Premium Essay

Womens Liberation Movement

In: Historical Events

Submitted By Junebug7
Words 312
Pages 2
Womens Liberation Movement

Why did the Women’s Liberation Movement Emerge in the late 1960’s? Discuss with reference to Britain and the United States of America.

In a decade where the whole world was experiencing revolutions due to social discontent, this increased the desire, of women, in the late 1960’s to ‘confront existing structures of oppression,’ giving the impetus for the emergence of the Women’s Liberation Movement. Caine argues the emergence of the movement bought a ‘new tone,’ when discussing women’s oppression. Rather than focusing directly on women’s suffrage, this was a political movement demanding ‘rapid and radical change,’ in an ever increasing ambience of liberalisation. Upon inception, it is vital to highlight one can account different reasons for the emergence of the movement in Britain and America, as different domestic situations led to different reasons for the emergence of a more radical form of feminism. This essay, together with a multiplicity of historians, will consider the importance of World War II and the Civil Rights Movement, and the impact they had on the emergence of the Women’s Liberation Movement. Linked to this is the ever apparent discrimination women faced and increasing desires to change this, coupled with developments of new opportunities, demonstrated by the aforementioned world events. Additionally, the impact of literature such as Betty Friedan’s, The Feminine Mystique, needs to be considered. Whilst all the factors play an important role in contributing to the emergence, it will be concluded that the increased confidence especially politically, demonstrated by the factors mentioned, by women was ultimately responsible for the emergence of the Women’s Liberation Movement in the late 1960’s. It has been argued that, predominantly in Britain, the Second World War gave women the idea of greater freedom. In the…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Womens Liberation Movement

...Why did the Women’s Liberation Movement Emerge in the late 1960’s? Discuss with reference to Britain and the United States of America. In a decade where the whole world was experiencing revolutions due to social discontent, this increased the desire, of women, in the late 1960’s to ‘confront existing structures of oppression,’ giving the impetus for the emergence of the Women’s Liberation Movement. Caine argues the emergence of the movement bought a ‘new tone,’ when discussing women’s oppression. Rather than focusing directly on women’s suffrage, this was a political movement demanding ‘rapid and radical change,’ in an ever increasing ambience of liberalisation. Upon inception, it is vital to highlight one can account different reasons for the emergence of the movement in Britain and America, as different domestic situations led to different reasons for the emergence of a more radical form of feminism. This essay, together with a multiplicity of historians, will consider the importance of World War II and the Civil Rights Movement, and the impact they had on the emergence of the Women’s Liberation Movement. Linked to this is the ever apparent discrimination women faced and increasing desires to change this, coupled with developments of new opportunities, demonstrated by the aforementioned world events. Additionally, the impact of literature such as Betty Friedan’s, The Feminine Mystique, needs to be considered. Whilst all the factors play an important role in......

Words: 3414 - Pages: 14

Premium Essay

Liberation Theology

...Introduction According to Enns (2008), liberation theology attempts to infer the holy writ through the plight of the poor. This movement originated from South America in the early 1950s when Marxism was the most popular theory among the poor. It was a response to the ill-treatment and poverty facing the ordinary people. It dealt with the issue of distribution of wealth among people in order to upgrade the economic status in life. This movement had strong Romanian Catholic roots bolstered in Colombia in 1968 at a conference where, the bishops proposed a merger between the Karl Marx teachings with those of Jesus Christ. Liberation theology support was immense but various critiques across the religious framework (Novak, 1991). This movement arose in catholic and protestant churches and it has three main expressions as discussed herein. Black Liberation Theology Black liberation theology strongly focuses on the African American community. This theory got formulated in 1969 by the Nation Committee of Black Church men as a civil rights movement. The key goal is to make Christianity real for the black people. The offshoot of this movement was in South America during the liberation of African American people from all kinds of injustices and bondage especially in the social, political and economical focus. Coined by James Cone in 1970, the movement focused on promoting communism and Marxism by incorporating religious interpretation. This theory focused on issues relating to......

