)239-7600 Fax: (781)239-0377 Norwest Equity Partners 40 William St., Ste. 305 Wellesley, MA 02481-3902 (781)237-5870 Fax: (781)237-6270 Website: http://www.norwestvp.com Bessemer Venture Partners (Wellesley Hills) 83 Walnut St. Wellesley Hills, MA 02481 (781)237-6050 Fax: (781)235-7576 E-mail: travis@bvpny.com Website: http://www.bvp.com Venture Capital Fund of New England 20 Walnut St., Ste. 120 Wellesley Hills, MA 02481-2175 (781)239-8262 Fax: (781)239-8263 Prism Venture Partners 100 Lowder Brook Dr., Ste. 2500 Westwood, MA 02090 (781)302-4000 Fax: (781)302-4040 E-mail: dwbaum@prismventure.com Palmer Partners LP 200 Unicorn Park Dr. Woburn, MA 01801 (781)933-5445 Fax: (781)933-0698

Michigan
Arbor Partners, L.L.C. 130 South First St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734)668-9000 Fax: (734)669-4195 Website: http://www.arborpartners.com EDF Ventures 425 N. Main St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734)663-3213 Fax: (734)663-7358 E-mail: edf@edfvc.com Website: http://www.edfvc.com White Pines Management, L.L.C. 2401 Plymouth Rd., Ste. B Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (734)747-9401 Fax: (734)747-9704 E-mail: ibund@whitepines.com Website: http://www.whitepines.com Wellmax, Inc. 3541 Bendway Blvd., Ste. 100 Bloomfield Hills, MI 48301 (248)646-3554 Fax: (248)646-6220 Venture Funding, Ltd. Fisher Bldg. 3011 West Grand Blvd., Ste. 321 Detroit, MI 48202 (313)871-3606 Fax: (313)873-4935 Investcare Partners L.P. / GMA Capital LLC 32330 W. Twelve Mile Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248)489-9000 Fax: (248)489-8819 E-mail: gma@gmacapital.com Website: http://www.gmacapital.com Liberty Bidco Investment Corp. 30833 Northwestern Highway, Ste. 211 Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248)626-6070 Fax: (248)626-6072 Seaflower Ventures 5170 Nicholson Rd. PO Box 474 Fowlerville, MI 48836 (517)223-3335 Fax: (517)223-3337 E-mail: gibbons@seaflower.com Website: http://www.seaflower.com

Ralph Wilson Equity Fund LLC 15400 E. Jefferson Ave. Gross Pointe Park, MI 48230 (313)821-9122 Fax: (313)821-9101 Website: http://www.Ralph WilsonEquityFund.com J. Skip Simms, President Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Minnesota
Development Corp. of Austin 1900 Eighth Ave., NW Austin, MN 55912 (507)433-0346 Fax: (507)433-0361 E-mail: dca@smig.net Website: http://www.spamtownusa.com Northeast Ventures Corp. 802 Alworth Bldg. Duluth, MN 55802 (218)722-9915 Fax: (218)722-9871 Medical Innovation Partners, Inc. 6450 City West Pkwy. Eden Prairie, MN 55344-3245 (612)828-9616 Fax: (612)828-9596 St. Paul Venture Capital, Inc. 10400 Vicking Dr., Ste. 550 Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (612)995-7474 Fax: (612)995-7475 Website: http://www.stpaulvc.com Cherry Tree Investments, Inc. 7601 France Ave. S, Ste. 150 Edina, MN 55435 (612)893-9012 Fax: (612)893-9036 Website: http://www.cherrytree.com Shared Ventures, Inc. 6550 York Ave. S Edina, MN 55435 (612)925-3411 Sherpa Partners LLC 5050 Lincoln Dr., Ste. 490 Edina, MN 55436 (952)942-1070 Fax: (952)942-1071 Website: http://www.sherpapartners.com Affinity Capital Management 901 Marquette Ave., Ste. 1810 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)252-9900

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Fax: (612)252-9911 Website: http://www.affinitycapital.com Artesian Capital 1700 Foshay Tower 821 Marquette Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)334-5600 Fax: (612)334-5601 E-mail: artesian@artesian.com Coral Ventures 60 S. 6th St., Ste. 3510 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)335-8666 Fax: (612)335-8668 Website: http://www.coralventures.com Crescendo Venture Management, L.L.C. 800 LaSalle Ave., Ste. 2250 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)607-2800 Fax: (612)607-2801 Website: http://www.crescendo ventures.com Gideon Hixon Venture 1900 Foshay Tower 821 Marquette Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)904-2314 Fax: (612)204-0913 Norwest Equity Partners 3600 IDS Center 80 S. 8th St. Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)215-1600 Fax: (612)215-1601 Website: http://www.norwestvp.com Oak Investment Partners (Minneapolis) 4550 Norwest Center 90 S. 7th St. Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)339-9322 Fax: (612)337-8017 Website: http://www.oakinv.com Pathfinder Venture Capital Funds (Minneapolis) 7300 Metro Blvd., Ste. 585 Minneapolis, MN 55439 (612)835-1121 Fax: (612)835-8389 E-mail: jahrens620@aol.com U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray Ventures, Inc. 800 Nicollet Mall, Ste. 800 Minneapolis, MN 55402 (612)303-5686 Fax: (612)303-1350 Website: http://www.paperjaffrey ventures.com The Food Fund, Ltd. Partnership 5720 Smatana Dr., Ste. 300 Minnetonka, MN 55343 (612)939-3950 Fax: (612)939-8106 Mayo Medical Ventures 200 First St. SW Rochester, MN 55905 (507)266-4586 Fax: (507)284-5410 Website: http://www.mayo.edu Website: http://www.gateway ventures.com Capital for Business, Inc. (St. Louis) 11 S. Meramac St., Ste. 1430 St. Louis, MO 63105 (314)746-7427 Fax: (314)746-8739 Website: http://www.capitalfor business.com Crown Capital Corp. 540 Maryville Centre Dr., Ste. 120 Saint Louis, MO 63141 (314)576-1201 Fax: (314)576-1525 Website: http://www.crowncap.com Gateway Associates L.P. 8000 Maryland Ave., Ste. 1190 St. Louis, MO 63105 (314)721-5707 Fax: (314)721-5135 Harbison Corp. 8112 Maryland Ave., Ste. 250 Saint Louis, MO 63105 (314)727-8200 Fax: (314)727-0249 Heartland Capital Fund, Ltd. PO Box 642117 Omaha, NE 68154 (402)778-5124 Fax: (402)445-2370 Website: http://www.heartland capitalfund.com Odin Capital Group 1625 Farnam St., Ste. 700 Omaha, NE 68102 (402)346-6200 Fax: (402)342-9311 Website: http://www.odincapital.com

Missouri
Bankers Capital Corp. 3100 Gillham Rd. Kansas City, MO 64109 (816)531-1600 Fax: (816)531-1334 Capital for Business, Inc. (Kansas City) 1000 Walnut St., 18th Fl. Kansas City, MO 64106 (816)234-2357 Fax: (816)234-2952 Website: http:// www.capitalforbusiness.com De Vries & Co. Inc. 800 West 47th St. Kansas City, MO 64112 (816)756-0055 Fax: (816)756-0061 InvestAmerica Venture Group Inc. (Kansas City) Commerce Tower 911 Main St., Ste. 2424 Kansas City, MO 64105 (816)842-0114 Fax: (816)471-7339 Kansas City Equity Partners 233 W. 47th St. Kansas City, MO 64112 (816)960-1771 Fax: (816)960-1777 Website: http://www.kcep.com Bome Investors, Inc. 8000 Maryland Ave., Ste. 1190 St. Louis, MO 63105 (314)721-5707 Fax: (314)721-5135

Nevada
Edge Capital Investment Co. LLC 1350 E. Flamingo Rd., Ste. 3000 Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702)438-3343 E-mail: info@edgecapital.net Website: http://www.edgecapital.net The Benefit Capital Companies Inc. PO Box 542 Logandale, NV 89021 (702)398-3222 Fax: (702)398-3700

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Millennium Three Venture Group LLC 6880 South McCarran Blvd., Ste. A-11 Reno, NV 89509 (775)954-2020 Fax: (775)954-2023 Website: http://www.m3vg.com (609)683-4500 Fax: (609)683-4880 Website: http://www.accel.com Cardinal Partners 221 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08542 (609)924-6452 Fax: (609)683-0174 Website: http://www.cardinal healthpartners.com Domain Associates L.L.C. One Palmer Sq., Ste. 515 Princeton, NJ 08542 (609)683-5656 Fax: (609)683-9789 Website: http://www.domainvc.com Johnston Associates, Inc. 181 Cherry Valley Rd. Princeton, NJ 08540 (609)924-3131 Fax: (609)683-7524 E-mail: jaincorp@aol.com Kemper Ventures Princeton Forrestal Village 155 Village Blvd. Princeton, NJ 08540 (609)936-3035 Fax: (609)936-3051 Penny Lane Parnters One Palmer Sq., Ste. 309 Princeton, NJ 08542 (609)497-4646 Fax: (609)497-0611 Early Stage Enterprises L.P. 995 Route 518 Skillman, NJ 08558 (609)921-8896 Fax: (609)921-8703 Website: http://www.esevc.com MBW Management Inc. 1 Springfield Ave. Summit, NJ 07901 (908)273-4060 Fax: (908)273-4430 BCI Advisors, Inc. Glenpointe Center W. Teaneck, NJ 07666 (201)836-3900 Fax: (201)836-6368 E-mail: info@bciadvisors.com Website: http://www.bci partners.com Demuth, Folger & Wetherill / DFW Capital Partners Glenpointe Center E., 5th Fl. 300 Frank W. Burr Blvd. Teaneck, NJ 07666 (201)836-2233 Fax: (201)836-5666 Website: http://www.dfwcapital.com Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants First Princeton Capital Corp. 189 Berdan Ave., No. 131 Wayne, NJ 07470-3233 (973)278-3233 Fax: (973)278-4290 Website: http://www.lytellcatt.net Edelson Technology Partners 300 Tice Blvd. Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07675 (201)930-9898 Fax: (201)930-8899 Website: http://www.edelsontech.com

New Jersey
Alan I. Goldman & Associates 497 Ridgewood Ave. Glen Ridge, NJ 07028 (973)857-5680 Fax: (973)509-8856 CS Capital Partners LLC 328 Second St., Ste. 200 Lakewood, NJ 08701 (732)901-1111 Fax: (212)202-5071 Website: http://www.cs-capital.com Edison Venture Fund 1009 Lenox Dr., Ste. 4 Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (609)896-1900 Fax: (609)896-0066 E-mail: info@edisonventure.com Website: http://www.edisonventure.com Tappan Zee Capital Corp. (New Jersey) 201 Lower Notch Rd. PO Box 416 Little Falls, NJ 07424 (973)256-8280 Fax: (973)256-2841 The CIT Group/Venture Capital, Inc. 650 CIT Dr. Livingston, NJ 07039 (973)740-5429 Fax: (973)740-5555 Website: http://www.cit.com Capital Express, L.L.C. 1100 Valleybrook Ave. Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 (201)438-8228 Fax: (201)438-5131 E-mail: niles@capitalexpress.com Website: http://www.capitalexpress.com Westford Technology Ventures, L.P. 17 Academy St. Newark, NJ 07102 (973)624-2131 Fax: (973)624-2008 Accel Partners 1 Palmer Sq. Princeton, NJ 08542

New Mexico
Bruce F. Glaspell & Associates 10400 Academy Rd. NE, Ste. 313 Albuquerque, NM 87111 (505)292-4505 Fax: (505)292-4258 High Desert Ventures, Inc. 6101 Imparata St. NE, Ste. 1721 Albuquerque, NM 87111 (505)797-3330 Fax: (505)338-5147 New Business Capital Fund, Ltd. 5805 Torreon NE Albuquerque, NM 87109 (505)822-8445 SBC Ventures 10400 Academy Rd. NE, Ste. 313 Albuquerque, NM 87111 (505)292-4505 Fax: (505)292-4528 Technology Ventures Corp. 1155 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87106 (505)246-2882 Fax: (505)246-2891

New York
New York State Science & Technology Foundation Small Business Technology Investment Fund 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1731 Albany, NY 12210

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(518)473-9741 Fax: (518)473-6876 Rand Capital Corp. 2200 Rand Bldg. Buffalo, NY 14203 (716)853-0802 Fax: (716)854-8480 Website: http://www.randcapital.com Seed Capital Partners 620 Main St. Buffalo, NY 14202 (716)845-7520 Fax: (716)845-7539 Website: http://www.seedcp.com Coleman Venture Group 5909 Northern Blvd. PO Box 224 East Norwich, NY 11732 (516)626-3642 Fax: (516)626-9722 Vega Capital Corp. 45 Knollwood Rd. Elmsford, NY 10523 (914)345-9500 Fax: (914)345-9505 Herbert Young Securities, Inc. 98 Cuttermill Rd. Great Neck, NY 11021 (516)487-8300 Fax: (516)487-8319 Sterling/Carl Marks Capital, Inc. 175 Great Neck Rd., Ste. 408 Great Neck, NY 11021 (516)482-7374 Fax: (516)487-0781 E-mail: stercrlmar@aol.com Website: http://www.serling carlmarks.com Impex Venture Management Co. PO Box 1570 Green Island, NY 12183 (518)271-8008 Fax: (518)271-9101 Corporate Venture Partners L.P. 200 Sunset Park Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)257-6323 Fax: (607)257-6128 Arthur P. Gould & Co. One Wilshire Dr. Lake Success, NY 11020 (516)773-3000 Fax: (516)773-3289 Dauphin Capital Partners 108 Forest Ave. Locust Valley, NY 11560 (516)759-3339 Fax: (516)759-3322 Website: http://www.dauphincapital.com 550 Digital Media Ventures 555 Madison Ave., 10th Fl. New York, NY 10022 Website: http://www.550dmv.com Aberlyn Capital Management Co., Inc. 500 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10110 (212)391-7750 Fax: (212)391-7762 Adler & Company 342 Madison Ave., Ste. 807 New York, NY 10173 (212)599-2535 Fax: (212)599-2526 Alimansky Capital Group, Inc. 605 Madison Ave., Ste. 300 New York, NY 10022-1901 (212)832-7300 Fax: (212)832-7338 Allegra Partners 515 Madison Ave., 29th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)826-9080 Fax: (212)759-2561 The Argentum Group The Chyrsler Bldg. 405 Lexington Ave. New York, NY 10174 (212)949-6262 Fax: (212)949-8294 Website: http://www.argentum group.com Axavision Inc. 14 Wall St., 26th Fl. New York, NY 10005 (212)619-4000 Fax: (212)619-7202 Bedford Capital Corp. 18 East 48th St., Ste. 1800 New York, NY 10017 (212)688-5700 Fax: (212)754-4699 E-mail: info@bedfordnyc.com Website: http://www.bedfordnyc.com Bloom & Co. 950 Third Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212)838-1858 Fax: (212)838-1843 Bristol Capital Management 300 Park Ave., 17th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)572-6306 Fax: (212)705-4292 Citicorp Venture Capital Ltd. (New York City) 399 Park Ave., 14th Fl. Zone 4 New York, NY 10043 (212)559-1127 Fax: (212)888-2940 CM Equity Partners 135 E. 57th St. New York, NY 10022 (212)909-8428 Fax: (212)980-2630 Cohen & Co., L.L.C. 800 Third Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212)317-2250 Fax: (212)317-2255 E-mail: nlcohen@aol.com Cornerstone Equity Investors, L.L.C. 717 5th Ave., Ste. 1100 New York, NY 10022 (212)753-0901 Fax: (212)826-6798 Website: http://www.cornerstoneequity.com CW Group, Inc. 1041 3rd Ave., 2nd fl. New York, NY 10021 (212)308-5266 Fax: (212)644-0354 Website: http://www.cwventures.com DH Blair Investment Banking Corp. 44 Wall St., 2nd Fl. New York, NY 10005 (212)495-5000 Fax: (212)269-1438 Dresdner Kleinwort Capital 75 Wall St. New York, NY 10005 (212)429-3131 Fax: (212)429-3139 Website: http://www.dresdnerkb.com East River Ventures, L.P. 645 Madison Ave., 22nd Fl.

