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INTEGRATED CIRCUITS

80C31/80C32 80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7 V–5.5 V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)
Product specification IC28 Data Handbook 2000 Aug 07

Philips Semiconductors

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

DESCRIPTION
The Philips 80C31/32 is a high-performance static 80C51 design fabricated with Philips high-density CMOS technology with operation from 2.7 V to 5.5 V. The 80C31/32 ROMless devices contain a 128 × 8 RAM/256 × 8 RAM, 32 I/O lines, three 16-bit counter/timers, a six-source, four-priority level nested interrupt structure, a serial I/O port for either multi-processor communications, I/O expansion or full duplex UART, and on-chip oscillator and clock circuits. In addition, the device is a low power static design which offers a wide range of operating frequencies down to zero. Two software selectable modes of power reduction—idle mode and power-down mode are available. The idle mode freezes the CPU while allowing the RAM, timers, serial port, and interrupt system to continue functioning. The power-down mode saves the RAM contents but freezes the oscillator, causing all other chip functions to be inoperative. Since the design is static, the clock can be stopped without loss of user data and then the execution resumed from the point the clock was stopped.

FEATURES

• 8051 Central Processing Unit
– 128 × 8 RAM (80C31) – 256 × 8 RAM (80C32) – Three 16-bit counter/timers – Boolean processor – Full static operation – Low voltage (2.7 V to 5.5 V@ 16 MHz) operation

• Memory addressing capability
– 64k ROM and 64k RAM

• Power control modes:
– Clock can be stopped and resumed – Idle mode – Power-down mode

• CMOS and TTL compatible • TWO speed ranges at VCC = 5 V
– 0 to 16 MHz – 0 to 33 MHz

SELECTION TABLE
For applications requiring more ROM and RAM, see the 8XC54/58 and 8XC51RA+/RB+/RC+/80C51RA+ data sheet. ROM/EPROM Memory Size (X by 8) 80C31/8XC51 0K/4K 80C32/8XC52/54/58 0K/8K/16K/32K 256 No No 128 No No RAM Size (X by 8) Programmable Timer Counter (PCA) Hardware Watch Dog Timer

• Three package styles • Extended temperature ranges • Dual Data Pointers • 4 level priority interrupt • 6 interrupt sources • Four 8-bit I/O ports • Full–duplex enhanced UART
– Framing error detection – Automatic address recognition

80C51RA+/8XC51RA+/RB+/RC+ 0K/8K/16K/32K 8XC51RD+ 64K 1024 Yes Yes 512 Yes Yes

• Programmable clock out • Asynchronous port reset • Low EMI (inhibit ALE) • Wake-up from Power Down by an external interrupt

2000 Aug 07

2

853–2213 24293

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

80C51/87C51 AND 80C31 ORDERING INFORMATION
ROMless P80C31SBPN P80C31SBAA P80C31SBBB P80C31SFP N P80C31SFA A P80C31SFB B TEMPERATURE RANGE °C AND PACKAGE 0 to +70 Plastic Dual In line Package +70, In-line 0 to +70, Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier +70 0 to +70 Plastic Quad Flat Pack +70, –40 to +85 Plastic Dual In line Package 40 +85, In-line –40 to +85, Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier 40 +85 –40 to +85 Plastic Quad Flat Pack 40 +85, VOLTAGE RANGE 2 7 V to 5.5 V 55 2.7 2 7 V to 5.5 V 55 2.7 2 7 V to 5.5 V 55 2.7 2.7 2 7 V to 5.5 V 55 2.7 2 7 V to 5.5 V 55 2.7 2 7 V to 5.5 V 55 FREQ. (MHz) 0 to 16 0 to 16 0 to 16 0 to 16 0 to 16 0 to 16 DRAWING NUMBER SOT129 1 SOT129-1 SOT187 2 SOT187-2 SOT307 2 SOT307-2 SOT129-1 SOT129 1 SOT187-2 SOT187 2 SOT307-2 SOT307 2

PART NUMBER DERIVATION
DEVICE NUMBER P80C31 P80C32 OPERATING FREQUENCY, MAX (S) S = 16 MHz U = 33 MHz TEMPERATURE RANGE (B) B = 0_ to +70_C F = –40_C to +85_C PACKAGE (AA) AA = PLCC BB = PQFP PN = PDIP

80C32 ORDERING INFORMATION
ROMless P80C32SBP N P80C32SBA A P80C32SBB B P80C32SFP N P80C32SFA A P80C32SFB B P80C32UBA A P80C32UBP N P80C32UBB B P80C32UFA A P80C32UFP N P80C32UFB B TEMPERATURE RANGE °C AND PACKAGE 0 to +70, Plastic Dual In-line Package 0 to +70, Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier 0 to +70, Plastic Quad Flat Pack –40 to +85, Plastic Dual In-line Package –40 to +85, Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier –40 to +85, Plastic Quad Flat Pack 0 to +70, Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier 0 to +70, Plastic Dual In-line Package 0 to +70, Plastic Quad Flat Pack –40 to +85, Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier –40 to +85, Plastic Dual In-line Package –40 to +85, Plastic Quad Flat Pack FREQ MHz 16 16 16 16 16 16 33 33 33 33 33 33 DRAWING NUMBER SOT129-1 SOT187-2 SOT307-2 SOT129-1 SOT187-2 SOT307-2 SOT187-2 SOT129-1 SOT307-2 SOT187-2 SOT129-1 SOT307-2

2000 Aug 07

3

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

BLOCK DIAGRAM
P0.0–P0.7 P2.0–P2.7

PORT 0 DRIVERS VCC VSS RAM ADDR REGISTER RAM PORT 0 LATCH

PORT 2 DRIVERS

PORT 2 LATCH

ROM/EPROM

8 B REGISTER STACK POINTER

ACC

TMP2

TMP1

PROGRAM ADDRESS REGISTER

ALU SFRs PSW TIMERS

BUFFER

PC INCREMENTER 8 PROGRAM COUNTER 16

PSEN ALE/PROG EAVPP RST PD TIMING AND CONTROL

INSTRUCTION REGISTER

DPTR’S MULTIPLE

PORT 1 LATCH

PORT 3 LATCH

OSCILLATOR PORT 1 DRIVERS XTAL1 XTAL2 P1.0–P1.7 PORT 3 DRIVERS

P3.0–P3.7

SU00845

2000 Aug 07

4

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

LOGIC SYMBOL
VCC XTAL1 PORT 0 ADDRESS AND DATA BUS VSS

PLASTIC LEADED CHIP CARRIER PIN FUNCTIONS
6 1 40

7

39

LCC

XTAL2 T2 T2EX RST EA/VPP PSEN SECONDARY FUNCTIONS ALE/PROG RxD TxD INT0 INT1 T0 T1 WR RD PORT 1 17 29

18 Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Function NIC* P1.0/T2 P1.1/T2EX P1.2 P1.3 P1.4 P1.5 P1.6 P1.7 RST P3.0/RxD NIC* P3.1/TxD P3.2/INT0 P3.3/INT1 Pin 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Function P3.4/T0 P3.5/T1 P3.6/WR P3.7/RD XTAL2 XTAL1 VSS NIC* P2.0/A8 P2.1/A9 P2.2/A10 P2.3/A11 P2.4/A12 P2.5/A13 P2.6/A14

28 Pin 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 Function P2.7/A15 PSEN ALE NIC* EA/VPP P0.7/AD7 P0.6/AD6 P0.5/AD5 P0.4/AD4 P0.3/AD3 P0.2/AD2 P0.1/AD1 P0.0/AD0 VCC

PORT 3

PORT 2

ADDRESS BUS

SU00830

PIN CONFIGURATIONS
T2/P1.0 1 T2EX/P1.1 2 P1.2 3 P1.3 4 P1.4 5 P1.5 6 P1.6 7 P1.7 8 RST 9 RxD/P3.0 10 TxD/P3.1 11 INT0/P3.2 12 INT1/P3.3 13 T0/P3.4 14 T1/P3.5 15 WR/P3.6 16 RD/P3.7 17 XTAL2 18 XTAL1 19 VSS 20 DUAL IN-LINE PACKAGE 40 VCC 39 P0.0/AD0 38 P0.1/AD1

* NO INTERNAL CONNECTION

SU01062

PLASTIC QUAD FLAT PACK PIN FUNCTIONS
44 34

37 P0.2/AD2 36 P0.3/AD3 1 35 P0.4/AD4 34 P0.5/AD5 33 P0.6/AD6 32 P0.7/AD7 31 EA/VPP 30 ALE 29 PSEN 28 P2.7/A15 27 P2.6/A14 26 P2.5/A13 25 P2.4/A12 24 P2.3/A11 23 P2.2/A10 22 P2.1/A9 21 P2.0/A8 Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Function P1.5 P1.6 P1.7 RST P3.0/RxD NIC* P3.1/TxD P3.2/INT0 P3.3/INT1 P3.4/T0 P3.5/T1 P3.6/WR P3.7/RD XTAL2 XTAL1 12 Pin 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Function VSS NIC* P2.0/A8 P2.1/A9 P2.2/A10 P2.3/A11 P2.4/A12 P2.5/A13 P2.6/A14 P2.7/A15 PSEN ALE NIC* EA/VPP P0.7/AD7 22 Pin 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 Function P0.6/AD6 P0.5/AD5 P0.4/AD4 P0.3/AD3 P0.2/AD2 P0.1/AD1 P0.0/AD0 VCC NIC* P1.0/T2 P1.1/T2EX P1.2 P1.3 P1.4 11 23 PQFP 33