Words: 1156 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Social Movements

...Course Title Date Social Movement Introduction The concept of participatory democracy entails direct involvement of the people in decisions concerning politics, especially those which impacts their lives. This idea underpinned the activities of most social movements between 1960s and 1970s. Its emergence was mostly characterized by establishing democracy at workplace or industries, a method regarded as useful in allowing workers to participate in decision-making. However, the concept ceased to narrow on democratizing workplace as social scientists modified it to a theory which is applicable in restoring democracy in the society (Bachrach et al. 1). The modified concept focuses on achieving egalitarian redistribution of power in the society, a process which would lead to greater effects on the agenda of democratization. Social media can be cited as one of the achievements of participatory democracy because a lot of information can be gathered and shared across the populations and countries. This article focuses on tracing the influence of participatory democracy on women liberation as well as highlighting its impact on the 21st century social media. The Influence of Participatory Democracy on Women Liberation Officially, women liberation can be traced back to 1960s and should not be confused with the women movement in United States around the same time. In fact, most social scientists regard women movement as a unique branch of women liberation. The difference......

Words: 989 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Sexual Liberations

... Sexual Liberation Cassandra M. Gonzalez HIS/145 the American Experience Since 1945 Dr. William Frost OCT/10/2012 Sexual liberation The 1960’s in our history of the United States are often described today as the period of profound societal change. Attitudes to a variety of issues changed including changes towards sexual attitudes. This altered view towards sexual attitudes and behavior is often today referred to as the sexual revolution, also known as the time of sexual liberation. Many different political movements were all important components to this period in the sexual revolution, such as Feminists, gay rights campaigners, and hippies just to name a few. American’s during this era faced many controversial issues – from the civil rights, to the Vietnam War, and nuclear arms, and the time was ripe for change. This climate of change led many, particularly the young in significantly shifting social attitudes, behaviors and institutional regulations surrounding sexuality. The Birth of Contraceptives Sexual liberation was a social movement that challenged what society viewed as the sexual norm and typical gender roles. Sex became more socially accepted outside of monogamous, heterosexual marriages, and increased. The increase in acceptance of intercourse prior to marriage gave individuals more freedom. The year of 1962 many advances occurred that supported the freedom of being sexual active and not having to procreate: the first Birth Control pill went on......

Words: 913 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

The Women's Movement

...The women’s rights movement was a huge turning point for women because they had succeeded in the altering of their status as a group and changing their lives of countless men and women. Gender, Ideology, and Historical Change: Explaining the Women’s Movement was a great chapter because it explained and analyzed the change and causes of the women’s movement. Elaine Tyler May’s essay, Cold War Ideology and the Rise of Feminism and Women’s Liberation and Sixties Radicalism by Alice Echols both gave important but different opinions and ideas about the women’s movement. Also, the primary sources reflect a number of economic, cultural, political, and demographic influences on the women’s movement. This chapter really explains how the Cold War ideologies, other protests and the free speech movements occurring during this time helped spark the rise or the women’s right’s movements. In Cold War Ideology and the Rise of Feminism by Elaine Tyler May, May examines the impact of political changes on American families, specifically the relationship of a Cold War ideology and the ideal of domesticity in the 1960s. May believed that with security as the common thread, the Cold War ideology and the domestic revival reinforced each other. Personal adaption, rather than political resistance, characterized the era. However, postwar domesticity never fully delivered on its promises because the baby-boom children who grew up in suburban homes abandoned the containment ethos......

Words: 2090 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

How Far Do You Agree That Women Had Made Significant Gains in Their Fight for Equality by 1980?