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New York, NY 10022 (212)644-2322 Fax: (212)644-5498 Easton Hunt Capital Partners 641 Lexington Ave., 21st Fl. New York, NY 10017 (212)702-0950 Fax: (212)702-0952 Website: http://www.eastoncapital.com Elk Associates Funding Corp. 747 3rd Ave., Ste. 4C New York, NY 10017 (212)355-2449 Fax: (212)759-3338 EOS Partners, L.P. 320 Park Ave., 22nd Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)832-5800 Fax: (212)832-5815 E-mail: mfirst@eospartners.com Website: http://www.eospartners.com Euclid Partners 45 Rockefeller Plaza, Ste. 3240 New York, NY 10111 (212)218-6880 Fax: (212)218-6877 E-mail: graham@euclidpartners.com Website: http://www.euclidpartners.com Evergreen Capital Partners, Inc. 150 East 58th St. New York, NY 10155 (212)813-0758 Fax: (212)813-0754 Exeter Capital L.P. 10 E. 53rd St. New York, NY 10022 (212)872-1172 Fax: (212)872-1198 E-mail: exeter@usa.net Financial Technology Research Corp. 518 Broadway Penthouse New York, NY 10012 (212)625-9100 Fax: (212)431-0300 E-mail: fintek@financier.com 4C Ventures 237 Park Ave., Ste. 801 New York, NY 10017 (212)692-3680 Fax: (212)692-3685 Website: http://www.4cventures.com Fusient Ventures 99 Park Ave., 20th Fl. New York, NY 10016 (212)972-8999 Fax: (212)972-9876 E-mail: info@fusient.com Website: http://www.fusient.com Generation Capital Partners 551 Fifth Ave., Ste. 3100 New York, NY 10176 (212)450-8507 Fax: (212)450-8550 Website: http://www.genpartners.com Golub Associates, Inc. 555 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212)750-6060 Fax: (212)750-5505 Hambro America Biosciences Inc. 650 Madison Ave., 21st Floor New York, NY 10022 (212)223-7400 Fax: (212)223-0305 Hanover Capital Corp. 505 Park Ave., 15th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)755-1222 Fax: (212)935-1787 Harvest Partners, Inc. 280 Park Ave, 33rd Fl. New York, NY 10017 (212)559-6300 Fax: (212)812-0100 Website: http://www.harvpart.com Holding Capital Group, Inc. 10 E. 53rd St., 30th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)486-6670 Fax: (212)486-0843 Hudson Venture Partners 660 Madison Ave., 14th Fl. New York, NY 10021-8405 (212)644-9797 Fax: (212)644-7430 Website: http://www.hudsonptr.com IBJS Capital Corp. 1 State St., 9th Fl. New York, NY 10004 (212)858-2018 Fax: (212)858-2768 InterEquity Capital Partners, L.P. 220 5th Ave. New York, NY 10001 (212)779-2022 Fax: (212)779-2103 Website: http://www.interequitycapital.com The Jordan Edmiston Group Inc. 150 East 52nd St., 18th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)754-0710 Fax: (212)754-0337 Josephberg, Grosz and Co., Inc. 633 3rd Ave., 13th Fl. New York, NY 10017 (212)974-9926 Fax: (212)397-5832 J.P. Morgan Capital Corp. 60 Wall St. New York, NY 10260-0060 (212)648-9000 Fax: (212)648-5002 Website: http://www.jpmorgan.com The Lambda Funds 380 Lexington Ave., 54th Fl. New York, NY 10168 (212)682-3454 Fax: (212)682-9231 Lepercq Capital Management Inc. 1675 Broadway New York, NY 10019 (212)698-0795 Fax: (212)262-0155 Loeb Partners Corp. 61 Broadway, Ste. 2400 New York, NY 10006 (212)483-7000 Fax: (212)574-2001 Madison Investment Partners 660 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10021 (212)223-2600 Fax: (212)223-8208 MC Capital Inc. 520 Madison Ave., 16th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)644-0841 Fax: (212)644-2926 McCown, De Leeuw and Co. (New York) 65 E. 55th St., 36th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)355-5500 Fax: (212)355-6283 Website: http://www.mdcpartners.com

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Morgan Stanley Venture Partners 1221 Avenue of the Americas, 33rd Fl. New York, NY 10020 (212)762-7900 Fax: (212)762-8424 E-mail: msventures@ms.com Website: http://www.msvp.com Nazem and Co. 645 Madison Ave., 12th Fl. New York, NY 10022 (212)371-7900 Fax: (212)371-2150 Needham Capital Management, L.L.C. 445 Park Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212)371-8300 Fax: (212)705-0299 Website: http://www.needhamco.com Norwood Venture Corp. 1430 Broadway, Ste. 1607 New York, NY 10018 (212)869-5075 Fax: (212)869-5331 E-mail: nvc@mail.idt.net Website: http://www.norven.com Noveltek Venture Corp. 521 Fifth Ave., Ste. 1700 New York, NY 10175 (212)286-1963 Paribas Principal, Inc. 787 7th Ave. New York, NY 10019 (212)841-2005 Fax: (212)841-3558 Patricof & Co. Ventures, Inc. (New York) 445 Park Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212)753-6300 Fax: (212)319-6155 Website: http://www.patricof.com The Platinum Group, Inc. 350 Fifth Ave, Ste. 7113 New York, NY 10118 (212)736-4300 Fax: (212)736-6086 Website: http://www.platinumgroup.com Pomona Capital 780 Third Ave., 28th Fl. New York, NY 10017 (212)593-3639 Fax: (212)593-3987 Website: http://www.pomonacapital.com Prospect Street Ventures 10 East 40th St., 44th Fl. New York, NY 10016 (212)448-0702 Fax: (212)448-9652 E-mail: wkohler@prospectstreet.com Website: http://www.prospectstreet.com Regent Capital Management 505 Park Ave., Ste. 1700 New York, NY 10022 (212)735-9900 Fax: (212)735-9908 Rothschild Ventures, Inc. 1251 Avenue of the Americas, 51st Fl. New York, NY 10020 (212)403-3500 Fax: (212)403-3652 Website: http://www.nmrothschild.com Sandler Capital Management 767 Fifth Ave., 45th Fl. New York, NY 10153 (212)754-8100 Fax: (212)826-0280 Siguler Guff & Company 630 Fifth Ave., 16th Fl. New York, NY 10111 (212)332-5100 Fax: (212)332-5120 Spencer Trask Ventures Inc. 535 Madison Ave. New York, NY 10022 (212)355-5565 Fax: (212)751-3362 Website: http://www.spencertrask.com Sprout Group (New York City) 277 Park Ave. New York, NY 10172 (212)892-3600 Fax: (212)892-3444 E-mail: info@sproutgroup.com Website: http://www.sproutgroup.com US Trust Private Equity 114 W.47th St. New York, NY 10036 (212)852-3949 Fax: (212)852-3759 Website: http://www.ustrust.com/ privateequity Vencon Management Inc. 301 West 53rd St., Ste. 10F New York, NY 10019 (212)581-8787 Fax: (212)397-4126 Website: http://www.venconinc.com Venrock Associates 30 Rockefeller Plaza, Ste. 5508 New York, NY 10112 (212)649-5600 Fax: (212)649-5788 Website: http://www.venrock.com Venture Capital Fund of America, Inc. 509 Madison Ave., Ste. 812 New York, NY 10022 (212)838-5577 Fax: (212)838-7614 E-mail: mail@vcfa.com Website: http://www.vcfa.com Venture Opportunities Corp. 150 E. 58th St. New York, NY 10155 (212)832-3737 Fax: (212)980-6603 Warburg Pincus Ventures, Inc. 466 Lexington Ave., 11th Fl. New York, NY 10017 (212)878-9309 Fax: (212)878-9200 Website: http://www.warburgpincus.com Wasserstein, Perella & Co. Inc. 31 W. 52nd St., 27th Fl. New York, NY 10019 (212)702-5691 Fax: (212)969-7879 Welsh, Carson, Anderson, & Stowe 320 Park Ave., Ste. 2500 New York, NY 10022-6815 (212)893-9500 Fax: (212)893-9575 Whitney and Co. (New York) 630 Fifth Ave. Ste. 3225 New York, NY 10111 (212)332-2400 Fax: (212)332-2422 Website: http://www.jhwitney.com Winthrop Ventures 74 Trinity Place, Ste. 600 New York, NY 10006 (212)422-0100 The Pittsford Group 8 Lodge Pole Rd. Pittsford, NY 14534 (716)223-3523 Genesee Funding 70 Linden Oaks, 3rd Fl. Rochester, NY 14625 (716)383-5550 Fax: (716)383-5305

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Gabelli Multimedia Partners One Corporate Center Rye, NY 10580 (914)921-5395 Fax: (914)921-5031 Stamford Financial 108 Main St. Stamford, NY 12167 (607)652-3311 Fax: (607)652-6301 Website: http://www.stamford financial.com Northwood Ventures LLC 485 Underhill Blvd., Ste. 205 Syosset, NY 11791 (516)364-5544 Fax: (516)364-0879 E-mail: northwood@northwood.com Website: http://www.north woodventures.com Exponential Business Development Co. 216 Walton St. Syracuse, NY 13202-1227 (315)474-4500 Fax: (315)474-4682 E-mail: dirksonn@aol.com Website: http://www.exponential-ny.com Onondaga Venture Capital Fund Inc. 714 State Tower Bldg. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315)478-0157 Fax: (315)478-0158 Bessemer Venture Partners (Westbury) 1400 Old Country Rd., Ste. 109 Westbury, NY 11590 (516)997-2300 Fax: (516)997-2371 E-mail: bob@bvpny.com Website: http://www.bvp.com Ovation Capital Partners 120 Bloomingdale Rd., 4th Fl. White Plains, NY 10605 (914)258-0011 Fax: (914)684-0848 Website: http://www.ovation capital.com First Union Capital Partners 1st Union Center, 12th Fl. 301 S. College St. Charlotte, NC 28288-0732 (704)383-0000 Fax: (704)374-6711 Website: http://www.fucp.com Frontier Capital LLC 525 North Tryon St., Ste. 1700 Charlotte, NC 28202 (704)414-2880 Fax: (704)414-2881 Website: http://www.frontierfunds.com Kitty Hawk Capital 2700 Coltsgate Rd., Ste. 202 Charlotte, NC 28211 (704)362-3909 Fax: (704)362-2774 Website: http://www.kittyhawk capital.com Piedmont Venture Partners One Morrocroft Centre 6805 Morisson Blvd., Ste. 380 Charlotte, NC 28211 (704)731-5200 Fax: (704)365-9733 Website: http://www.piedmontvp.com Ruddick Investment Co. 1800 Two First Union Center Charlotte, NC 28282 (704)372-5404 Fax: (704)372-6409 The Shelton Companies Inc. 3600 One First Union Center 301 S. College St. Charlotte, NC 28202 (704)348-2200 Fax: (704)348-2260 Wakefield Group 1110 E. Morehead St. PO Box 36329 Charlotte, NC 28236 (704)372-0355 Fax: (704)372-8216 Website: http://www.wakefiel dgroup.com Aurora Funds, Inc. 2525 Meridian Pkwy., Ste. 220 Durham, NC 27713 (919)484-0400 Fax: (919)484-0444 Website: http://www.aurora funds.com Intersouth Partners 3211 Shannon Rd., Ste. 610 Durham, NC 27707 (919)493-6640 Fax: (919)493-6649 E-mail: info@intersouth.com Website: http://www.intersouth.com Geneva Merchant Banking Partners PO Box 21962 Greensboro, NC 27420 (336)275-7002 Fax: (336)275-9155 Website: http://www.geneva merchantbank.com The North Carolina Enterprise Fund, L.P. 3600 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 107 Raleigh, NC 27612 (919)781-2691 Fax: (919)783-9195 Website: http://www.ncef.com Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Ohio
Senmend Medical Ventures 4445 Lake Forest Dr., Ste. 600 Cincinnati, OH 45242 (513)563-3264 Fax: (513)563-3261 The Walnut Group 312 Walnut St., Ste. 1151 Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513)651-3300 Fax: (513)929-4441 Website: http://www.thewal nutgroup.com Brantley Venture Partners 20600 Chagrin Blvd., Ste. 1150 Cleveland, OH 44122 (216)283-4800 Fax: (216)283-5324 Clarion Capital Corp. 1801 E. 9th St., Ste. 1120 Cleveland, OH 44114 (216)687-1096 Fax: (216)694-3545 Crystal Internet Venture Fund, L.P. 1120 Chester Ave., Ste. 418 Cleveland, OH 44114 (216)263-5515 Fax: (216)263-5518 E-mail: jf@crystalventure.com Website: http://www.crystal venture.com

North Carolina
Carolinas Capital Investment Corp. 1408 Biltmore Dr. Charlotte, NC 28207 (704)375-3888 Fax: (704)375-6226

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Key Equity Capital Corp. 127 Public Sq., 28th Fl. Cleveland, OH 44114 (216)689-3000 Fax: (216)689-3204 Website: http://www.keybank.com Morgenthaler Ventures Terminal Tower 50 Public Square, Ste. 2700 Cleveland, OH 44113 (216)416-7500 Fax: (216)416-7501 Website: http://www.morgenthaler.com National City Equity Partners Inc. 1965 E. 6th St. Cleveland, OH 44114 (216)575-2491 Fax: (216)575-9965 E-mail: nccap@aol.com Website: http://www.nccapital.com Primus Venture Partners, Inc. 5900 LanderBrook Dr., Ste. 2000 Cleveland, OH 44124-4020 (440)684-7300 Fax: (440)684-7342 E-mail: info@primusventure.com Website: http://www.primusventure.com Banc One Capital Partners (Columbus) 150 East Gay St., 24th Fl. Columbus, OH 43215 (614)217-1100 Fax: (614)217-1217 Battelle Venture Partners 505 King Ave. Columbus, OH 43201 (614)424-7005 Fax: (614)424-4874 Ohio Partners 62 E. Board St., 3rd Fl. Columbus, OH 43215 (614)621-1210 Fax: (614)621-1240 Capital Technology Group, L.L.C. 400 Metro Place North, Ste. 300 Dublin, OH 43017 (614)792-6066 Fax: (614)792-6036 E-mail: info@capitaltech.com Website: http://www.capitaltech.com Northwest Ohio Venture Fund 4159 Holland-Sylvania R., Ste. 202 Toledo, OH 43623 (419)824-8144 Fax: (419)882-2035 E-mail: bwalsh@novf.com Shaw Venture Partners 400 SW 6th Ave., Ste. 1100 Portland, OR 97204-1636 (503)228-4884 Fax: (503)227-2471 Website: http://www.shawventures.com

Oklahoma
Moore & Associates 1000 W. Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 370 Oklahoma City, OK 73116 (405)842-3660 Fax: (405)842-3763 Chisholm Private Capital Partners 100 West 5th St., Ste. 805 Tulsa, OK 74103 (918)584-0440 Fax: (918)584-0441 Website: http://www.chisholmvc.com Davis, Tuttle Venture Partners (Tulsa) 320 S. Boston, Ste. 1000 Tulsa, OK 74103-3703 (918)584-7272 Fax: (918)582-3404 Website: http://www.davistuttle.com RBC Ventures 2627 E. 21st St. Tulsa, OK 74114 (918)744-5607 Fax: (918)743-8630

