Premium Essay

Reflection on Montessori Curriculum

In: Other Topics

Submitted By Shiem
Words 1181
Pages 5
REFLECTIONS ON MONTESSORI CURRICULUM AND TEACHING by Shiela May N. Barrientos Today’s parents are increasingly becoming interested in educational methodologies and gradually and increasingly believing in the importance of early childhood education. It is increasingly more acknowledged that the first five to six years of life are really crucial to the child’s development. The brain cells are multiplying at a very high speed specifically during the first three years of life. During this early phase of life, the child is moving towards gaining more and more control over both his physical skills as well as his social interaction with the surrounding environment.(Darroch, 1907)
Consequently more non-traditional educational institutions have been emerging in response to the parents’ requests and needs.
Three of the very best approaches specifically have arisen in Europe in the past century, which are the Waldorf approach, the ReggioEmilia approach and the Montessori approach. All three approaches were an absolute inspiration in the process of educational reform, and two of them, the Reggio Emilia approach and the Montessori approach arose from Italy. (Goffin, 2000) I attempt to understand more about the Montessori approach and compare it occasionally to the other two approaches. Maria Montessori (1870-1952), the founder of the Montessori approach, was the first female physician in Italy and after working in an asylum for the insane as it was called at that time, she was intrigued by special needs children and found that the methods she used with them brought out better outcome. Later in 1907, she opened “Casa dei bambini” and started to work with normally developing children. Along her life journey she came up with a lot of theories concerning child education and development and was nominated for Nobel prize three times till she died in Holland in 1952 leaving...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Montessori for the 21st Century

...Montessori: Evolving Toward a Public Secondary School in the 21st Century Nadia Bryden November 7, 2012 Abstract The educational community has long been familiar with the Montessori method for its international ability to remediate or engage children who are, for any number of reasons, not suited to traditional public schooling. This paper examines the basis of the need for alternative schooling, outlines the development and evolution of the Montessori method and philosophy, and validates the methodology in research, providing a side-by-side comparison for examination of relative strengths and weaknesses of the program. For 21st century school reformists seeking alternative methods of education or an individualized, child-centered curriculum, Montessori presents itself as an adaptive, hands-on, future-friendly option for the democratic community as it evolves toward offering a full preschool to secondary public program. Keywords: Montessori, constructivism, independence, Dewey, progressive, alternative education Montessori: Evolving Toward a Public Secondary School in the 21st Century Since the time of early philosophers such as Socrates, Aristotle and Plato, to whom we can trace the traditional subjects of the common core curriculum, there have been heated political and social debates surrounding the field of education. Rather than being discouraged by their recurrent nature, academic planners and developers must examine these questions anew to refresh our......

Words: 8960 - Pages: 36

Free Essay

Explain How the Role of Teacher Changes in Child Growing Process of the Child's Growing Normalisation (Socialisation)

...introduction here…) Montessori acknowledgment that emphasis she placed on preparation for the learning environment was probably the main characteristic by which people identified her method. She believed that “environment” includes not only the space the children use and the furnishings and materials within that space but also the adults and the children who share their days with each other, as well as the outdoor environment and other places where children learn. A Montessori teacher has to be quite different from a teacher from ordinary school (The Absorbent Mind). A Montessori teacher must be a guardian for child’s learning and care, custodian to the favourable environment and an observer of each child’s nuances. “The teacher of children up to six years of age knows that she has helped mankind in essential part of its formation. …She will be able to say: “I have served the spirits of those children, and they have fulfilled their development, and I have kept them company in their experiences”(Montessori, 2007a). What normalisation is? M Montessori said: “The transition from one stage to another always follows a piece of work done by the hands with real things, work accompanied by mental concentration”(Montessori, 2007a) Dr. Montessori said, “the thing we should cultivate in our teachers is more the spirit than mechanical skill of the scientists – that is, the direction of the preparation should be toward the spirit rather than toward the mechanism”(The Essential......