SU01063

* NO INTERNAL CONNECTION

SU01064

2000 Aug 07

5

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

PIN DESCRIPTIONS
PIN NUMBER MNEMONIC VSS VCC P0.0–0.7 DIP 20 40 39–32 LCC 22 44 43–36 QFP 16 38 37–30 TYPE I I I/O NAME AND FUNCTION Ground: 0 V reference. Power Supply: This is the power supply voltage for normal, idle, and power-down operation. Port 0: Port 0 is an open-drain, bidirectional I/O port with Schmitt trigger inputs. Port 0 pins that have 1s written to them float and can be used as high-impedance inputs. Port 0 is also the multiplexed low-order address and data bus during accesses to external program and data memory. In this application, it uses strong internal pull-ups when emitting 1s. Port 1: Port 1 is an 8-bit bidirectional I/O port with internal pull-ups and Schmitt trigger inputs. Port 1 pins that have 1s written to them are pulled high by the internal pull-ups and can be used as inputs. As inputs, port 1 pins that are externally pulled low will source current because of the internal pull-ups. (See DC Electrical Characteristics: IIL). Alternate functions for Port 1 include: T2 (P1.0): Timer/Counter 2 external count input/clockout (see Programmable Clock-Out) T2EX (P1.1): Timer/Counter 2 Reload/Capture/Direction control Port 2: Port 2 is an 8-bit bidirectional I/O port with internal pull-ups and Schmitt trigger inputs. Port 2 pins that have 1s written to them are pulled high by the internal pull-ups and can be used as inputs. As inputs, port 2 pins that are externally being pulled low will source current because of the internal pull-ups. (See DC Electrical Characteristics: IIL). Port 2 emits the high-order address byte during fetches from external program memory and during accesses to external data memory that use 16-bit addresses (MOVX @DPTR). In this application, it uses strong internal pull-ups when emitting 1s. During accesses to external data memory that use 8-bit addresses (MOV @Ri), port 2 emits the contents of the P2 special function register. Port 3: Port 3 is an 8-bit bidirectional I/O port with internal pull-ups and Schmitt trigger inputs. Port 3 pins that have 1s written to them are pulled high by the internal pull-ups and can be used as inputs. As inputs, port 3 pins that are externally being pulled low will source current because of the pull-ups. (See DC Electrical Characteristics: IIL). Port 3 also serves the special features of the 80C51 family, as listed below: RxD (P3.0): Serial input port TxD (P3.1): Serial output port INT0 (P3.2): External interrupt INT1 (P3.3): External interrupt T0 (P3.4): Timer 0 external input T1 (P3.5): Timer 1 external input WR (P3.6): External data memory write strobe RD (P3.7): External data memory read strobe Reset: A high on this pin for two machine cycles while the oscillator is running, resets the device. An internal diffused resistor to VSS permits a power-on reset using only an external capacitor to VCC. Address Latch Enable: Output pulse for latching the low byte of the address during an access to external memory. In normal operation, ALE is emitted at a constant rate of 1/6 the oscillator frequency, and can be used for external timing or clocking. Note that one ALE pulse is skipped during each access to external data memory. ALE can be disabled by setting SFR auxiliary.0. With this bit set, ALE will be active only during a MOVX instruction. Program Store Enable: The read strobe to external program memory. When the 80C31/32 is executing code from the external program memory, PSEN is activated twice each machine cycle, except that two PSEN activations are skipped during each access to external data memory. PSEN is not activated during fetches from internal program memory. External Access Enable/Programming Supply Voltage: EA must be externally held low to enable the device to fetch code from external program memory locations 0000H to 0FFFH. Crystal 1: Input to the inverting oscillator amplifier and input to the internal clock generator circuits.

P1.0–P1.7

1–8

2–9

40–44, 1–3

I/O

1 2 P2.0–P2.7 21–28

2 3 24–31

40 41 18–25

I/O I I/O

P3.0–P3.7

10–17

11, 13–19

5, 7–13

I/O

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 RST 9

11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10

5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4

I O I I I I O O I

ALE

30

33

27

O

PSEN

29

32

26

O

EA/VPP

31

35

29

I

XTAL1

19

21

15

I

XTAL2 18 20 14 O Crystal 2: Output from the inverting oscillator amplifier. NOTE: To avoid “latch-up” effect at power-on, the voltage on any pin at any time must not be higher than VCC + 0.5 V or VSS – 0.5 V, respectively.

2000 Aug 07

6

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

Table 1.
SYMBOL ACC* AUXR# AUXR1# B* DPTR: DPH DPL IE* IP* IPH# P0* P1* P2* P3* PCON#1 PSW* RACAP2H# RACAP2L# SADDR# SADEN# SBUF SCON* SP TCON*

8XC51/80C31 Special Function Registers
DESCRIPTION Accumulator Auxiliary Auxiliary 1 B register Data Pointer (2 bytes) Data Pointer High Data Pointer Low Interrupt Enable Interrupt Priority Interrupt Priority High Port 0 Port 1 Port 2 Port 3 Power Control Program Status Word Timer 2 Capture High Timer 2 Capture Low Slave Address Slave Address Mask Serial Data Buffer Serial Control Stack Pointer Timer Control DIRECT ADDRESS E0H 8EH A2H F0H 83H 82H A8H B8H B7H 80H 90H A0H B0H 87H D0H CBH CAH A9H B9H 99H 98H 81H 88H AF EA BF – B7 – 87 AD7 97 – A7 AD15 B7 RD SMOD1 D7 CY AE – BE – B6 – 86 AD6 96 – A6 AD14 B6 WR SMOD0 D6 AC AD ET2 BD PT2 B5 PT2H 85 AD5 95 – A5 AD13 B5 T1 – D5 F0 AC ES BC PS B4 PSH 84 AD4 94 – A4 AD12 B4 T0 POF D4 RS1 AB ET1 BB PT1 B3 PT1H 83 AD3 93 – A3 AD11 B3 INT1 GF1 D3 RS0 AA EX1 BA PX1 B2 PX1H 82 AD2 92 – A2 AD10 B2 INT0 GF0 D2 OV A9 ET0 B9 PT0 B1 PT0H 81 AD1 91 T2EX A1 AD9 B1 TxD PD D1 – A8 EX0 B8 PX0 B0 PX0H 80 AD0 90 T2 A0 AD8 B0 RxD IDL D0 P BIT ADDRESS, SYMBOL, OR ALTERNATIVE PORT FUNCTION MSB E7 – – F7 E6 – – F6 E5 – – F5 E4 – – F4 E3 – WUPD2 F3 E2 – 0 F2 E1 – – F1 LSB E0 AO DPS F0 RESET VALUE 00H xxxxxxx0B xxx000x0B 00H 00H 00H 0x000000B xx000000B xx000000B FFH FFH FFH FFH 00xx0000B 000000x0B 00H 00H 00H 00H xxxxxxxxB 00H 07H 00H 00H xxxxxx00B 00H 00H 00H 00H 00H 00H 00H

9F
SM0/FE

9E SM1 8E TR1 CE EXF2 –

9D SM2 8D TF0 CD RCLK –

9C REN 8C TR0 CC TCLK –

9B TB8 8B IE1 CB EXEN2 –

9A RB8 8A IT1 CA TR2 –

99 TI 89 IE0 C9 C/T2 T2OE

98 RI 88 IT0 C8 CP/RL2 DCEN

T2CON* Timer 2 Control C8H T2MOD# Timer 2 Mode Control C9H TH0 Timer High 0 8CH TH1 Timer High 1 8DH TH2# Timer High 2 CDH TL0 Timer Low 0 8AH TL1 Timer Low 1 8BH TL2# Timer Low 2 CCH TMOD Timer Mode 89H GATE C/T M1 M0 GATE C/T M1 M0 NOTE: Unused register bits that are not defined should not be set by the user’s program. If violated, the device could function incorrectly. * SFRs are bit addressable. # SFRs are modified from or added to the 80C51 SFRs. – Reserved bits. 1. Reset value depends on reset source. 2. Not available on 80C31.

8F TF1 CF TF2 –

2000 Aug 07

7

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

OSCILLATOR CHARACTERISTICS
XTAL1 and XTAL2 are the input and output, respectively, of an inverting amplifier. The pins can be configured for use as an on-chip oscillator, as shown in the logic symbol. To drive the device from an external clock source, XTAL1 should be driven while XTAL2 is left unconnected. There are no requirements on the duty cycle of the external clock signal, because the input to the internal clock circuitry is through a divide-by-two flip-flop. However, minimum and maximum high and low times specified in the data sheet must be observed.

For the 80C31 or 80C32, either a hardware reset or external interrupt can be used to exit from Power Down. Reset redefines all the SFRs but does not change the on-chip RAM. An external interrupt allows both the SFRs and the on-chip RAM to retain their values. WUPD (AUXR1.3–Wakeup from Power Down) enables or disables the wakeup from power down with external interrupt. Where: WUPD = 0 Disable WUPD = 1 Enable To properly terminate Power Down the reset or external interrupt should not be executed before VCC is restored to its normal operating level and must be held active long enough for the oscillator to restart and stabilize (normally less than 10 ms). With an external interrupt, INT0 or INT1 must be enabled and configured as level-sensitive. Holding the pin low restarts the oscillator but bringing the pin back high completes the exit. Once the interrupt is serviced, the next instruction to be executed after RETI will be the one following the instruction that put the device into Power Down. For the 80C31, wakeup from power down is always enabled.

Reset
A reset is accomplished by holding the RST pin high for at least two machine cycles (24 oscillator periods), while the oscillator is running. To insure a good power-up reset, the RST pin must be high long enough to allow the oscillator time to start up (normally a few milliseconds) plus two machine cycles.

Stop Clock Mode
The static design enables the clock speed to be reduced down to 0 MHz (stopped). When the oscillator is stopped, the RAM and Special Function Registers retain their values. This mode allows step-by-step utilization and permits reduced system power consumption by lowering the clock frequency down to any value. For lowest power consumption the Power Down mode is suggested.

