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Louis Armstrong Contributions

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"Satchmo," "Pops," and "Ambassador Satch" were names for an outstanding jazz artist that inspired many. He was one of the most important musicians in jazz. He helped to transform the traditional New Orleans style into a completely different form of jazz. Louis Daniel Armstrong was born on August 4, 1901, in New Orleans, Louisiana in a very poor neighborhood. His father, a laborer, abandoned the family when he was young, and his mother was an irresponsible single parent. She left Armstrong and his sister in the care of their grandmother(Source C). Armstrong was taken out of school in fifth grade to begin working. On New Year's Eve in 1912, Armstrong fired his stepfather's gun in the air during a celebration and was arrested. He was then sent …show more content…
While in New York, Armstrong made dozens of records as a sideman, creating inspirational jazz and backup singing for many blues singers. Moreover, he had records as a soloist including "Cornet Chop Suey" and "Potato Head Blues." These solos changed jazz history, by incorporating daring rhythm choices, swing and high notes on cornet(Source B). Furthermore, in 1926, Armstrong finally switched from the cornet to the trumpet. After 1926, Louis became more and more famous and broke more and more barriers through his music. In 1936, Armstrong became the first African American to be featured in a Hollywood movie and to write an autobiography. Also, in 1937 he was the first African American to be on a sponsored radio broadcast. Moreover, he performed at hotels that didn't allow African Americans to stay, and he had contracts that no other African American had in the 1930s (Source A). Armstrong brought together scat singing, blues, and his trumpet and cornet to make a modern jazz. In his lifetime, Armstrong made thousands or records and inspired many to follow their dreams. Although he died, there was not another musician as popular as Louis Armstrong. Even years after he has passed, remakes of his songs when to the top of charts (Source A). Overall, Louis Armstrong has made the world we live in a more diverse and creative environment. He should be

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