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Disclaimer
Academic programmes, requirements, courses, tuition, and fee schedules listed in this catalogue are subject to change at any time at the discretion of the Management and Board of Trustees of the College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT). The COSTAATT Catalogue is the authoritative source for information on the College’s policies, programmes and services. Programme information in this catalogue is effective from September 2010. Students who commenced studies at the College prior to this date, are to be guided by programme requirements as stipulated by the relevant department. Updates on the schedule of classes and changes in academic policies, degree requirements, fees, new course offerings, and other information will be issued by the Office of the Registrar. Students are advised to consult with their departmental academic advisors at least once per semester, regarding their course of study. The policies, rules and regulations of the College are informed by the laws of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago.

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Table of Contents
PG 9 PG 9 PG 10 PG 11 PG 11 PG 12 PG 12 PG 13 PG 14 PG 14 PG 14 PG 14 PG 15 PG 17 PG 18 PG 20 PG 20 PG 20 PG 21 PG 22 PG 22 PG 22 PG 23 PG 23 PG 23 PG 23 PG 24 PG 24 PG 24 PG 24 PG 25 PG 25 PG 25 PG 26 PG 26 PG 26 PG 26 PG 26 PG 26 PG 27 PG 27 PG 27 PG 27 PG 27 PG 27 PG 28 PG 28 PG 28 PG 28 PG 28 PG 33 PG 37 Vision Mission President’s Welcome Institutional Profile Management Structure Registered Status and Accreditation Candidacy Commitment to Quality and Continuous Improvement Core Values General Information Equal Opportunity Disability Right to Privacy Campus Safety and Security How to Use this Catalogue List of Programmes Admissions Four-tiered Admissions Process Prior Learning and Assessment (PLA) How to Apply Placement Testing Music Auditions Transfer Applicants Advanced Standing Caricom and International Applicants Transient Applicants Readmission Tuition and Other Fees Student Insurance Method of Payment Refunds Financial Aid Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses (GATE) Higher Education Loan Programme (HELP) Registration Full-time Students Part-Time Students Step 1 Academic Advisement Step 2 Register for Courses Step 3 GATE Application Step 4 Payment of Fees Step 5 Student ID Cards and Validation Stickers Late Registration Changes in Registration Add-Drops Withdrawals from a Course Withdrawals from the College Leave of Absence Academic Programme Quality and Relevance Academic Schedule Instruction and Assessment Core Curriculum Academic Schools and Programmes

iv

PG 38 PG 38 PG 39 PG 47 PG 53 PG 57 PG 65 PG 107 PG 107 PG 108 PG 121 PG 130 PG 132 PG 159 PG 160 PG 160 PG 165 PG 172 PG 182 PG 190 PG 228 PG 228 PG 229 PG 229 PG 239 PG 241 PG 244 PG 250 PG 250 PG 250 PG 250 PG 251 PG 251 PG 252 PG 252 PG 253 PG 253 PG 253 PG 254 PG 255 PG 256 PG 256 PG 256 PG 256 PG 257 PG 258 PG 258 PG 258 PG 259 PG 259 PG 259 PG 259 PG 259 PG 260 PG 260 PG 260 PG 261

School of Liberal Arts and Human Services Mission Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences Department of Languages, Literature and Communication Studies Department of Mathematics Department of Fine and Performing Arts Course Descriptions School of Business and Information Technologies Mission Department of Entrepreneurship and Management Department of Information Science and Technology Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies Course Descriptions School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences Mission Department of Nursing Department of Health Science Technologies Department of Environmental Studies Department of Natural and Life Sciences Course Descriptions School of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning Mission List of Programmes Certificate Programmes Advanced Professional Programmes Continuing Education Courses COMPASS (Compensatory Programmes and Academic Support Services) Academic Resources Computer Labs SMART Classrooms E-Classroom Tutorial Centres Library Library E-Learning Resources Interlibrary Loans Academic Policies Academic Advisement College and Pre-College Credits Grading Scheme Grade Point Average (GPA), Quality Value and Quality Points Transfer Credits Course Load Class Attendance Standards of Academic Progress Repeats Grade Corrections Grade Appeals Requirements for Graduation Application for Graduation Honours and Awards Academic Awards President’s List Dean’s List Graduate Merit Award Valedictorian New Student Orientation Student Rights and Responsibilities

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PG 261 PG 263 PG 264 PG 264 PG 264 PG 264 PG 265 PG 265 PG 265 PG 265 PG 266 PG 267 PG 268 PG 268 PG 268 PG 268 PG 268 PG 268 PG 268 PG 269 PG 269 PG 269 PG 269 PG 270 PG 270 PG 272 PG 277 PG 278

Student Code of Conduct Guidelines for Appropriate Attire Student Government Student Body Student Councils Student Executive Council Student Governance Committee Registered Student Organisations (RSOs) Student Life Career Preparation and Internships Health and Counselling Services Athletics Student Support Services Registry Services Transcripts Letters of Verification Replacement Identification Cards Technology Services MyCOSTAATT (Banner Self-Service) Student Email IT Help Desk Cafeteria College Store Management Team Administrative Departments Campus Information 2010-2012 Annual Calendar NOTES

vi

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

To be a dynamic, innovative, and student-centred multi-campus in teaching and college, learning, promoting serving excellence diverse

Vision

communities and producing lifelong learners who can compete globally.

To be the premier educational institution in providing high quality, affordable and accessible educational programmes, serving the needs communities, and facilitating the personal and professional development of its students, faculty and staff.

Mission

of business, industry and the diverse campus



President’s Welcome
On behalf of the faculty, administrators and staff, I welcome you to the College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT). As one of the largest public tertiary level

educational institutions in Trinidad and Tobago, we at COSTAATT student-centred approach to teaching and learning.

take pride in our commitment to academic excellence and our

The selection of a college is one of the most critical decisions you decision to make COSTAATT your choice for tertiary education, as

will make as you plan for your future. We commend you on your we offer a wide range of programmes at associate, bachelor’s and Our dedicated academic advisors will assist you in selecting the goals.

post-bachelor’s levels to meet the diverse needs of our students. programme of study most suited to your career and educational

Since our establishment in the year 2000, we have graduated over 10,000 students who are making significant activities. As a student of COSTAATT you will be exposed to a wide-ranging and balanced curriculum, which will

contributions to national development through public and private sector employment and entrepreneurial enable you to excel globally and transition seamlessly into the challenging world of work. Our core curriculum is student development programme, sports, clubs and other registered student organisations.

supported by rewarding co-curricular offerings, involving participation in student governance, a comprehensive

At COSTAATT, we are committed to transformative education and to working closely with our students to student-centred philosophy, we fulfill this mission, one student at a time.

empower them to take responsibility for transforming their lives, their communities and the nation. Through our

In this catalogue, you will find information on programmes, courses, requirements, policies, services and other and enjoyable one, as you strive to achieve your educational goals.

valuable information. Our faculty and staff will work with you to make your experience a rewarding, productive

Once again, we welcome you to COSTAATT and look forward to partnering with you as you embark on this lifetransforming journey.

Emmanuel E. Gonsalves, Esq. President

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Institutional Profile
The College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT) was legally established as a body corporate on October 27th 2000 by Act of Parliament (Act No. 77 of 2000).

As one of the largest public tertiary institutions in Trinidad and Tobago, COSTAATT awards certificates, advanced

diplomas, associate and bachelor’s degrees in a wide range of specialized, technical and academic programmes to full and part-time students. The College is the premier regional institution offering educational programmes in a number of critical areas including: radiography, medical laboratory technology, nursing, business and library studies. In addition, the College is the official translation body for the Government of Trinidad and Tobago. The College provides access to tertiary education for its students at seven campuses and learning centres: • City Campus (Port of Spain) • Port of Spain General Hospital (Department of Nursing) • St. Ann’s Hospital (Department of Nursing) • Trincity Learning Centre • South Campus • Tobago Campus COSTAATT plays a role of strategic importance in national development, especially with respect to Government’s plans for social equity and economic diversification. achievement of the goal of increasing participation in tertiary education for a more diverse range of students. The College is one of a few tertiary level institutions within Trinidad and Tobago that are equipped and able to create the national economy. educational opportunities that transform academically underprepared citizens into meaningful contributors to Its mandate for broadening access is pivotal to the • North Learning Centre (Department of Foreign Languages)

Management Structure
COSTAATT is managed by a Board of Trustees - comprising the President of the College, eleven members appointed by the President of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, and designated representatives of the

student body, faculty and non-academic staff. Members of the Board are drawn from among persons who have qualifications or wide experience and ability in a variety of areas including law, health, finance, business, information technology, labour relations, education and training. A supportive administration is critical to the success of students at COSTAATT. Our administrative team

collaborates to ensure that the resources and facilities required for the delivery of programmes and services to our students are available in a timely and effective manner and are aligned to ensure quality and excellence. Our vice presidents, academic deans, chairs and directors bring many years of knowledge and experience in

higher education to the management of the College’s operations. Through our dedication to public service and commitment to the delivery of innovative programmes and services, the College is well positioned to forge new pathways to student success and excellence in the 21st century.

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Registered Status and Accreditation Candidacy
In June 2008, COSTAATT successfully completed an institutional registration exercise with the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT), achieving registered status for the maximum period of three (3) years. Subsequently, in October 2008, the College obtained candidacy status with the ACTT, in pursuit of institutional 2010.

accreditation. The College anticipates the imminent success of its application for accreditation by the end of

Commitment to Quality and Continuous Improvement
The College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago is committed to achieving excellence in the delivery of programmes and services that meet the needs of its diverse stakeholder groups. The College’s experience and promotes standards that allow for continuous improvement throughout the institution.

quality policy provides a framework that facilitates planning, development, delivery and evaluation of the learning

Quality at COSTAATT is based on a student-centred approach to the delivery of educational products and services

that meet national and international standards. The College is committed to gathering student feedback through surveys and other mechanisms in order to inform the continuous improvement of its academic programmes and services.

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Core Values
Student-Centredness and Success – We value our students as our raison d’être, the primary focus of all our endeavours. Transformation – We acknowledge student transformation as a key driver in all our decisions and seek to challenge and support all students to achieve their full potential. We aim to produce graduates who are: • • • • innovative and creative; ethically grounded;

disciplined and civically engaged; the nation in which they live.

change agents and problem-solvers who will positively impact their families, communities, and ultimately,

Academic Excellence – We aspire to the highest standards of academic excellence and embrace research and scholarship as critical aspects of the academic enterprise. We are committed to maintaining relevance and currency in programme content and in the teaching and learning experience.

Academic Freedom – We are committed to upholding the principles of academic freedom as a core requirement for the development of a vibrant academic community, committed to knowledge creation and application.

Professionalism – Discipline, honesty, integrity, trust, transparency, accountability. We hold these attributes to be the cornerstones of professional and ethical behaviour at the individual, group and institutional levels and seek always to be guided by, and act in accordance with them.

