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World Bank and Developing Countries

In: Business and Management

Submitted By mvettukallel
Words 7437
Pages 30
World Bank: Roles and Responsibilities in Developing Countries

Mathew Vettukallel
Liberty University

Business 606-B01 LUO
Professor Dr. Joan Koonce
October 11, 2013

Abstract
This research paper will focus on how the World Bank has helped many third world counties to transition into developing nations. The mission of the World Bank is total elimination of poverty from the face of the earth by the year 2030 (www.worldbank.org). The World Bank has been helping many developing countries to fight against diseases such as AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria in many parts of the world (Clark, 2011). The World Bank is offering financial help for several programs to help with agriculture, transportation, infrastructure, and irrigation in many South Asian countries to reduce poverty. There has been so much controversy about the activities of the World Bank. Even though the main mission of the World Bank is to alleviate poverty from the face of the earth, there has been severe criticism that the World Bank is changing its focus to financial policy reforms and structural adjustments. The World Bank as an international financial institution has done so much to help numerous developing countries when they are in financial crisis or needed help to undertake a major development project. Regardless of the criticism and corruption accusations, this author believes that the World Bank is in the right direction by providing basic reforms and structural adjustments in order to alleviate poverty. If the World Bank just donated billions of dollars to a developing country without any concrete objective, that money might be used for gaining political advantages. For this research, this author has used resources from Fresno State University Library, Liberty University online Library, Clovis Public Library, and many online search engines. This paper will briefly describe the history,...

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