Criminal Justice Ethics

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Submitted By quinn89
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Responding to an anonymous tip of a local gun rally without a permit may be tricky for a police officer. Responsibilities of a police officer are varied, and may differ greatly from within one political context to another. Typical duties relate to keeping the peace, law enforcement, protection of people and property, and the investigation of crimes. Officers are expected to respond to a variety of situations that may arise while they are on duty such as an unlawful assembly. Freedom of speech is one of our most dearly held rights and a building block of any democracy. But there are laws that govern the assembly of people for the purpose of holding a protest rally. A peaceful demonstration or assembly can be a productive way to express what we feel is wrong with our government. While such a protest is considered a part of our first amendment rights, most cities do require a permit in an effort to help avoid traffic and crowd problems.
The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees individuals the right of freedom of assembly. Under the Common Law and modern statutes, however, the meeting of three or more persons may constitute an unlawful assembly if the persons have an illegal purpose or if their meeting will breach the public peace of the community. If they actually execute their purpose, they have committed the criminal offense of riot.
Even as a police officer you strongly support Article 2 of the Constitution. Which includes "the right of the people to bear arms." The U.S. Supreme Court stated that the militia reference doesn't limit arms to only law enforcement and the military. Most Americans have a constitutional right to own guns for the purpose of self-defense or certain legal activities, such as hunting or target practice. The fact if a rally does not have a permit as a police officer you need to advise your fellow police officers about the…...

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