Pennsylvania
Mid-Atlantic Venture Funds 125 Goodman Dr. Bethlehem, PA 18015 (610)865-6550 Fax: (610)865-6427 Website: http://www.mavf.com Newspring Ventures 100 W. Elm St., Ste. 101 Conshohocken, PA 19428 (610)567-2380 Fax: (610)567-2388 Website: http://www.news printventures.com Patricof & Co. Ventures, Inc. 455 S. Gulph Rd., Ste. 410 King of Prussia, PA 19406 (610)265-0286 Fax: (610)265-4959 Website: http://www.patricof.com Loyalhanna Venture Fund 527 Cedar Way, Ste. 104 Oakmont, PA 15139 (412)820-7035 Fax: (412)820-7036 Innovest Group Inc. 2000 Market St., Ste. 1400 Philadelphia, PA 19103 (215)564-3960 Fax: (215)569-3272 Keystone Venture Capital Management Co. 1601 Market St., Ste. 2500 Philadelphia, PA 19103 (215)241-1200 Fax: (215)241-1211 Website: http://www.keystonevc.com Liberty Venture Partners 2005 Market St., Ste. 200 Philadelphia, PA 19103 (215)282-4484 Fax: (215)282-4485 E-mail: info@libertyvp.com Website: http://www.libertyvp.com Penn Janney Fund, Inc. 1801 Market St., 11th Fl. Philadelphia, PA 19103

Oregon
Utah Ventures II LP 10700 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy., Ste. 548 Beaverton, OR 97005 (503)574-4125 E-mail: adishlip@uven.com Website: http://www.uven.com Orien Ventures 14523 SW Westlake Dr. Lake Oswego, OR 97035 (503)699-1680 Fax: (503)699-1681 OVP Venture Partners (Lake Oswego) 340 Oswego Pointe Dr., Ste. 200 Lake Oswego, OR 97034 (503)697-8766 Fax: (503)697-8863 E-mail: info@ovp.com Website: http://www.ovp.com Oregon Resource and Technology Development Fund 4370 NE Halsey St., Ste. 233 Portland, OR 97213-1566 (503)282-4462 Fax: (503)282-2976

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(215)665-4447 Fax: (215)557-0820 Philadelphia Ventures, Inc. The Bellevue 200 S. Broad St. Philadelphia, PA 19102 (215)732-4445 Fax: (215)732-4644 Birchmere Ventures Inc. 2000 Technology Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15219-3109 (412)803-8000 Fax: (412)687-8139 Website: http://www.birchmerevc.com CEO Venture Fund 2000 Technology Dr., Ste. 160 Pittsburgh, PA 15219-3109 (412)687-3451 Fax: (412)687-8139 E-mail: ceofund@aol.com Website: http://www.ceoventure fund.com Innovation Works Inc. 2000 Technology Dr., Ste. 250 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412)681-1520 Fax: (412)681-2625 Website: http://www.innovation works.org Keystone Minority Capital Fund L.P. 1801 Centre Ave., Ste. 201 Williams Sq. Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412)338-2230 Fax: (412)338-2224 Mellon Ventures, Inc. One Mellon Bank Ctr., Rm. 3500 Pittsburgh, PA 15258 (412)236-3594 Fax: (412)236-3593 Website: http://www.mellon ventures.com Pennsylvania Growth Fund 5850 Ellsworth Ave., Ste. 303 Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (412)661-1000 Fax: (412)361-0676 Point Venture Partners The Century Bldg. 130 Seventh St., 7th Fl. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412)261-1966 Fax: (412)261-1718 Cross Atlantic Capital Partners 5 Radnor Corporate Center, Ste. 555 Radnor, PA 19087 (610)995-2650 Fax: (610)971-2062 Website: http://www.xacp.com Meridian Venture Partners (Radnor) The Radnor Court Bldg., Ste. 140 259 Radnor-Chester Rd. Radnor, PA 19087 (610)254-2999 Fax: (610)254-2996 E-mail: mvpart@ix.netcom.com TDH 919 Conestoga Rd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 301 Rosemont, PA 19010 (610)526-9970 Fax: (610)526-9971 Adams Capital Management 500 Blackburn Ave. Sewickley, PA 15143 (412)749-9454 Fax: (412)749-9459 Website: http://www.acm.com S.R. One, Ltd. Four Tower Bridge 200 Barr Harbor Dr., Ste. 250 W. Conshohocken, PA 19428 (610)567-1000 Fax: (610)567-1039 Greater Philadelphia Venture Capital Corp. 351 East Conestoga Rd. Wayne, PA 19087 (610)688-6829 Fax: (610)254-8958 PA Early Stage 435 Devon Park Dr., Bldg. 500, Ste. 510 Wayne, PA 19087 (610)293-4075 Fax: (610)254-4240 Website: http://www.paearlystage.com The Sandhurst Venture Fund, L.P. 351 E. Constoga Rd. Wayne, PA 19087 (610)254-8900 Fax: (610)254-8958 TL Ventures 700 Bldg. 435 Devon Park Dr. Wayne, PA 19087-1990 (610)975-3765 Fax: (610)254-4210 Website: http://www.tlventures.com Rockhill Ventures, Inc. 100 Front St., Ste. 1350 West Conshohocken, PA 19428 (610)940-0300 Fax: (610)940-0301

Puerto Rico
Advent-Morro Equity Partners Banco Popular Bldg. 206 Tetuan St., Ste. 903 San Juan, PR 00902 (787)725-5285 Fax: (787)721-1735 North America Investment Corp. Mercantil Plaza, Ste. 813 PO Box 191831 San Juan, PR 00919 (787)754-6178 Fax: (787)754-6181 Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Rhode Island
Manchester Humphreys, Inc. 40 Westminster St., Ste. 900 Providence, RI 02903 (401)454-0400 Fax: (401)454-0403 Navis Partners 50 Kennedy Plaza, 12th Fl. Providence, RI 02903 (401)278-6770 Fax: (401)278-6387 Website: http://www.navis partners.com

South Carolina
Capital Insights, L.L.C. PO Box 27162 Greenville, SC 29616-2162 (864)242-6832 Fax: (864)242-6755 E-mail: jwarner@capitalinsights.com Website: http://www.capitalin sights.com Transamerica Mezzanine Financing 7 N. Laurens St., Ste. 603 Greenville, SC 29601 (864)232-6198 Fax: (864)241-4444

Tennessee
Valley Capital Corp. Krystal Bldg. 100 W. Martin Luther King Blvd., Ste. 212

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Chattanooga, TN 37402 (423)265-1557 Fax: (423)265-1588 Coleman Swenson Booth Inc. 237 2nd Ave. S Franklin, TN 37064-2649 (615)791-9462 Fax: (615)791-9636 Website: http:// www.colemanswenson.com Capital Services & Resources, Inc. 5159 Wheelis Dr., Ste. 106 Memphis, TN 38117 (901)761-2156 Fax: (907)767-0060 Paradigm Capital Partners LLC 6410 Poplar Ave., Ste. 395 Memphis, TN 38119 (901)682-6060 Fax: (901)328-3061 SSM Ventures 845 Crossover Ln., Ste. 140 Memphis, TN 38117 (901)767-1131 Fax: (901)767-1135 Website: http://www.ssm ventures.com Capital Across America L.P. 501 Union St., Ste. 201 Nashville, TN 37219 (615)254-1414 Fax: (615)254-1856 Website: http:// www.capitalacrossamerica.com Equitas L.P. 2000 Glen Echo Rd., Ste. 101 PO Box 158838 Nashville, TN 37215-8838 (615)383-8673 Fax: (615)383-8693 Massey Burch Capital Corp. One Burton Hills Blvd., Ste. 350 Nashville, TN 37215 (615)665-3221 Fax: (615)665-3240 E-mail: tcalton@masseyburch.com Website: http://www.masseyburch.com Nelson Capital Corp. 3401 West End Ave., Ste. 300 Nashville, TN 37203 (615)292-8787 Fax: (615)385-3150

Texas
Phillips-Smith Specialty Retail Group 5080 Spectrum Dr., Ste. 805 W Addison, TX 75001 (972)387-0725 Fax: (972)458-2560 E-mail: pssrg@aol.com Website: http://www.phillips-smith.com Austin Ventures, L.P. 701 Brazos St., Ste. 1400 Austin, TX 78701 (512)485-1900 Fax: (512)476-3952 E-mail: info@ausven.com Website: http://www.austinventures.com The Capital Network 3925 West Braker Lane, Ste. 406 Austin, TX 78759-5321 (512)305-0826 Fax: (512)305-0836 Techxas Ventures LLC 5000 Plaza on the Lake Austin, TX 78746 (512)343-0118 Fax: (512)343-1879 E-mail: bruce@techxas.com Website: http://www.techxas.com Alliance Financial of Houston 218 Heather Ln. Conroe, TX 77385-9013 (936)447-3300 Fax: (936)447-4222 Amerimark Capital Corp. 1111 W. Mockingbird, Ste. 1111 Dallas, TX 75247 (214)638-7878 Fax: (214)638-7612 E-mail: amerimark@amcapital.com Website: http://www.amcapital.com AMT Venture Partners / AMT Capital Ltd. 5220 Spring Valley Rd., Ste. 600 Dallas, TX 75240 (214)905-9757 Fax: (214)905-9761 Website: http://www.amtcapital.com Arkoma Venture Partners 5950 Berkshire Lane, Ste. 1400 Dallas, TX 75225 (214)739-3515 Fax: (214)739-3572 E-mail: joelf@arkomavp.com

Capital Southwest Corp. 12900 Preston Rd., Ste. 700 Dallas, TX 75230 (972)233-8242 Fax: (972)233-7362 Website: http:// www.capitalsouthwest.com Dali, Hook Partners One Lincoln Center, Ste. 1550 5400 LBJ Freeway Dallas, TX 75240 (972)991-5457 Fax: (972)991-5458 E-mail: dhook@hookpartners.com Website: http://www.hookpartners.com HO2 Partners Two Galleria Tower 13455 Noel Rd., Ste. 1670 Dallas, TX 75240 (972)702-1144 Fax: (972)702-8234 Website: http://www.ho2.com Interwest Partners (Dallas) 2 Galleria Tower 13455 Noel Rd., Ste. 1670 Dallas, TX 75240 (972)392-7279 Fax: (972)490-6348 Website: http://www.interwest.com Kahala Investments, Inc. 8214 Westchester Dr., Ste. 715 Dallas, TX 75225 (214)987-0077 Fax: (214)987-2332 MESBIC Ventures Holding Co. 2435 North Central Expressway, Ste. 200 Dallas, TX 75080 (972)991-1597 Fax: (972)991-4770 Website: http://www.mvhc.com North Texas MESBIC, Inc. 9500 Forest Lane, Ste. 430 Dallas, TX 75243 (214)221-3565 Fax: (214)221-3566 Richard Jaffe & Company, Inc, 7318 Royal Cir. Dallas, TX 75230 (214)265-9397 Fax: (214)739-1845 Sevin Rosen Management Co. 13455 Noel Rd., Ste. 1670 Dallas, TX 75240

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(972)702-1100 Fax: (972)702-1103 E-mail: info@srfunds.com Website: http://www.srfunds.com Stratford Capital Partners, L.P. 300 Crescent Ct., Ste. 500 Dallas, TX 75201 (214)740-7377 Fax: (214)720-7393 E-mail: stratcap@hmtf.com Sunwestern Investment Group 12221 Merit Dr., Ste. 935 Dallas, TX 75251 (972)239-5650 Fax: (972)701-0024 Wingate Partners 750 N. St. Paul St., Ste. 1200 Dallas, TX 75201 (214)720-1313 Fax: (214)871-8799 Buena Venture Associates 201 Main St., 32nd Fl. Fort Worth, TX 76102 (817)339-7400 Fax: (817)390-8408 Website: http://www.buenaventure.com The Catalyst Group 3 Riverway, Ste. 770 Houston, TX 77056 (713)623-8133 Fax: (713)623-0473 E-mail: herman@thecatalystgroup.net Website: http://www.thecatalyst group.net Cureton & Co., Inc. 1100 Louisiana, Ste. 3250 Houston, TX 77002 (713)658-9806 Fax: (713)658-0476 Davis, Tuttle Venture Partners (Dallas) 8 Greenway Plaza, Ste. 1020 Houston, TX 77046 (713)993-0440 Fax: (713)621-2297 Website: http://www.davistuttle.com Houston Partners 401 Louisiana, 8th Fl. Houston, TX 77002 (713)222-8600 Fax: (713)222-8932 Southwest Venture Group 10878 Westheimer, Ste. 178 Houston, TX 77042 (713)827-8947 (713)461-1470 AM Fund 4600 Post Oak Place, Ste. 100 Houston, TX 77027 (713)627-9111 Fax: (713)627-9119 Ventex Management, Inc. 3417 Milam St. Houston, TX 77002-9531 (713)659-7870 Fax: (713)659-7855 MBA Venture Group 1004 Olde Town Rd., Ste. 102 Irving, TX 75061 (972)986-6703 First Capital Group Management Co. 750 East Mulberry St., Ste. 305 PO Box 15616 San Antonio, TX 78212 (210)736-4233 Fax: (210)736-5449 The Southwest Venture Partnerships 16414 San Pedro, Ste. 345 San Antonio, TX 78232 (210)402-1200 Fax: (210)402-1221 E-mail: swvp@aol.com Medtech International Inc. 1742 Carriageway Sugarland, TX 77478 (713)980-8474 Fax: (713)980-6343 Fax: (801)524-8941 E-mail: mail@wasatchvc.com

Vermont
North Atlantic Capital Corp. 76 Saint Paul St., Ste. 600 Burlington, VT 05401 (802)658-7820 Fax: (802)658-5757 Website: http://www.north atlanticcapital.com Green Mountain Advisors Inc. PO Box 1230 Quechee, VT 05059 (802)296-7800 Fax: (802)296-6012 Website: http://www.gmtcap.com

Organizations, Agencies, & Consultants

Virginia
Oxford Financial Services Corp. Alexandria, VA 22314 (703)519-4900 Fax: (703)519-4910 E-mail: oxford133@aol.com Continental SBIC 4141 N. Henderson Rd. Arlington, VA 22203 (703)527-5200 Fax: (703)527-3700 Novak Biddle Venture Partners 1750 Tysons Blvd., Ste. 1190 McLean, VA 22102 (703)847-3770 Fax: (703)847-3771 E-mail: roger@novakbiddle.com Website: http://www.novakbiddle.com Spacevest 11911 Freedom Dr., Ste. 500 Reston, VA 20190 (703)904-9800 Fax: (703)904-0571 E-mail: spacevest@spacevest.com Website: http://www.spacevest.com Virginia Capital 1801 Libbie Ave., Ste. 201 Richmond, VA 23226 (804)648-4802 Fax: (804)648-4809 E-mail: webmaster@vacapital.com Website: http://www.vacapital.com Calvert Social Venture Partners 402 Maple Ave. W Vienna, VA 22180

Utah
First Security Business Investment Corp. 15 East 100 South, Ste. 100 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 (801)246-5737 Fax: (801)246-5740 Utah Ventures II, L.P. 423 Wakara Way, Ste. 206 Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (801)583-5922 Fax: (801)583-4105 Website: http://www.uven.com Wasatch Venture Corp. 1 S. Main St., Ste. 1400 Salt Lake City, UT 84133 (801)524-8939