...How far do you agree that women had made significant gains in their fight for equality by 1980? Equality is ensuring individuals or groups of individuals are treated fairly and equally on the grounds of their race, gender, religion, disability, age or sexual orientation. One such group of individuals who are in an unremitting fight for equality in context of gender and race are woman within the United States exemplified by the World economic forum global gender gap report of 2015, ranking the country 28th in terms of equality between men and woman. Although in terms of the global demographic the ranking appears adequate – impressive even by some accounts, the unwavering determination of the feminist movement leading up the 1980’s, disappointingly appears to pale in vain to the statistic. Indeed this trait of gender inequality is consistent not only today but also throughout America’s history. On the 3rd February 1870 the 15th Amendment to the constitution of the United States of America declared that all US citizens had equal voting rights. Indeed this would prove to be an unequivocally vital development in socio-political dynamic of the country, however the amendment ultimately marginalised and repudiated a fundamental gender arguing that they served no purpose other than to adhere to gender roles ministering to a man and reproducing. – The female. In perspective one could argue that the recognition of US citizenship within the parameters of voting rights proved to be......

Words: 2207 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

African American

...History Winter Quarter 2010 Purdue University Instructor: Professor Wilkens Introduction When the Black Feminist movement was developed, it was a revolution for black women. It gave them power, liberation, and a voice to overcome the emasculating efforts of white male power (Harrold, Hine, and Hine, 2009). When I first began this research, I discovered that Black Feminism is too broad of a topic to elaborate on as a whole. This paper defines the term “Black Feminism. It will explore two published articles that report on the theory and practice of how black feminism is making waves and what role of education in the development of the Black Feminist Thought from 1860 to 1920. This paper will examine when the National Black Feminist Organization was founded and lastly, how two outstanding women who made an impact in the Black Feminist Movement. According to Encyclo (n.d.) online encyclopedia the definition of black feminism is “A strand of feminist thought which highlights the multiple disadvantages of gender, class and race that shape the experiences of nonwhite women. Black feminists reject the idea of a single unified gender oppression that is experienced evenly by all women, and argue that early feminist analysis reflected the specific concerns of white, middle-class women.” In other words, black feminist argue that the liberation of black women entails freedom for all people since it would require the end of racism, sexism and class oppression. This......

Words: 1725 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

The Social Events of the 1950's, 60's, 70's, 80's, and 90's

...The Social Events of the 1950's, 60's, 70's, 80's, and 90s Introduction Over the past 50 years, there have been many changes within the social movement in the United States. Some of these changes have been for the better and some not so great. These changes were made with the hopes and dreams of making life better for all cultures, species, families, and environment. Now the question is, how did these change come about, and what were these changes about? Social Life of the 1950's In the early 1950's was a new beginning for the United States. With the end of the Great Depression and World War II, people felt that they could start living, and have things they thought they would never have, like a home, cars, a wife or husband, and children. With the new beginning, families started moving from large city life to the suburbs, for the reason that life in the suburbs was considerable less hectic and peaceful than what city life was like. Due to the Great Depression, many men and women put off getting married or starting families for the reason of lack of money or homes, and with the War, many were afraid they might not come home. However, with the new feeling of security and peace couples were able start the family they always wanted and so began the Baby Boom years. People moving to the suburbs......

Words: 2021 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Qfqfe

...identity, now and historically. Throughout history, women were outcasts to the formal configurations of political life. Over the course of the century, however, women in America progressed considerably into all facets of public life, the political realm, the labor force, memberships, careers, mass media, and trendy culture. I believe that women’s identity now and historically has progressively been revamped through the use of proper integration and successful women’s movements. Since the beginning of time, women have been fighting for their rights and fighting to be equal with men on every level. Both individuals and organized groups felt that women were treated unjustly, and they vowed to fix these problems. The peak of this movement transpired in the 1960s and 1970s, when the Women's Liberation Movement was recognized as an organized power to gain equality of women. Starting in primitive eras, women of the Prehistoric Age were first reflected as inferior through division of labor. The men were sent to hunt for food, and the women were caretakers watching over the family. This conception of sexually depicted roles implied that women were too delicate and frail to go out hunting with the men (Sinclair 184). The New Stone Age kept women's status inferior to that of men. They were still in charge of rally and farming, which led them to many technological advances in the fields of plowing and cooking. Although the contributions of women were unmatched by most men in this......