Words: 1346 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Education

...essay will discuss the philosophical, historical, political, social and economic factors that have contributed to the development of Early Childhood Care and Education services in Australia within a global perspective. Early childhood education (ECE) today consists of a number of crèches, preschools, kindergartens, primary classes and early intervention programs (Woodill, 1992). Educational theory and practice stretches from Ancient Greek philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle (Biggs & Potter, 1999), into the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, on to more recent centuries (McCarthy & Houston, 1980). Among these, three of the most influential in the field of early childhood education are Johann Pestalozzi, Freidrich Wilhelm Froebel, and Maria Montessori. Early ideas have shaped the provision of care and educational services into those currently operating in Australia today. During medieval times very little importance was placed on childhood. As a result, this period was marked with a view of ‘preformationism’. This was a view that saw children “as miniature, already formed adults” (Berk, 1996, p.6). During this time, the idea that children were unique surreptitiously began to emerge when the church defended the innocence of children. The sixteenth century saw a different image of children emerge born out of protestant belief. This belief raised the idea that children were born evil and needed to be reformed (Berk, 1996). In the seventeenth century, John Locke rejected this......

Words: 2696 - Pages: 11

Free Essay

Montessori Method in Developing Childrens Creativity

...How effective is the Montessori method in developing children's creativity, both during early years education and throughout primary school education? There are currently approximately 700 Montessori schools operating in the United Kingdom, and this number is growing annually (Montessori St. Nicholas, 2010). The vast majority of these schools cater for children between the ages of three and six. However, in more recent times, there has been a gradual establishment of Montessori schools that provide primary school education for children older than six. There are now about thirty such primary schools in the United Kingdom (Montessori St. Nicholas, 2010). Although this is still a relatively small number of schools on a national scale, it is nevertheless an interesting increase to investigate further. These schools use the 'Montessori method' to both educate children, and further their holistic development. Before a brief discussion of what differentiates the Montessori method of education from other educational pedagogies, it is important to know and understand the underlying principles that all Montessori schools adhere to for the benefit of the children who attend them. The Montessori method is based on the ideas and theories of Maria Montessori, an Italian physician who experimented with giving young children more freedom, both to direct their own learning, and work and learn at their own pace. In the process, she arrived at two pivotal (and, at the time,......

Words: 5180 - Pages: 21

Premium Essay

Child Development

...1. INTRODUCTION AND AIMS Welcome to KuKi Montessori, one of the greatest gifts we can give our children is the joy of learning.  Our focus is to provide a stimulating early care and education experience which promotes each child's cognitive, physical, social and emotional development.  Our program is designed for children aged 3 and 4 years old. We aim to provide a safe, happy, caring and stimulating environment where your child can learn through encouragement, sensitivity to others and mutual respect while at the same time encouraging each child to express his own personality through imaginative and creative play. Our program offer children opportunities for learning, play, taking part in arts and crafts, children will be able to work and play in small and large groups, both inside the classroom and outdoors. In our main class we include a library’s corner; we reinforce all skills about communication, reading and writing. Through stories, children learn to appreciate language, gain new vocabulary, and learn to use new words and concepts, we provide a separate motor’s room as well offering the children organized games and gym based program and an outdoor play area with a wide range of toys, slides, playhouses… and also we have a garden area that the children use to grow flowers and vegetables. Spanish language is an integral part of our curriculum.  Teacher introduces Spanish through songs, games, instruction, greetings…This program is designed for children who have no......