Design Consideration

• When the idle mode is terminated by a hardware reset, the device normally resumes program execution, from where it left off, up to two machine cycles before the internal reset algorithm takes control. On-chip hardware inhibits access to internal RAM in this event, but access to the port pins is not inhibited. To eliminate the possibility of an unexpected write when Idle is terminated by reset, the instruction following the one that invokes Idle should not be one that writes to a port pin or to external memory.

Idle Mode
In idle mode (see Table 2), the CPU puts itself to sleep while all of the on-chip peripherals stay active. The instruction to invoke the idle mode is the last instruction executed in the normal operating mode before the idle mode is activated. The CPU contents, the on-chip RAM, and all of the special function registers remain intact during this mode. The idle mode can be terminated either by any enabled interrupt (at which time the process is picked up at the interrupt service routine and continued), or by a hardware reset which starts the processor in the same manner as a power-on reset.

ONCE™ Mode
The ONCE (“On-Circuit Emulation”) Mode facilitates testing and debugging of systems without the device having to be removed from the circuit. The ONCE Mode is invoked by: 1. Pull ALE low while the device is in reset and PSEN is high; 2. Hold ALE low as RST is deactivated. While the device is in ONCE Mode, the Port 0 pins go into a float state, and the other port pins and ALE and PSEN are weakly pulled high. The oscillator circuit remains active. While the 80C31/32 is in this mode, an emulator or test CPU can be used to drive the circuit. Normal operation is restored when a normal reset is applied.

Power-Down Mode
To save even more power, a Power Down mode (see Table 2) can be invoked by software. In this mode, the oscillator is stopped and the instruction that invoked Power Down is the last instruction executed. The on-chip RAM and Special Function Registers retain their values down to 2.0 V and care must be taken to return VCC to the minimum specified operating voltages before the Power Down Mode is terminated.

Table 2. External Pin Status During Idle and Power-Down Modes
MODE Idle Idle Power-down Power-down PROGRAM MEMORY Internal External Internal External ALE 1 1 0 0 PSEN 1 1 0 0 PORT 0 Data Float Data Float PORT 1 Data Data Data Data PORT 2 Data Address Data Data PORT 3 Data Data Data Data

2000 Aug 07

8

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

Programmable Clock-Out
A 50% duty cycle clock can be programmed to come out on P1.0. This pin, besides being a regular I/O pin, has two alternate functions. It can be programmed: 1. to input the external clock for Timer/Counter 2, or 2. to output a 50% duty cycle clock ranging from 61 Hz to 4 MHz at a 16 MHz operating frequency. To configure the Timer/Counter 2 as a clock generator, bit C/T2 (in T2CON) must be cleared and bit T20E in T2MOD must be set. Bit TR2 (T2CON.2) also must be set to start the timer. The Clock-Out frequency depends on the oscillator frequency and the reload value of Timer 2 capture registers (RCAP2H, RCAP2L) as shown in this equation: 4 Where: (RCAP2H,RCAP2L) = the content of RCAP2H and RCAP2L taken as a 16-bit unsigned integer. In the Clock-Out mode Timer 2 roll-overs will not generate an interrupt. This is similar to when it is used as a baud-rate generator. It is possible to use Timer 2 as a baud-rate generator and a clock generator simultaneously. Note, however, that the baud-rate and the Clock-Out frequency will be the same. Oscillator Frequency (65536 * RCAP2H, RCAP2L)

TH2, to be captured into registers RCAP2L and RCAP2H, respectively. In addition, the transition at T2EX causes bit EXF2 in T2CON to be set, and EXF2 like TF2 can generate an interrupt (which vectors to the same location as Timer 2 overflow interrupt. The Timer 2 interrupt service routine can interrogate TF2 and EXF2 to determine which event caused the interrupt). The capture mode is illustrated in Figure 2 (There is no reload value for TL2 and TH2 in this mode. Even when a capture event occurs from T2EX, the counter keeps on counting T2EX pin transitions or osc/12 pulses.).

Auto-Reload Mode (Up or Down Counter)
In the 16-bit auto-reload mode, Timer 2 can be configured (as either a timer or counter (C/T2* in T2CON)) then programmed to count up or down. The counting direction is determined by bit DCEN (Down Counter Enable) which is located in the T2MOD register (see Figure 3). When reset is applied the DCEN=0 which means Timer 2 will default to counting up. If DCEN bit is set, Timer 2 can count up or down depending on the value of the T2EX pin. Figure 4 shows Timer 2 which will count up automatically since DCEN=0. In this mode there are two options selected by bit EXEN2 in T2CON register. If EXEN2=0, then Timer 2 counts up to 0FFFFH and sets the TF2 (Overflow Flag) bit upon overflow. This causes the Timer 2 registers to be reloaded with the 16-bit value in RCAP2L and RCAP2H. The values in RCAP2L and RCAP2H are preset by software means. If EXEN2=1, then a 16-bit reload can be triggered either by an overflow or by a 1-to-0 transition at input T2EX. This transition also sets the EXF2 bit. The Timer 2 interrupt, if enabled, can be generated when either TF2 or EXF2 are 1. In Figure 5 DCEN=1 which enables Timer 2 to count up or down. This mode allows pin T2EX to control the direction of count. When a logic 1 is applied at pin T2EX Timer 2 will count up. Timer 2 will overflow at 0FFFFH and set the TF2 flag, which can then generate an interrupt, if the interrupt is enabled. This timer overflow also causes the 16–bit value in RCAP2L and RCAP2H to be reloaded into the timer registers TL2 and TH2. When a logic 0 is applied at pin T2EX this causes Timer 2 to count down. The timer will underflow when TL2 and TH2 become equal to the value stored in RCAP2L and RCAP2H. Timer 2 underflow sets the TF2 flag and causes 0FFFFH to be reloaded into the timer registers TL2 and TH2. The external flag EXF2 toggles when Timer 2 underflows or overflows. This EXF2 bit can be used as a 17th bit of resolution if needed. The EXF2 flag does not generate an interrupt in this mode of operation.

TIMER 2 OPERATION Timer 2
Timer 2 is a 16-bit Timer/Counter which can operate as either an event timer or an event counter, as selected by C/T2* in the special function register T2CON (see Figure 1). Timer 2 has three operating modes:Capture, Auto-reload (up or down counting) ,and Baud Rate Generator, which are selected by bits in the T2CON as shown in Table 3.

Capture Mode
In the capture mode there are two options which are selected by bit EXEN2 in T2CON. If EXEN2=0, then timer 2 is a 16-bit timer or counter (as selected by C/T2* in T2CON) which, upon overflowing sets bit TF2, the timer 2 overflow bit. This bit can be used to generate an interrupt (by enabling the Timer 2 interrupt bit in the IE register). If EXEN2= 1, Timer 2 operates as described above, but with the added feature that a 1- to -0 transition at external input T2EX causes the current value in the Timer 2 registers, TL2 and

Table 3. Timer 2 Operating Modes
RCLK + TCLK 0 0 1 X CP/RL2 0 1 X X TR2 1 1 1 0 16-bit Auto-reload 16-bit Capture Baud rate generator (off) MODE

2000 Aug 07

9

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

(MSB) TF2 Symbol TF2 EXF2 Position T2CON.7 T2CON.6 EXF2 RCLK TCLK EXEN2 TR2 C/T2

(LSB) CP/RL2

Name and Significance Timer 2 overflow flag set by a Timer 2 overflow and must be cleared by software. TF2 will not be set when either RCLK or TCLK = 1. Timer 2 external flag set when either a capture or reload is caused by a negative transition on T2EX and EXEN2 = 1. When Timer 2 interrupt is enabled, EXF2 = 1 will cause the CPU to vector to the Timer 2 interrupt routine. EXF2 must be cleared by software. EXF2 does not cause an interrupt in up/down counter mode (DCEN = 1). Receive clock flag. When set, causes the serial port to use Timer 2 overflow pulses for its receive clock in modes 1 and 3. RCLK = 0 causes Timer 1 overflow to be used for the receive clock. Transmit clock flag. When set, causes the serial port to use Timer 2 overflow pulses for its transmit clock in modes 1 and 3. TCLK = 0 causes Timer 1 overflows to be used for the transmit clock. Timer 2 external enable flag. When set, allows a capture or reload to occur as a result of a negative transition on T2EX if Timer 2 is not being used to clock the serial port. EXEN2 = 0 causes Timer 2 to ignore events at T2EX. Start/stop control for Timer 2. A logic 1 starts the timer. Timer or counter select. (Timer 2) 0 = Internal timer (OSC/12) 1 = External event counter (falling edge triggered). Capture/Reload flag. When set, captures will occur on negative transitions at T2EX if EXEN2 = 1. When cleared, auto-reloads will occur either with Timer 2 overflows or negative transitions at T2EX when EXEN2 = 1. When either RCLK = 1 or TCLK = 1, this bit is ignored and the timer is forced to auto-reload on Timer 2 overflow.
SU00728

RCLK TCLK EXEN2

T2CON.5 T2CON.4 T2CON.3

TR2 C/T2

T2CON.2 T2CON.1

CP/RL2

T2CON.0

Figure 1. Timer/Counter 2 (T2CON) Control Register

OSC

÷ 12 C/T2 = 0 TL2 (8-bits) C/T2 = 1 TH2 (8-bits) TF2

T2 Pin

Control

TR2 Transition Detector

Capture Timer 2 Interrupt RCAP2L RCAP2H

T2EX Pin

EXF2

Control

EXEN2

SU00066

Figure 2. Timer 2 in Capture Mode

2000 Aug 07

10

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

T2MOD

Address = 0C9H Not Bit Addressable — Bit 7 — 6 — 5 — 4 — 3 — 2 T2OE 1

Reset Value = XXXX XX00B

DCEN 0

Symbol — T2OE DCEN *

Function Not implemented, reserved for future use.* Timer 2 Output Enable bit. Down Count Enable bit. When set, this allows Timer 2 to be configured as an up/down counter.