Respect for Diversity, Self and Others – We acknowledge the uniqueness of all individuals, irrespective of their economic, social, ethnic, religious or other affiliations; and seek always to act with and promote respect, tolerance, cooperation and understanding in all our affairs.

Continuous Improvement – We believe that excellence in teaching, learning and service delivery is based on committed to addressing challenges in order to bring about improvements in the quality of all that we do.

regular and honest self-reflection and critical evaluation by our internal and external stakeholders; we are

Lifelong Learning – We value lifelong learning as a means of realizing individual potential, facilitating flexibility and adaptability, and securing independence and self-sufficiency.

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General Information
Equal Opportunity
The College does not discriminate in employment or in the delivery of its programmes and services on the differently-abled is guided by the stipulations of the College’s disability policy. basis of ethnicity, religion, gender, socio-economic status and physical ability. Educational provision for the

Disability
In order to support student success, COSTAATT provides educational opportunities with reasonable disabilities are required to disclose their conditions at the time of application so that the College can determine its ability to provide the necessary support and guidance. accommodation for prospective students who are differently-abled. Students with physical, mental or learning

Right to Privacy
Various departments at the College collect and maintain information about students in order to: • allow the College, government agencies, research institutions or accrediting organizations to compile • establish student records in manual and electronic file formats. statistics, audit or evaluate programmes or plan future educational provision; and

COSTAATT’s academic records contain information on the educational history and academic progress of the student. In addition, records may also contain information related to, but not limited to, a student’s employment and medical history.

Administrative and teaching personnel of the College whose positions warrant access to these records may be granted access in order to fulfill the responsibilities of their job. Persons other than administrative or teaching personnel are considered to be third parties and as such are restricted from accessing students’ records.

While COSTAATT respects the student’s right to privacy and undertakes not to disclose the information provided in the following instances: • • • • •

by students to unauthorized agencies, the College may be required to disclose elements of a student’s record

the student has disclosed information which the College is asked to confirm; purposes;

the student is between 16 and 18 and is claimed by his/her parents as a dependant for tax the student is in an emergency situation and it is necessary to protect his/her health or the health and safety of others; the student is suspected of fraud against the College; authority.

the student’s information is requested under the laws of Trinidad and Tobago by legitimate legal

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Campus Safety and Security

The College is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for students, faculty and staff at all

campuses and sites. The Public Safety and Security Department works to ensure the provision of efficient and effective security services and the maintenance of an environment conducive to teaching and learning for all students.

While the primary responsibility for the provision of a safe and secure environment rests with the College, all personal safety and security.

students are encouraged to be aware of their surroundings and to take reasonable measures to ensure their

Security Services on College Premises: Security officers maintain a continous presence at all locations. In addition, sites also benefit from 24-hour electronic security surveillance. Students are requested to collaborate with college officials in creating a safe and secure environment for all, by reading the following information and complying with all requirements and instructions:

Identification Cards: All students must present a valid student ID card to gain access to COSTAATT’s campuses

and sites. ID cards must be prominently displayed on their person while on college premises. Students who misplace their ID cards or are unable to produce them when seeking access to college premises, are required to visit the Office of the Registrar at the City Campus or the administrative offices at the South and Tobago campuses and other sites.

Incident Reporting: Prompt reporting is essential to detect, prevent, investigate and effectively respond to incidents and emergencies. Students must be aware of their surroundings and report any of the following to

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the Public Safety and Security Department and where applicable, campus directors or senior staff at the relevant locations: • • • • • • loss of property; safety hazards; threat; assault;

malicious damage; or college authorities.

other behaviours or occurrences which may pose a threat or need to be brought to the attention of

Public Safety and Security Contact Numbers • • • • • City Campus: 625-5030 ext 2480/1500 625-5030 ext 5760 625-5030 ext 5600 749-2217 749-2217 749-2217

South Campus:

Tobago Campus: North Learning Centre:

Trincity Learning Centre:

After Hours (10pm – 6am):

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

How to Use this Catalogue Course Descriptions:
Courses related to the degree programmes offered by the college are listed at the end of the programme descriptions for each school. Because all degrees combine both technical and general education courses,

students will find information on all courses in their programmes under the relevant school listing. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical and numerical ascending order under the relevant school as follows:
School of Business and Information Technologies
ACCT ADMN BUSI CCNA CORR COTR CRIM ECON ENTP FINC HURM INTC ITEC LAWW LIBS MGMT MKTG OFAD POLC RCMT CORR COTR Accounting Administration Business Computer Communication and Networks Corrections Court Transcription Criminology Economics Entrepreneurship Finance Human Resources International Trade and Commerce Information Technology Law Library Studies Management Studies Marketing Office Administration Political Science Records Management Corrections Court Transcription

School of Liberal Arts and Human Services
ANTH ARTS COMM COPR COUN ENGL FREN GERM GRDE HIST JOUR LAST MATH MUSI POLI PSYC READ RELI SOBE SOCI SOWK SPAN SPCH STAT WRIT Anthropology Arts and Culture Communication Life Skills Counselling English French German Graphic Design History Journalism Latin American Studies Mathematics All music courses Political Science Psychology Reading Religion Social and Behavioural Sciences Sociology Social Work Spanish Public Speaking Statistics Writing

School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Studies
BIOL CHEM CTIM EMCM ENVH ENVS GEOG GISY HISM HLED MDLT NURS OSHE PHAR PHYS RADG RADT SCIE WRMT Biology Chemistry Computer Tomography Im Emergency Care Management Environmental Health Environmental Management Geography Geographic Information Systems Health Records Information Systems Health Education Medical Laboratory Technology Nursing Occupational Safety and Health Pharmacy Physics Radiography Radiation Therapy Science Water Resources Management

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List of Programmes

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
Bachelor’s Degree Programmes Associate Degree Programmes

Department of Entrepreneurship and Management
• Accounting • Entrepreneurship • Business Administration • Management Studies for the Protective Services • Management with Accounting • Office Administration

• Financial Management

• Human Resource Management Marketing • Public Sector Management • International Trade and Commerce (2011)

Department of Criminal Justice
• Criminal Justice (2011) • Criminal Justice: Police Science

Department of Information Science and Technology
• Information Technology: Computer • Information Technology – Networking • Internet Technology Information Systems • Information Technology: Information Systems Development • Information Technology: Operating Systems Management • Internet Technology • Library and Information Studies

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS AND HUMAN SERVICES
Bachelor’s Degree Programmes Associate Degree Programmes

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences
• Applied Psychology • Social Work • Psychology • Sociology • Social Work

Department of Languages, Literature and Communication Studies
• Mass Communication • Latin American Studies (2011) • Journalism/Public Relations • Literatures in English • Foreign Languages for Business: Spanish

Department of Mathematics
• Mathematics • Mathematics

Department of Performing and Creative Arts
• Music • Performing Arts: Music • Graphic Design

18

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 SCHOOL OF NURSING, HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Bachelor’s Degree Programmes Associate Degree Programmes

Department of Nursing
• Nursing (General) • Nursing (Psychiatric) • Nursing (General) • Nursing (Psychiatric)

Department of Health Science Technologies
• Medical Laboratory Technology • Radiation Therapy • Radiography • Medical Laboratory Technology

Department of Environmental Studies
• Environmental Management • Marine Environmental Studies (2011) • Environmental Health • Environmental Management • Environmental Technology

• Water Resources Management and Technology

• Water and Wastewater Management Services and Technology • Geographic Information Systems • Occupational Safety and Health • Water Resources Management and Technology Technology

• Water and Wastewater Management Services and

Department of Natural and Life Sciences
• Biology • Geography • Biology • Geography • Chemistry • Physics

SCHOOL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION AND LIFELONG LEARNING
Certificate Programmes • • • • • • • Court Transcription Records Management Family and Community Continuing Education Courses • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Introduction to Computer Art Geographic Information Systems Event Planning Conversational Spanish – Level I Conversational Spanish – Level II Conversational Spanish – Level III Conversational French – Level I Conversational German – Level I Jewellery – Basic Design Techniques (new) Small Business Development – Idea to Entrepreneur (new) Computer Literacy Basic Web Page Design (new) Business Communication (new) Image Etiquette and Protocol Continuing Professional Education Programmes • • • Diabetes Educator Graduate Certificate (new) Diploma in International Trade (new) Ultrasound

Studies (2011) Pharmacy Assistant Health Records Science Journalism (new) CISCO – CCNA (new)

1

Admissions
Four-tiered Admissions Process
Admission to the college is based on a four-tiered process, with varying levels of academic readiness.

designed to broaden access to tertiary education for students professionals, secondary school graduates, adult learners

Practising

and those seeking to strengthen their academic foundations can all access opportunities to pursue their particular educational and career goals. Tier I

Applicants with CAPE (or GCE Advanced Level qualifications) or equivalent, who may qualify for advanced standing and the award of relevant credits

Tier II Tier III

Applicants who possess 5 CSEC / CXC (or GCE Ordinary Level qualifications) or equivalent Applicants with less than 5 CSEC / CXC (or GCE Ordinary Level qualifications) but who demonstrate the requisite potential to pursue tertiary level education (COMPASS)

Tier IV

Applicants

work experience relevant to their desired

who

possess

considerable

programme of study and who may qualify for award of college credit through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)

Once admitted to the College, other assessment activities will determine where you may be placed in your programme of study and, where applicable, what credit will be awarded for your knowledge and experience.

Prior Learning and Assessment (PLA)
Prior Learning and Assessment is “a term used by colleges and universities to describe the process of earning

college credit certification or advanced standing, from learning acquired through a student’s work, training, volunteer experiences, and personal life. Also known as assessment of prior learning (APL), prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR), and flexible assessment (a term used in the UK)” (Colvin, 2006).1 Students who believe that they qualify for the award of PLA credits may apply to the Admissions Office for an appointment to see a PLA advisor who will assess the student’s request for PLA eligibility and provide suitable guidance.
1 Colvin, J. (2006). Earn college credits for what you know. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt.

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

How to Apply

Applicants to the College may apply on-line at www.costaatt.edu.tt or by completing the application form which can be downloaded from the website or obtained in hard copy at all campus sites. There is a non-refundable application fee of $25.00 for the processing of applications. This fee does not apply to online applications.

Applicants are required to submit the following documents along with a completed application form: • Photo identification e.g. passport or national ID (nationals of Trinidad and Tobago only) • Birth certificate (nationals of Trinidad and Tobago only) • Originals and copies of academic qualifications (e.g. CSEC, CXC, CAPE, GCE)

• Academic transcripts from previous tertiary level institutions (where applicable) Original documents should not be sent by mail. The College reserves the right to verify all documentation submitted in support of an application for admission.