Words: 2148 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Article Review

...Anne Sawka EDUC 320 Smith,R.R.,(2006). Reflections of an american educator on the teaching of language arts in france. Young Children,61,94-99 In the article,Reflections of an American Educator on the Teaching Of Language Arts in France, the author, Robin Smith, decides to travel to France to compare first hand the differences and similarities between the French and American systems of education in Early Childhood. While reading this article I observed that there are many more similarities than differences in the teaching of language arts. When comparing the two educational systems Smith found that both the French and American system expect children to learn how to communicate orally during group time where they can share ideas and express their opinions. The difference here is French students are expected to memorize and recite poems to the rest of the class. This rote memorization is no longer as emphasized in the American system. Other similarities include that the teaching of reading and writing be included throughout the day and the sequence of teaching these skills is the same. For example in both systems children are first taught alphabet reorganization and then to associate sounds with the letters. Phonemic awareness is considered very important in both systems of education. One difference here is the use of tactile production of sounds and the use of nonsense words to measure phonemic awareness. These strategies are used more in American classrooms. I feel...

Words: 627 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Child Development

...CHILD DEVELOPMENT ESSAY Sensitive Mothering is essential to the social and emotional development of the child. Discuss this statement in the context of relevant development theory. • Explain what is meant by the term Sensitive Mothering. Explain why sensitive mothering is important in building a positive emotional base. • Link this explanation to Bowlby’s attachment theory and Ainsworth’s studies. You will need to show an understanding of the internal working model of attachment and how sensitive mothering impacts the quality of attachment. • Links also need to be made to Erikson’s relevant psychological stages of personality development, emphasizing the importance of a supportive social environment. • Consider research that determines how early attachment impacts social and emotional development of three to five year olds and adults. Bowlby (1969 cited in Nicholls & Kirkland, 1996, p.55) states that an important element in the development of secure attachment is maternal sensitivity. This is necessary in order to engender an infant’s confidence in a mother's   accessibility and responsiveness. Ainsworth et al (1978 cited in Barnes, 1995, p.14) opine that maternal sensitivity predicts the extent of attachment between mother and infant.   “Mothers who are more sensitive, responsive, accessible and cooperative during their child’s first year are likely to have a child who develops a secure attachment”. Ainsworth et al, (1978 cited in Barnes,......

Words: 14097 - Pages: 57

Premium Essay

Mte 501 Slingshot Academy / Tutorialrank.Com

...MTE 501 Entire Course For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialrank.com MTE 501 Entire Course MTE 501 Week 1 Individual Assignment Evolution of Education Timeline MTE 501 Week 2 Individual Assignment Educational Issues MTE 501 Week 2 Team Assignment Educational Learning Opportunities MTE 501 Week 3 Individual Assignment Philosophical and Educational Perspectives MTE 501 Week 3 Team Assignment Educator Philosophy Interview MTE 501 Week 4 Individual Assignment Classroom Observation MTE 501 Week 4 Individual Assignment Ethical Decisions Presentation MTE 501 Week 4 Individual Assignment Professional Expectations Brochure ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ MTE 501 Week 1 Individual Assignment Evolution of Education Timeline For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialrank.com Watch all eight sections of "The History of Education" video. Reflect on how education has evolved in your own lifetime. Create a timeline or use a timeline maker, such as the one from the ReadWriteThink® website, to display how educational policies and practices have evolved throughout your lifetime. Include a minimum of eight entries. At least two of those entries must describe important government mandates that have made major contributions to the field of education. • All entries on your timeline must be supported by an explanation and citation. Develop a list of references used to create the timeline. Format your citations...

Words: 787 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Mte 501 Slingshot Academy - Snaptutorial.Com

...MTE 501 Entire Course For more classes visit www.snaptutorial.com MTE 501 Entire Course MTE 501 Week 1 Individual Assignment Evolution of Education Timeline MTE 501 Week 2 Individual Assignment Educational Issues MTE 501 Week 2 Team Assignment Educational Learning Opportunities MTE 501 Week 3 Individual Assignment Philosophical and Educational Perspectives MTE 501 Week 3 Team Assignment Educator Philosophy Interview MTE 501 Week 4 Individual Assignment Classroom Observation MTE 501 Week 4 Individual Assignment Ethical Decisions Presentation MTE 501 Week 4 Individual Assignment Professional Expectations Brochure MTE 501 Week 4 Team Assignment Ethical Decisions Presentation ----------------------------------------------- MTE 501 Week 1 Individual Assignment Evolution of Education Timeline For more classes visit www.snaptutorial.com Watch all eight sections of "The History of Education" video. Reflect on how education has evolved in your own lifetime. Create a timeline or use a timeline maker, such as the one from the ReadWriteThink® website, to display how educational policies and practices have evolved throughout your lifetime. Include a minimum of eight entries. At least two of those entries must describe important government mandates that have made major contributions to the field of education. • All entries on your timeline must be supported by an explanation and citation. Develop a list of references used to create the timeline. Format......