User software should not write 1s to reserved bits. These bits may be used in future 8051 family products to invoke new features. In that case, the reset or inactive value of the new bit will be 0, and its active value will be 1. The value read from a reserved bit is indeterminate. Figure 3. Timer 2 Mode (T2MOD) Control Register

SU00729

OSC

÷ 12 C/T2 = 0 TL2 (8-BITS) C/T2 = 1 TH2 (8-BITS)

T2 PIN

CONTROL

TR2

RELOAD

TRANSITION DETECTOR

RCAP2L

RCAP2H TF2 TIMER 2 INTERRUPT

T2EX PIN

EXF2

CONTROL

EXEN2

SU00067

Figure 4. Timer 2 in Auto-Reload Mode (DCEN = 0)

2000 Aug 07

11

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

(DOWN COUNTING RELOAD VALUE) FFH FFH

TOGGLE EXF2

OSC

÷12

C/T2 = 0 OVERFLOW TL2 TH2 TF2 INTERRUPT

T2 PIN

C/T2 = 1 CONTROL TR2 COUNT DIRECTION 1 = UP 0 = DOWN RCAP2L RCAP2H T2EX PIN

(UP COUNTING RELOAD VALUE)

SU00730

Figure 5. Timer 2 Auto Reload Mode (DCEN = 1)

Timer 1 Overflow

NOTE: OSC. Freq. is divided by 2, not 12. ÷2 C/T2 = 0 TL2 (8-bits) C/T2 = 1 T2 Pin Control TH2 (8-bits) “1”

÷2 “0” “1” SMOD “0” RCLK

OSC

÷ 16 TR2 “1” Reload “0”

RX Clock

TCLK

Transition Detector

RCAP2L

RCAP2H

÷ 16

TX Clock

T2EX Pin

EXF2

Timer 2 Interrupt

Control EXEN2 Note availability of additional external interrupt.

SU00068

Figure 6. Timer 2 in Baud Rate Generator Mode

2000 Aug 07

12

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

Baud Rate Generator Mode
Bits TCLK and/or RCLK in T2CON (Table 3) allow the serial port transmit and receive baud rates to be derived from either Timer 1 or Timer 2. When TCLK= 0, Timer 1 is used as the serial port transmit baud rate generator. When TCLK= 1, Timer 2 is used as the serial port transmit baud rate generator. RCLK has the same effect for the serial port receive baud rate. With these two bits, the serial port can have different receive and transmit baud rates – one generated by Timer 1, the other by Timer 2. Figure 6 shows the Timer 2 in baud rate generation mode. The baud rate generation mode is like the auto-reload mode, in that a rollover in TH2 causes the Timer 2 registers to be reloaded with the 16-bit value in registers RCAP2H and RCAP2L, which are preset by software. The baud rates in modes 1 and 3 are determined by Timer 2’s overflow rate given below: Modes 1 and 3 Baud Rates + Timer 2 Overflow Rate 16 The timer can be configured for either “timer” or “counter” operation. In many applications, it is configured for “timer” operation (C/T2*=0). Timer operation is different for Timer 2 when it is being used as a baud rate generator. Usually, as a timer it would increment every machine cycle (i.e., 1/12 the oscillator frequency). As a baud rate generator, it increments every state time (i.e., 1/2 the oscillator frequency). Thus the baud rate formula is as follows: Modes 1 and 3 Baud Rates = Oscillator Frequency [32 [65536 * (RCAP2H, RCAP2L)]] Where: (RCAP2H, RCAP2L)= The content of RCAP2H and RCAP2L taken as a 16-bit unsigned integer. The Timer 2 as a baud rate generator mode shown in Figure 6, is valid only if RCLK and/or TCLK = 1 in T2CON register. Note that a rollover in TH2 does not set TF2, and will not generate an interrupt. Thus, the Timer 2 interrupt does not have to be disabled when Timer 2 is in the baud rate generator mode. Also if the EXEN2 (T2 external enable flag) is set, a 1-to-0 transition in T2EX (Timer/counter 2 trigger input) will set EXF2 (T2 external flag) but will not cause a reload from (RCAP2H, RCAP2L) to (TH2,TL2). Therefore when Timer 2 is in use as a baud rate generator, T2EX can be used as an additional external interrupt, if needed. When Timer 2 is in the baud rate generator mode, one should not try to read or write TH2 and TL2. As a baud rate generator, Timer 2 is incremented every state time (osc/2) or asynchronously from pin T2;

under these conditions, a read or write of TH2 or TL2 may not be accurate. The RCAP2 registers may be read, but should not be written to, because a write might overlap a reload and cause write and/or reload errors. The timer should be turned off (clear TR2) before accessing the Timer 2 or RCAP2 registers. Table 4 shows commonly used baud rates and how they can be obtained from Timer 2.

Table 4.

Timer 2 Generated Commonly Used Baud Rates
Timer 2 Osc Freq 12 MHz 12 MHz 12 MHz 12 MHz 12 MHz 12 MHz 12 MHz 6 MHz 6 MHz RCAP2H FF FF FF FF FE FB F2 FD F9 RCAP2L FF D9 B2 64 C8 1E AF 8F 57

Baud Ba d Rate 375 K 9.6 K 2.8 K 2.4 K 1.2 K 300 110 300 110

Summary Of Baud Rate Equations
Timer 2 is in baud rate generating mode. If Timer 2 is being clocked through pin T2(P1.0) the baud rate is: Baud Rate + Timer 2 Overflow Rate 16 If Timer 2 is being clocked internally, the baud rate is: Baud Rate + f OSC [65536 * (RCAP2H, RCAP2L)]]

[32

Where fOSC= Oscillator Frequency To obtain the reload value for RCAP2H and RCAP2L, the above equation can be rewritten as: RCAP2H, RCAP2L + 65536 * f OSC Baud Rate

32

Timer/Counter 2 Set-up
Except for the baud rate generator mode, the values given for T2CON do not include the setting of the TR2 bit. Therefore, bit TR2 must be set, separately, to turn the timer on. See Table 5 for set-up of Timer 2 as a timer. Also see Table 6 for set-up of Timer 2 as a counter.

2000 Aug 07

13

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

Table 5. Timer 2 as a Timer
MODE 16-bit Auto-Reload 16-bit Capture Baud rate generator receive and transmit same baud rate Receive only Transmit only T2CON INTERNAL CONTROL (Note 1) 00H 01H 34H 24H 14H EXTERNAL CONTROL (Note 2) 08H 09H 36H 26H 16H

Table 6. Timer 2 as a Counter
MODE 16-bit Auto-Reload TMOD INTERNAL CONTROL (Note 1) 02H 03H EXTERNAL CONTROL (Note 2) 0AH 0BH

NOTES: 1. Capture/reload occurs only on timer/counter overflow. 2. Capture/reload occurs on timer/counter overflow and a 1-to-0 transition on T2EX (P1.1) pin except when Timer 2 is used in the baud rate generator mode.

Enhanced UART
The UART operates in all of the usual modes that are described in the first section of Data Handbook IC20, 80C51-Based 8-Bit Microcontrollers. In addition the UART can perform framing error detect by looking for missing stop bits, and automatic address recognition. The 80C31/32 UART also fully supports multiprocessor communication. When used for framing error detect the UART looks for missing stop bits in the communication. A missing bit will set the FE bit in the SCON register. The FE bit shares the SCON.7 bit with SM0 and the function of SCON.7 is determined by PCON.6 (SMOD0) (see Figure 7). If SMOD0 is set then SCON.7 functions as FE. SCON.7 functions as SM0 when SMOD0 is cleared. When used as FE SCON.7 can only be cleared by software. Refer to Figure 8. Automatic Address Recognition Automatic Address Recognition is a feature which allows the UART to recognize certain addresses in the serial bit stream by using hardware to make the comparisons. This feature saves a great deal of software overhead by eliminating the need for the software to examine every serial address which passes by the serial port. This feature is enabled by setting the SM2 bit in SCON. In the 9 bit UART modes, mode 2 and mode 3, the Receive Interrupt flag (RI) will be automatically set when the received byte contains either the “Given” address or the “Broadcast” address. The 9 bit mode requires that the 9th information bit is a 1 to indicate that the received information is an address and not data. Automatic address recognition is shown in Figure 9. The 8 bit mode is called Mode 1. In this mode the RI flag will be set if SM2 is enabled and the information received has a valid stop bit following the 8 address bits and the information is either a Given or Broadcast address. Mode 0 is the Shift Register mode and SM2 is ignored. Using the Automatic Address Recognition feature allows a master to selectively communicate with one or more slaves by invoking the Given slave address or addresses. All of the slaves may be contacted by using the Broadcast address. Two special Function Registers are used to define the slave’s address, SADDR, and the address mask, SADEN. SADEN is used to define which bits in the 2000 Aug 07 14

SADDR are to b used and which bits are “don’t care”. The SADEN mask can be logically ANDed with the SADDR to create the “Given” address which the master will use for addressing each of the slaves. Use of the Given address allows multiple slaves to be recognized while excluding others. The following examples will help to show the versatility of this scheme: Slave 0 SADDR = SADEN = Given = SADDR = SADEN = Given = 1100 0000 1111 1101 1100 00X0 1100 0000 1111 1110 1100 000X