Additional information and entry requirements for specific programmes are listed in the table below. Additional Entry Requirements Programmes Nursing

Entry Requirements

• Two (2) written character references • Nursing Council permit • Mandatory medical certificate

Radiography

• Two (2) written character references • Mandatory medical certificate • Minimum enrolment age 18

Medical Laboratory Technology Environmental Health Graphic Arts

• Two (2) written character references • Mandatory medical certificate • Minimum enrolment age 18 • Portfolio • Minimum enrolment age 21

Occupational Safety and Health

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Applicants to programmes in certain professional areas may be required to demonstrate their suitability for the particular profession through an interview process.

Placement Testing
All newly admitted applicants are required to take the College Placement Test to determine their levels of proficiency in English and mathematics in order to be placed in the appropriate level courses. Tests are scheduled throughout the year and are offered at campuses in Port of Spain, San Fernando and Tobago. Applicants must register online for the placement test in mathematics and English at http://www.costaatt.edu.tt/admissions/ placement.html. Applicants sitting the placement test must bring a recognized form of photo identification the College’s website.

(e.g. National ID card or passport). The College Placement Test is free of charge. Sample tests are available on

Music Auditions

Students in the music programme are required to audition to enable lecturers to place them in the appropriate level courses.

Transfer Applicants
Applicants wishing to transfer to COSTAATT from local or international tertiary institutions must submit official transcripts of all subjects completed at previous tertiary institutions, along with the completed application form. Citizens of Trinidad and Tobago who received Government Assistance for Tertiary Education (GATE) funding at their previous tertiary institution, must contact the Admissions Office prior to completing the application form.

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Advanced Standing
Applicants wishing to transfer to COSTAATT with advanced standing must submit the following, along with the application form:

• Official transcripts of all subjects previously completed at a tertiary level institution • Copies of syllabus/course outlines for courses completed • A completed Request for Transfer Credit form, which is available at the Office of the Registrar

CARICOM and International Applicants
CARICOM and international applicants must submit, to the Admissions Office, originals and copies of all academic certificates, as well as official copies of transcripts of all subjects completed at prior

secondary and tertiary level institutions. A certified

translation is required for documents not in English. It may also be necessary for applicants to have their qualifications assessed by the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT).

Transient Applicants
A transient applicant is one who is attending another tertiary level institution (local or foreign), but wishes to temporarily enrol in COSTAATT and transfer credit provide an official transcript and written evidence of courses approved for transfer of credit. Applicants Admissions form and pay the relevant fee. back to the home institution. The student must advisement from the home institution, identifying the for transient status must complete the College’s

Readmission
Students who commenced studies with COSTAATT, but have been absent without approval for three or more will not be readmitted to the College. consecutive semesters, must complete the College’s readmission form. Students who fail to complete the form

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Tuition and Other Fees
The following fee schedule takes effect from Academic Year 2010 – 2011:

TUITION AND INSTITUTIONAL FEES
FEES Application Registration Tuition Technology Student Insurance Student Guild Administrative Fee CITIZENS $25 $80 $300 $100 $30 $100 $100 CARICOM $25 $80 $400 $100 $30 $100 $100 INTERNATIONAL $25 $80 $750 $100 $30 $100 $100 FREQUENCY Per application Per semester Per credit Per semester Annually Annually Per semester

Citizens of Trinidad and Tobago are eligible to apply for Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses (GATE) to cover the cost of tuition.

Student Insurance
All students of COSTAATT are required to pay an annual insurance fee of $30.00. Completed student insurance forms must be submitted to the College at the beginning of the first semester in which students register for the academic year. Coverage is restricted to students who are between ages 16 to 65.

Method of Payment
The College accepts the following methods of payment: • Cash • LINX • Visa/Master card • Certified/Manager’s cheque

Refunds
Institutional fees are non-refundable. Students who officially withdraw from the College may be eligible for a refund of tuition fees in accordance with the schedule outlined in the Academic Calendar. Please note that students in receipt of GATE funding are not eligible for tuition refunds.

24

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Financial Aid
Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses (GATE)
The Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses programme (GATE) provides free tuition to all eligible citizens of Trinidad and Tobago pursuing approved programmes at public and private tertiary level institutions. Information Tertiary Education’s website at: http://stte.gov.tt/ Important: on eligibility and conditions for accessing GATE funding is available at the Ministry of Science, Technology and

Students must note that GATE funding is available for the duration of their course of study and one year to meet the cost of programme completion.

beyond. Students who fail to complete their programme within the stipulated time frame will be required

Higher Education Loan Programme (HELP)
The Higher Education Loan Programme (HELP) is a special loan facility made available to citizens of Trinidad and Tobago who are enrolled in an approved tertiary level programme at a registered tertiary institution to meet the following expenses: • • • • • • • tuition fees

accommodation

airfare and other transportation costs books and related materials special equipment

personal maintenance costs and living expenses

other related tertiary expenses

The HELP programme is administered by participating commercial banks in Trinidad and Tobago, including First Citizens, RBTT, Republic and Scotiabank. Application forms are available at all branch locations of these banks.

For further details students can visit the MSTTE website: http://stte.gov.tt/

25

Registration
A registered student is one who has enrolled in courses for a given semester; has met all requirements for Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses (GATE) or direct payment of tuition expenses; paid completed student insurance form in the relevant semester.

the College’s institutional fees and submitted a

Students must register online via MyCOSTAATT or

Banner Self-Service on the days indicated in the

academic calendar. A student may not register for a course unless all requirements, academic (e.g. prerequisites) and otherwise, have been satisfied. Full-time Students

A full-time student is defined as one who takes a course load of between twelve (12) and eighteen (18) credits per semester. Part-Time Students

A part-time student is defined as one who takes semester.

a course load of between 3 and 9 credits per

No student will be allowed to attend a course for which he/she has not registered.

Registration Process
Step 1 Academic Advisement

The first step in the registration process is academic advisement. Before proceeding to register for courses, students must consult with an academic advisor to establish academic goals, review academic progress, and assessment of their academic progress. Step 2 Register for Courses determine an appropriate course workload for the semester, based on their grade point average and general

Students must log on to the secure area in MyCOSTAATT or Banner Self-Service at the appointed time to register Service Student Registration User Guide. Step 3 GATE Application

for courses in each semester. Details of the online registration procedures are outlined in the Banner Self-

All new and continuing students, who are citizens of Trinidad and Tobago, and who wish to access GATE must complete the GATE application form each semester.

26

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Step 4 Payment of Fees

Students must pay institutional and tuition fees for each semester in which they are enrolled. Payment can be campuses.

made at the Office of the Registrar at the City Campus and at the administrative offices at the Tobago and South

Step 5 Student ID Cards and Validation Stickers

Upon enrolment at COSTAATT, each new student will be issued a student identification card. This card is validated at each registration session with a semester-specific validation sticker. Students are required to display their validated ID cards at all times while on any COSTAATT’s premises or at affiliated institutions. Students must present a valid identification card to borrow books from the library and to use any of the College’s facilities. Student ID cards must also be presented at examination sessions.

Late Registration
Late registration comes into effect on the first day of class of each semester. Students are required to pay an additional fifty dollar ($50.00) fee when registering during the late registration period.

Changes in Registration
The following are common requests for change in registration status • change from full-time to part-time status or vice-versa; • change in registration from ‘for credit’ to audit2;º • change in programme/major • change in name/address

The relevant forms can be obtained from academic departments, the Office of the Registrar or the south and Tobago administrative offices and must be approved by the department chair. All forms must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar or administrative offices within one week of approval by the department chair. See Registry Services on page 266.

Add-Drops

Students must log on to the secure area using MyCOSTAATT or Banner Self-Service to drop and add classes as necessary. Students may drop and add from the start of the registration period until the ‘Add/Drop Deadline’ date. which is stipulated in the academic calendar. Students will not be allowed to add and drop courses beyond that

Withdrawals from a Course

A student may withdraw from any course without academic penalty provided that this is done by the withdrawal

deadline indicated in the academic calendar. In order to withdraw, a student must complete the Withdrawal

Form, seek the approval of the department chair and submit the signed form to the Office of the Registrar, by ‘W.’ ‘W’ grades have no impact on Grade Point Average (GPA).
2

the deadline date. Students who withdraw from a course by the stipulated deadline date will receive a grade of
Students who audit courses are not evaluated and do not receive a grade.

27

Withdrawals from the College

In order to officially withdraw from the College, a student must complete COSTAATT’s Withdrawal Form and return his/her ID card to the Office of the Registrar.

Students who withdraw from a programme are normally entitled to apply for re-admission and must submit an application to the Admissions Office.

Leave of Absence

Students may apply for leave of absence from a programme for medical, personal or financial reasons using the Leave of Absence form. Leave of Absence forms must be approved by the relevant department chair and submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Such leave shall not exceed three consecutive semesters or one academic year.

Students are strongly advised to consult the Finance and Grant Administration Division of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Tertiary Education in order to be apprised of the financial implications with respect to GATE.

Academic Programme Quality and Relevance
Since its inception COSTAATT has had a special mandate to design and deliver programmes that are cuttingedge, internationally bench-marked and relevant to the country’s social and economic development needs. embarked on a major curriculum re-engineering exercise which led to the introduction of several new bachelor’s to face the challenges of the twenty-first century. The College is therefore committed to reviewing and continually upgrading its curricula and in 2008, faculty degree programmes and an expanded core curriculum designed to produce graduates who are better equipped

Academic Schedule
The College operates on a semester system in which the academic year comprises two major semesters, each advised to consult the academic calendar for dates and deadlines such as academic advisement and registration, deadlines for withdrawals from classes without penalty and examination dates. lasting approximately sixteen (16) weeks, and a short eight (8) week session in June and July. Students are

Instruction and Assessment
The standard unit used to define instructional time at the College is the credit hour. The credit-to-contact hour ratio is determined by the type of instructional activity as set out below:

28

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Type of Instruction Lecture Laboratory

Credits / Contact Hours 1 credit 15 contact hours in a lecture class. 1 credit ranges from 30 to 90 contact hours in a laboratory setting in which students work with limited supervision by lecturer.

Clinical Practice

1 credit ranges from 45 to 90 contact hours in a workplace setting under the supervision of a clinical coordinator or supervisor.

Students are advised to note that for every fifteen hours spent in the classroom setting, they are expected to commit to at least thirty (30) hours of study outside of the classroom in order to consolidate learning. The number of credits per course ranges from one (1) to four (4). In general, full-time students register for twelve (12) to eighteen (18) credits per semester, while part-time students register for three (3) to nine (9) credits.

Student-centredness is the organizing principle which defines the College’s approach to instruction. Through this approach, faculty members make every effort to meet students at their point of need, and to develop strategies and approaches that cater for different learning styles. To do this, they employ a variety of instructional and assessment activities which are aimed at developing diverse types of knowledge, skills and competencies.

2

The range of instructional activities includes:
Lecture Instruction in which content is primarily delivered by the lecturer, with the aim of achieving objectives clearly specified on the course outline and syllabus.