Words: 2441 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

The Feminist Movement

...Assignment: A movement that is changing the world Shadrach Diamond Kaplan University SS 310-06 April 25, 2012 The 1960s was a decade filled with changes that had an effect on the nation and the world like none other. During this period, Civil Rights movements took place, the country was at war, a U.S. president was assassinated, and humans walked on the moon. Music and television were creating a completely different culture. For the first time a presidential election was broadcast on TV giving millions of Americans the ability see this event, and the Beatles were influencing the youth with their magical music and lyrics. The events that occurred in this decade not only touched this planet as a whole, but it also made an impression on my personal life. The city I live in saw a big change during the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. New Orleans, Louisiana, has a large black population who shared the same dream that Martin Luther King spoke about at the Capital. “On August 28, 1963, more than 250,000 people from across the nation came together in Washington, D.C. to peacefully demonstrate their support for the passage of a meaningful civil rights bill, an end to racial segregation in schools and the creation of jobs for the unemployed” (Hansan, n.d.). Martin Luther King Jr. was a pioneer for the Civil Rights movement who encouraged other people to follow him and help change the country’s laws. Because of the advancements in the Civil Rights......

Words: 1712 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Feminism and the Brady Bunch

...a firm hold on American, as well as the world’s, political and social norm, and television could not and did not ignore it. News reports as well as comedy television shows used the women’s liberation movement as a basis for a commentary in announcements, an episode, or a show as a whole. Television, as always, captured, communicated, and connected Americans everywhere with the changing times as women sought more than just their suffrage. As a contemporary issue for its time, it seemed unusual for a situation comedy television show like The Brady Bunch (1969-1974 ABC), which kept to traditional family values, to include episodes with feminism as its main subject matter. However, The Brady Bunch – particularly episode 19, season 2 – made the women’s liberation movement a family friendly topic for America’s living rooms. The episode was not just spontaneous and unrelated from the show as a whole; rather it built on the already established balanced norm that the show established since the very first episode. The Brady Bunch took great strides to maintain equilibrium between the boys and the girls – a mother with three daughters, a man with three sons, and the additional woman, Alice, substance a moderate position and generally does not take sides. Episode 19 of the second season, ‘The Liberation of Marcia Brady’ discusses feminism, but in the end nothing is really broken and the family remains united and wholesome. In a time where there was political, social, and familial......

Words: 1375 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Paper

...greater number of total words, please write to South End Press for permission. INTRODUCTION Come Closer to Feminism 1. 2. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Hooks, Bell. Feminism is for everybody: passionate politics / Bell Hooks. p.cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-89608-629-1 - ISBN 0-89608-628-3 (pbk.) 1. Feminist theory. 2. Feminism - Philosophy. 3. Feminism Political aspects. 4. Sex discrimination against women. 1. Title. FEMINIST POLITICS Where We Stand 1 CONSCIOUSNESS-RAISING A Constant Change of Heart 7 3. SISI:ERHOOD IS STILL POWERFUL 4. Vll 13 00-036589 South End Press, 7 Brookline Street, #1, Cambridge, MA 02139 06 05 04 7 8 9 Printed in Canada 19 OUR BODIES, OURSELVES Reproductive Rights 25 6. HQl190 .H67 2000 305.42'01 - dc21 FEMINIST EDUCATION FOR CRITICAL CONSCIOUSNESS BEAUTY WITHIN AND WITHOUT 31 7. FEMINIST CLASS STRUGGLE 37 8. GLOBAL FEMINISM 44 5. 9. WOMEN AT WORI( 48 10. RACE AND GENDER 55 11. ENDING VIOLENCE 61 12. FEMINIST MASCULINITY 67 13. FEMINIST PARENTING 72 14. LIBERATING MARRIAGE AND PARTNERSHIP 78 15. A FEMINIST SEXUAL POLITIC An Ethics of Mutual Freedom 85 16. TOTAL BLISS Lesbianism and Feminism 93 INTRODUCTION 17. TO LOVE AGAIN The Heart of Feminism 100 18. FEMINIST SPIRITUALITY 105 19. VISIONARY FEMINISM 110 INDEX 119 ABOUT......