Words: 1077 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Preschool Classroom

...PRESCHOOL CLASSROOM Janelle Conlin Early Childhood Curriculum & Methods: ECE311 Instructor: Michael Walter August 10, 2012 PRESCHOOL CLASSROOM Preschool classroom’s fosters an exploratory play environment for children ages four to five to prepare students for private school kindergarten courses and utilizes North Carolina kindergarten standards to develop curriculum. Cumberland County public school system does not have the best reputation for educating students and has created a need for more private schools. Currently, we only offer a preschool program but plan to expand into the elementary school ages. As the new school year approaches I will be redesigning the classroom environment and curriculum by incorporating theories from Reggio Emilia, Creative Curriculum, and High Scope Curriculum along with including state standard activities to cover the main concepts for the core subjects to prepare for Kindergarten. Classroom environment and teaching strategies will incorporate philosophies and theories from Reggio Emilia, Creative Curriculum, High Scope Curriculum, and Piaget’s theory into a comprehensive curriculum design for preschoolers. When developing curriculum it is important for this age group to have several approaches. “Children ages 3–8 benefit from planned, teacher-guided, interactive small-group and large- group experiences” (NAEYC, 2009). “Reggio Emilia programs demonstrate how planning an environment is driven by respect for the rights of the...

Words: 2169 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Ethics

...General overview of organizational ethic policies Forbes magazine raised the issue in an article entitled, “Not Qualified for Obamacare’s Subsidies? Just Lie-Govt. To use ‘Honor System’ Without Verifying Your Eligibility” (2013, p.1). With the recent debates on whether or not Obama care is a critical component to ensure that individuals will receive health benefits, the ethical conversation must be debated throughout the United States of America amongst corporations and educational institutions which will be affected. According to Johnson, “The job of the leader, then, is to foster ethical accountability, to encourage followers to live up to their moral responsibilities to the rest of the group, (2012, p. 278. The author’s intent within is paper is to create of code of ethics that will demonstrate the significance of having an ethical and cultural competence in acceptance, understanding and sensitivity; both as an educational goal, and as a fundamental aspect of exemplifying responsibility and accountability. Rationale for the design of your code of ethics The motivation for designing a code of ethics stems from the author’s doctoral course on ethical dilemmas and stewardship. For this author, it opened the gateway to research for meaning and purpose to understand the importance on why educational, corporate and religious organizations must have a code of ethics that is grounded with integrity, authenticity and accountability. In order for a code of ethics to be in......

Words: 1149 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Problems Encountered by the Irregular College Students

...others takes time and energy to build rapport and come to a consensus on behavior-change priorities and strategies. It's tempting just to forge ahead. Although, going at it alone may seem like a good idea in the short-run, in the long run, we are more likely to burn out and lose our effectiveness. Positive student behaviors are most effectively developed and supported through relationship-based whole-school and classroom practices, and clearly communicated behavioral expectations. Some students exhibit challenging behavior and require additional support and interventions to address this behavior and to develop positive behaviors.(Grossman, 2004) It is one of the trickiest issues teachers face today. Disruptive behavior results in lost curriculum time and creates a classroom environment that is not always conducive to learning. One key to nipping behavioral problems in the bud is to promote positive behavior before problems arise. This takes some planning, but the following article will provide you with practical tips to help you lay a foundation for positive classroom behavior. Understanding the various behavior, teachers may encounter in their classroom is an essential component in creating a positive classroom environment. If instructors are not sensitive to the cues given by a student, the teacher may misinterpret the actions, behaviors and intentions of that student. And it is part of the primary responsibilities as teachers to help the students learn. It is difficult......