Seminar

Less formal than a lecture, a seminar brings students together for in-depth discussion or critical analysis of assigned readings or current topics relevant to the subject studied. The seminar session may be led by the lecturer or an external subject matter expert. Seminar classes are usually assigned to upper level students and are conducted in small groups to facilitate maximum interaction between facilitator and students.

Practicum

A learning experience or course which is designed to give students an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge acquired in the classroom to a real world setting, under assignment on the work site for a short duration. the supervision of a subject matter expert. The practicum may involve a day-release or

Clinical Practicum

Practicum experience in a clinical setting for students enrolled in nursing and health science programmes.

Oral Presentation

A learning experience in which students are expected to distill their knowledge on a classmates, teachers and/or examination committees.

specific topic into a suitable format for oral delivery to a range of audiences, including

Group Work

Instructional activity designed to facilitate collaborative learning and the development of team work skills required for the modern work place.

Laboratory

A course which takes place in a laboratory environment. May include computer, scientific or foreign language laboratory. Lab classes usually provide students with the opportunity to practise and develop skills in the subject, with limited supervision by the lecturer.

Field Trip

An excursion to a site to provide students with an opportunity to engage in observational or applied learning activities which are not possible within the classroom environment.

Recitals

Musical performance by a single student; contrasted with an ensemble which is a performance of instrumental or vocal music by one or more students.

Independent Study

A course in which the goals and objectives are not covered by the standard curriculum, and which is tailored, with the approval of the lecturer, to meet the need of an individual student. This option is offered to students only under special conditions.

Capstone/Senior Project

Terminal project in a degree programme in which students are expected to integrate, synthesize and apply knowledge and/or skills acquired in lower level courses.

Portfolio

An organized record of academic experiences which illustrates the quality and developmental progress of students’ achievement along with their reflections. Portfolios can be developed in paper or electronic formats.

30

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Research Project Project in which students are expected to apply knowledge acquired in a specific methodologies, and to analyse and report on the findings. Thesis

subject area to the systematic investigation of phenomena, using established

A thesis in a bachelor’s degree programme is a cumulative project which students usually undertake after completing all required courses, clinical practica or internships. In the thesis, the student is expected to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of a specific area of study and mastery of basic principles of scholarly writing, informed by the guidelines for the relevant discipline.

Internship

A terminal learning experience in a programme of study which requires the students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills learned in previous courses, under direct supervision in a work environment for a period of two to six months. Students on internship usually fulfill the normal duties of an employee at the work place.

Blended Learning

Course in which instruction is delivered partially online and partially in face-toface mode.

Fully Online Learning

Course in which instruction and assessment take place online in either synchronous or asynchronous mode.

ASSESSMENT Continuous Assessment

A key aspect of the College’s student-centred approach to teaching and learning is the adoption of a continuous assessment model in which students are assessed at regular intervals during the course and provided with timely feedback which allows them to adjust their study skills, time management and use of academic support services accordingly. Students can check their grades online using the Banner Gradebook facility. Final Examinations

Final examinations are usually held in the last week of the semester and generally account for no more than forty (40) percent of total marks for the course. Course Numbering System

The course numbering system at the College is designed to immediately telegraph information about course content, sequencing, level of difficulty and type of instruction to the student.

Course codes are alpha-numeric with four letters assigned to indicate the discipline or subject area of the programme, and three numbers assigned to designate curriculum sequencing information.

The numeric component of the course code consists of three digits: The first digit indicates the level of the programme, as outlined below.

31

Range 400 - 499 300 - 399 200 - 299 120 - 199 100 - 119 000 - 099

Explanation Senior/Final year of baccalaureate degree Third year of baccalaureate degree Second year of baccalaureate degree First year of baccalaureate degree in the major area of study. College level courses in the discipline which may be accessed by non-majors for college level credit. Pre-college courses (COMPASS courses)

The second and third digits indicate the progressive level of difficulty of each course within the level. For 125.

example, a communication course numbered COMM 156 will be more difficult than a course numbered COMM

The new course numbering system also uses select two-digit codes to designate specific types of teaching/ learning activities. The two-digit codes also reflect the degree of difficulty of the learning requirements. Thesis/Senior Project - 99 Portfolio – 88 Independent Study – 77 Internship – 66 Practicum – 55 Seminar - 33

Achieving student success at the College is dependent on a partnership between students and faculty. While it delivery, students must assume personal responsibility for their own learning and managing their academic progress both in and out of the classroom.

is the responsibility of faculty to be knowledgeable in their field of study and capable of effective instructional

32

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Core Curriculum
The goal of the new core curriculum is to ensure that all COSTAATT graduates can: a) have an arsenal of tools and techniques to become adept critical thinkers and problem solvers; cultural issues; cultures;

b) understand and communicate our unique perspective on a range of social, economic, scientific and c) have a deeper understanding of themselves and others of different races, ethnicities, religions and d) be more entrepreneurial and innovative; e) become effective change agents; g) excel in a globalised world. f) make the Caribbean a proactive player on the world stage; and

Students enrolled in all degree programmes (associate and bachelor’s level) are required to complete the relevant core curriculum courses from the following list: LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION • Fundamentals of Writing • Comparative Literature • Communication in the Workplace • Introduction to Spanish COMPUTATIONAL SKILLS

• College Mathematics Option (varies by discipline) • Fundamentals of Statistics RESEARCH SKILLS

• Fundamental Research Skills HISTORY AND CULTURE

• History of Trinidad and Tobago • Foundations of Art and Music

• Introduction to the Study of Society

UNDERSTANDING INDIVIDUALS, COMMUNITIES AND INSTITUTIONS • Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity • Leadership and Ethics SCIENCES

• Foundations of Natural Science

• Contemporary Issues in Science UNDERSTANDING THE ECONOMY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT • Introduction to General Economics • Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

33

GLOBAL AFFAIRS

• Environmental Issues and Sustainability • World Issues in Public Health • Comparative Religion

Students should be guided by their academic advisors as to the appropriate sequence of enrolment in core curriculum courses.

Course Descriptions:
ARTS 119 Foundations of Art and Music This course comprises an overview of Western European art and music and their function as expressions of culture. Students will also study local and regional artists and the rich cultural diversity of the musical traditions of Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None BUSI 203 Leadership and Ethics

This introductory course focuses on leadership theories and the ethical practices necessary for good governance. Students will analyse personal attitudes and values, and focus on the application of leadership principles learned throughout the course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 117 Fundamentals of Writing

This course enables students to strengthen their writing skills. Students will learn to write clearly and concisely communication. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

in a variety of rhetorical modes and will develop critical thinking and analytical skills as imperatives of effective

COMM 118 Communication in the Workplace

In this course students will learn and practise an array of oral and written business communication skills. Students will develop confidence in their ability to respond effectively to the diverse communication demands of the modern workplace. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ECON 110 Introduction to General Economics

In this course, students learn how economics affects everyday life. Non-business students will develop an appreciation of key micro and macro-economic theories and the symbiotic nature of individual behaviour and economic performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENGL 200 Comparative Literature

This course introduces students to examples of nationally and internationally acclaimed literary works. Students literary elements, terms, concepts and genres. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

will develop critical thinking skills through the analysis of selected texts and will gain an understanding of

ENTP 210 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

This course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills associated with successful entrepreneurship. Students develop critical problem solving skills and acquire the tools and techniques needed to identify None entrepreneurial opportunities and to create and present a comprehensive business plan. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

34

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ENVH 102 World Issues in Public Health

In this course, students examine critical issues that impact public health at national, regional and international

levels. They discuss topics such as access to potable water, availability of life-saving medication and the importance of proper sanitation in the maintenance of health and hygiene standards. Students develop an appreciation for the impact of the individual on the creation and resolution of environmental problems. credit/ Prerequisite: None ENVS 121 1

This course introduces students to important environmental issues facing societies worldwide. Students explore of biodiversity. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None HIST 210 History of Trinidad and Tobago

Environmental Issues and Sustainability

the economic, cultural and social impact of topics such as environmental degradation, climate change and loss

This course examines the history of Trinidad and Tobago during the period 1797 to 1990. It focuses on key preciation of the power relations among the various social and ethnic groups. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LIBS 130 Fundamental Research Skills

events in the historical narrative and on social rather than political or economic history. Students gain an ap-

In this course, students learn and practise the basic steps of the research process and the tasks associated with each step. Primary emphasis is placed on information literacy and appropriate use of internet resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

PSYC 103 Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity

In this course, students explore basic psychological theory and concepts useful in understanding the self, the the individual in society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None RELI 205 Comparative Religion

other and society. They will examine their thoughts and emotions as a platform for analyzing and understanding

This course surveys world religions ranging from Christianity, Islam and Judaism to Rastafarianism, Vodun and develop the understanding and tolerance of diversity, necessary for peaceful coexistence in a plural society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

Orisha. Students will gain an appreciation of the origins of various religious traditions, rituals and beliefs and

SCIE 121 Foundations of Natural Sciences

This course introduces students to basic concepts in biology, chemistry and physics. Students acquire an study and analysis. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None SCIE 201 Contemporary Issues in Science

understanding of objects, phenomena, laws of nature and the physical world that can serve as a basis for further

This course introduces students to a number of important issues in contemporary science. Students learn the basic principles of the scientific method. Through class discussion, they also learn how to critically assess industrial and scientific processes. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None SOCI 102 Introduction to the Study of Society

In this course, students will gain an informed understanding of contemporary social problems as well as the society in which they live. They will examine and analyse competing explanations for common sociological phenomena and social trends. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

35

SPAN 100 Introduction to Spanish

This introductory course is designed to develop basic level proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and of settings. Students also develop an awareness of the target culture. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None STAT 120 Fundamentals of Statistics

writing so as to enable students to interact formally and informally with native speakers within a limited range

This course provides an introduction to statistics, including comparing and picturing data, descriptive statistics, probability, inferential statistics and estimation, hypothesis testing and questionnaire. Students explore survey design and implementation, linear regression and correlation, the concept of least squares and the regression line. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

36

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Academic Schools and Programmes
There are four academic schools within the College, each with an array of offerings in bachelor degree programmes are offered

the relevant discipline areas. Associate and by the Schools of Business and Information Technologies, Liberal Arts and Human Services and Nursing, Health and Environmental Studies. The School of Continuing Education and

Lifelong Learning offers customized training, professional development programmes and continuing education courses that meet

students’ personal, career, or leisure interests at certificate, diploma and post-graduate diploma levels.

37

School of Liberal Arts and Human Services

The School of Liberal Arts and Human Services produces a diverse range of graduates with varying skills and competencies including artists, musicians, mathematicians, psychologists, social workers, sociologists, the social and cultural development of the nation. journalists, poets, dramatists, and in general, graduates who can make great contributions towards enhancing

The School of Liberal Arts and Human Services consists of four departments: • Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences • Department of Mathematics

• Department of Languages, Literature and Communication Studies • Department of Fine and Performing Arts These departments provide students with a range of academic services to meet a growing number of careers and opportunities locally, regionally, and globally.