Words: 37459 - Pages: 150

Free Essay

Raja Rao Kanthapura

...Emancipation Of Women and their role in nationalist movement in Raja Rao’s Kanthapura Raja Rao’s first published work in English, the Kanthapura had a rather controversial and revolutionary plot in accordance with women being participants of nationalist movements. The third world countries, at that time, were opposed to the idea of women in the socio-political realms. Kanthapura drove through barriers of male dominance and female regression that prevailed in India at that time and Raja Rao was much criticized for the idea of female liberation. In kanthapura, the fact that the narrator is an old woman, acchaka, who comments on the actions of characters with a sharp eyed wisdom makes evident the fact that the author was of view of freedom of speech for women. The novel, which is predominantly based on Mahatma Gandhi’s principle of satyagraha women, as satyagrahis, demonstrated fearlessness in their struggle for independence. Inspite of the lathi blows, they persevere their nonviolent march exhibiting a conscious knowledge of their strength and power , and endure pain in the face of brutality, inhumanity and cruelty of the police. Raja rao, in kanthapura portrays the role of women in the nationalist movement inspired by gandhian ideals. It is an extreme shift from the position of women in the patriarchal Indian society to that in a strong movement against colonialism. This without doubt also reflects the Gandhian ideal to encourage emancipation of women and support......

Words: 504 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

History of Birth Control

...control was largely illegal in the United States for much of the 20th century, so maybe one of your questions could be how people gained access to it prior to its legalization, as well as the social stigma surrounding birth control, and how some women were stuck with raising more children than they could handle because of the difficulty in obtaining birth control. Another question you could cover is the nature of abortion procedures prior to its legalization. Birth control as a movement in the US has had a very uneven relationship to movements for women s rights. Discuss early birth control reform efforts in relationship to issues of gender and class power. Birth control was an early-twentieth-century slogan, but it has become the generic for all forms of control of reproduction. With the spread of agriculture and the economic advantages of large families, religious and in some cases secular law increasingly restricted birth control, with the result that there appears to have been an increase in reliance on abortion while contraceptive technology and use declined. Both practices were legal in the United States until the mid-nineteenth century. Birth control as a movement in the US has had a very uneven relationship to movements for women s rights. Discuss early birth control reform efforts in relationship to issues of gender and class power. Birth control was an early-twentieth-century slogan, but it has become the generic for all forms of control of reproduction.......

Words: 1313 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

History

...……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Assess the Achievements of Women’s Movement in American in the Second Half of 20th Century 1. Introduction The Women’s Movement in the 1960s and 1970s has played a significant role in the development of openness, equity, democracy and freedom of American society. This movement is conducive to helping the American people gain a new recognition of the role of women in family, society and guarantee their social rights, which improves the degree of civilization of American society. The achievement of the women’s movement in America in the second half of 20th century from a macro perspective in terms of feminist movement, position changes of employment competition after the Second War, women’s political rights and education to explore their achievements and influence in the development of the United States society. 2. Feminist Movement 2.1 The First Wave Robert & Baker (2001) asserted that American women’s campaign emerged in the 1840s with the symbol of the first American Women Conference in Seneca Falls, New York, which blew the horn of political struggle of women’s rights in America. The main goal of the first wave of women’s movement is to liberate women and guarantee women’s political rights. 2.2 The Second Wave Beth & Alexander (2006) deemed that the second wave of the women’s movement, also called the women’s liberation movement, appeared in the early 1960s, Feminists participated in this movement aimed at the......

Words: 2640 - Pages: 11