What Is Biological Psychology

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By lizcamuy33
Words 388
Pages 2
Biological Psychology Worksheet
Liz Rodriguez
PSY 400
March 22, 2012
Dr. Iris Thomas

Biological Psychology Worksheet
1. What is biological psychology?
It is the study of the biology of behavior. It is the study of what role biology plays in behavior, and the links between the brain and the body. How the brain functions and how the body reacts or how it behaves to the activity of the brain. Biopsychology has also been called the mind-body connection.

2. What is the historical development of biological psychology?
The historical development of biopsychology is traced as far back as the ancient Greek era. It became the Roman church who dictated much of the human behavior according to their religious beliefs. After the Dark Ages subsided a new way of thinking was born and this period is called the Renaissance era. With this era came new ways of studying things, ways to see things by observing them and this was how modern science was founded.

3. Name one of the three important theorists associated with biological psychology.
Rene Descartes (1596-1650) was a French philosopher but also the one the first to conclude that the Universe was made up of two elements. One of which was the physical matter or the human body, and the other was the soul, spirit, self, or the human mind.

4. Describe the relationship between biological psychology and other fields in psychology and neuroscience.
Whether it is the study of biopsychology and other fields of psychology or neuroscience, all psychologists and scientists are trying to understand the functions of the brain. The body and mind connection and how it reacts to certain behaviors or illnesses.

5. Describe the major underlying assumption of a biopsychological approach.
The assumption is that by understanding how the body and mind or soul reacts to certain behaviors we can understand or…...

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