Mission

To provide well-designed, contemporary, relevant programmes of study, by attracting quality faculty and support staff who understand the vision and mission of the College and are willing to embrace the watch words “Transforming lives, transforming communities, transforming the nation.....one student at a time.”

38

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences
The Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences is committed to providing students with an environment conducive to personal and professional growth and development. Focused on broadening access through Prior at their point of need, the department provides students with relevant training in sociology, social work, and Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) and distance education delivery modes, and on meeting students applied psychology to meet the needs of the private and public sectors. The programmes offered by the Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences play a critical role in helping students to understand the functioning of strategies. societies, how to successfully negotiate issues arising out of diversity, and to develop appropriate intervention

Programmes

The Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes B.Sc. B.Sc. BSW Applied Psychology Psychology Social Work Associate Degree Programmes AA AAS AAS Psychology Sociology Social Work

3

Bachelor of Science - Psychology/Applied Psychology
This programme is designed to offer an examination of the distinctive socio-cultural make-up of this society issues and to training in areas such as conflict intervention and resolution.

and of the relevance of psychological issues to the local context. Particular attention is paid to current social

Students enrolled in the B.Sc. programme in Applied Psychology also have the option of pursuing specialised courses in one of the following tracks: • Addiction Studies • School Guidance • Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. Psychology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology, students must successfully complete 123 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study

Guided elective courses in major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Elective courses

48 credits 54 credits 12 credits 51 credits 6 credits 6 credits

Total courses in major area of study

Total Credits Required for Graduation

123 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
PSYC 122 PSYC 205 PSYC 212 PSYC 220 PSYC 233 PSYC 261 PSYC 325 PSYC 350 PSYC 360 PSYC 370 PSYC 410 PSYC 425 PSYC 433 PSYC 462 PSYC 468 PSYC 499

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Psychology Social Psychology Life Span Development Applied Psychology Psychology Seminar I-Special Topics in Psychology Psychology of Adjustment Human Development Culture, Diversity and Behaviour Theories of Individual Differences Theories of Learning History of Psychology Research Designs and Analysis Psychology Seminar II- Field Experience Physiology of Behaviour Cognitive Psychology Senior Thesis - Psychology

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major GUIDED ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE MAJOR Any two 3-credit courses in major area of study Total Credits in Major Area of Study ELECTIVE COURSES Any two courses offered by the College

48 6 54

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES Caribbean Anthropology

51

6

ANTH 250

3

40

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

BIOL 109 STAT 121 SOCI 100 Total Elective Credits 6

Introduction to Human Biology Introduction to Inferential Statistics Introduction to Sociology Total Support Course Credits

3 3 3 12

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. Applied Psychology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Psychology, students must successfully complete 132 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution: Required courses in major area of study Guided electives in major area of study Specialization courses

48 credits 15 credits 51 credits

6 credits

Total courses in major area of study

69 credits 12 credits

Core curriculum courses Support courses Total Credits Required for Graduation

132 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
PSYC 122 PSYC 205 PSYC 212 PSYC 220 PSYC 233 PSYC 261 PSYC 325 PSYC 350 PSYC 360 PSYC 370 PSYC 410 PSYC 425 PSYC 433 PSYC 462 PSYC 468 PSYC 499

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Psychology Social Psychology Life Span Development Applied Psychology Psychology Seminar I-Special Topics in Psychology Psychology of Adjustment Human Development Culture, Diversity and Behaviour Theories of Individual Differences Theories of Learning History of Psychology Research Designs and Analysis Psychology Seminar II- Field Experience Physiology of Behaviour Cognitive Psychology Senior Thesis - Psychology

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

48

Total Core Curriculum Credits

51

SPECIALIZATION COURSES IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY OPTION
(Choose any 5 courses in a specific track)
PSYC 445 PSYC 448 PSYC 457 SOBE 218 SOBE 322 SOBE 326 SOBE 328 SOBE 335 SOBE 375 SOBE 420 Educational Psychology Industrial and Organizational Psychology Psychology of Work Introduction to Addiction Studies Intervention for Non-Chemical Dependency Prevention and Intervention for Addictive Behaviours Theories of Addiction and Treatment Introduction to Conflict Resolution Introduction to Career Guidance Theories of Guidance and Counselling 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 SOBE 428 SOBE 438 SOCI 215 SOCI 240 SOCI 278 SOWK 124 SOWK 318 SOWK 324 SOWK 357 SOWK 426 Pharmacology and Substance Abuse Interventions and Treatment for Special Populations Introduction to Gender Studies Sociology of Education Ageing and the Family Social Work with Children and Family Residential Social Work Social Work Intervention with Substance Abusers Social Work Intervention with the Elderly Advocacy in Social Work 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Five Specialization Courses

15

41

GUIDED ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE MAJOR
Any two 3-credit courses in major area of study

SUPPORT COURSES 6
ANTH 250 BIOL 109 STAT 121 SOCI 100 Caribbean Anthropology Introduction to Human Biology Introduction to Inferential Statistics Introduction to Sociological Theories 3 3 3 3

Total Guided Elective Credits

6

Total Support Course Credits

12

Career Options: • Guidance officers

• School guidance officers

• Community social service providers

• Paraprofessionals in treatment centres or community-based organizations Associate in Arts - Psychology The Associate in Arts degree in Psychology offers a solid base in the area of psychology. It has been specifically designed to furnish participants with the key theoretical understandings and scientific insights into the cific areas. This associate degree provides students with the foundation courses in the discipline of psychology complexity of human behaviour and mental processes, and to equip them with practical competencies in sperequired to transfer into a baccalaureate programme at both regional and extra-regional institutions of higher professionals in all areas of human development services.

learning. It will also be an invaluable course of study for those wishing to get certification as competent para-

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Arts - Psychology To be awarded the Associate in Arts degree in Psychology, students must successfully complete 60 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study

1 guided elective course in major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Elective courses

21 credits

Total Courses in Major Area of Study

24 credits 24 credits 9 credits 3 credits

3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

60 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
PSYC 205 PSYC 122 PSYC 212 PSYC 220 PSYC 233 PSYC 261

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 21 3 ARTS 119 COMM 117 COMM 118 LIBS 130 MATH 164 PSYC 103 SCIE 121 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Social Psychology Foundations of Psychology Life Span Development Applied Psychology Psychology Seminar I-Special Topics in Psychology Psychology of Adjustment Required Courses in the Major Guided elective in major

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Foundations of Natural Science Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study

24

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

42

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

ANTH 250 BIOL 109 SOCI 100

SUPPORT COURSES Caribbean Anthropology Introduction to Human Biology

3 3

ELECTIVE COURSES Any course from the College

3

Introduction to Sociology Total Support Course Credits

3 9

Total Elective Credits

3

Career Options: This is a transfer degree which allows graduates to pursue further study in psychology at the bachelor’s degree level.

Bachelor of Social Work The Bachelor’s degree in Social Work prepares graduates to function as professional social workers in the education, social services and national security sectors. Students acquire critical social work competencies in issues. individual and group work, youth work, direct practice, community practice and addressing family and child

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Social Work To successfully complete the Bachelor’s degree in Social Work, students must complete 134 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Five elective courses in major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Total Credits Required for Graduation Total Courses in Major Area of Study

47 credits 62 credits 51 credits 134 credits 21 credits 15 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
SOWK 116 SOWK 122 SOWK 119 SOWK 218 SOWK 241 SOWK 234 SOWK 236 SOWK 248 SOWK 245 SOWK 323 SOWK 326 SOWK 255 SOWK 355 SOWK 455 SOWK 499

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Social Work Case Work Practice for Social Work Community Intervention for Social Work Practice Group Work Practice for Social Work Introduction to Practicum Social Welfare in the Caribbean Legal and Ethical Issues in Social Work Counselling Skills for Social Workers Practicum I: Human Skills Lab Social Work Management and Administration Social Research Methods Practicum II Practicum lll Practicum IV Senior Project – Social Work

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3

43

STAT 120

Fundamentals of Statistics

3

Total Required Courses in the Major
SOBE 247 SOBE 322 SOBE 326 SOBE 328 SOBE 428 SOBE 438 SOCI 215 SOCI 278 SOWK 124 SOWK 318 SOWK 324 SOWK 357 SOWK 426 ELECTIVE COURSES IN MAJOR Introduction to Addiction Studies Intervention for Non-Chemical Dependency Prevention and Intervention for Addictive Behaviours Theories of Addiction and Treatment Pharmacology and Substance Abuse Interventions and Treatment for Special Populations Introduction to Gender Studies Ageing and the Family Social Work with Children and Family Residential Social Work Social Work Intervention with Substance Abusers Social Work Intervention with the Elderly Advocacy in Social Work

47
3 3 3 3 ANTH 250 LAWW 122 PSYC 122 PSYC 212

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Caribbean Anthropology Law, Governance and Society Foundations of Psychology Life Span Development Theories of Individual Differences Foundations of Psychopathology Caribbean Sociology I

51
3 3 3 3

Five of Any of the Elective Courses in the Major

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 15

PSYC 360 PSYC 430 SOCI 101

Total Support Course Credits

3 3 3 21

Career Option: • Social Worker

Associate in Applied Science - Social Work
This Associate in Applied Science degree in Social Work develops social work competencies which enables students to work immediately as paraprofessionals in the field. It also provides them with a solid foundation to pursue baccalaureate studies, if they so desire. Graduates would have gained exposure to various service child issues.

areas such as individual and group work, youth work, direct practice, community practice, and family and

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – Social Work
To successfully complete the Associate in Applied Science degree in Social Work, students must complete 67 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution: Required courses in the major area of study Two elective courses in major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Total Credits Required for Graduation Total Courses in Major Area of Study 25 credits

31 credits 27 credits 9 credits

6 credits

67 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
SOWK 116 SOWK 122 SOWK 218 SOWK 236 SOWK 241 SOWK 245 SOWK 255

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 4

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Social Work Case Work Practice for Social Work Group Work Practice for Social Work Legal and Ethical Issues in Social Work Introduction to Practicum Practicum I: Human Skills Lab Practicum II

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ENTP 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 SCIE 121

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Foundations of Natural Sciences

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

44

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

SOWK 248

Counselling Skills for Social Workers

3

SOCI 102 SPAN 100

Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish

3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in Major
GUIDED ELECTIVES IN THE MAJOR Two 3-credit elective courses in the major

25
6 BIOL 109 BIOL 113 PSYC 122 PSYC 212

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Introduction Human Biology OR Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology Foundations of Psychology Life Span Development

