Examining a Business Failure Paper

In: Business and Management

Submitted By POINTER6
Words 1022
Pages 5
Running Head: ENRON BUSINESS FAILURE

Examining a Business Failure Paper

Enron

Rachel Y. Pointer
University of Phoenix
LDR/531
Ernest Price, Instructor
January 17, 2010

Enron Business Failure

One of the world’s most catastrophic business failures was Enron. Unveiled in October 2001, this scandal involves the renowned energy company Enron in conjunction with the accounting, auditing and consultancy schemes of Arthur Andersen. Enron disgraces ultimately lead the organization to a scandal that resulted in the biggest economic failure in United States history (TIME Enron, 2001). The Enron scandal also destroyed one of the foremost accounting agencies in the world, Arthur Andersen.

Enron’s downfall was the result of their choice of accounting practices, in particular target entities and poor financial reporting. Enron’s accounting structure had so many loopholes that it was unproblematic for Andrew Fastow, the organization’s chief financial officer, to mask billions in debt from failed transactions and schemes. Fastow and other main executives purposely misinformed the organization’s board of directors and audit commission. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) began an investigation into Enron after the organization’s stock price began to plummet and Dynegy offered to purchase Enron at a price much lower than normal market price. When the Dynegy deal did not happen, Enron filed for bankruptcy on December 2, 2001 under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code. Enron's auditor, Arthur Andersen, was responsible the shame of bankruptcy also.

In light of the ambiguities, many began to point the finger at various key executives. Despite the fact that Enron’s shareholders and employees presented billions in stock prices and pensions, they dealt with indomitable suits. The Enron scandal brought about the…...

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