Slave 1

In the above example SADDR is the same and the SADEN data is used to differentiate between the two slaves. Slave 0 requires a 0 in bit 0 and it ignores bit 1. Slave 1 requires a 0 in bit 1 and bit 0 is ignored. A unique address for Slave 0 would be 1100 0010 since slave 1 requires a 0 in bit 1. A unique address for slave 1 would be 1100 0001 since a 1 in bit 0 will exclude slave 0. Both slaves can be selected at the same time by an address which has bit 0 = 0 (for slave 0) and bit 1 = 0 (for slave 1). Thus, both could be addressed with 1100 0000. In a more complex system the following could be used to select slaves 1 and 2 while excluding slave 0: Slave 0 SADDR = SADEN = Given = SADDR = SADEN = Given = SADDR = SADEN = Given = 1100 0000 1111 1001 1100 0XX0 1110 0000 1111 1010 1110 0X0X 1110 0000 1111 1100 1110 00XX

Slave 1

Slave 2

In the above example the differentiation among the 3 slaves is in the lower 3 address bits. Slave 0 requires that bit 0 = 0 and it can be uniquely addressed by 1110 0110. Slave 1 requires that bit 1 = 0 and it can be uniquely addressed by 1110 and 0101. Slave 2 requires that bit 2 = 0 and its unique address is 1110 0011. To select Slaves 0

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

and 1 and exclude Slave 2 use address 1110 0100, since it is necessary to make bit 2 = 1 to exclude slave 2. The Broadcast Address for each slave is created by taking the logical OR of SADDR and SADEN. Zeros in this result are trended as don’t-cares. In most cases, interpreting the don’t-cares as ones, the broadcast address will be FF hexadecimal. SCON Address = 98H Bit Addressable SM0/FE Bit: SM1 SM2 5 REN 4

Upon reset SADDR (SFR address 0A9H) and SADEN (SFR address 0B9H) are leaded with 0s. This produces a given address of all “don’t cares” as well as a Broadcast address of all “don’t cares”. This effectively disables the Automatic Addressing mode and allows the microcontroller to use standard 80C51 type UART drivers which do not make use of this feature.

Reset Value = 0000 0000B

TB8 3

RB8 2

Tl 1

Rl 0

7 6 (SMOD0 = 0/1)*

Symbol FE SM0 SM1

Function Framing Error bit. This bit is set by the receiver when an invalid stop bit is detected. The FE bit is not cleared by valid frames but should be cleared by software. The SMOD0 bit must be set to enable access to the FE bit. Serial Port Mode Bit 0, (SMOD0 must = 0 to access bit SM0) Serial Port Mode Bit 1 SM0 SM1 Mode 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 3 Description shift register 8-bit UART 9-bit UART 9-bit UART Baud Rate** fOSC/12 variable fOSC/64 or fOSC/32 variable

SM2

Enables the Automatic Address Recognition feature in Modes 2 or 3. If SM2 = 1 then Rl will not be set unless the received 9th data bit (RB8) is 1, indicating an address, and the received byte is a Given or Broadcast Address. In Mode 1, if SM2 = 1 then Rl will not be activated unless a valid stop bit was received, and the received byte is a Given or Broadcast Address. In Mode 0, SM2 should be 0. Enables serial reception. Set by software to enable reception. Clear by software to disable reception. The 9th data bit that will be transmitted in Modes 2 and 3. Set or clear by software as desired. In modes 2 and 3, the 9th data bit that was received. In Mode 1, if SM2 = 0, RB8 is the stop bit that was received. In Mode 0, RB8 is not used. Transmit interrupt flag. Set by hardware at the end of the 8th bit time in Mode 0, or at the beginning of the stop bit in the other modes, in any serial transmission. Must be cleared by software. Receive interrupt flag. Set by hardware at the end of the 8th bit time in Mode 0, or halfway through the stop bit time in the other modes, in any serial reception (except see SM2). Must be cleared by software.

REN TB8 RB8 Tl Rl

NOTE: *SMOD0 is located at PCON6. **fOSC = oscillator frequency

SU00043

Figure 7. SCON: Serial Port Control Register

2000 Aug 07

15

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

D0

D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

D6

D7

D8

START BIT

DATA BYTE

ONLY IN MODE 2, 3

STOP BIT

SET FE BIT IF STOP BIT IS 0 (FRAMING ERROR) SM0 TO UART MODE CONTROL

SM0 / FE

SM1

SM2

REN

TB8

RB8

TI

RI

SCON (98H)

SMOD1

SMOD0



POF

GF1

GF0

PD

IDL

PCON (87H)

0 : SCON.7 = SM0 1 : SCON.7 = FE

SU01191

Figure 8. UART Framing Error Detection

D0

D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

D6

D7

D8

SM0 1 1

SM1 1 0

SM2 1

REN 1

TB8 X

RB8

TI

RI

SCON (98H)

RECEIVED ADDRESS D0 TO D7 PROGRAMMED ADDRESS COMPARATOR

IN UART MODE 2 OR MODE 3 AND SM2 = 1: INTERRUPT IF REN=1, RB8=1 AND “RECEIVED ADDRESS” = “PROGRAMMED ADDRESS” – WHEN OWN ADDRESS RECEIVED, CLEAR SM2 TO RECEIVE DATA BYTES – WHEN ALL DATA BYTES HAVE BEEN RECEIVED: SET SM2 TO WAIT FOR NEXT ADDRESS.

SU00045

Figure 9. UART Multiprocessor Communication, Automatic Address Recognition

2000 Aug 07

16

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

Interrupt Priority Structure
The 80C31 and 80C32 have a 6-source four-level interrupt structure. They are the IE, IP and IPH. (See Figures 10, 11, and 12.) The IPH (Interrupt Priority High) register that makes the four-level interrupt structure possible. The IPH is located at SFR address B7H. The structure of the IPH register and a description of its bits is shown in Figure 12. The function of the IPH SFR is simple and when combined with the IP SFR determines the priority of each interrupt. The priority of each interrupt is determined as shown in the following table: PRIORITY BITS IPH.x 0 0 1 1 IP.x 0 1 0 1 INTERRUPT PRIORITY LEVEL Level 0 (lowest priority) Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 (highest priority)

An interrupt will be serviced as long as an interrupt of equal or higher priority is not already being serviced. If an interrupt of equal or higher level priority is being serviced, the new interrupt will wait until it is finished before being serviced. If a lower priority level interrupt is being serviced, it will be stopped and the new interrupt serviced. When the new interrupt is finished, the lower priority level interrupt that was stopped will be completed.

Table 7.

Interrupt Table
POLLING PRIORITY 1 2 3 4 5 6 REQUEST BITS IE0 TP0 IE1 TF1 RI, TI TF2, EXF2 HARDWARE CLEAR? N (L)1 Y N (L) Y (T) Y N N Y (T)2 VECTOR ADDRESS 03H 0BH 13H 1BH 23H 2BH X0 T0 X1 T1 SP T2

SOURCE

NOTES: 1. L = Level activated 2. T = Transition activated 7 IE (0A8H) EA 6 — 5 ET2 4 ES 3 ET1 2 EX1 1 ET0 0 EX0

Enable Bit = 1 enables the interrupt. Enable Bit = 0 disables it. BIT IE.7 IE.6 IE.5 IE.4 IE.3 IE.2 IE.1 IE.0 SYMBOL EA — ET2 ES ET1 EX1 ET0 EX0 FUNCTION Global disable bit. If EA = 0, all interrupts are disabled. If EA = 1, each interrupt can be individually enabled or disabled by setting or clearing its enable bit. Not implemented. Reserved for future use. Timer 2 interrupt enable bit. Serial Port interrupt enable bit. Timer 1 interrupt enable bit. External interrupt 1 enable bit. Timer 0 interrupt enable bit. External interrupt 0 enable bit. SU00571 Figure 10. IE Registers

2000 Aug 07

17

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

7 IP (0B8H) —

6 —

5 PT2

4 PS

3 PT1

2 PX1

1 PT0

0 PX0

Priority Bit = 1 assigns higher priority Priority Bit = 0 assigns lower priority BIT IP.7 IP.6 IP.5 IP.4 IP.3 IP.2 IP.1 IP.0 SYMBOL — — PT2 PS PT1 PX1 PT0 PX0 FUNCTION Not implemented, reserved for future use. Not implemented, reserved for future use. Timer 2 interrupt priority bit. Serial Port interrupt priority bit. Timer 1 interrupt priority bit. External interrupt 1 priority bit. Timer 0 interrupt priority bit. External interrupt 0 priority bit. Figure 11. IP Registers

SU00572

7 IPH (B7H) —

6 —

5 PT2H

4 PSH

3 PT1H

2 PX1H

1 PT0H

0 PX0H

Priority Bit = 1 assigns higher priority Priority Bit = 0 assigns lower priority BIT IPH.7 IPH.6 IPH.5 IPH.4 IPH.3 IPH.2 IPH.1 IPH.0 SYMBOL — — PT2H PSH PT1H PX1H PT0H PX0H FUNCTION Not implemented, reserved for future use. Not implemented, reserved for future use. Timer 2 interrupt priority bit high. Serial Port interrupt priority bit high. Timer 1 interrupt priority bit high. External interrupt 1 priority bit high. Timer 0 interrupt priority bit high. External interrupt 0 priority bit high. Figure 12. IPH Registers

SU01058

2000 Aug 07

18

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

Reduced EMI Mode
The AO bit (AUXR.0) in the AUXR register when set disables the ALE output.

Note that bit 2 is not writable and is always read as a zero. This allows the DPS bit to be quickly toggled simply by executing an INC DPTR instruction without affecting the WOPD or LPEP bits.

Reduced EMI Mode
AUXR (8EH)
7 – 6 – 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1 – 0 AO DPS BIT0 AUXR1

DPTR1 DPTR0 DPH (83H) DPL (82H) EXTERNAL DATA MEMORY

AUXR.0

AO

Turns off ALE output.

Dual DPTR
The dual DPTR structure (see Figure 13) enables a way to specify the address of an external data memory location. There are two 16-bit DPTR registers that address the external memory, and a single bit called DPS = AUXR1/bit0 that allows the program code to switch between them. Figure 13.