27
3 3 3

Total Support Courses

6

Total Support Courses

9

Career Option: • Paraprofessional in social services agencies or organizations Associate in Applied Science - Sociology This Associate in Applied Science degree in Sociology gives broad coverage of contemporary social issues to dents for paraprofessional jobs in administrative and research functions and provides a basis for transfer to

produce critical thinkers and solutions-oriented social service providers. This degree programme prepares stucomplete either a three- or four-year degree programme. Students complete courses in sociological theory, and about the major social institutions, discuss contemporary social problems, and engage in sociological analysis ods and complete a research project on a topic of their choice.

its application to the Caribbean in particular and the wider international environment in general. They learn to identify options to address these problems. They also gain in-depth exposure to sociological research meth-

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science - Sociology To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Sociology, students must successfully complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Required courses in the major area of study Two elective courses in major area of study Core curriculum courses Total Courses in Major Area of Study 30 credits

36 credits 63 credits 27 credits

6 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
SOCI 100 SOCI 101 SOCI 104 SOCI 105 SOCI 220 SOCI 230 SOCI 250 SOCI 274 SOCI 281 SOCI 282

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Sociology Caribbean Sociology I Caribbean Sociology II Caribbean Sociology III Quantitative Research Methods Qualitative Research Methods Exploring Caribbean Social Problems Fundamentals of SPSS Research Project I Research Project II

CODE
ARTS 119 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 LIBS 130 MATH 116 STAT 120 SCIE 121 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Fundamentals of Statistics Foundations of Natural Science Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

45

Total Credits for Required Courses in Major
ELECTIVE OPTIONS IN THE MAJOR Two 3-credit elective courses in the major

30
6

Total Core Curriculum Credits

27

Total Credits for Elective Courses in Major

6

Career Options: While the AAS in Sociology prepare students for specific jobs requiring broad social sciences competencies, it also serves as a transfer degree which allows graduates to pursue a bachelor’s level in sociology and a related subject area.

Faculty Profile – Social and Behavioural Sciences
Cheryl Lewis – Department Chair Senior Lecturer - Psychology M.A., M.Ed., B.A. Research Interests: Family dynamics and educational achievements; culture and psychology. Chevonne Agana Senior Lecturer- Psychology M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Employee motivation Roslyn Humphrey Senior Lecturer- Psychology M.A., M. Ed Research Interests: Adult education Ayinka Nurse-Carrington Lecturer - Sociology M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Criminology- criminal profile Rudolph Paul Senior Lecturer - Sociology M.A., B.Sc. Research Interests: Criminology and prison reform Raquel Sukhu Senior Lecturer - Sociology MPhil., BA Research Interests: Gender studies, masculinity, gender violence, sociology of religion Rachel Wolsey Senior Lecturer - Psychology M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Gender identity and sexual orientation; risk factors for and intervention in delinquency

Josie Kennedy Lecturer - Social Work B.Sc. Research Interests: The relationship between gender and the instances of deviance in the protective services Tricia McIntosh Lecturer- Sociology PGDip., B.Sc. Research Interests: Family conflicts and mediation Vanessa Nelson Senior lecturer - Psychology M.A., B.A. Research Interests: Student perception of learning in the classroom and its impact on academic performance

Pamela Degazon Senior Lecturer- Social Work M.A., B.Sc. Research Interests: Domestic violence; dynamics involved in exiting residential care Ayanna Gellineau Lecturer- Psychology B.Sc. Research Interests: Deliberate self harm in adolescents; Childhood trauma and resilience in adulthood Nneka St. Rose Lecturer- Sociology PGDip., B.Sc. Research Interests: Relationship between gender and media influences; Youth sexuality

46

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Department of Languages, Literature and Communication Studies
The programmes offered by the Department of Languages, Literatures and Communication Studies are designed to meet the needs of aspiring and working professionals who wish to complement a firm theoretical grounding in communication studies with practical workplace skills. Many of the department’s graduates currently hold supervisory and management functions in public relations, marketing, sales and advertising. Programmes The Department of Languages, Literature and Communication Studies offers the following degree programme options:

Bachelor Degree Programmes BA Mass Communication

Associate Degree Programmes AAS AA AAS Journalism/Public Relations Literatures in English Foreign Languages for Business: Spanish

Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication The Bachelor of Arts degree in Mass Communication is designed to create synergies among the various disciplines acquire an understanding of current communication theories, which is complemented by practical experience

that comprise the field of mass communication, such as media studies, public relations and advertising. Students in real world media and public relations and the development of critical thinking, analytical and research skills and capabilities. Students are kept abreast of changes and shifts within the communication industry, and advancements in relevant technologies. Graduates of COSTAATT’s Associate in Applied Science Degree in Journalism and Public Relations will be awarded transfer credits for relevant courses in the bachelor’s degree programme.

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication To be awarded the BA in Mass Communication, students must successfully complete 121 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Four elective courses in major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Guided elective courses Total Credits in Major Area of Study

49 credits 61 credits 48 credits 3 credits 9 credits 12 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

121 credits

47

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COMM 121 COMM 130 COMM 350 COMM 365 COMM 450 COMM 452 COMM 499 JOUR 123 JOUR 131 JOUR 139 JOUR 221 JOUR 244 JOUR 275 JOUR 340 JOUR 455 LAWW 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 4 3 49 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 GRDE 127

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Mass Communication Communication III: Understanding Human Communication Communication via Social Networking Audience and Reception Music as Communication Film as Communication Senior Project – Mass Communication Fundamentals of Reporting Ethics in Journalism and Public Relations Introduction to Strategic Public Relations Image, Etiquette and Protocol Media/ Public Relations Internship Critical Analysis of Media and TV Coverage Mass Media in the Global Context Media/ Public Relations Practicum Laws Affecting Journalism and Public Relations

CODE
ARTS 119 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Math Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 48 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

Total Core Curriculum Credits

ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE MAJOR
COMM 140 COMM 135 JOUR 135 JOUR 281 JOUR 290 JOUR 351 JOUR 353 JOUR 460 Speech Writing Voice and Presentation Photo Journalism Broadcast News Writing Introduction to Video Production Applied Public Relations Planning Investigative Reporting Newspaper and Magazine Editing

SUPPORT COURSES
Digital Communication Design

Total Support Course Credits

3
3 3 3 3 3 3

GUIDED ELECTIVES
ENGL 270 ITEC 240 LAWW 133 MGMT 200 MKTG 202 MKTG 205 Creative Writing Web Design Law and the Community Events Management Principles of Advertising Principles of Marketing

Total Credits for Any Four Elective Courses in the Major

12

Total Credits for Any Three Guided Elective Courses

9

Career Options: • Advertising specialist

• Reporter - print, radio or television • Writer – print, radio or television • Communication specialist • Public relations officer

• Sub-editor, editor - print, radio or television

Associate in Applied Science – Journalism and Public Relations The programme is designed to enable students to function as paraprofessionals in dynamic and fast-paced media

environments. It facilitates their advancement to increasingly higher levels of responsibility in the workplace and provides them with a solid foundation of theoretical knowledge and practical skills needed to pursue studies at undergraduate level.

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science - Journalism and Public Relations To be awarded the AAS degree in Journalism and Public Relations, students must successfully complete 60 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

48

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Required courses in the major area of study Elective courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Total Credits Required for Graduation Total credits in the major area of study

27 credits

33 credits 24 credits 60 credits 3 credits

6 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COMM 121 COMM 130 JOUR 123 JOUR 131 JOUR 139 JOUR 221 JOUR 244 JOUR 275 LAWW 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Mass Communication Communication III: Understanding Human Communication Fundamentals of Reporting Ethics in Journalism and Public Relations Introuction to Strategic Public Relations Image, Etiquette and Protocol Media/ Public Relations Internship Critical Analysis of Media and TV Coverage Laws Affecting Journalism and Public Relations

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 LIBS 130 MATH 116 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 PSYC 103

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Math Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
ELECTIVE COURSES IN MAJOR AREA OF STUDY (Choose any two of the four courses below) Speech Writing Photo Journalism Broadcast News Writing Introduction to Video Production

27

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES (Choose one of the two courses below) Events Management Web Design

24

COMM 140 JOUR 135 JOUR 281 JOUR 290

3 3 3 3

MGMT 200 ITEC 240

3 3

Total Credits for Two Elective Courses in the Major

6

Total Support Course Credits

3

Career Options: • Advertising specialist

• Reporter - print, radio or television • Writer – print, radio or television • Communication specialist • Public relations officer

• Sub-editor, editor - print, radio or television

Associate in Arts - Literatures in English The Associate in Arts degree in Literatures and English provides students with exposure to the major literary genres, through the examination of the works of both renowned and contemporary authors. These studies are complemented by general education courses drawn from a broad range of disciplines, creating a solid foundation for students who wish to pursue studies up to the bachelor’s level or for language and literature teachers who wish to enhance their knowledge base in the field. This associate degree programme is also suitable for students who wish to pursue careers and/or further study in the areas of journalism, advertising and communications. Graduation Requirements: Associate in Arts – Literatures in English To be awarded the Associate in Arts degree in Literatures in English, students must successfully complete 60 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

4

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Total Credits Required for Graduation

36 credits 60 credits 24 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENGL 121 ENGL 122 ENGL 123 ENGL 130 ENGL 131 ENGL 230 ENGL 240 ENGL 241 ENGL 242 ENGL 250 ENGL 251 ENGL 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Poetry Introduction to Drama Introduction to Prose Fiction The Shakespearean Century Oral Literatures Introduction to Caribbean Prose Fiction 20th Century Commonwealth Literatures Introduction to 20th Century American Literature Caribbean Poetry and Drama The Moderns Introduction to Critical Theory Creative Writing

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC103 RELI 205 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Math Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

36

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

Career Options: The degree is a transfer degree which allows graduates to pursue a bachelor’s degree in the relevant subject area-literature; literature and language; literature, language and education; literature and communication. It can also lead to careers/advancement in: • Teaching • Copywriting • Advertising • Journalism

Associate in Applied Science - Foreign Languages for Business: Spanish The Associate in Applied Science degree in Foreign Languages for Business: Spanish is designed to provide

graduates with a competitive edge in the global marketplace, through an intensive learning experience that focuses on the development of competencies in Spanish language skills, international business and cultural awareness required to effectively conduct or support business activity in a Latin American context.