Words: 7203 - Pages: 29

Premium Essay

Sensitive Period

...1.A) Sensitive periods are specific, limited time when the child shows a strong attraction to a particular activity. The activity child is drawn to aid the child in his/her physical, mental and emotional development. Sensitive periods can be long, short, some overlap or run parallel. When a child is gaining new skills or knowledge during a sensitive period, he/she does so with great ease and with deep concentration. * The first one is the period of Sensory awareness. It originates at birth and continues until the young one reaches the age of 4. During this time the child needs to fully implement all the senses in order to expand them as much as possible. * The second sensitive period which focuses on Language development does not start until the age of three months. The child is in this phase until he/she reaches almost 6 years of age. In this time the little one distinguishes the sound of a human voice and is able to identify the person’s mouth moving. During this stage the child imitates certain sounds, especially the ones that people make. This shows the ability that the small being has to be able to discriminate and mimic the noise that other individuals make. * The third sensitive period focuses on Order. It appears from the age of one and subsides at the age of three. In this time the child expresses the need for stability as this is the organizational phase. The little one is concentrating on forming patterns and foundations for understanding the world......

Words: 2746 - Pages: 11

Premium Essay

Relationship Education

...Relationship Education Introduction In the United States of America, the secondary curriculum for Relationship education (RE) has been in existence since mid-1800. Before then, it was known as the domestic economy. In the 20th century the name changed to home economics and in 1994 to family and consumer sciences. Findings on the number of teachers and student in the secondary RE education indicated that the number of girls enrolled rose to almost 50% around 1959 from the 17% before then. This paper draws both theoretical and empirical literature in an attempt to unmask how family and consumer science education has addressed healthy relationship among youths in middle and high schools. Further emphasis is on the literature gaps that exist regarding this topic. Addressing concerns and problems using RE Kerpelman et al. (151-171), asserts that family and consumer sciences education is an important field that focuses on families, work, and their interrelationships with the aim of improving lives. At high school and middle levels, family and consumer sciences education play a vital rolse in the lives of the youths. For instance, the youths are empowered to have abilities in identifying and creating alternative solutions to common everyday challenges. Under this case, the author further indicates that family consumer education enables the youths to manage the resources at their disposal thereby being able to cope with challenging situations. Additionally, family and consumer......

Words: 3610 - Pages: 15

Free Essay

A Motivational View of Constructivist Informed Teaching

...with roots in philosophy, psychology, and cybernetics”.[1] Constructivism has implications to the theory of instruction. Discovery learning, hands-on, experiential, collaborate, project-based, tasked-based are a number of application that base teaching and learning. Constructivists • John Dewey (1859–1952) • Maria Montessori (1870–1952) • Władysław Strzemiński (1893–1952) • Lev Vygotsky (1896–1934) • Jean Piaget (1896–1980) • George Kelly (1905–1967) • Heinz von Foerster (1911–2002) • Ernst von Glasersfeld (1917–2010) • Paul Watzlawick (1921–2007) • Edgar Morin (1921–) • Humberto Maturana (1928–) • Laszlo Garai (1935–) • David A. Kolb (1939–) Historical and Theoretical Roots According to Kliebard,[2] John Dewey created an active intellectual learning environment in his laboratory school during the early 20th century. Neuroscience now supports this form of active learning as the way people naturally learn.[3] Active learning conditionalizes knowledge through experiential learning. Smith[4] writes that John Dewey believed education must engage with and expand experience; those methods used to educate must provide for exploration, thinking, and reflection; and that interaction with the environment is necessary for learning; also, that democracy should be upheld in the educational...

Words: 7240 - Pages: 29