SU00745A

• New Register Name: AUXR1# • SFR Address: A2H • Reset Value: xxx000x0B
AUXR1 (A2H)
7 – 6 – 5 – 4 –

DPTR Instructions The instructions that refer to DPTR refer to the data pointer that is currently selected using the AUXR1/bit 0 register. The six instructions that use the DPTR are as follows: INC DPTR MOV DPTR, #data16 Increments the data pointer by 1 Loads the DPTR with a 16-bit constant Move code byte relative to DPTR to ACC Move external RAM (16-bit address) to ACC Move ACC to external RAM (16-bit address) Jump indirect relative to DPTR

3 WUPD

2 0

1 –

0 DPS

MOV A, @ A+DPTR MOVX A, @ DPTR

Where: DPS = AUXR1/bit0 = Switches between DPTR0 and DPTR1. Select Reg DPTR0 DPTR1 DPS 0 1

MOVX @ DPTR , A JMP @ A + DPTR

The DPS bit status should be saved by software when switching between DPTR0 and DPTR1.

The data pointer can be accessed on a byte-by-byte basis by specifying the low or high byte in an instruction which accesses the SFRs. See application note AN458 for more details.

2000 Aug 07

19

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS1, 2, 3
PARAMETER Operating temperature under bias Storage temperature range Voltage on EA pin to VSS Voltage on any other pin to VSS Maximum IOL per I/O pin RATING 0 to +70 or –40 to +85 –65 to +150 0 to +13.0 –0.5 to +6.5 15 UNIT °C °C V V mA

Power dissipation (based on package heat transfer limitations, not device power consumption) 1.5 W NOTES: 1. Stresses above those listed under Absolute Maximum Ratings may cause permanent damage to the device. This is a stress rating only and functional operation of the device at these or any conditions other than those described in the AC and DC Electrical Characteristics section of this specification is not implied. 2. This product includes circuitry specifically designed for the protection of its internal devices from the damaging effects of excessive static charge. Nonetheless, it is suggested that conventional precautions be taken to avoid applying greater than the rated maximum. 3. Parameters are valid over operating temperature range unless otherwise specified. All voltages are with respect to VSS unless otherwise noted.

AC ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Tamb = 0°C to +70°C or –40°C to +85°C CLOCK FREQUENCY RANGE –f SYMBOL 1/tCLCL FIGURE 29 PARAMETER Oscillator frequency Speed versions : S (16 MHz) U (33 MHz) MIN 0 0 MAX 16 33 UNIT MHz MHz

2000 Aug 07

20

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

DC ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Tamb = 0°C to +70°C or –40°C to +85°C, VCC = 2.7 V to 5.5 V, VSS = 0 V (16 MHz devices) SYMBOL PARAMETER TEST CONDITIONS 4.0 V < VCC < 5.5 V 2.7 V 100 pF), the noise pulse on the ALE pin may exceed 0.8 V. In such cases, it may be desirable to qualify ALE with a Schmitt Trigger, or use an address latch with a Schmitt Trigger STROBE input. IOL can exceed these conditions provided that no single output sinks more than 5 mA and no more than two outputs exceed the test conditions. 3. Capacitive loading on ports 0 and 2 may cause the VOH on ALE and PSEN to momentarily fall below the VCC–0.7 specification when the address bits are stabilizing. 4. Pins of ports 1, 2 and 3 source a transition current when they are being externally driven from 1 to 0. The transition current reaches its maximum value when VIN is approximately 2 V. 5. See Figures 22 through 25 for ICC test conditions. Active mode: ICC = 0.9 × FREQ. + 1.1 mA Idle mode: ICC = 0.18 × FREQ. +1.01 mA; See Figure 21. 6. This value applies to Tamb = 0°C to +70°C. For Tamb = –40°C to +85°C, ITL = –750 µA. 7. Load capacitance for port 0, ALE, and PSEN = 100 pF, load capacitance for all other outputs = 80 pF. 8. Under steady state (non-transient) conditions, IOL must be externally limited as follows: Maximum IOL per port pin: 15 mA (*NOTE: This is 85°C specification.) 26 mA Maximum IOL per 8-bit port: Maximum total IOL for all outputs: 71 mA If IOL exceeds the test condition, VOL may exceed the related specification. Pins are not guaranteed to sink current greater than the listed test conditions. 9. ALE is tested to VOH1, except when ALE is off then VOH is the voltage specification. 10. Pin capacitance is characterized but not tested. Pin capacitance is less than 25 pF.

2000 Aug 07

21

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

DC ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Tamb = 0°C to +70°C or –40°C to +85°C, 33 MHz devices; 5 V ±10%; VSS = 0 V SYMBOL VIL VIH VIH1 VOL VOL1 VOH VOH1 IIL ITL ILI ICC PARAMETER Input low voltage Input high voltage (ports 0, 1, 2, 3, EA) Input high voltage, XTAL1, RST Output low voltage, ports 1, 2, 3 8 Output low voltage, port 0, ALE, PSEN 7, 8 Output high voltage, ports 1, 2, 3 3 Output high voltage (port 0 in external bus mode), ALE9, PSEN3 Logical 0 input current, ports 1, 2, 3 Logical 1-to-0 transition current, ports 1, 2, 36 Input leakage current, port 0 Power supply current (see Figure 21): Active mode (see Note 5) Idle mode (see Note 5) Power-down mode or clock stopped (see Figure 25 f conditions) for diti ) Internal reset pull-down resistor Pin capacitance10 (except EA) VCC = 4.5 V IOL = 1.6mA2 VCC = 4.5 V IOL = 3.2mA2 VCC = 4.5 V IOH = –30µA VCC = 4.5 V IOH = –3.2mA VIN = 0.4 V VIN = 2.0 V See note 4 0.45 < VIN < VCC – 0.3 See note 5 VCC – 0.7 VCC – 0.7 –1 –50 –650 ±10 TEST CONDITIONS 4.5 V < VCC < 5.5 V LIMITS MIN –0.5 0.2 VCC+0.9 0.7 VCC TYP1 UNIT MAX 0.2 VCC–0.1 VCC+0.5 VCC+0.5 0.4 0.4 V V V V V V V µA µA µA

Tamb = 0°C to 70°C Tamb = –40°C to +85°C 40

3

50 75 225 15

µA µA kΩ pF

RRST CIO

NOTES: 1. Typical ratings are not guaranteed. The values listed are at room temperature, 5 V. 2. Capacitive loading on ports 0 and 2 may cause spurious noise to be superimposed on the VOLs of ALE and ports 1 and 3. The noise is due to external bus capacitance discharging into the port 0 and port 2 pins when these pins make 1-to-0 transitions during bus operations. In the worst cases (capacitive loading > 100 pF), the noise pulse on the ALE pin may exceed 0.8 V. In such cases, it may be desirable to qualify ALE with a Schmitt Trigger, or use an address latch with a Schmitt Trigger STROBE input. IOL can exceed these conditions provided that no single output sinks more than 5mA and no more than two outputs exceed the test conditions. 3. Capacitive loading on ports 0 and 2 may cause the VOH on ALE and PSEN to momentarily fall below the VCC–0.7 specification when the address bits are stabilizing. 4. Pins of ports 1, 2 and 3 source a transition current when they are being externally driven from 1 to 0. The transition current reaches its maximum value when VIN is approximately 2 V. 5. See Figures 22 through 25 for ICC test conditions. Active mode: ICC(MAX) = 0.9 × FREQ. + 1.1 mA Idle mode: ICC(MAX) = 0.18 × FREQ. +1.0 mA; See Figure 21. 6. This value applies to Tamb = 0°C to +70°C. For Tamb = –40°C to +85°C, ITL = –750 µA. 7. Load capacitance for port 0, ALE, and PSEN = 100 pF, load capacitance for all other outputs = 80 pF. 8. Under steady state (non-transient) conditions, IOL must be externally limited as follows: 15 mA (*NOTE: This is 85°C specification.) Maximum IOL per port pin: Maximum IOL per 8-bit port: 26 mA 71 mA Maximum total IOL for all outputs: If IOL exceeds the test condition, VOL may exceed the related specification. Pins are not guaranteed to sink current greater than the listed test conditions. 9. ALE is tested to VOH1, except when ALE is off then VOH is the voltage specification. 10. Pin capacitance is characterized but not tested. Pin capacitance is less than 25 pF. Pin capacitance of ceramic package is less than 15 pF (except EA is 25 pF).