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – Foreign Languages for Business: Spanish To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Foreign Languages for Business: Spanish, students must successfully complete 72 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Elective courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Total Credits Required for Graduation Total credits in the major area of study

36 credits

39 credits 24 credits 72 credits 9 credits

3 credits

50

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
LAST 120 LAST 121 LAST 225 SPAN 121 SPAN 122 SPAN 123 SPAN 130 SPAN 210 SPAN 211 SPAN 230 SPAN 241

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Latin American Studies International Relations and Latin America Doing Business in Latin America Advanced Conversational Spanish Spanish for Business I Spanish for Business II Spanish Stylistics I Latin American Civilisation and Culture I Latin American Civilisation and Culture II Introduction to Translation Introduction to Interpreting Techniques

CODE
BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENTP 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Math Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
SPAN 247 SPAN 277 ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE MAJOR Study Abroad OR Independent Study

36
3 BUSI 216 MKTG 205 MKTG 330

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Introduction to International Business Principles of Marketing International Marketing

24
3 3 3

Total Credits for Elective Courses in the Major

3

Total Support Course Credits

9

Career Options: • Export/Sales representative in a local or international company • International trade and commerce • Bilingual secretary • Foreign services employee Faculty Profile – Languages, Literature and Communication Studies
Clarinda Jack - Department Chair Senior Lecturer - Communication, Literature MA, Dip Ed. BA. Research Interests: Teaching of literature, poetry and the works of Jean Rhys Luis Arreaza Lecturer - Spanish and Latin American Culture Título de Profesor, Especialidad: Inglés (5yr undergraduate) Research Interests: Teaching methodologies; translation; Latin American Studies Roddy Batchasingh Senior Lecturer - Communication, Literature MA, BA Research Interests: Creative writing, Caribbean literature, Shakespeare and film Sophia Edwards Senior Lecturer – Mass Communications , Journalism/PR, MA Research Interests: Alternative forms of media (online, music and film) and their impact on the Caribbean audience Mariel Ganpat Senior Lecturer - Spanish and French MA - Languages, MA - International Relations Research Interests: Translation and interpretation Louella Joseph Senior Lecturer- Communication, History MA, BA Research Interests: Poverty reduction in the Caribbean: relevance of Caribbean Single Market Economy (CSME) Jada Lee Condappa –Lewis Senior Lecturer – Journalism, Communication BA Research Interests: Culture, identity and communication in the Caribbean; the psychology of trauma and healing Simon Lee Senior Lecturer - Communication, Literature MA, BA. Research Interests: Contemporary Caribbean cultures (especially music); creole poetics and linguistics and Caribbean cultural theory

Beulah Garcia Senior Lecturer - Communication, History MPhil, MA, BA. Research Interests: History of Arima

51

Earl Best Senior Lecturer – Journalism, Communication BA Research Interests: The extent to which the secondary school system prepares its citizens for tertiary education Christian Dial Senior Lecturer – Literature, Communication MA , BA Research Interests: Post colonialism, modernism and Yeats Karen Dougdeen-Gokool Lecturer - Spanish BA- Spanish Research Interests: Teaching methodologies; assessment; second language acquisition

Augustina Debra Greaves Senior Lecturer - Mass Communications, Communication, Journalism/PR MA Research Interests: The impact of old and new media on how citizens vote in Trinidad and Tobago Abigail Gúzman Senior Lecturer - Spanish MA - Spanish, BA – Spanish Research Interests: Hispanic and Spanish literature; literary analysis; cultural studies Winnifred Henry Senior Lecturer - Communication, Literature MPhil, BA Research Interests: Non-fiction works of V.S Naipaul

Joel Nanton Senior Lecturer – Journalism, Communication B.Sc. Research Interests: The importance and impact of formal media training on the local media industry Keith Ward Lecturer - Spanish PGCert - Education, BA-Spanish Research Interests: Structural factors and their impact on teaching methodologies

52

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Department of Mathematics
Mathematics embodies the spirit of the liberal arts. It is an art, a pure science, a language and an analytical tool for philosophical questions and a beautiful edifice that is a tribute to human creativity. The curriculum offered by the varied objectives: the natural and social sciences; it is a means of exploring

Department of Mathematics is planned with the following

as an important area of human thought

• To offer students an introduction to mathematics

• To prepare students for graduate study in pure or statistics and operations research.

applied mathematics, and in such related fields as • To serve the needs of students in fields that rely substantially on mathematics, such as the physical, biological, • To engineering, and business administration. provide liberal arts students social and information sciences, with

introduction to the kinds of mathematical and quantitative thinking that are important in the contemporary world.

an

Programmes

The Department of Mathematics offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes B.Sc. Mathematics Associate Degree Programmes AS Mathematics

Bachelor of Science - Mathematics The Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics develops many useful career skills: attention to detail, comfort with numbers and computation, and a familiarity with standard mathematical models. It offers a solid base in both basic and advanced mathematics principles, preparing students to be innovative and imaginative in complex situations - ready for a world of challenges. Students also have an opportunity for further specialization in the discipline by taking courses such as Real and Numerical Analysis as well as Complex Variable Theory. Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Science - Mathematics To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics, students must successfully complete 120 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution: Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

63 credits 48 credits 120 credits 9 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

53

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
MATH 126 MATH 143 MATH 150 MATH 151 MATH 161 MATH 257 MATH 258 MATH 260 MATH 261 MATH 340 MATH 341 MATH 350 MATH 360 MATH 450 MATH 451 MATH 460 MATH 461 STAT 121 STAT 200 STAT 400 STAT 401

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Financial Mathematics Discrete Mathematics Linear Algebra I Linear Algebra II Calculus II Differential Equations I Differential Equations II Calculus III Calculus IV Abstract Algebra I Abstract Algebra II Numerical Analysis Partial Differential Equations Complex Variable Theory I Complex Variable Theory II Real Analysis I Real Analysis II Introduction to Inferential Statistics Mathematical Probability and Statistics I Mathematical Probability and Statistics II Advanced Statistical Inference

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 160 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Calculus I Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Programme Design Programming I Object Oriented Programming I

48

ITEC 130 ITEC 133 ITEC 235

3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study

63

Total Support Course Credits

9

Associate in Science - Mathematics The Associate in Science degree in Mathematics is essentially the first two years of the bachelor’s degree programme in mathematics. As students progress through the programme, they develop rigorous, logical thinking and problem-solving skills; an appreciation of and familiarity with complex structures and algorithms, and the ability to learn technical, detailed, or abstract material. Graduation Requirements: To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Mathematics, students must successfully complete the 60 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

33 credits 24 credits 60 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

54

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
MATH 126 MATH 143 MATH 150 MATH 151 MATH 161 MATH 257 MATH 258 MATH 260 MATH 261 STAT 121 STAT 200

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Financial Mathematics Discrete Mathematics Linear Algebra I Linear Algebra II Calculus II Differential Equations I Differential Equations II Calculus III Calculus IV Introduction to Inferential Statistics Mathematical Probability and Statistics

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 LIBS 130 MATH 160 SOCI 102 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamental Research Skills Calculus I Introduction to the Study of Society Fundamentals of Statistics And any other 6 credits from core curriculum

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 6

Total Core Curriculum Credits
ITEC 130 SUPPORT COURSES Programme Design

24
3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

33

Total Support Course Credits

3

Career Options: • Primary or secondary school teacher

• Trainee in a range of occupations requiring strong mathematical and analytical skills such as: • data analyst - information technology sector • net developers - web-based industries • packaging design • research engineer - technology industries • reinsurance and risk analysts - insurance industry • credit analysts - banking industry • power plant manager • merger and acquisition operations – finance sector • technical liaison - engineer-manufacturing companies

Full-Time Faculty Profile – Mathematics
Paula Sellier Department Chair, Senior Lecturer Mathematics, Calculus M.Ed, B.Sc. Research Interests: Differentiated instruction in Mathematics to improve success rates at the Tertiary level , Mathematics Education Laura Bridglal Senior Lecturer - Mathematics, Numerical Analysis M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Fluid mechanics Ramon Hernandez Senior Lecturer Mathematics, Statistics PhD, M.Ed., B.Sc. Research Interests: Applied mathematical theories, bio-statistical theories Doodnath Persad Senior Lecturer - Mathematics, Discrete Mathematics M.Sc., B.Ed. Research Interest: Using linear statistical hierarchical models to measure efficiency of secondary schools in Trinidad and Tobago Tracey Stoute Senior Lecturer - Mathematics, Applied Mathematics MBA, BSc. Research Interests: Econometrics

Chantal James Lecturer - Mathematics B.Sc. Research Interests: Mathematics education

55

Lennox Celestin Senior Lecturer - Mathematics, Differential Equations MM, M Phil, B.Sc. Research Interests: Oscillatory integrals and the Path integral approach to option pricing; Stochastic analysis on a path space; Economic dynamics Anthea Clarke Senior Lecturer- Mathematics, Algebra M.Ed., B.Ed. Research Interests: Mathematics education Adrian Nathai Lecturer – Mathematics, Financial Mathematics and Actuarial Science M.Sc. Economics (Finance and Investment Management), B.Sc. Mathematics Research Interests: Econometrics

Jeffrey Leela Senior Lecturer - Mathematics, Linear Algebra M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Numerical analysis and fluid mechanics

Neil Sylvester Senior Lecturer - Mathematics MBA, M.Sc. Dip. Ed, B.Sc. Research Interests: Financial mathematics

Brian Maurice Senior Lecturer - Mathematics, Financial Mathematics CIMA, B.Sc. Research Interests: : Factors affecting successful completion of statistics courses at COSTAATT

Hezron Veerasammy Senior Lecturer - Mathematics M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Applied mathematical theories

56

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Department of Fine and Performing Arts

The Department of Fine and Performing Arts caters to the needs of amateur and professional musicians; students with a desire to teach music, and aspiring and industry graphic artists. Students for music or a flair for the arts. The programmes offered by the department have been designed to respond industry needs and are benchmarked to international standards.

enrolled in our programmes possess one common trait-passion

Programmes The Department of Fine and Performing Arts offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes BM – Music: Performance BM – Music Education Associate Degree Programmes AAS Performing Arts: Music AAS Graphic Design

Bachelor of Music – Performance/Music Education This programme is designed to prepare students for the music industry, and offers professional preparation for

performance and music education careers. Students can major in music performance in such areas as: steel pan,

voice, guitar, classical piano, brass, reed, and music education. Courses are taught by professional musicians from many different genres and backgrounds-jazz, classical, and other contemporary idioms-who combine academic qualifications with significant experience in the music industry of Trinidad and Tobago.

57

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Music To be awarded the Bachelor degree in Music, students must successfully complete the required courses in the major, the courses in the instrument specialization and the core curriculum credits, according to the distribution below.

Area of Specialization Voice Guitar Piano Pan Woodwind and Brass Music Education

Courses in the Major 37 credits 37 credits 37 credits 37 credits 37 credits 37 credits

Core Curriculum Credits 51 credits 51 credits 51 credits 51 credits 51 credits 51 credits

Instrument Specialization 34 credits 28 credits 34 credits 31 credits 31 credits 37 credits

Guided Elective Credits 3 credits 9 credits 3 credits 6 credits 6 credits 0 credits

TOTAL CREDITS 125 125 125 125 125 125

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
MUSC 155 MUSC 156 MUSC 157 MUSC 158 MUSC 185 MUSC 205 MUSC 290 MUSC 294 MUSC 315 MUSC 329 MUSC 405 MUSC 408 MUSC 409 MUSC 490 MUSP 200 MUSP 201

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 2 2 3 1 3 3 3 3 1 2 2 3 1 1

COURSE TITLE
Music Theory I Music Theory II Aural Skills I Aural Skills II History of Music of Western Europe I Basic Conducting Music Theory III History of Music of Western Europe II Computers and Music Survey of the Music Industry Intermediate Conducting World Music and Caribbean Aesthetics Poetry and Lyrics in Music Music Theory IV Class Piano I Class Piano II

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

37

Total Core Curriculum Credits

51

VOICE SPECIALIZATION The requirements for the voice specialization are 125 credits (37 credits in major, 34 specialized credits, 3 guided elective credits, and 51 core curriculum credits).

