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Theories of Behaviourism

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Submitted By emorad
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E-Leader Manila 2012

A Comparison of Two Theories of Learning -Behaviorism and Constructivism as applied to Face-to-Face and Online Learning Dr. Mary Anne Weegar Dr. Dina Pacis National University San Diego, CA, USA
Abstract The two theories of learning discussed are Behaviorism and Constructivism. Skinner and Watson, the two major developers of the behaviorist school of thought sought to prove that behavior could be predicted and controlled (Skinner, 1974). They studied how learning is affected by changes in the environment. The constructivists viewed learning as a search for meaning. Piaget and Vygotsky described elements that helped predict what children understand at different stages (Rummel, 2008). Details of both theories illuminate the differences and connections between the behavioral and constructivist theories in relationship to how children learn and how their behavior is affected. How curriculum and instruction work with these theories to promote learning and how educators view learning with respect to both theories are also reviewed. Introduction Many students enrolled in institutions of higher education in the United States have had experience with both face-to-face and online classes. Educational researchers have begun to examine the technological characteristics of online classes which contribute to making online classes equivalent to face-to-face classes in relationship to their pedagogical effectiveness. The growth of online learning has changed the traditional learning environment of brick and mortar

E-Leader Manila 2012

classrooms to learning in cyberspace. This environmental change has caused educators to look more closely at the way students’ best experience learning in the 21st century. Behaviorism and constructivism are learning theories which stem from two philosophical schools of thought which have influenced educators’ view of learning....

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