2000 Aug 07

22

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

AC ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Tamb = 0°C to +70°C or –40°C to +85°C, VCC = +2.7 V to +5.5 V, VSS = 0 V1, 2, 3 16 MHz CLOCK SYMBOL 1/tCLCL tLHLL tAVLL tLLAX tLLIV tLLPL tPLPH tPLIV tPXIX tPXIZ tAVIV 4 tPLAZ Data Memory tRLRH tWLWH tRLDV tRHDX tRHDZ tLLDV tAVDV tLLWL tAVWL tQVWX tWHQX tQVWH tRLAZ tWHLH tCHCX tCLCX tCLCH tCHCL Shift Register tXLXL tQVXH tXHQX tXHDX 17 17 17 17 Serial port clock cycle time Output data setup to clock rising edge Output data hold after clock rising edge Input data hold after clock rising edge 750 492 8 0 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 16 15, 16 15, 16 18 18 18 18 RD pulse width WR pulse width RD low to valid data in Data hold after RD Data float after RD ALE low to valid data in Address to valid data in ALE low to RD or WR low Address valid to WR low or RD low Data valid to WR transition Data hold after WR Data valid to WR high RD low to address float RD or WR high to ALE high High time Low time Rise time Fall time 23 20 20 20 20 137 122 13 13 287 0 103 0 65 350 397 239 275 275 147 FIGURE 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 PARAMETER Oscillator frequency5 Speed versions :S ALE pulse width Address valid to ALE low Address hold after ALE low ALE low to valid instruction in ALE low to PSEN low PSEN pulse width PSEN low to valid instruction in Input instruction hold after PSEN Input instruction float after PSEN Address to valid instruction in PSEN low to address float 0 37 207 10 32 142 82 MIN MAX

VARIABLE CLOCK MIN 3.5 MAX 16 UNIT MHz ns ns ns 4tCLCL–100 tCLCL–30 3tCLCL–45 3tCLCL–105 0 tCLCL–25 5tCLCL–105 10 6tCLCL–100 6tCLCL–100 5tCLCL–165 0 2tCLCL–60 8tCLCL–150 9tCLCL–165 3tCLCL–50 4tCLCL–130 tCLCL–50 tCLCL–50 7tCLCL–150 0 tCLCL–40 20 20 tCLCL+40 tCLCL–tCLCX tCLCL–tCHCX 20 20 12tCLCL 10tCLCL–133 2tCLCL–117 0 3tCLCL+50 ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns

85 22 32 150

2tCLCL–40 tCLCL–40 tCLCL–30

External Clock

tXHDV 17 Clock rising edge to input data valid 492 10tCLCL–133 ns NOTES: 1. Parameters are valid over operating temperature range unless otherwise specified. 2. Load capacitance for port 0, ALE, and PSEN = 100 pF, load capacitance for all other outputs = 80 pF. 3. Interfacing the 80C31 and 80C32 to devices with float times up to 45ns is permitted. This limited bus contention will not cause damage to Port 0 drivers. 4. See application note AN457 for external memory interface. 5. Parts are guaranteed to operate down to 0 Hz. When an external clock source is used, the RST pin should be held high for a minimum of 20 µs for power-on or wakeup from power down.

2000 Aug 07

23

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

AC ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Tamb = 0°C to +70°C or –40°C to +85°C, VCC = 5 V ±10%, VSS = 0 V1, 2, 3 VARIABLE CLOCK4 16 MHz to fmax SYMBOL tLHLL tAVLL tLLAX tLLIV tLLPL tPLPH tPLIV tPXIX tPXIZ tAVIV tPLAZ Data Memory tRLRH tWLWH tRLDV tRHDX tRHDZ tLLDV tAVDV tLLWL tAVWL tQVWX tWHQX tQVWH tRLAZ tWHLH External Clock tCHCX tCLCX tCLCH tCHCL Shift Register tXLXL tQVXH tXHQX tXHDX 17 17 17 17 Serial port clock cycle time Output data setup to clock rising edge Output data hold after clock rising edge Input data hold after clock rising edge 12tCLCL 10tCLCL–133 2tCLCL–80 0 0 360 167 ns ns ns ns 18 18 18 18 High time Low time Rise time Fall time 0.38tCLCL 0.38tCLCL tCLCL–tCLCX tCLCL–tCHCX 5 5 ns ns ns ns 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 15, 16 16 15, 16 15, 16 RD pulse width WR pulse width RD low to valid data in Data hold after RD Data float after RD ALE low to valid data in Address to valid data in ALE low to RD or WR low Address valid to WR low or RD low Data valid to WR transition Data hold after WR Data valid to WR high RD low to address float RD or WR high to ALE high tCLCL–25 3tCLCL–50 4tCLCL–75 tCLCL–30 tCLCL–25 7tCLCL–130 0 tCLCL+25 5 0 2tCLCL–28 8tCLCL–150 9tCLCL–165 3tCLCL+50 40 45 0 5 80 0 55 6tCLCL–100 6tCLCL–100 5tCLCL–90 0 32 90 105 140 82 82 60 ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns FIGURE 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 PARAMETER ALE pulse width Address valid to ALE low Address hold after ALE low ALE low to valid instruction in ALE low to PSEN low PSEN pulse width PSEN low to valid instruction in Input instruction hold after PSEN Input instruction float after PSEN Address to valid instruction in PSEN low to address float 0 tCLCL–25 5tCLCL–80 10 tCLCL–25 3tCLCL–45 3tCLCL–60 0 5 70 10 MIN 2tCLCL–40 tCLCL–25 tCLCL–25 4tCLCL–65 5 45 30 55 MAX 33 MHz CLOCK MIN 21 5 MAX UNIT ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns

tXHDV 17 Clock rising edge to input data valid 10tCLCL–133 167 ns NOTES: 1. Parameters are valid over operating temperature range unless otherwise specified. 2. Load capacitance for port 0, ALE, and PSEN = 100 pF, load capacitance for all other outputs = 80 pF. 3. Interfacing the 80C31 and 80C32 to devices with float times up to 45ns is permitted. This limited bus contention will not cause damage to Port 0 drivers. 4. Variable clock is specified for oscillator frequencies greater than 16 MHz to 33 MHz. For frequencies equal or less than 16 MHz, see 16 MHz “AC Electrical Characteristics”, page 23. 5. Parts are guaranteed to operate down to 0 Hz. When an external clock source is used, the RST pin should be held high for a minimum of 20 µs for power-on or wakeup from power down.

2000 Aug 07

24

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

EXPLANATION OF THE AC SYMBOLS
Each timing symbol has five characters. The first character is always ‘t’ (= time). The other characters, depending on their positions, indicate the name of a signal or the logical status of that signal. The designations are: A – Address C – Clock D – Input data H – Logic level high I – Instruction (program memory contents) L – Logic level low, or ALE P – PSEN Q – Output data R – RD signal t – Time V – Valid W – WR signal X – No longer a valid logic level Z – Float Examples: tAVLL = Time for address valid to ALE low. tLLPL =Time for ALE low to PSEN low.

tLHLL
ALE

tAVLL

tLLPL

PSEN

tPLPH tLLIV tPLIV tPLAZ tPXIX
INSTR IN

tLLAX

tPXIZ

PORT 0

A0–A7

A0–A7

tAVIV
PORT 2 A0–A15 A8–A15

SU00006

Figure 14. External Program Memory Read Cycle

ALE

tWHLH
PSEN

tLLDV tLLWL
RD

tRLRH

tAVLL
PORT 0

tLLAX tRLAZ
A0–A7 FROM RI OR DPL

tRLDV tRHDX
DATA IN

tRHDZ

A0–A7 FROM PCL

INSTR IN

tAVWL tAVDV
PORT 2 P2.0–P2.7 OR A8–A15 FROM DPF A0–A15 FROM PCH

SU00025

Figure 15. External Data Memory Read Cycle

2000 Aug 07

25

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

ALE

tWHLH
PSEN

tLLWL
WR

tWLWH

tAVLL
PORT 0

tLLAX

tQVWX tQVWH

tWHQX

A0–A7 FROM RI OR DPL

DATA OUT

A0–A7 FROM PCL

INSTR IN

tAVWL

PORT 2

P2.0–P2.7 OR A8–A15 FROM DPF

A0–A15 FROM PCH

SU00026

Figure 16. External Data Memory Write Cycle

INSTRUCTION ALE

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

tXLXL
CLOCK

tQVXH
OUTPUT DATA 0 WRITE TO SBUF

tXHQX
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

tXHDV
INPUT DATA VALID CLEAR RI VALID

tXHDX
SET TI VALID VALID VALID VALID VALID VALID

SET RI

SU00027

Figure 17. Shift Register Mode Timing

VCC–0.5 0.45V

0.7VCC 0.2VCC–0.1

tCHCL

tCLCX tCLCL

tCHCX tCLCH

SU00009

Figure 18. External Clock Drive

2000 Aug 07

26

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

VCC–0.5

0.2VCC+0.9 VLOAD 0.2VCC–0.1

VLOAD+0.1V VLOAD–0.1V

TIMING REFERENCE POINTS

VOH–0.1V VOL+0.1V

0.45V

NOTE: AC inputs during testing are driven at VCC –0.5 for a logic ‘1’ and 0.45V for a logic ‘0’. Timing measurements are made at VIH min for a logic ‘1’ and VIL max for a logic ‘0’.

NOTE: For timing purposes, a port is no longer floating when a 100mV change from load voltage occurs, and begins to float when a 100mV change from the loaded VOH/VOL level occurs. IOH/IOL ≥ ±20mA.

SU00717

SU00718

Figure 19. AC Testing Input/Output

Figure 20. Float Waveform

35 30

25 ICC(mA)

MAX ACTIVE MODE ICCMAX = 0.9 X FREQ. + 1.1

20

15

TYP ACTIVE MODE

10 MAX IDLE MODE 5 TYP IDLE MODE 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36

FREQ AT XTAL1 (MHz)

SU01413

Figure 21. ICC vs. FREQ Valid only within frequency specifications of the device under test

2000 Aug 07

27

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

VCC ICC VCC VCC P0 EA (NC) CLOCK SIGNAL XTAL2 XTAL1 VSS (NC) CLOCK SIGNAL XTAL2 XTAL1 VSS VCC RST P0 EA VCC

VCC ICC

VCC

RST

SU00719

SU00720

Figure 22. ICC Test Condition, Active Mode All other pins are disconnected

Figure 23. ICC Test Condition, Idle Mode All other pins are disconnected

VCC–0.5 0.45V

0.7VCC 0.2VCC–0.1

tCHCL

tCLCX tCLCL

tCHCX tCLCH

SU00009

Figure 24. Clock Signal Waveform for ICC Tests in Active and Idle Modes tCLCH = tCHCL = 5ns
VCC ICC VCC RST P0 EA (NC) XTAL2 XTAL1 VSS VCC

SU00016

Figure 25. ICC Test Condition, Power Down Mode All other pins are disconnected. VCC = 2 V to 5.5 V

2000 Aug 07

28

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

DIP40: plastic dual in-line package; 40 leads (600 mil)

SOT129-1

2000 Aug 07

29

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

PLCC44: plastic leaded chip carrier; 44 leads

SOT187-2

2000 Aug 07

30

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

QFP44: plastic quad flat package; 44 leads (lead length 1.3 mm); body 10 x 10 x 1.75 mm

SOT307-2

2000 Aug 07

31

Philips Semiconductors

Product specification

80C51 8-bit microcontroller family
128/256 byte RAM ROMless low voltage (2.7V–5.5V), low power, high speed (33 MHz)

80C31/80C32

Data sheet status
Data sheet status Objective specification Preliminary specification Product specification Product status Development Qualification Definition [1] This data sheet contains the design target or goal specifications for product development. Specification may change in any manner without notice. This data sheet contains preliminary data, and supplementary data will be published at a later date. Philips Semiconductors reserves the right to make changes at any time without notice in order to improve design and supply the best possible product. This data sheet contains final specifications. Philips Semiconductors reserves the right to make changes at any time without notice in order to improve design and supply the best possible product.

