Free Essay

Writing Across the Ciriculum

In: Other Topics

Submitted By ciaraloren
Words 661
Pages 3
Mat 205-01 Statistics: Course summary December 3, 2014 Emmanuel Johnson

Descriptive statistics is the term given to the analysis of data that helps describe, show or summarize data in a meaningful way such that, for example, patterns might emerge from the data. Descriptive statistics do not, however, allow us to make conclusions beyond the data we have analysed or reach conclusions regarding any hypotheses we might have made. They are simply a way to describe our data. Descriptive statistics are very important because if we simply presented our raw data it would be hard to visulize what the data was showing, especially if there was a lot of it. Descriptive statistics therefore enables us to present the data in a more meaningful way, which allows simpler interpretation of the data. For example, if we had the results of 100 pieces of students' coursework, we may be interested in the overall performance of those students. We would also be interested in the distribution or spread of the marks. Descriptive statistics allow us to do this. How to properly describe data through statistics and graphs is an important topic and discussed in other Laerd Statistics guides. In simple linear regression, we predict scores on one variable from the scores on a second variable. The variable we are predicting is called the criterion variableand is referred to as Y. The variable we are basing our predictions on is called thepredictor variable and is referred to as X. When there is only one predictor variable, the prediction method is called simple regression. In simple linear regression, the topic of this section, the predictions of Y when plotted as a function of X form a straight line. The study of probability helps us figure out the likelihood of something happening. For instance, when you roll a pair of dice, you might ask how likely you are to roll a seven. In math, we call the "something happening" an "event." In probability and statistics, a probability distribution assigns a probability to each measurable subset of the possible outcomes of a random experiment, survey, or procedure of statistical inference. Examples are found in experiments whose sample space is non-numerical, where the distribution would be a categorical distribution; experiments whose sample space is encoded by discrete random variables, where the distribution can be specified by a probability mass function; and experiments with sample spaces encoded by continuous random variables, where the distribution can be specified by a probability density function. More complex experiments, such as those involving stochastic processesdefined in continuous time, may demand the use of more general probability measures. Inferential statistics can be contrasted with descriptive statistics. Descriptive statistics is solely concerned with properties of the observed data, and does not assume that the data came from a larger population. Statistical inference makes propositions about a population, using data drawn from the population via some form of sampling. Given a hypothesis about a population, for which we wish to draw inferences, statistical inference consists of selecting a statistical model of the process that generates the data and deducing propositions from the model. Probability is used to quantify an attitude of mind towards some proposition of whose truth we are not certain.The proposition of interest is usually of the form "Will a specific event occur?" The attitude of mind is of the form "How certain are we that the event will occur?" The certainty we adopt can be described in terms of a numerical measure and this number, between 0 and 1 (where 0 indicates impossibility and 1 indicates certainty), we call probability.Thus the higher the probability of an event, the more certain we are that the event will occur. A simple example would be the toss of a fair coin. Since the 2 outcomes are deemed equiprobable, the probability of "heads" equals the probability of "tails" and each probability is 1/2 or equivalently a 50% chance of either "heads" or "tails".

Similar Documents