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(703)255-4930 Fax: (703)255-4931 E-mail: calven2000@aol.com Fairfax Partners 8000 Towers Crescent Dr., Ste. 940 Vienna, VA 22182 (703)847-9486 Fax: (703)847-0911 Global Internet Ventures 8150 Leesburg Pike, Ste. 1210 Vienna, VA 22182 (703)442-3300 Fax: (703)442-3388 Website: http://www.givinc.com Walnut Capital Corp. (Vienna) 8000 Towers Crescent Dr., Ste. 1070 Vienna, VA 22182 (703)448-3771 Fax: (703)448-7751 Materia Venture Associates, L.P. 3435 Carillon Pointe Kirkland, WA 98033-7354 (425)822-4100 Fax: (425)827-4086 OVP Venture Partners (Kirkland) 2420 Carillon Pt. Kirkland, WA 98033 (425)889-9192 Fax: (425)889-0152 E-mail: info@ovp.com Website: http://www.ovp.com Digital Partners 999 3rd Ave., Ste. 1610 Seattle, WA 98104 (206)405-3607 Fax: (206)405-3617 Website: http://www.digitalpartners.com Frazier & Company 601 Union St., Ste. 3300 Seattle, WA 98101 (206)621-7200 Fax: (206)621-1848 E-mail: jon@frazierco.com Kirlan Venture Capital, Inc. 221 First Ave. W, Ste. 108 Seattle, WA 98119-4223 (206)281-8610 Fax: (206)285-3451 Website: http://www.kirlanventure.com Phoenix Partners 1000 2nd Ave., Ste. 3600 Seattle, WA 98104 (206)624-8968 Fax: (206)624-1907 Voyager Capital 800 5th St., Ste. 4100 Seattle, WA 98103 (206)470-1180 Fax: (206)470-1185 E-mail: info@voyagercap.com Website: http://www.voyagercap.com Northwest Venture Associates 221 N. Wall St., Ste. 628 Spokane, WA 99201 (509)747-0728 Fax: (509)747-0758 Website: http://www.nwva.com

Wisconsin
Venture Investors Management, L.L.C. University Research Park 505 S. Rosa Rd. Madison, WI 53719 (608)441-2700 Fax: (608)441-2727 E-mail: roger@ventureinvestors.com Website: http://www.venture investers.com Capital Investments, Inc. 1009 West Glen Oaks Lane, Ste. 103 Mequon, WI 53092 (414)241-0303 Fax: (414)241-8451 Website: http:// www.capitalinvestmentsinc.com Future Value Venture, Inc. 2745 N. Martin Luther King Dr., Ste. 204 Milwaukee, WI 53212-2300 (414)264-2252 Fax: (414)264-2253 E-mail: fvvventures@aol.com William Beckett, President Lubar and Co., Inc. 700 N. Water St., Ste. 1200 Milwaukee, WI 53202 (414)291-9000 Fax: (414)291-9061 GCI 20875 Crossroads Cir., Ste. 100 Waukesha, WI 53186 (262)798-5080 Fax: (262)798-5087

Washington
Encompass Ventures 777 108th Ave. NE, Ste. 2300 Bellevue, WA 98004 (425)486-3900 Fax: (425)486-3901 E-mail: info@evpartners.com Website: http://www.encom passventures.com Fluke Venture Partners 11400 SE Sixth St., Ste. 230 Bellevue, WA 98004 (425)453-4590 Fax: (425)453-4675 E-mail: gabelein@flukeventures.com Website: http://www.flukeventures.com Pacific Northwest Partners SBIC, L.P. 15352 SE 53rd St. Bellevue, WA 98006 (425)455-9967 Fax: (425)455-9404

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Absolute liability Liability that is incurred due to product defects or negligent actions. Manufacturers or retail establishments are held responsible, even though the defect or action may not have been intentional or negligent. ACE See Active Corps of Executives Accident and health benefits Benefits offered to employees and their families in order to offset the costs associated with accidental death, accidental injury, or sickness. Account statement A record of transactions, including payments, new debt, and deposits, incurred during a defined period of time. Accounting system System capturing the costs of all employees and/or machinery included in business expenses. Accounts payable See Trade credit Accounts receivable Unpaid accounts which arise from unsettled claims and transactions from the sale of a company’s products or services to its customers. Active Corps of Executives (ACE) A group of volunteers for a management assistance program of the U.S. Small Business Administration; volunteers provide one-on-one counseling and teach workshops and seminars for small firms. ADA See Americans with Disabilities Act Adaptation The process whereby an invention is modified to meet the needs of users. Adaptive engineering The process whereby an invention is modified to meet the manufacturing and commercial requirements of a targeted market. Adverse selection The tendency for higher-risk individuals to purchase health care and more comprehensive plans, resulting in increased costs. Advertising A marketing tool used to capture public attention and influence purchasing decisions for a product or service. Utilizes various forms of media to generate consumer response, such as flyers, magazines, newspapers, radio, and television. Age discrimination The denial of the rights and privileges of employment based solely on the age of an individual. Agency costs Costs incurred to insure that the lender or investor maintains control over assets while allowing the borrower or entrepreneur to use them. Monitoring and information costs are the two major types of agency costs. Agribusiness The production and sale of commodities and products from the commercial farming industry. America Online An online service which is accessible by computer modem. The service features Internet access, bulletin boards, online periodicals, electronic mail, and other services for subscribers. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Law designed to ensure equal access and opportunity to handicapped persons.
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Annual report Yearly financial report prepared by a business that adheres to the requirements set forth by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Antitrust immunity Exemption from prosecution under antitrust laws. In the transportation industry, firms with antitrust immunity are permitted under certain conditions to set schedules and sometimes prices for the public benefit. Applied research Scientific study targeted for use in a product or process. Asians A minority category used by the U.S. Bureau of the Census to represent a diverse group that includes Aleuts, Eskimos, American Indians, Asian Indians, Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Vietnamese, Filipinos, Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders. Assets Anything of value owned by a company. Audit The verification of accounting records and business procedures conducted by an outside accounting service. Average cost Total production costs divided by the quantity produced. Balance Sheet A financial statement listing the total assets and liabilities of a company at a given time. Bankruptcy The condition in which a business cannot meet its debt obligations and petitions a federal district court either for reorganization of its debts (Chapter 11) or for liquidation of its assets (Chapter 7). Basic research Theoretical scientific exploration not targeted to application. Basket clause A provision specifying the amount of public pension funds that may be placed in investments not included on a state’s legal list (see separate citation). BBS See Bulletin Board Service
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BDC See Business development corporation Benefit Various services, such as health care, flextime, day care, insurance, and vacation, offered to employees as part of a hiring package. Typically subsidized in whole or in part by the business. BIDCO See Business and industrial development company Billing cycle A system designed to evenly distribute customer billing throughout the month, preventing clerical backlogs. Birth See Business birth Blue chip security A low-risk, low-yield security representing an interest in a very stable company. Blue sky laws A general term that denotes various states’ laws regulating securities. Bond A written instrument executed by a bidder or contractor (the principal) and a second party (the surety or sureties) to assure fulfillment of the principal’s obligations to a third party (the obligee or government) identified in the bond. If the principal’s obligations are not met, the bond assures payment to the extent stipulated of any loss sustained by the obligee. Bonding requirements Terms contained in a bond (see separate citation). Bonus An amount of money paid to an employee as a reward for achieving certain business goals or objectives. Brainstorming A group session where employees contribute their ideas for solving a problem or meeting a company objective without fear of retribution or ridicule. Brand name The part of a brand, trademark, or service mark that can be spoken. It can be a word, letter, or group of words or letters.
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Bridge financing A short-term loan made in expectation of intermediateterm or long-term financing. Can be used when a company plans to go public in the near future. Broker One who matches resources available for innovation with those who need them. Budget An estimate of the spending necessary to complete a project or offer a service in comparison to cash-onhand and expected earnings for the coming year, with an emphasis on cost control. Bulletin Board Service (BBS) An online service enabling users to communicate with each other about specific topics. Business and industrial development company (BIDCO) A private, for-profit financing corporation chartered by the state to provide both equity and long-term debt capital to small business owners (see separate citations for equity and debt capital). Business birth The formation of a new establishment or enterprise. The appearance of a new establishment or enterprise in the Small Business Data Base (see separate citation). Business conditions Outside factors that can affect the financial performance of a business. Business contractions The number of establishments that have decreased in employment during a specified time. Business cycle A period of economic recession and recovery. These cycles vary in duration. Business death The voluntary or involuntary closure of a firm or establishment. The disappearance of an establishment or enterprise from the Small Business Data Base (see separate citation). Business development corporation (BDC) A business financing agency, usually composed of the financial institutions in an area or state, organized to
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assist in financing businesses unable to obtain assistance through normal channels; the risk is spread among various members of the business development corporation, and interest rates may vary somewhat from those charged by member institutions. A venture capital firm in which shares of ownership are publicly held and to which the Investment Act of 1940 applies. Business dissolution For enumeration purposes, the absence of a business that was present in the prior time period from any current record. Business entry See Business birth Business ethics Moral values and principles espoused by members of the business community as a guide to fair and honest business practices. Business exit See Business death Business expansions The number of establishments that added employees during a specified time. Business failure Closure of a business causing a loss to at least one creditor. Business format franchising The purchase of the name, trademark, and an ongoing business plan of the parent corporation or franchisor by the franchisee. Business license A legal authorization issued by municipal and state governments and required for business operations. Business name Enterprises must register their business names with local governments usually on a “doing business as” (DBA) form. (This name is sometimes referred to as a “fictional name.”) The procedure is part of the business licensing process and prevents any other business from using that same name for a similar business in the same locality. Business norms See Financial ratios
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Business permit See Business license Business plan A document that spells out a company’s expected course of action for a specified period, usually including a detailed listing and analysis of risks and uncertainties. For the small business, it should examine the proposed products, the market, the industry, the management policies, the marketing policies, production needs, and financial needs. Frequently, it is used as a prospectus for potential investors and lenders. Business proposal See Business plan Business service firm An establishment primarily engaged in rendering services to other business organizations on a fee or contract basis. Business start For enumeration purposes, a business with a name or similar designation that did not exist in a prior time period. Cafeteria plan See Flexible benefit plan Capacity Level of a firm’s, industry’s, or nation’s output corresponding to full practical utilization of available resources. Capital Assets less liabilities, representing the ownership interest in a business. A stock of accumulated goods, especially at a specified time and in contrast to income received during a specified time period. Accumulated goods devoted to production. Accumulated possessions calculated to bring income. Capital expenditure Expenses incurred by a business for improvements that will depreciate over time. Capital gain The monetary difference between the purchase price and the selling price of capital. Capital gains are taxed at a rate of 28% by the federal government.
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Capital intensity The relative importance of capital in the production process, usually expressed as the ratio of capital to labor but also sometimes as the ratio of capital to output. Capital resource The equipment, facilities and labor used to create products and services. Caribbean Basin Initiative An interdisciplinary program to support commerce among the businesses in the nations of the Caribbean Basin and the United States. Agencies involved include: the Agency for International Development, the U.S. Small Business Administration, the International Trade Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce, and various private sector groups. Catastrophic care Medical and other services for acute and long-term illnesses that cost more than insurance coverage limits or that cost the amount most families may be expected to pay with their own resources. CDC See Certified development corporation CD-ROM Compact disc with read-only memory used to store large amounts of digitized data. Certified development corporation (CDC) A local area or statewide corporation or authority (for profit or nonprofit) that packages U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), bank, state, and/or private money into financial assistance for existing business capital improvements. The SBA holds the second lien on its maximum share of 40 percent involvement. Each state has at least one certified development corporation. This program is called the SBA 504 Program. Certified lenders Banks that participate in the SBA guaranteed loan program (see separate citation). Such banks must have a good track record with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and must agree to certain conditions set forth by the agency. In return, the SBA agrees to process any guaranteed loan application within three business days.
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Champion An advocate for the development of an innovation. Channel of distribution The means used to transport merchandise from the manufacturer to the consumer. Chapter 7 of the 1978 Bankruptcy Act Provides for a court-appointed trustee who is responsible for liquidating a company’s assets in order to settle outstanding debts. Chapter 11 of the 1978 Bankruptcy Act Allows the business owners to retain control of the company while working with their creditors to reorganize their finances and establish better business practices to prevent liquidation of assets. Closely held corporation A corporation in which the shares are held by a few persons, usually officers, employees, or others close to the management; these shares are rarely offered to the public. Code of Federal Regulations Codification of general and permanent rules of the federal government published in the Federal Register. Code sharing See Computer code sharing Coinsurance Upon meeting the deductible payment, health insurance participants may be required to make additional health care cost-sharing payments. Coinsurance is a payment of a fixed percentage of the cost of each service; copayment is usually a fixed amount to be paid with each service. Collateral Securities, evidence of deposit, or other property pledged by a borrower to secure repayment of a loan. Collective ratemaking The establishment of uniform charges for services by a group of businesses in the same industry. Commercial insurance plan See Underwriting Commercial loans Short-term renewable loans used to finance specific capital needs of a business.
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Commercialization The final stage of the innovation process, including production and distribution. Common stock The most frequently used instrument for purchasing ownership in private or public companies. Common stock generally carries the right to vote on certain corporate actions and may pay dividends, although it rarely does in venture investments. In liquidation, common stockholders are the last to share in the proceeds from the sale of a corporation’s assets; bondholders and preferred shareholders have priority. Common stock is often used in firstround start-up financing. Community development corporation A corporation established to develop economic programs for a community and, in most cases, to provide financial support for such development. Competitor A business whose product or service is marketed for the same purpose/use and to the same consumer group as the product or service of another. Computer code sharing An arrangement whereby flights of a regional airline are identified by the two-letter code of a major carrier in the computer reservation system to help direct passengers to new regional carriers. Consignment A merchandising agreement, usually referring to secondhand shops, where the dealer pays the owner of an item a percentage of the profit when the item is sold. Consortium A coalition of organizations such as banks and corporations for ventures requiring large capital resources. Consultant An individual that is paid by a business to provide advice and expertise in a particular area. Consumer price index A measure of the fluctuation in prices between two points in time. Consumer research Research conducted by a business to obtain information about existing or potential consumer markets.
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Continuation coverage Health coverage offered for a specified period of time to employees who leave their jobs and to their widows, divorced spouses, or dependents. Contractions See Business contractions Convertible preferred stock A class of stock that pays a reasonable dividend and is convertible into common stock (see separate citation). Generally the convertible feature may only be exercised after being held for a stated period of time. This arrangement is usually considered second-round financing when a company needs equity to maintain its cash flow. Convertible securities A feature of certain bonds, debentures, or preferred stocks that allows them to be exchanged by the owner for another class of securities at a future date and in accordance with any other terms of the issue. Copayment See Coinsurance Copyright A legal form of protection available to creators and authors to safeguard their works from unlawful use or claim of ownership by others. Copyrights may be acquired for works of art, sculpture, music, and published or unpublished manuscripts. All copyrights should be registered at the Copyright Office of the Library of Congress. Corporate financial ratios The relationship between key figures found in a company’s financial statement expressed as a numeric value. Used to evaluate risk and company performance. Also known as Financial averages, Operating ratios, and Business ratios. Corporation A legal entity, chartered by a state or the federal government, recognized as a separate entity having its own rights, privileges, and liabilities distinct from those of its members. Cost containment Actions taken by employers and insurers to curtail rising health care costs; for example, increasing
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employee cost sharing (see separate citation), requiring second opinions, or preadmission screening. Cost sharing The requirement that health care consumers contribute to their own medical care costs through deductibles and coinsurance (see separate citations). Cost sharing does not include the amounts paid in premiums. It is used to control utilization of services; for example, requiring a fixed amount to be paid with each health care service. Cottage industry Businesses based in the home in which the family members are the labor force and family-owned equipment is used to process the goods. Credit Rating A letter or number calculated by an organization (such as Dun & Bradstreet) to represent the ability and disposition of a business to meet its financial obligations. Customer service Various techniques used to ensure the satisfaction of a customer. Cyclical peak The upper turning point in a business cycle. Cyclical trough The lower turning point in a business cycle. DBA See Business name Death See Business death Debenture A certificate given as acknowledgment of a debt (see separate citation) secured by the general credit of the issuing corporation. A bond, usually without security, issued by a corporation and sometimes convertible to common stock. Debt Something owed by one person to another. Financing in which a company receives capital that must be repaid; no ownership is transferred.
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