Production

[1] Please consult the most recently issued datasheet before initiating or completing a design.

Definitions
Short-form specification — The data in a short-form specification is extracted from a full data sheet with the same type number and title. For detailed information see the relevant data sheet or data handbook. Limiting values definition — Limiting values given are in accordance with the Absolute Maximum Rating System (IEC 134). Stress above one or more of the limiting values may cause permanent damage to the device. These are stress ratings only and operation of the device at these or at any other conditions above those given in the Characteristics sections of the specification is not implied. Exposure to limiting values for extended periods may affect device reliability. Application information — Applications that are described herein for any of these products are for illustrative purposes only. Philips Semiconductors make no representation or warranty that such applications will be suitable for the specified use without further testing or modification.

Disclaimers
Life support — These products are not designed for use in life support appliances, devices or systems where malfunction of these products can reasonably be expected to result in personal injury. Philips Semiconductors customers using or selling these products for use in such applications do so at their own risk and agree to fully indemnify Philips Semiconductors for any damages resulting from such application. Right to make changes — Philips Semiconductors reserves the right to make changes, without notice, in the products, including circuits, standard cells, and/or software, described or contained herein in order to improve design and/or performance. Philips Semiconductors assumes no responsibility or liability for the use of any of these products, conveys no license or title under any patent, copyright, or mask work right to these products, and makes no representations or warranties that these products are free from patent, copyright, or mask work right infringement, unless otherwise specified. Philips Semiconductors 811 East Arques Avenue P.O. Box 3409 Sunnyvale, California 94088–3409 Telephone 800-234-7381 © Copyright Philips Electronics North America Corporation 2000 All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. Date of release: 08-00 Document order number: 9397 750 07403

Philips Semiconductors
2000 Aug 07 32

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...The name Microsoft was created from the word microcomputer and software, because software was programmed in microcomputer. Bill gates and his friend Paul Allen use to skip Classes, and were spending more time in computer room, they started to find out how these computers work, and read books about them, and also started to write programs. Sooner they started to find many loop holes and learnt to hack it, but they were banned from the computer room because they had crashed some important files.  He started to write programs for the computers at the age of 13, and still holds that position as one of the youngest and smartest programmer ever this world had witnessed. Sooner their time changed as they were hired by a company to explore weaknesses in their system to tighten the security loop holes, But the company never payed them money instead they allowed them to use the computer anytime they wish. After finishing there schooling days they had joined Harvard University. This was the time when gates got into full time into the world of computers. CREATION OF MICROSOFT Within couple of weeks they were hired by another company for writing programs for them, the company was Information Sciences Inc. This time they payed them and also gave them access to the computer full time. By this time they were famous in the city, so they gained many contracts for many company’s, who told them to fix the bugs, and to write the programs for them, this jobs helped them to explorer......

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...1. Liza needs to buy a textbook for the next economics class. The price at the college bookstore is $65. One online site offers it for $55 and another site, for $57. All prices include sales tax. The accompanying table indicates the typical shipping and handling charges for the textbook ordered online. Shipping method | Delivery time | Charge | Standard shipping | 3–7 days | $3.99 | Second-day air | 2 business days | $8.98 | Next-day air | 1 business day | $13.98 | a. What is the opportunity cost of buying online instead of at the bookstore? Note that if you buy the book online, you must wait to get it. The opportunity cost of buying online instead of at the bookstore would be whatever is you would need to give up to get the book online. This would mean that the opportunity cost of buying online would include the sum of the shipping charge and the time that you would spend waiting on the book to arrive. If you buy the book at the store, you would be able to get the book the same day but it would also mean losing out on the possible savings that you would get if you bought it online. b. Show the relevant choices for this student. What determines which of these options the student will choose? So if Liza buys from the bookstore it would cost $65. If Liza decides to buy online from the first store the cost would vary. The price of the book from the first online store would be $55. Next day air to get the book in one business day would cost an......

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...1. When the price of a product is increased 10 percent, the quantity demanded decreases 15 percent. In this range of prices, demand for this product is ( ) a. elastic. b. inelastic. c. cross-elastic. d. unitary elastic. 2. Total revenue falls as the price of a good is raised, if the demand for the good is ( ) a. elastic. b. inelastic. c. unitary elastic. d. perfectly elastic. 3. The price elasticity of demand increases with the length of the period considered simply because ( ) a. consumers' incomes will increase over time. b. the demand curve will shift outward as time passes. c. all prices will increase over time. d. consumers will be better able to find substitutes. 4. A state government wants to increase the taxes on cigarettes to increase tax revenue. This tax would only be effective in raising new tax revenues if the price elasticity of demand is ( ) a. unity. b. elastic. c. inelastic. d. perfectly elastic. 5. Airlines charge business travelers more than leisure travelers because there is a more () a. elastic supply of business travel. b. inelastic supply of business travel. c. elastic demand for business travel. d. inelastic demand for business travel. 6. Cash expenditures a firm makes to pay for resources are called ( ) a. implicit costs. b. explicit costs. c. normal profit. d. opportunity costs. 7. Economic profits are equal to ( ) a. total revenues minus...

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...Is competition necessarily beneficial for consumers? Niall Douglas Firstly, I shall summarise the Neo-Classical Economic interpretation of the maximisation of social welfare through the concept of perfect competition versus monopolies. Secondly, I shall state a range of empirical evidence drawn from various sources negating the Neo-Classical interpretation, from which it shall become clear in what situations the Neo-Classical model fails. Lastly, I shall outline a game theory explanation of the typical case where monopoly invariably outperforms competition. The Neo-Classical Economic Interpretation According to this interpretation, social welfare (in the sense of maximising allocative efficiency1) is maximised only under perfect competition where infinitely tiny (relative to all other competing) firms are price takers2. In contrast, monopolies, whom are price setters through their ability to affect their market, create a deadweight loss to society as output is lower than is socially optimal3. This model is summarised by the top graph in Figure 1 below where Pm and Qm are aggregate equilibrium price & quantity for monopolies and Ppc and Qpc are for perfectly competitive firms. The graph on the bottom is that for a single perfectly competitive firm, with its straight line fixed price. 1 By ‘allocative efficiency’ I mean reaching a Pareto Efficient Optimum whereby any further change would make the aggregate of consumers and firms (ie; society) worse off......

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...Atom: the smallest particle of an element that has properties of an element Atomic Theory: Greek philosopher DEMOCRITUS * Atoms can’t be broken into smaller pieces * In any one element, all atoms are exactly alike * Atoms of different elements are different * Atoms of 2 or more elements can combine to form compounds * Atoms of each element have a unique mass * The masses of the elements in a compound are always in constant ratio Bohr Theory: Danish physicist NEILS BOHR * Electrons are arranged in definite shells or NRG levels, considerable distance from the nucleus * Electron configuration: how electrons are arranged * # of electrons = the atomic # of atoms Sir James Chadwick: 1932 * Discovered in the nucleus another particle, neutron * Neutron has same weight as the proton * Neutron has no electrical charge * Nucleus is made up of protons and neutrons * # of protons is = to # of electrons, which is the atomic # of atom Atoms & Molecules * Atoms combine & arrange to form different compounds & molecules * Molecule: 2 or more atoms that are joined together chemically to act as a single unit * Chemical Bond: is the force that holds atoms together * Compound: 2 or more different atoms joined together chemically * All compounds are molecules, but not all molecules are compounds Ex: Oxygen gas = O2 is a molecule, not a compound (both atoms are alike) Water= H20 is a molecule......

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...BIO 205- Final Exam: Study guide The Final Exam will include chapters covered in Topics 6, 7, and 8. There will be 40 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions. Here is an outline of the materials you will be tested on: Topic 6 Review Topic 6 quiz- study guide. Chapter 5 * Define pasteurization and explain the different methods with examples Chapter 20 * Explain any 2 mechanisms of acquiring resistance to antimicrobial drugs with one example for each. Topic 7 Chapter 21: streptococcal infections, Diphtheria, Common cold, Mycoplasmal pneumonia, Pertussis, TB, Influenza * Causative agent of strep throat * Toxin production in C. diphtheria * Vaccine for the common cold * Diseases of the lower respiratory tract  * The characteristic virulence factor of S. pneumoniae * Mycoplasma * Mucociliary escalator * Treatment for diphtheria * Antigenic DRIFT vs. antigenic SHIFT * Explain why common cold is not treated with antibiotics. Chapter 22: Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Lyme, Varicella, Rubeola, Rubella, Mumps, warts, mycoses * The antimicrobial aspect(s) of the skin * Staphylococcal skin infection * MRSA * S. pyogenes- M protein * Lyme disease * Varicella * Shingles * MMR vaccine * Mycoses * Skin bacteria: humans living in the tropics vs in the desert * List and describe 3 microorganisms that are found in the normal microbiota of human......

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