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The Women's Suffrage Movement

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Women’s suffrage movement

The women's suffrage Movement has been a widely discussed topic from 1870s all the way up to now.We are going to touch as many bases on why it’s still talked about today.

In 1920 women of america had finally won the right to vote.The win was a near lose,it was up to one Tennessee man to vote yes.Harry Burns,a law man,voted in all the womens ‘favor after his dear mother had sent him a letter.The letter was written to “urge” him into being a “good boy”.The fact that one man,a true mother's son,won millions of women the right to vote and even helped women realize their “purpose” wasn't always to stay at home,close their mouth,throw away their protest,and complete house chores.Although some …show more content…
The women's rights movement has been through a variety of crazy stuff.Such as 16 little ladies who decided they were going to illegally vote in 1812 in Rochester,New York.And 50ish years before women could even vote Victoria Woodhull ran for president,but she was arrested for adultery on election day,some say she was framed by angry people who thought her ways of change were disgusting and unladylike.I personally think those people were disgusting and unreasonable.On another note,the female figures,and some male,thought starting a fashion line would have more people interested in the movment.Their idea worked at first,but shortly after they realized it wasn't going to ever focus back on the W.R.M.The fashion line was shortly cut off due to the fact it got more attention than the W.R.M.Also,an important thing a lot of people didn't acknowledge is that several men gave up social respect from others to stand up and help out the women fighting for the …show more content…
The women's rights movement is still widely discussed and is still affecting people today.Some wonder if it is truly over,and some wonder why it still matters today.In the end American women won,and got the 19th amendment,”The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. “I learned a lot while putting this together,and the biggest thing i realized was this movement was not only ladies walking around with posters,it was so much more complex than that.

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