Debt capital Business financing that normally requires periodic interest payments and repayment of the principal within a specified time. Debt financing See Debt capital Debt securities Loans such as bonds and notes that provide a specified rate of return for a specified period of time. Deductible A set amount that an individual must pay before any benefits are received. Demand shock absorbers A term used to describe the role that some small firms play by expanding their output levels to accommodate a transient surge in demand. Demographics Statistics on various markets, including age, income, and education, used to target specific products or services to appropriate consumer groups. Demonstration Showing that a product or process has been modified sufficiently to meet the needs of users. Deregulation The lifting of government restrictions; for example, the lifting of government restrictions on the entry of new businesses, the expansion of services, and the setting of prices in particular industries. Desktop Publishing Using personal computers and specialized software to produce camera-ready copy for publications. Disaster loans Various types of physical and economic assistance available to individuals and businesses through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). This is the only SBA loan program available for residential purposes. Discrimination The denial of the rights and privileges of employment based on factors such as age, race, religion, or gender.
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Diseconomies of scale The condition in which the costs of production increase faster than the volume of production. Dissolution See Business dissolution Distribution Delivering a product or process to the user. Distributor One who delivers merchandise to the user.
Glossary

Diversified company A company whose products and services are used by several different markets. Doing business as (DBA) See Business name Dow Jones An information services company that publishes the Wall Street Journal and other sources of financial information. Dow Jones Industrial Average An indicator of stock market performance. Earned income A tax term that refers to wages and salaries earned by the recipient, as opposed to monies earned through interest and dividends. Economic efficiency The use of productive resources to the fullest practical extent in the provision of the set of goods and services that is most preferred by purchasers in the economy. Economic indicators Statistics used to express the state of the economy. These include the length of the average work week, the rate of unemployment, and stock prices. Economically disadvantaged See Socially and economically disadvantaged Economies of scale See Scale economies EEOC See Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 8(a) Program A program authorized by the Small Business Act that directs federal contracts to small businesses owned and
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operated by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals. Electronic mail (e-mail) The electronic transmission of mail via phone lines. E-mail See Electronic mail Employee leasing A contract by which employers arrange to have their workers hired by a leasing company and then leased back to them for a management fee. The leasing company typically assumes the administrative burden of payroll and provides a benefit package to the workers. Employee tenure The length of time an employee works for a particular employer. Employer identification number The business equivalent of a social security number. Assigned by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. Enterprise An aggregation of all establishments owned by a parent company. An enterprise may consist of a single, independent establishment or include subsidiaries and other branches under the same ownership and control. Enterprise zone A designated area, usually found in inner cities and other areas with significant unemployment, where businesses receive tax credits and other incentives to entice them to establish operations there. Entrepreneur A person who takes the risk of organizing and operating a new business venture. Entry See Business entry Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) A federal agency that ensures nondiscrimination in the hiring and firing practices of a business. Equal opportunity employer An employer who adheres to the standards set by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (see separate citation).
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Equity The ownership interest. Financing in which partial or total ownership of a company is surrendered in exchange for capital. An investor’s financial return comes from dividend payments and from growth in the net worth of the business. Equity capital See Equity; Equity midrisk venture capital Equity financing See Equity; Equity midrisk venture capital Equity midrisk venture capital An unsecured investment in a company. Usually a purchase of ownership interest in a company that occurs in the later stages of a company’s development. Equity partnership A limited partnership arrangement for providing startup and seed capital to businesses. Equity securities See Equity Equity-type Debt financing subordinated to conventional debt. Establishment A single-location business unit that may be independent (a single-establishment enterprise) or owned by a parent enterprise. Establishment and Enterprise Microdata File See U.S. Establishment and Enterprise Microdata File Establishment birth See Business birth Establishment Longitudinal Microdata File See U.S. Establishment Longitudinal Microdata File Ethics See Business ethics Evaluation Determining the potential success of translating an invention into a product or process. Exit See Business exit Experience rating See Underwriting
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

Export A product sold outside of the country. Export license A general or specific license granted by the U.S. Department of Commerce required of anyone wishing to export goods. Some restricted articles need approval from the U.S. Departments of State, Defense, or Energy. Failure See Business failure Fair share agreement An agreement reached between a franchisor and a minority business organization to extend business ownership to minorities by either reducing the amount of capital required or by setting aside certain marketing areas for minority business owners. Feasibility study A study to determine the likelihood that a proposed product or development will fulfill the objectives of a particular investor. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Federal agency that promotes free enterprise and competition within the U.S. Federal Trade Mark Act of 1946 See Lanham Act Fictional name See Business name Fiduciary An individual or group that hold assets in trust for a beneficiary. Financial analysis The techniques used to determine money needs in a business. Techniques include ratio analysis, calculation of return on investment, guides for measuring profitability, and break-even analysis to determine ultimate success. Financial intermediary A financial institution that acts as the intermediary between borrowers and lenders. Banks, savings and loan associations, finance companies, and venture capital companies are major financial intermediaries in the United States.
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Financial ratios See Corporate financial ratios; Industry financial ratios Financial statement A written record of business finances, including balance sheets and profit and loss statements. Financing See First-stage financing; Second-stage financing; Thirdstage financing First-stage financing Financing provided to companies that have expended their initial capital, and require funds to start full-scale manufacturing and sales. Also known as First-round financing. Fiscal year Any twelve-month period used by businesses for accounting purposes. 504 Program See Certified development corporation Flexible benefit plan A plan that offers a choice among cash and/or qualified benefits such as group term life insurance, accident and health insurance, group legal services, dependent care assistance, and vacations. FOB See Free on board Format franchising See Business format franchising; Franchising 401(k) plan A financial plan where employees contribute a percentage of their earnings to a fund that is invested in stocks, bonds, or money markets for the purpose of saving money for retirement. Four Ps Marketing terms referring to Product, Price, Place, and Promotion. Franchising A form of licensing by which the owner-the franchisor- distributes or markets a product, method, or service through affiliated dealers called franchisees. The product, method, or service being marketed is identified by a brand name, and the franchisor
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maintains control over the marketing methods employed. The franchisee is often given exclusive access to a defined geographic area. Free on board (FOB) A pricing term indicating that the quoted price includes the cost of loading goods into transport vessels at a specified place. Frictional unemployment See Unemployment FTC See Federal Trade Commission Fulfillment The systems necessary for accurate delivery of an ordered item, including subscriptions and direct marketing. Full-time workers Generally, those who work a regular schedule of more than 35 hours per week. Garment registration number A number that must appear on every garment sold in the U.S. to indicate the manufacturer of the garment, which may or may not be the same as the label under which the garment is sold. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission assigns and regulates garment registration numbers. Gatekeeper A key contact point for entry into a network. GDP See Gross domestic product General obligation bond A municipal bond secured by the taxing power of the municipality. The Tax Reform Act of 1986 limits the purposes for which such bonds may be issued and establishes volume limits on the extent of their issuance. GNP See Gross national product Good Housekeeping Seal Seal appearing on products that signifies the fulfillment of the standards set by the Good Housekeeping Institute to protect consumer interests.
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Goods sector All businesses producing tangible goods, including agriculture, mining, construction, and manufacturing businesses. GPO See Gross product originating Gross domestic product (GDP) The part of the nation’s gross national product (see separate citation) generated by private business using resources from within the country. Gross national product (GNP) The most comprehensive single measure of aggregate economic output. Represents the market value of the total output of goods and services produced by a nation’s economy. Gross product originating (GPO) A measure of business output estimated from the income or production side using employee compensation, profit income, net interest, capital consumption, and indirect business taxes. HAL See Handicapped assistance loan program Handicapped assistance loan program (HAL) Low-interest direct loan program through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) for handicapped persons. The SBA requires that these persons demonstrate that their disability is such that it is impossible for them to secure employment, thus making it necessary to go into their own business to make a living. Health maintenance organization (HMO) Organization of physicians and other health care professionals that provides health services to subscribers and their dependents on a prepaid basis. Health provider An individual or institution that gives medical care. Under Medicare, an institutional provider is a hospital, skilled nursing facility, home health agency, or provider of certain physical therapy services. Hispanic A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Latin American (Central or South American), European Spanish, or other Spanish-speaking origin or ancestry.
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

HMO See Health maintenance organization Home-based business A business with an operating address that is also a residential address (usually the residential address of the proprietor). Hub-and-spoke system A system in which flights of an airline from many different cities (the spokes) converge at a single airport (the hub). After allowing passengers sufficient time to make connections, planes then depart for different cities. Human Resources Management A business program designed to oversee recruiting, pay, benefits, and other issues related to the company’s work force, including planning to determine the optimal use of labor to increase production, thereby increasing profit. Idea An original concept for a new product or process. Import Products produced outside the country in which they are consumed. Income Money or its equivalent, earned or accrued, resulting from the sale of goods and services. Income statement A financial statement that lists the profits and losses of a company at a given time. Incorporation The filing of a certificate of incorporation with a state’s secretary of state, thereby limiting the business owner’s liability. Incubator A facility designed to encourage entrepreneurship and minimize obstacles to new business formation and growth, particularly for high-technology firms, by housing a number of fledgling enterprises that share an array of services, such as meeting areas, secretarial services, accounting, research library, on-site financial and management counseling, and word processing facilities.
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Independent contractor An individual considered self-employed (see separate citation) and responsible for paying Social Security taxes and income taxes on earnings. Indirect health coverage Health insurance obtained through another individual’s health care plan; for example, a spouse’s employersponsored plan. Industrial development authority The financial arm of a state or other political subdivision established for the purpose of financing economic development in an area, usually through loans to nonprofit organizations, which in turn provide facilities for manufacturing and other industrial operations. Industry financial ratios Corporate financial ratios averaged for a specified industry. These are used for comparison purposes and reveal industry trends and identify differences between the performance of a specific company and the performance of its industry. Also known as Industrial averages, Industry ratios, Financial averages, and Business or Industrial norms. Inflation Increases in volume of currency and credit, generally resulting in a sharp and continuing rise in price levels. Informal capital Financing from informal, unorganized sources; includes informal debt capital such as trade credit or loans from friends and relatives and equity capital from informal investors. Initial public offering (IPO) A corporation’s first offering of stock to the public. Innovation The introduction of a new idea into the marketplace in the form of a new product or service or an improvement in organization or process. Intellectual property Any idea or work that can be considered proprietary in nature and is thus protected from infringement by others.
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Internal capital Debt or equity financing obtained from the owner or through retained business earnings. Internet A government-designed computer network that contains large amounts of information and is accessible through various vendors for a fee. Intrapreneurship The state of employing entrepreneurial principles to nonentrepreneurial situations. Invention The tangible form of a technological idea, which could include a laboratory prototype, drawings, formulas, etc. IPO See Initial public offering Job description The duties and responsibilities required in a particular position. Job tenure A period of time during which an individual is continuously employed in the same job. Joint marketing agreements Agreements between regional and major airlines, often involving the coordination of flight schedules, fares, and baggage transfer. These agreements help regional carriers operate at lower cost. Joint venture Venture in which two or more people combine efforts in a particular business enterprise, usually a single transaction or a limited activity, and agree to share the profits and losses jointly or in proportion to their contributions. Keogh plan Designed for self-employed persons and unincorporated businesses as a tax-deferred pension account. Labor force Civilians considered eligible for employment who are also willing and able to work. Labor force participation rate The civilian labor force as a percentage of the civilian population.
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Labor intensity The relative importance of labor in the production process, usually measured as the capital-labor ratio; i.e., the ratio of units of capital (typically, dollars of tangible assets) to the number of employees. The higher the capitallabor ratio exhibited by a firm or industry, the lower the capital intensity of that firm or industry is said to be. Labor surplus area An area in which there exists a high unemployment rate. In procurement (see separate citation), extra points are given to firms in counties that are designated a labor surplus area; this information is requested on procurement bid sheets. Labor union An organization of similarly-skilled workers who collectively bargain with management over the conditions of employment. Laboratory prototype See Prototype LAN See Local Area Network Lanham Act Refers to the Federal Trade Mark Act of 1946. Protects registered trademarks, trade names, and other service marks used in commerce. Large business-dominated industry Industry in which a minimum of 60 percent of employment or sales is in firms with more than 500 workers. LBO See Leveraged buy-out Leader pricing A reduction in the price of a good or service in order to generate more sales of that good or service. Legal list A list of securities selected by a state in which certain institutions and fiduciaries (such as pension funds, insurance companies, and banks) may invest. Securities not on the list are not eligible for investment. Legal lists typically restrict investments to high quality securities meeting certain specifications. Generally, investment is
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

limited to U.S. securities and investment-grade blue chip securities (see separate citation). Leveraged buy-out (LBO) The purchase of a business or a division of a corporation through a highly leveraged financing package. Liability An obligation or duty to perform a service or an act. Also defined as money owed. License A legal agreement granting to another the right to use a technological innovation. Limited partnerships See Venture capital limited partnerships Liquidity The ability to convert a security into cash promptly. Loans See Commercial loans; Disaster loans; SBA direct loans; SBA guaranteed loans; SBA special lending institution categories Local Area Network (LAN) Computer networks contained within a single building or small area; used to facilitate the sharing of information. Local development corporation An organization, usually made up of local citizens of a community, designed to improve the economy of the area by inducing business and industry to locate and expand there. A local development corporation establishes a capability to finance local growth. Long-haul rates Rates charged by a transporter in which the distance traveled is more than 800 miles. Long-term debt An obligation that matures in a period that exceeds five years. Low-grade bond A corporate bond that is rated below investment grade by the major rating agencies (Standard and Poor’s, Moody’s). Macro-efficiency Efficiency as it pertains to the operation of markets and market systems.
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Managed care A cost-effective health care program initiated by employers whereby low-cost health care is made available to the employees in return for exclusive patronage to program doctors. Management Assistance Programs See SBA Management Assistance Programs Management and technical assistance A term used by many programs to mean business (as opposed to technological) assistance. Mandated benefits Specific treatments, providers, or individuals required by law to be included in commercial health plans. Market evaluation The use of market information to determine the sales potential of a specific product or process. Market failure The situation in which the workings of a competitive market do not produce the best results from the point of view of the entire society. Market information Data of any type that can be used for market evaluation, which could include demographic data, technology forecasting, regulatory changes, etc. Market research A systematic collection, analysis, and reporting of data about the market and its preferences, opinions, trends, and plans; used for corporate decision-making. Market share In a particular market, the percentage of sales of a specific product. Marketing Promotion of goods or services through various media. Master Establishment List (MEL) A list of firms in the United States developed by the U.S. Small Business Administration; firms can be selected by industry, region, state, standard metropolitan statistical area (see separate citation), county, and zip code. Maturity The date upon which the principal or stated value of a bond or other indebtedness becomes due and payable.
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Medicaid (Title XIX) A federally aided, state-operated and administered program that provides medical benefits for certain low income persons in need of health and medical care who are eligible for one of the government’s welfare cash payment programs, including the aged, the blind, the disabled, and members of families with dependent children where one parent is absent, incapacitated, or unemployed. Medicare (Title XVIII) A nationwide health insurance program for disabled and aged persons. Health insurance is available to insured persons without regard to income. Monies from payroll taxes cover hospital insurance and monies from general revenues and beneficiary premiums pay for supplementary medical insurance. MEL See Master Establishment List MESBIC See Minority enterprise small business investment corporation MET See Multiple employer trust Metropolitan statistical area (MSA) A means used by the government to define large population centers that may transverse different governmental jurisdictions. For example, the Washington, D.C. MSA includes the District of Columbia and contiguous parts of Maryland and Virginia because all of these geopolitical areas comprise one population and economic operating unit. Mezzanine financing See Third-stage financing Micro-efficiency Efficiency as it pertains to the operation of individual firms. Microdata Information on the characteristics of an individual business firm. Mid-term debt An obligation that matures within one to five years.
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Midrisk venture capital See Equity midrisk venture capital Minimum premium plan A combination approach to funding an insurance plan aimed primarily at premium tax savings. The employer self-funds a fixed percentage of estimated monthly claims and the insurance company insures the excess. Minimum wage The lowest hourly wage allowed by the federal government. Minority Business Development Agency Contracts with private firms throughout the nation to sponsor Minority Business Development Centers which provide minority firms with advice and technical assistance on a fee basis. Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Corporation (MESBIC) A federally funded private venture capital firm licensed by the U.S. Small Business Administration to provide capital to minority-owned businesses (see separate citation). Minority-owned business Businesses owned by those who are socially or economically disadvantaged (see separate citation). Mom and Pop business A small store or enterprise having limited capital, principally employing family members. Moonlighter A wage-and-salary worker with a side business. MSA See Metropolitan statistical area Multi-employer plan A health plan to which more than one employer is required to contribute and that may be maintained through a collective bargaining agreement and required to meet standards prescribed by the U.S. Department of Labor. Multi-level marketing A system of selling in which you sign up other people to assist you and they, in turn, recruit others to help them. Some entrepreneurs have built successful
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companies on this concept because the main focus of their activities is their product and product sales. Multimedia The use of several types of media to promote a product or service. Also, refers to the use of several different types of media (sight, sound, pictures, text) in a CD-ROM (see separate citation) product. Multiple employer trust (MET) A self-funded benefit plan generally geared toward small employers sharing a common interest. NAFTA See North American Free Trade Agreement NASDAQ See National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations Provides price quotes on over-the-counter securities as well as securities listed on the New York Stock Exchange. National income Aggregate earnings of labor and property arising from the production of goods and services in a nation’s economy. Net assets See Net worth Net income The amount remaining from earnings and profits after all expenses and costs have been met or deducted. Also known as Net earnings. Net profit Money earned after production and overhead expenses (see separate citations) have been deducted. Net worth The difference between a company’s total assets and its total liabilities. Network A chain of interconnected individuals or organizations sharing information and/or services.
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New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) The oldest stock exchange in the U.S. Allows for trading in stocks, bonds, warrants, options, and rights that meet listing requirements. Niche A career or business for which a person is wellsuited. Also, a product which fulfills one need of a particular market segment, often with little or no competition.
Glossary

Nodes One workstation in a network, either local area or wide area (see separate citations). Nonbank bank A bank that either accepts deposits or makes loans, but not both. Used to create many new branch banks. Noncompetitive awards A method of contracting whereby the federal government negotiates with only one contractor to supply a product or service. Nonmember bank A state-regulated bank that does not belong to the federal bank system. Nonprofit An organization that has no shareholders, does not distribute profits, and is without federal and state tax liabilities. Norms See Financial ratios North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Passed in 1993, NAFTA eliminates trade barriers among businesses in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. NYSE See New York Stock Exchange Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Federal agency that regulates health and safety standards within the workplace. Optimal firm size The business size at which the production cost per unit of output (average cost) is, in the long run, at its minimum.
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Organizational chart A hierarchical chart tracking the chain of command within an organization. OSHA See Occupational Safety & Health Administration Overhead Expenses, such as employee benefits and building utilities, incurred by a business that are unrelated to the actual product or service sold. Owner’s capital Debt or equity funds provided by the owner(s) of a business; sources of owner’s capital are personal savings, sales of assets, or loans from financial institutions. P&L See Profit and loss statement Part-time workers Normally, those who work less than 35 hours per week. The Tax Reform Act indicated that part-time workers who work less than 17.5 hours per week may be excluded from health plans for purposes of complying with federal nondiscrimination rules. Part-year workers Those who work less than 50 weeks per year. Partnership Two or more parties who enter into a legal relationship to conduct business for profit. Defined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Code as joint ventures, syndicates, groups, pools, and other associations of two or more persons organized for profit that are not specifically classified in the IRS code as corporations or proprietorships. Patent A grant made by the government assuring an inventor the sole right to make, use, and sell an invention for a period of 17 years. PC See Professional corporation Peak See Cyclical peak Pension A series of payments made monthly, semiannually, annually, or at other specified intervals during the
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lifetime of the pensioner for distribution upon retirement. The term is sometimes used to denote the portion of the retirement allowance financed by the employer’s contributions. Pension fund A fund established to provide for the payment of pension benefits; the collective contributions made by all of the parties to the pension plan. Performance appraisal An established set of objective criteria, based on job description and requirements, that is used to evaluate the performance of an employee in a specific job. Permit See Business license Plan See Business plan Pooling An arrangement for employers to achieve efficiencies and lower health costs by joining together to purchase group health insurance or self-insurance. PPO See Preferred provider organization Preferred lenders program See SBA special lending institution categories Preferred provider organization (PPO) A contractual arrangement with a health care services organization that agrees to discount its health care rates in return for faster payment and/or a patient base. Premiums The amount of money paid to an insurer for health insurance under a policy. The premium is generally paid periodically (e.g., monthly), and often is split between the employer and the employee. Unlike deductibles and coinsurance or copayments, premiums are paid for coverage whether or not benefits are actually used. Prime-age workers Employees 25 to 54 years of age. Prime contract A contract awarded directly by the U.S. Federal Government.
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

Private company See Closely held corporation Private placement A method of raising capital by offering for sale an investment or business to a small group of investors (generally avoiding registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission or state securities registration agencies). Also known as Private financing or Private offering. Pro forma The use of hypothetical figures in financial statements to represent future expenditures, debts, and other potential financial expenses. Proactive Taking the initiative to solve problems and anticipate future events before they happen, instead of reacting to an already existing problem or waiting for a difficult situation to occur. Procurement A contract from an agency of the federal government for goods or services from a small business. Prodigy An online service which is accessible by computer modem. The service features Internet access, bulletin boards, online periodicals, electronic mail, and other services for subscribers. Product development The stage of the innovation process where research is translated into a product or process through evaluation, adaptation, and demonstration. Product franchising An arrangement for a franchisee to use the name and to produce the product line of the franchisor or parent corporation. Production The manufacture of a product. Production prototype See Prototype Productivity A measurement of the number of goods produced during a specific amount of time.
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Professional corporation (PC) Organized by members of a profession such as medicine, dentistry, or law for the purpose of conducting their professional activities as a corporation. Liability of a member or shareholder is limited in the same manner as in a business corporation. Profit and loss statement (P & L) The summary of the incomes (total revenues) and costs of a company’s operation during a specific period of time. Also known as Income and expense statement. Proposal See Business plan Proprietorship The most common legal form of business ownership; about 85 percent of all small businesses are proprietorships. The liability of the owner is unlimited in this form of ownership. Prospective payment system A cost-containment measure included in the Social Security Amendments of 1983 whereby Medicare payments to hospitals are based on established prices, rather than on cost reimbursement. Prototype A model that demonstrates the validity of the concept of an invention (laboratory prototype); a model that meets the needs of the manufacturing process and the user (production prototype). Prudent investor rule or standard A legal doctrine that requires fiduciaries to make investments using the prudence, diligence, and intelligence that would be used by a prudent person in making similar investments. Because fiduciaries make investments on behalf of third-party beneficiaries, the standard results in very conservative investments. Until recently, most state regulations required the fiduciary to apply this standard to each investment. Newer, more progressive regulations permit fiduciaries to apply this standard to the portfolio taken as a whole, thereby allowing a fiduciary to balance a portfolio with higher-yield, higher-risk investments. In states with more progressive regulations, practically every type of security is eligible for inclusion in the portfolio of investments made by a fiduciary, provided
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that the portfolio investments, in their totality, are those of a prudent person. Public equity markets Organized markets for trading in equity shares such as common stocks, preferred stocks, and warrants. Includes markets for both regularly traded and nonregularly traded securities. Public offering General solicitation for participation in an investment opportunity. Interstate public offerings are supervised by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (see separate citation). Quality control The process by which a product is checked and tested to ensure consistent standards of high quality. Rate of return The yield obtained on a security or other investment based on its purchase price or its current market price. The total rate of return is current income plus or minus capital appreciation or depreciation. Real property Includes the land and all that is contained on it. Realignment See Resource realignment Recession Contraction of economic activity occurring between the peak and trough (see separate citations) of a business cycle. Regulated market A market in which the government controls the forces of supply and demand, such as who may enter and what price may be charged. Regulation D A vehicle by which small businesses make small offerings and private placements of securities with limited disclosure requirements. It was designed to ease the burdens imposed on small businesses utilizing this method of capital formation. Regulatory Flexibility Act An act requiring federal agencies to evaluate the impact of their regulations on small businesses before
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the regulations are issued and to consider less burdensome alternatives. Research The initial stage of the innovation process, which includes idea generation and invention. Research and development financing A tax-advantaged partnership set up to finance product development for start-ups as well as more mature companies. Resource mobility The ease with which labor and capital move from firm to firm or from industry to industry. Resource realignment The adjustment of productive resources to interindustry changes in demand. Resources The sources of support or help in the innovation process, including sources of financing, technical evaluation, market evaluation, management and business assistance, etc. Retained business earnings Business profits that are retained by the business rather than being distributed to the shareholders as dividends. Revolving credit An agreement with a lending institution for an amount of money, which cannot exceed a set maximum, over a specified period of time. Each time the borrower repays a portion of the loan, the amount of the repayment may be borrowed yet again. Risk capital See Venture capital Risk management The act of identifying potential sources of financial loss and taking action to minimize their negative impact. Routing The sequence of steps necessary to complete a product during production. S corporations See Sub chapter S corporations
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

SBA See Small Business Administration SBA direct loans Loans made directly by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA); monies come from funds appropriated specifically for this purpose. In general, SBA direct loans carry interest rates slightly lower than those in the private financial markets and are available only to applicants unable to secure private financing or an SBA guaranteed loan. SBA 504 Program See Certified development corporation SBA guaranteed loans Loans made by lending institutions in which the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) will pay a prior agreed-upon percentage of the outstanding principal in the event the borrower of the loan defaults. The terms of the loan and the interest rate are negotiated between theborrower and the lending institution, within set parameters. SBA loans See Disaster loans; SBA direct loans; SBA guaranteed loans; SBA special lending institution categories SBA Management Assistance Programs Classes, workshops, counseling, and publications offered by the U.S. Small Business Administration. SBA special lending institution categories U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) loan program in which the SBA promises certified banks a 72-hour turnaround period in giving its approval for a loan, and in which preferred lenders in a pilot program are allowed to write SBA loans without seeking prior SBA approval. SBDB See Small Business Data Base SBDC See Small business development centers SBI See Small business institutes program SBIC See Small business investment corporation
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SBIR Program See Small Business Innovation Development Act of 1982 Scale economies The decline of the production cost per unit of output (average cost) as the volume of output increases. Scale efficiency The reduction in unit cost available to a firm when producing at a higher output volume. SCORE See Service Corps of Retired Executives SEC See Securities and Exchange Commission SECA See Self-Employment Contributions Act Second-stage financing Working capital for the initial expansion of a company that is producing, shipping, and has growing accounts receivable and inventories. Also known as Secondround financing. Secondary market A market established for the purchase and sale of outstanding securities following their initial distribution. Secondary worker Any worker in a family other than the person who is the primary source of income for the family. Secondhand capital Previously used and subsequently resold capital equipment (e.g., buildings and machinery). Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Federal agency charged with regulating the trade of securities to prevent unethical practices in the investor market. Securitized debt A marketing technique that converts long-term loans to marketable securities. Seed capital Venture financing provided in the early stages of the innovation process, usually during product development.
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Self-employed person One who works for a profit or fees in his or her own business, profession, or trade, or who operates a farm. Self-Employment Contributions Act (SECA) Federal law that governs the self-employment tax (see separate citation). Self-employment income Income covered by Social Security if a business earns a net income of at least $400.00 during the year. Taxes are paid on earnings that exceed $400.00. Self-employment retirement plan See Keogh plan Self-employment tax Required tax imposed on self-employed individuals for the provision of Social Security and Medicare. The tax must be paid quarterly with estimated income tax statements. Self-funding A health benefit plan in which a firm uses its own funds to pay claims, rather than transferring the financial risks of paying claims to an outside insurer in exchange for premium payments. Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) Volunteers for the SBA Management Assistance Program who provide one-on-one counseling and teach workshops and seminars for small firms. Service firm See Business service firm Service sector Broadly defined, all U.S. industries that produce intangibles, including the five major industry divisions of transportation, communications, and utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Set asides See Small business set asides Short-haul service A type of transportation service in which the transporter supplies service between cities where the maximum distance is no more than 200 miles. Short-term debt An obligation that matures in one year.
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SIC codes See Standard Industrial Classification codes Single-establishment enterprise See Establishment Small business An enterprise that is independently owned and operated, is not dominant in its field, and employs fewer than 500 people. For SBA purposes, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) considers various other factors (such as gross annual sales) in determining size of a business. Small Business Administration (SBA) An independent federal agency that provides assistance with loans, management, and advocating interests before other federal agencies. Small Business Data Base A collection of microdata (see separate citation) files on individual firms developed and maintained by the U.S. Small Business Administration. Small business development centers (SBDC) Centers that provide support services to small businesses, such as individual counseling, SBA advice, seminars and conferences, and other learning center activities. Most services are free of charge, or available at minimal cost. Small business development corporation See Certified development corporation Small business-dominated industry Industry in which a minimum of 60 percent of employment or sales is in firms with fewer than 500 employees. Small Business Innovation Development Act of 1982 Federal statute requiring federal agencies with large extramural research and development budgets to allocate a certain percentage of these funds to small research and development firms. The program, called the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, is designed to stimulate technological innovation and make greater use of small businesses in meeting national innovation needs. Small business institutes (SBI) program Cooperative arrangements made by U.S. Small Business Administration district offices and local colleges and
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

universities to provide small business firms with graduate students to counsel them without charge. Small business investment corporation (SBIC) A privately owned company licensed and funded through the U.S. Small Business Administration and private sector sources to provide equity or debt capital to small businesses. Small business set asides Procurement (see separate citation) opportunities required by law to be on all contracts under $10,000 or a certain percentage of an agency’s total procurement expenditure. Smaller firms For U.S. Department of Commerce purposes, those firms not included in the Fortune 1000. SMSA See Metropolitan statistical area Socially and economically disadvantaged Individuals who have been subjected to racial or ethnic prejudice or cultural bias without regard to their qualities as individuals, and whose abilities to compete are impaired because of diminished opportunities to obtain capital and credit. Sole proprietorship An unincorporated, one-owner business, farm, or professional practice. Special lending institution categories See SBA special lending institution categories Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes Four-digit codes established by the U.S. Federal Government to categorize businesses by type of economic activity; the first two digits correspond to major groups such as construction and manufacturing, while the last two digits correspond to subgroups such as home construction or highway construction. Standard metropolitan statistical area (SMSA) See Metropolitan statistical area Start-up A new business, at the earliest stages of development and financing.
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Start-up costs Costs incurred before a business can commence operations. Start-up financing Financing provided to companies that have either completed product development and initial marketing or have been in business for less than one year but have not yet sold their product commercially.
Glossary

Stock A certificate of equity ownership in a business. Stop-loss coverage Insurance for a self-insured plan that reimburses the company for any losses it might incur in its health claims beyond a specified amount. Strategic planning Projected growth and development of a business to establish a guiding direction for the future. Also used to determine which market segments to explore for optimal sales of products or services. Structural unemployment See Unemployment Sub chapter S corporations Corporations that are considered noncorporate for tax purposes but legally remain corporations. Subcontract A contract between a prime contractor and a subcontractor, or between subcontractors, to furnish supplies or services for performance of a prime contract (see separate citation) or a subcontract. Surety bonds Bonds providing reimbursement to an individual, company, or the government if a firm fails to complete a contract. The U.S. Small Business Administration guarantees surety bonds in a program much like the SBA guaranteed loan program (see separate citation). Swing loan See Bridge financing Target market The clients or customers sought for a business’ product or service.
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Targeted Jobs Tax Credit Federal legislation enacted in 1978 that provides a tax credit to an employer who hires structurally unemployed individuals. Tax number A number assigned to a business by a state revenue department that enables the business to buy goods without paying sales tax. Taxable bonds An interest-bearing certificate of public or private indebtedness. Bonds are issued by public agencies to finance economic development. Technical assistance See Management and technical assistance Technical evaluation Assessment of technological feasibility. Technology The method in which a firm combines and utilizes labor and capital resources to produce goods or services; the application of science for commercial or industrial purposes. Technology transfer The movement of information about a technology or intellectual property from one party to another for use. Tenure See Employee tenure Term The length of time for which a loan is made. Terms of a note The conditions or limits of a note; includes the interest rate per annum, the due date, and transferability and convertibility features, if any. Third-party administrator An outside company responsible for handling claims and performing administrative tasks associated with health insurance plan maintenance. Third-stage financing Financing provided for the major expansion of a company whose sales volume is increasing and that is breaking even or profitable. These funds are used for further plant expansion, marketing, working capital,
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or development of an improved product. Also known as Third-round or Mezzanine financing. Time deposit A bank deposit that cannot be withdrawn before a specified future time. Time management Skills and scheduling techniques used to maximize productivity. Trade credit Credit extended by suppliers of raw materials or finished products. In an accounting statement, trade credit is referred to as “accounts payable.” Trade name The name under which a company conducts business, or by which its business, goods, or services are identified. It may or may not be registered as a trademark. Trade periodical A publication with a specific focus on one or more aspects of business and industry. Trade secret Competitive advantage gained by a business through the use of a unique manufacturing process or formula. Trade show An exhibition of goods or services used in a particular industry. Typically held in exhibition centers where exhibitors rent space to display their merchandise. Trademark A graphic symbol, device, or slogan that identifies a business. A business has property rights to its trademark from the inception of its use, but it is still prudent to register all trademarks with the Trademark Office of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Translation See Product development Treasury bills Investment tender issued by the Federal Reserve Bank in amounts of $10,000 that mature in 91 to 182 days. Treasury bonds Long-term notes with maturity dates of not less than seven and not more than twenty-five years.
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GLOSSARY OF SMALL BUSINESS TERMS

Treasury notes Short-term notes maturing in less than seven years. Trend A statistical measurement used to track changes that occur over time. Trough See Cyclical trough UCC See Uniform Commercial Code UL See Underwriters Laboratories Underwriters Laboratories (UL) One of several private firms that tests products and processes to determine their safety. Although various firms can provide this kind of testing service, many local and insurance codes specify UL certification. Underwriting A process by which an insurer determines whether or not and on what basis it will accept an application for insurance. In an experience-rated plan, premiums are based on a firm’s or group’s past claims; factors other than prior claims are used for community-rated or manually rated plans. Unfair competition Refers to business practices, usually unethical, such as using unlicensed products, pirating merchandise, or misleading the public through false advertising, which give the offending business an unequitable advantage over others. Unfunded accrued liability The excess of total liabilities, both present and prospective, over present and prospective assets. Unemployment The joblessness of individuals who are willing to work, who are legally and physically able to work, and who are seeking work. Unemployment may represent the temporary joblessness of a worker between jobs (frictional unemployment) or the joblessness of a worker whose skills are not suitable for jobs available in the labor market (structural unemployment).
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Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) A code of laws governing commercial transactions across the U.S., except Louisiana. Their purpose is to bring uniformity to financial transactions. Uniform product code (UPC symbol) A computer-readable label comprised of ten digits and stripes that encodes what a product is and how much it costs. The first five digits are assigned by the Uniform Product Code Council, and the last five digits by the individual manufacturer. Unit cost See Average cost UPC symbol See Uniform product code U.S. Establishment and Enterprise Microdata (USEEM) File A cross-sectional database containing information on employment, sales, and location for individual enterprises and establishments with employees that have a Dun & Bradstreet credit rating. U.S. Establishment Longitudinal Microdata (USELM) File A database containing longitudinally linked sample microdata on establishments drawn from the U.S. Establishment and Enterprise Microdata file (see separate citation). U.S. Small Business Administration 504 Program See Certified development corporation USEEM See U.S. Establishment and Enterprise Microdata File USELM See U.S. Establishment Longitudinal Microdata File VCN See Venture capital network Venture capital Money used to support new or unusual business ventures that exhibit above-average growth rates, significant potential for market expansion, and are in need of additional financing to sustain growth or further research and development; equity or equitytype financing traditionally provided at the
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commercialization stage, increasingly available prior to commercialization. Venture capital company A company organized to provide seed capital to a business in its formation stage, or in its first or second stage of expansion. Funding is obtained through public or private pension funds, commercial banks and bank holding companies, small business investment corporations licensed by the U.S. Small Business Administration, private venture capital firms, insurance companies, investment management companies, bank trust departments, industrial companies seeking to diversify their investment, and investment bankers acting as intermediaries for other investors or directly investing on their own behalf. Venture capital limited partnerships Designed for business development, these partnerships are an institutional mechanism for providing capital for young, technology-oriented businesses. The investors’ money is pooled and invested in money market assets until venture investments have been selected. The general partners are experienced investment managers who select and invest the equity and debt securities of firms with high growth potential and the ability to go public in the near future. Venture capital network (VCN) A computer database that matches investors with entrepreneurs. WAN See Wide Area Network

Wide Area Network (WAN) Computer networks linking systems throughout a state or around the world in order to facilitate the sharing of information. Withholding Federal, state, social security, and unemployment taxes withheld by the employer from employees’ wages; employers are liable for these taxes and the corporate umbrella and bankruptcy will not exonerate an employer from paying back payroll withholding. Employers should escrow these funds in a separate account and disperse them quarterly to withholding authorities. Workers’ compensation A state-mandated form of insurance covering workers injured in job-related accidents. In some states, the state is the insurer; in other states, insurance must be acquired from commercial insurance firms. Insurance rates are based on a number of factors, including salaries, firm history, and risk of occupation. Working capital Refers to a firm’s short-term investment of current assets, including cash, short-term securities, accounts receivable, and inventories. Yield The rate of income returned on an investment, expressed as a percentage. Income yield is obtained by dividing the current dollar income by the current market price of the security. Net yield or yield to maturity is the current income yield minus any premium above par or plus any discount from par in purchase price, with the adjustment spread over the period from the date of purchase to the date of maturity.

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Index
Listings in this index are arranged alphabetically by business plan type, then alphabetically by business plan name. Users are provided with the volume number in which the plan appears.

Art Glass Studio
Phyllis Farmington Art Glass, 6

Biscotti Bakery
Italian Eatery, The, 1

Audio Production Service
Jack Cornwall Productions, 4

Bistro and Wine Bar
Wine Bistro, The, 10

Auto Accessories and Detailing
Auto Accessories Unlimited, 3 J.E.M. Ventures, Inc., 3

Bottled Water Manufacturer
Sparkling Horizon Bottled Water, 4

Index

Academic Testing Improvement Service
Academic Assistance, 14

Bowling Alley
Family Bowl, The, 7

Automated Teller Machines (ATMs)
Quick Cash Services, 16

Accounting Service
Marcus Accounting LLC, 7

Bread Bakery
Breadcrafter, 5

Automobile Assembly
Dream Cars, 2

Accounting Systems Consultants
Accounting Management Systems, 1

Brewpub
Hopstreet Brewery, 11

Automotive Dealer Group
Pompei-Schmidt Auto Dealers Inc., 4

Bridal Salon
Megan’s Bridal Boutique, 6

Adventure Travel Lodging Company
Cobra Travel Adventure Group, 11

Automotive Repair Service
Collision Experts Inc., 10 LR Automotive, 4

Business Consulting
Blake & Associates, 1 Koshu, 1

Advertising Agency
BlueIsland.com, 8

Auto Sales Company
Mountain View Lease, LLC, 7

Business Development Firm
NKR Consulting, Inc., 9

Advertising Brokerage Firm
Cover Art Advertising, 13

Bagel Shop
USA Bagels, 5

Cafe and Gas Station
Troon Cafe and Gas Station, 14

Aerospace Supplier
Flatland Manufacturing, Inc., 1

Barbecue Sauce Manufacturer
Flamethrower Barbecue Sauce, 13

Campground
California RV & Campgrounds, 12

Aftermarket Internet Applications
AutoAftermarket.com, 8

Beauty Salon
Salon Flora, 12

Campus Apartment Complex
Fourwinds Apartments, 13

Bed & Breakfast
Aphrodite’s Dream Bed & Breakfast, 6 Red Barron Bed & Breakfast, 1 Rocheport Bed and Breakfast, 16 Victoria Bed & Breakfast, 4

Aftermarket Skate Store
Pegasus Sports International, 8

Car Wash
ABC, Inc., 7 Dirt Buster, The, 1 J&A Ventures, Inc., 5 Platinum Carwash, 12

Air Brushing Services
Workz of Art, 15

Beekeeping Business
B. Strand’s Bees, 16

Airlines
Puddle Jumpers Airlines, Inc., 6 SkyTrails Airlines, Ltd., 9

Bicycle Shop
Wheelies, 15

Car Wash and Car Detailing Business
Wash and Go, 16

Art Easel Manufacturer
Art Easels and Supplies, Inc., 15

Bioterrorism Prevention Organization
Bioterrorism & Infections Prevention Organization, 10

´ Caribbean Cafe
´ Calypso Cafe, 6

Art Gallery
Cooke Gallery, 14

Carpet Cleaning Service
Carpet Chem Corporation, 3

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INDEX

Caviar Company
Caviar Delights, 9

Condiment Manufacturer
Salvador Sauces, Inc., 6

Dial-It Service
Callmaster, Inc., 3

Charity Youth Hockey Tournament
Lucky Pucks, 8

Construction Development & Real Estate Firm
Black Pearl Development and Real Estate LLC, 11

Diaper Delivery
Diapers ’n More, 1

Diner
Shoestrings, 16

Chemical Manufacturer
Chemalyze, Inc., 8

Child Transportation Service
Kid Cart, 4

Construction and Home Rehabilitation Company
Pedro’s Construction, 11

Direct Mail Outlet
Post Direct, 4

Childrens’ Indoor Recreation Center
Interactive Garden, 13

Convenience Store & Bait Shop
The Dock Store, 8

Discount Internet Securities Broker
E-Best-Trade.com, 8

Cookie Shop
Grandma Miller’s Cookies and Muffins, 6

Chiropractic Office
Cole’s Care Chiropractic, 6

Display Technology Company
TouchTop Technologies, Inc., 7

Christmas Ornament Company
Scriptures for You, Inc., 6

Corner Store
Martin General Store, 13

Dollar Store
Dollar Daze, 9

Cigar Company
Smokescreen Cigars, 11

Counseling Center
Juniper Counseling Center, 9

Domestic Services Provider
Helping Hands Personal Services LLC, 16

Cigar Shop
Holy Smokes, 5

Counseling Practice
Roper Counseling Services Inc., 16

Dry Cleaner
A.Z. Ventures/Expert Cleaning, 3

Climbing Outfitter
Rockhound Outfitters, 5

Courier Service
Corporate Courier, 14

DVD Kiosk Rental Business
Rent DVDs Now, 15

Coatings Inspection Company
Professional Coatings Services, Inc. 10

Crane Service
Chesterfield Crane Service, 1

E–Commerce Website Producer
Internet Capabilities, 12

Coffee Bean Plant/Exporter
Silvera & Sons Ltda., 7

Creative Agency
Oceania Creative Print & Interactive, 8

Editorial Services & Consulting
Hilton & Associates, 1

Coffee House
Coffee Circus, 4

Custodial Cleaning Company
Spic and Span, 12

Elder Care
Summer Gardens Residential Care Facility for the Ambulatory Elderly, 1

Coffee Roaster
Venezia Coffee Roasters, 4

Custom Carpentry Shop
Choice Cut Carpentry Inc., 16

Comedy Club
The Comedy Corner, 15

Dance and Skate Outfitter
Arabesque Dance & Skate Shop, 3

Electronic Document Security Company
GoldTrustMark.com, 9

Computer Matchmaking Service
Matchmate, Inc., 3

Day Camp Organizer
Camp in the Park, 16

Emu Ranch
Southwestern Emu Ranch, 4

Computer Reseller
Computech Management, 5 Ellipse Technologies, Inc., 5

Daycare Facility
Childhood Dreams Inc. , 12 Rachel’s Clubhouse, 11 Ziggle Zag Zip Daycare/Childcare, 12

Energy Consultant
Jacobs Consulting, 15

Computer Training Service Business
Enhanced Occupations Center, 9

Dentist
Fremont Dental Office, 12 Stanley M. Kramer, DDS, LLC, 8

Energy Efficiency Auditing Firm
Energy Physicians, 16

Energy Solutions Company
Abaka Energy Solutions, 8

Concert Promotions Company
Good Vibrations, Inc., 9

Desktop Publishing Company
Power Desk Top Publishing, Inc., 7

Concrete Coating Company
Techno–Coatings USA, 12

Detective Agency
Barr Detective Agency, 5

Engineering Management Consultant
Herman Livingston Consultants, 4

262

B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

INDEX

Entertainment Production, Distribution, and Performance Company
Mentonic Hero Inc., 12

Framing/Antiques Store
Flora’s Frames & Antiques, 1

Handyman Service
“I’m the Man!” Handyman Services, 11

Franchise Postal Service
Express Postal Center, 5

Healthcare Marketing Agency
Johnson & Brooks LLC, 15

Environmentally–Friendly Greenhouse
Green Greenhouse, 15

Freelance Editor
Scrivener, The, 2 Word for Word, 2

Healthcare Software Company
QuikMed Info., 7

Health Insurance Company
Southeast Healthplans, Inc., 6

Environmentally–Minded Residential Construction Company
Green Earth Construction, 13

Freight Expediting
Gazelle Expediting Inc., 5

Holistic Health Center
Holistic Choices, LLC, 10

Furniture Resale Shop
Furniture Finds, 15

Equipment Rental
Rich Rentals, 1

Furniture Restoration Company
Furniture Restoration Business, 15

´ Home Decor Products Manufacturer
Burton Decor, Inc., 10 Index

Ethanol Fuel Production
Ontario Ethanol Supply, 14

General Contracting Company
Smith Contracting Company, 7

Home Furnishing Manufacturer
Castellini Manufacturing, 14

Ethnic Food Supplier
World Cuisine, 13

General Staffing Company
GENRX LLC, 12

Home Inspection Company
Home Inspectors Are We, 12

Event Photography Service brightroom, Inc., 10

Gift Shop
The Busy Bee, 16

Home Organization Service
Break Free Organizing, 16

Event Planning Company
Occasions, The Event Planning Specialists, 7

Gift Store
Crystal Creek Gifts, 5 Little Treasures Gift Shop, 13

Home Renovation Contractor
Stephens Contracting, 13

Fantasy Book & Memorabilia Store
Wizard and Warlock Books, 14

Homeless Shelter
Sister Joan of Arc Center, 11

Giftware Company
Jenni Frey Gifts, 11

Hotel Resort
Seven Elms Resort, 7

Fast Food
Pasta Express, 3 Pasta Now!, 3

Go–Cart Designer and Supplier
Speedy Go–Cart, 12

House Cleaning
Mid-Missouri Maid Service, 16

Golf Driving Range
Mountain Cedar Golf Club, 9

Fertilizer & Commodity Chemicals Company
Agronix Organics, Inc., 10

Housing Rehabilitation Company
Madison Builders, LLC, 10

Golf Grip Manufacturer
ProGrip, 10

Ice Cream Parlor
SonnyScoops, 16

Financial Services Company
Diamond Strategic Services, 7 Prisma Microfinance, Inc., 9

Gourmet Foods Company
Good Earth Foods Company, 8

Ice Cream Shop
Fran’s Ice, 3

Fire Equipment Retailer
Gallagher’s Fire Service, 5

Graffiti Removal Service
Graffiti, Inc., 3

Import Boutique
Bellisimo Imports, Inc., 1

Fitness Center
Woodland Gym Ltd., 13

Greenhouse and Flower Shop
Little Greenie Shop, 14

Import/Export Store
Central Import/Export, 9

Food and Beverage Vending Company
Paco Bello Vending, 14

Grocery Store
Viking Grocery Stores, 9

Indoor Playground
Kid’s World, 3

Hair Salon
Epiphany Salon, 6

Food, Diet, & Nutrition Company
Think Thin Weight Loss Corporation, 10

Information Technology Personnel Agency
Rekve IT Staffing, 12

Food Processor
Rio Grande, 3

Handmade Greeting Card Company
Heartsongs, 11

Inn/Resort
Lighthouse Inn, The, 1

B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

263

INDEX

Interior Design Company
Make It Your Own Space Inc., 11

Limited Liability Company
Northern Investments, LLC, 7

Microbrewery
Harbor Brewing Company, 2 Juniper Brewing Company, 2

Interior Painting Service
Eyecatching Interiors LLC, 11

Litigation Services Company
Acme Litigation Company, 10

Mobile Studio
CRS Mobile Studio, 2

Interior Renovation Company
Addams Interiors, 14

Low–Cost Home Decorating Service
Your Home Stylists, 15

Mortgage Company
National Mortgage, Inc., 7

Internet & Network Security Solution Provider
Safety Net Canada, Inc., 10

Magazine Publisher
GRAPEVINE, 1

Motorcycle Dealership and Racetrack
Zoom Motors, 11

Internet Bid Clearinghouse
Opexnet, LLC, 5

Mailing List Service
Forest Mail Service, 3

Multilevel Marketing
RFM Enterprises, 3

Internet Cafe
Wired Bean, 5

Management Consulting Service
Salmon & Salmon, 3

Mural Company
Smith Ray Design, 10

Internet Communications Service Provider
Appian Way Communications Network, Ltd., 9

Manufacturing Business
Fiber Optic Automation, Inc., 3

Music Store
The Fret Board, 15

Marble Quarry
Vomarth Marble Quarry, 9

Internet Consultant
Allen Consulting, 3 Worldwide Internet Marketing Services, 3

Marketing Communications Firm
Cornelius Marketing, 4

Natural Gas Home Filling Station Provider
Green Fuel Stations, 15

Marketing Consultancy
Meridian Consulting, 5 Simmons Marketing Associates, 3

Nature Photography Business
Shutterbugs Inc., 16

Internet Loyalty Program
Tunes4You, 11

Network Game Centers
PowerPlay Gaming, LLC, 10

Internet Marketplace
ABC Internet Marketplace, Inc., 8

Massage Therapists
MASSAGEWORKS, 11

Newsletter
Network Journal, 2 Network Journal (Revised), 2

Internet Services Portal Site
Net Solutions, 11

Maternity Aid
Nest in Comfort, 2

Internet Software Company
Poggle, Inc., 9

Meal Facilitation and Preparation Company
Kitchen Helper, LLC, 13

Nightclub
Wild Oasis, 7

Internet Travel Agency Business
Memory Lane Cruises, 9

Media Producer
Dynamic Video, 2 Dynamic Video (Revised), 2 Shalimar Films, Inc., 2

Nonprofit Youth Outreach Ministry
Life Works Cincinnati, 9

Investor Trading Software Company
Investor Trends, Inc., 6

Novelty Shop
Great Pretender, The, 5

Medical Billing Company
Physicians 1st Billing and Claims, 7

Nursery
Wonderland Nursery, 7

Kennel
Best Friend Kennel, 2

Medical Equipment Producer
Mediquip, Inc., 6 Premium Therapy, LLC, 10

Office Furniture
Powerline of Northern Minnesota, 5

Ladder Company
Jacks’ Ladder Inc., 1

Online Consulting
Borderline Transmissions, Inc., 1

Landscaping Service
Helping Hand, Inc., 13

Men’s Clothing Retailer
Van Schaack, 4

Online Customer Service Support live e-care, Inc., 10

Leasing Company
Leasing Group, 8

Mentally Disabled Care Facility
Welcome Home Organization, 11

Leather Accessory Manufacturer
Safari Leatherworks, 13

Metal Shop
Krosnow Metal Works, 5

Online Government Contract Service
U.S.Consulting - GOV.COM, 4

264

B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

INDEX

Online Hospitality Service
Tinner Corp., 4

Photography Studio
Midwest Studios, 15

Real Estate Renovation and Resale
HouseFlipperz, 15

Online Job Service
CareerConnections.com, 8

Physical Therapy Practice
Healing Hands Physical Therapy Inc., 16

Record Company
Reed Entertainment Corp., 4

Online Merchant
E-Return Solutions, 8

Pizzeria
Coastal Pizza, 11 Pizza to Go, Inc., 6

Record Store
Hidden Treasure Records L.C., 6

Online Mortgage Company
Valuable Mortgage, 11

Refrigerant Recovery
Road Runner Refrigerant Recovery System, 3

Plastic Drum Company
River City Drum, Inc., 7

Online Outdoor Company
Outdoorsman.com, 8

Plumbing Service
Jax Plumbing, 3 Matt’s Plumbing and Air Conditioning, 12

Rental Defibrillator Service
Heartsong Defibrillator, LLC, 15

Online Party–Planning Company
Theme Party in a Box, 16

Online Payment Services
Exactor Technologies, LLC, 12

Residential and Commercial Painting Service
Color My World, Inc., 14 Index

Plus–Sized Children’s Clothing Store
Jennifer’s Clothing Corner, 15

Online Publishing System
Moonbeam Publishing, 9

Restaurant
American Diner, 1 Butcher Hollow Bar BQ, 7 Cafe Fresco, 13 Kelly House Inn, 5 Peach Blossom Diner, 1 Rock Island Tavern, 5 Tokyo Sun, 13 Whistle Shop, The, 4

Online Woodworking Manufacturing & Retailing
U–nique Woodworking, 12

Powder Coating Manufacturer
Brudder Coating Systems Inc., 4 Innovative Over Coast, 4

Printing Company
Master Printer and Partners Printing, 1 Printer Perfect, 1

Organic Cleaning Supplies
Green Home Care Solutions, 16

Organic Grower and Supplier
Great Lakes Organics, 14

Private Investigator
FBEyes, 11

Restaurant (Nonprofit)
McMurphy’s Grill, 1 Murphy’s Grill, 2 Murphy’s Grill (Revised), 2

Outdoor Adventure Travel Company
RAD-Venture, 4

Private Label Food Manufacturer
Clarence Pratt Enterprises, Inc., 6

Restaurant Franchise
Reuben’s Deli, 2

Paint Distributor
Eartham Distributors, 4

Producer and Supplier of Plants and Flowers
Bountyfull Farms, 13

Restaurant/Bar
Plugged Nickel, The, 2 Watering Hole, The, 2

Paintball Sport Company
Paintball Sport Palace, 6

Public Relations Firm
SHP & Associates Business Communications, 2

Restaurant/Microbrewery
Homesteaders’ Pub & Grub, 5

Painting Company
Ko-Bas Painting Company, 10

Publisher
Group Publishing, The, 6 Infoguide Inc., 1

Retail & Commercial Design Firm
Future Designs, 4

Parts Manufacturer
Zemens Metal Corporation, 5

Party Supply Store
Celebrations, 5

Racing Parts Store
Southeast Racing Parts, 8

Retail Art Furnishings Business
Wood Designs Gallery, 6

Pasta Franchise
Pasta Express, 5

Real Estate Brokerage
Thomasson Real Estate, 15

Retail Business Incubator
Acme Incubators, 9

Pet Sitting Service
Pet Care People, 14

Real Estate Company
MSN Real Estate, 7

Retail Clothing
Boston Rags Clothing Store, 9 Clothes as Art Inc., 1

Pharmaceutical Company
Pain Away, Inc., 3

Real Estate Investment Company
Wolfe Partners, 6

Retail Florist
Designs by Linda, 1

Photo Framing
Talking Photo Technology, 2

Real Estate Renovation Company
ABC Corp., 6

Retail Tobacco/Magazines
Standard Tobacco & News, 1

B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

265

INDEX

Rock Climber’s Store & Cafe
The Boulder Stop, 8

Sports Bar
Stone Oak Sports Bar & Grille, 12 Take Five Sports Bar & Grill, 6

Used Car Business
Budget Cars, 6

Roller Rink
Santiago Roller Rink, 7

Sports Collectibles
Diamond Collection, Inc., 2

Used Clothing, Furniture, and Antique Store
Rebecca’s Shoppe, 14

Routing/Navigation Software Company
PATH Systems, Inc., 10

Sports Tournament Organizer
Scramble Sports Tournament Series, 12

Veterinary Practice
Four Legged Friends Clinic, 13

Rubber Adhesive Manufacturer
Shake Proof, 4

Stable
Miller Stables, 16

Video Production & Distribution Company
Kitamon Productions, 9

Salad Packaging
Lyons & Coyne, Inc., 1

Structural Engineering Consulting Firm
StructureAll Ltd., 8

Video Service
Express Video Service, 3

Sandwich Shop
Romastrano Incorporated, 3

Science Information Website Company e-Science Technologies, Inc., 9

Structural Genomics Software Provider
Pharmatech Genomics, 10

Virtual Reality
Building Aids Inc., 1 CineMedia Studios, Inc., 1

Student Services Consulting Firm
Grad Student Exchange Consultants International, 8

Screen Print Drying Company
DLP, Inc., 7

Virtual Shopping
Click ’n Shop Inc., 2

Search Service
Searchers, The, 2

Tattoo & Body Piercing
Chapel Hill Tattoo, 14

Water Purification System Distributor
Fresh Faucet Distribution, 14

Senior Care Facility
Hearts and Hopes Senior Home, 12

Taxi Service
Lakeview Taxi, 5

Website Designer
Portal Code, Inc., 14

Shave Ice Business
Ice Dreams, 6

Technology Solutions Provider
Exceed Expectations, 13

Windmill Distributor
Pierson Windmills, 15

Shoe Store
Thomasson Shoes, 14

Teen Night Club
Ventures, 8

Ski Resort
Mounjoy, LLC, 8

Television Childproofer
Television for Kids, 2

Wine Merchant and Storage Facility
Wine Seller Cellar, 13

Skin Cream Formulator
LaBelle Industries, Inc., 9

Toiletry Company
Verde, 1

Wine Storage
Wine Portfolio Inc., 16

Smoothie and Juice Shop
Suzie’s Smoothies, 14

Toy Company
Toys for a New Generation Inc., 1

Wireless Internet Service
Superior XL Internet, 7

Software Developer
Data Technologies Corporation, 1

Trademarked Resort Wear Distributor
Muskrat Bluffs Apparel, 13

Wireless Systems Integrator
SpongeShark, LLC, 9

Software Engineering & Management Company
Swiss Issue WebTools, 7

Travel Agency
International Business Tours, 4

Wooden Furniture Manufacturer and Supplier
Nashville Furniture, 14

Special Needs Clothing Store
You Can Do It!, 7

Travel Information Service
Traveling U.S. Inc., 4

Yoga Studio
Namaste Family Yoga Studio, 15

266

B U S I N E S S P L A N S H A N D B O O K , Volume 16

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...entitled “A study on working capital management at MATHRUBHUMI PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY LTD, CALICUT”. The details regarding the history, finance and inventory policies of the company were collected through discussion with the company officers. The secondary data collected from records, reports and profile of the company. Data analysis was carried out and findings are listed down. Suitable suggestions have been provided. The tools used in this study where Liquidity ratios, inventory turnover ratio, debtor’s turnover ratio, current asset turnover ratio, cash to current asset ratio, receivables to current assets ratio etc. were also used. Apart from it trend analysis is also used to have a look on the performance of the company. CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Introduction to the study The study is concerned with the analysis of working capital management of Mathrubhumi printing and publishing company limited, Kozhikode. The Mathrubhumi printing and publishing company limited is the publishers of the leading national daily in Malayalam-Mathrubhumi. Analysis of working capital management is part of financial analysis. The term financial also known as analysis and interpretation of financial statements’ refers to the process of determining the financial strength and weakness of a firm by establishing strategic relationship between the items of the balance sheet, profit and loss account and other operative area. Working capital is one of the most......

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Working Capital

...WORKING CAPITAL DEFINITION OF WORKING CAPITAL Working Capital = Current Assets - Current Liabilities ❖ Current Assets are - ➢ Customer Outstanding ➢ FG Inventory ➢ WIP ➢ GIT ➢ Other Current Assets ➢ Vendor Debits. ❖ Current Liabilities are - ➢ Customer Advances ➢ Vendor Credits etc. ❖ +ve WC signifies requirement of money and vice versa ❖ Analogous to Cash Inflow – Cash Outflows Working Capital Budgeting/ Monitoring of Various Parameters Customer outstanding – Amount receivable from the customer for progress / pucca invoices raised including the retention money both for divisible and indivisible contracts. Tax deducted at source by the customer should form part of outstanding until customer issue TDS certificates. For divisible contracts, the outstanding represent gross amount of the invoices less pure advance and milestone payments received. For indivisible contracts, the outstanding represent gross progress bill amount less pure advance, milestone and progress payments received. Format for computation of customer outstanding |Month |April 01 |. |. |Mar2002 |Average | | |1 |2 |3 |12 ...

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Working Capital

...SUMMER TRAINING REPORT SUBMITTED TOWARDS THE PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF POST GRADUATE DEGREE IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT On Kotak Mahindra Group INDUSTRY GUIDE FACULTY GUIDE AMITY INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS SCHOOL, NOIDA AMITY UNIVERSITY – UTTAR PRADESH TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter No. Subject Page No. Ch No.1 Executive Summary…………………. 6 Ch No.2 Research Methodology……………… 7 2.1 Primary Objective(s)…………. 2.2 Hypothesis…………………… 2.3 Research Design……………… 2.4 Sample Design……………….. 2.5 Scope of the Study……………. 2.6 Limitations……………………. Ch No.3 Critical Review of Literature……….. 9 Ch No.4 Company Profile ……………………. 18 Ch No.5 Industry Profile……………….. 21 Ch No.6 SWOT Analysis…………………. 45 Ch No.7 Data………………………………….. 46 7.1 Collection……………………… 7.2 Primary Data…………………… 7.3 Secondary Data….…………….. Ch No.8 Working Capital- Overall View……… 53 Ch No.9 Findings & Analysis…………………. 100 Ch No.10 Recommendations…………………… 112 Ch No.11 Bibliography…………………………. 114 Ch No.12 Annexure…………………………….. 115 12.1 Tables…………………………. 12.2 Graphs………………………… Ch No.13 Case Study...…..................................... ......

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Working Capital

...MANAGEMENT OF WORKING CAPITAL 1. Meaning and Types of Finance: Finance - Finance is the Art & Science of Managing Money - Finance is the Art of passing currency from hand to hand until it finally disappears Types & Sources of Finance ____________________________________________________________ ________ Long Term Sources of Finance - Finance required to meet Capital Expenditure - Also, known as Fixed Capital Finance Short Term Sources of Finance - Finance required to meet day-to-day Business requirements - Also, known as Working Capital Finance 2. Working Capital Management: Working Capital (WC) ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________ Basics regarding WC Meaning of WC Working Capital Concept Factors Affecting WC Meaning of WC Management Importance of WC Management Classification/Type of WC A On the Basis of Concept (i) (ii) Gross Working Capital Net Working Capital (Positive & Negative Working Capital) Methods of estimating WC Conventional Method Operating Cycle Method Cash Cost Method Balance Sheet Method B On the Basis of Periodicity (i) (ii) Fixed / Permanent Working Capital (Regular & Reserve Margin/ Cushion WC) Variable Working Capital (Seasonal & Special Working Capital) Parag Nalin Doshi 1/12/2009 www.CAalley.com Meaning of Working Capital: - Working Capital is the amount of Capital that a Business has available to meet the day-to-day cash requirements of its operations -......

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