58

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

COURSES IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
CODE
MUSV 131 MUSV 132 MUSV 253 MUSV 254 MUSV 151 MUSV 152 MUSV 263 MUSV 264 MUSV 320 MUSV 351 MUSV 352 MUSV 485 MUSV 486 MUSV 301 MUSV 302 MUSC 303 MUSV 403 MUSV 435 MUSV 455

GUIDED ELECTIVES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3 1 1 2 2 3 3 0 0

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I-Voice Primary Applied Instrument II-Voice Primary Applied Instrument III-Voice Primary Applied Instrument IV-Voice Major Performing Ensemble I-Voice Major Performing Ensemble II-Voice Major Performing Ensemble III-Voice Major Performing Ensemble IV-Voice Junior Recital-Voice Primary Applied Instrument V-Voice Primary Applied Instrument VI-Voice Major Performing Ensemble V-Voice Major Performing Ensemble VI-Voice Diction for Singers I Diction for Singers II Movement and Acting Opera Theatre Workshop Recital Attendance -Voice Senior Recital-Voice

CODE
MUSC 410 MUSC 411 MUSC 412 MUSC 413 MUSC 414 MUSC 495

COURSE TITLE
History of Calypso Jazz History The Art of Transcription Musical Theatre History Calypso Arranging Big Band Arranging Any one of the above

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in Voice Specialization

34

Total Guided Elective Credits

3

GUITAR SPECIALIZATION The requirements for the guitar specialization are 125 credits (37 credits in major, 28 specialized credits, 9 guided elective credits, and 51 core curriculum credits).

COURSES IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
CODE
MUSG 131 MUSG 132 MUSG 253 MUSG 254 MUSG 151 MUSG 152 MUSG 263 MUSG 264 MUSG 320 MUSG 351 MUSG 352 MUSG 485 MUSG 486 MUSG 304 MUSG 305 MUSG 435 MUSG 455

GUIDED ELECTIVES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3 1 1 2 2 0 0

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument II-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument III-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument IV-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble I-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble II-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble III-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble IV-Guitar Junior Recital-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument V-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument VI-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble V-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble VI-Guitar Guitar Literature Guitar Pedagogy Recital Attendance -Guitar Senior Recital-Guitar

CODE
MUSC 410 MUSC 411 MUSC 412 MUSC 413 MUSC 414 MUSC 495

COURSE TITLE
History of Calypso Jazz History The Art of Transcription Musical Theatre History Calypso Arranging Big Band Arranging Any three of the above

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 9

Total Credits for Required Courses in Guitar Specialization

28

Total Guided Elective Credits

9

5

PIANO SPECIALIZATION The requirement for the piano specialization is 125 credits (37 credits in major, 34 specialized credits, 3 guided elective credits, and 51 core curriculum credits). COURSES IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
CODE
MUSP 131 MUSP 132 MUSP 253 MUSP 254 *** *** *** *** MUSP 320 MUSP 351 MUSP 352 *** *** MUSP 304 MUSP 305 MUSP 328 MUSP 405 MUSP 325 MUSP 455

GUIDED ELECTIVES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3 1 1 2 2 3 3 0 0

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I-Piano Primary Applied Instrument II-Piano Primary Applied Instrument III-Piano Primary Applied Instrument IV-Piano Major Performing Ensemble I Major Performing Ensemble II Major Performing Ensemble III Major Performing Ensemble IV Junior Recital-Piano Primary Applied Instrument V-Piano Primary Applied Instrument VI-Piano Major Performing Ensemble V Major Performing Ensemble VI Piano Literature Piano Pedagogy Keyboard Techniques Jazz Class-Piano Recital Attendance -Piano Senior Recital-Piano

CODE
MUSC 410 MUSC 411 MUSC 412 MUSC 413 MUSC 414 MUSC 495

COURSE TITLE
History of Calypso Jazz History The Art of Transcription Musical Theatre History Calypso Arranging Big Band Arranging Any one of the above

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in Piano Specialization

34

Total Guided Elective Credits

3

*** There is no piano ensemble. Piano majors will be required to participate in one of the other ensemble classes.

PAN SPECIALIZATION The requirement for the pan specialization is 125 credits (37 credits in major, 31 specialized credits, 6 guided elective credits, and 51 core curriculum credits).

COURSES IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
CODE
MUSS 131 MUSS 132 MUSS 253 MUSS 254 MUSS 151 MUSS 152 MUSS 263 MUSS 264 MUSS 320 MUSS 351 MUSS 352 MUSS 485 MUSS 486 MUSS 304 MUSS 305 MUSC 404 MUSS 435 MUSS 455

GUIDED ELECTIVES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3 1 1 2 2 3 0 0

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I- Pan Primary Applied Instrument II-Pan Primary Applied Instrument III-Pan Primary Applied Instrument IV-Pan Major Performing Ensemble I-Pan Major Performing Ensemble II-Pan Major Performing Ensemble III-Pan Major Performing Ensemble IV-Pan Junior Recital-Pan Primary Applied Instrument V-Pan Primary Applied Instrument VI-Pan Major Performing Ensemble V-Pan Major Performing Ensemble VI-Pan Pan Literature Pan Pedagogy Acoustics/Pan Technology Recital Attendance -Pan Senior Recital-Pan

CODE
MUSC 410 MUSC 411 MUSC 412 MUSC 413 MUSC 414 MUSC 495

COURSE TITLE
History of Calypso Jazz History The Art of Transcription Musical Theatre History Calypso Arranging Big Band Arranging

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3

Any two of the above

6

Total Credits for Required Courses in Pan Specialization

31

Total Guided Elective Credits

6

60

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
WOODWIND AND BRASS SPECIALIZATION The requirement for the woodwind and brass specialization is 125 credits (37 credits in major, 28 specialized credits, 9 guided elective credits, and 51 core curriculum credits). COURSES IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
CODE
MUSW 131 MUSW 132 MUSW 253 MUSW 254 MUSJ 151 MUSJ 152 MUSJ 263 MUSJ 264 MUSW 320 MUSW 351 MUSW 352 MUSJ 485 MUSJ 486 MUSI 304 MUSI 305 MUSW 435 MUSW 455

GUIDED ELECTIVES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3 1 1 2 2 0 0

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I-Woodwind/Brass Primary Applied Instrument II- Woodwind/Brass Primary Applied Instrument III-Woodwind/Brass Primary Applied Instrument IV- Woodwind/Brass Major Performing Ensemble I-Jazz Major Performing Ensemble II-Jazz Major Performing Ensemble III-Jazz Major Performing Ensemble IV-Jazz Junior Recital - Woodwind/Brass Primary Applied Instrument V-Woodwind/Brass Primary Applied Instrument VI-Woodwind/Brass Major Performing Ensemble V-Jazz Major Performing Ensemble VI-Jazz Instrumental Literature Instrumental Pedagogy Recital Attendance - Woodwind/Brass Senior Recital - Woodwind/Brass

CODE
MUSC 410 MUSC 411 MUSC 412 MUSC 413 MUSC 414 MUSC 495

COURSE TITLE
History of Calypso Jazz History The Art of Transcription Musical Theatre History Calypso Arranging Big Band Arranging Any three of the above

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 9

Total Credits for Required Courses in Woodwind/ Brass Specialization

28

Total Guided Elective Credits

9

MUSIC EDUCATION SPECIALIZATION The requirement for the music education specialization is 125 credits (37 credits in the major, 37 specialized credits, and 51 core curriculum credits).

COURSES IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
CODE
*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** MUSC 312 MUSG 313 MUSE 311 MUSE 411 MUSE 325 MUSC 499

GUIDED ELECTIVES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3 1 1 2 2 3 3 0 3

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I Primary Applied Instrument II Primary Applied Instrument III Primary Applied Instrument IV Major Performing Ensemble I Major Performing Ensemble II Major Performing Ensemble III Major Performing Ensemble IV Junior Recital Primary Applied Instrument V Primary Applied Instrument VI Major Performing Ensemble V Major Performing Ensemble VI Introduction to Music Therapy Guitar Accompaniment Music Education I Music Education II Recital Attendance –Music Education Senior Project - Music

CODE
MUSC 410 MUSC 411 MUSC 412 MUSC 413 MUSC 414 MUSC 495

COURSE TITLE
History of Calypso Jazz History The Art of Transcription Musical Theatre History Calypso Arranging Big Band Arranging

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in Music Education Specialization

37

Total Guided Elective Credits

0

***Music Education majors are required to choose and study an instrument from the menu of available options. The ensemble must complement the primary applied instrument of study.

61

Career Options: • Music performer

• Music educator in early childhood, primary or secondary school • Music school administrator • Studio teacher

• Music consultant / supervisor Associate in Applied Arts - Performing Arts: Music This degree programme essentially comprises the first two years of the Bachelor of Music degree. Students Music, once they have completed the prescribed list of courses below.

pursuing a Bachelor of Music degree can exit with an Associate in Applied Science degree in Performing Arts:

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Arts – Performing Arts: Music To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Performing Arts: Music, students must successfully complete 65 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study

Required courses in the area of specialization Core curriculum courses

Total courses in major area of study

41 credits 65 credits 24 credits

16 credits

25 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

MAJOR COURSES
CODE
MUSC 155 MUSC 156 MUSC 157 MUSC 158 MUSC 185 MUSC 205 MUSC 290 MUSC 294 MUSC 315 MUSP 200 MUSP 201

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 2 2 3 1 3 3 3 1 1

COURSE TITLE
Music Theory I Music Theory II Aural Skills I Aural Skills II History of the Music of Western Europe I Basic Conducting Music Theory III History of Music of Western Europe II Computers and Music Class Piano I Class Piano II

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 LIBS 130 STAT 120 PSYC 103 BUSI 203 ARTS 119 SCIE 121

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamental Research Skills Fundamentals of Statistics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Leadership and Ethics Foundations of Art and Music Foundations of Natural Science

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

25

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

REQUIRED COURSES FOR VOICE SPECIALIZATION
CODE
MUSV 131 MUSV 132 MUSV 253 MUSV 254 MUSV 151 MUSV 152 MUSV 263 MUSV 264 MUSV 320

REQUIRED COURSES FOR GUITAR SPECIALIZATION
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I-Voice Primary Applied Instrument II-Voice Primary Applied Instrument III-Voice Primary Applied Instrument IV-Voice Major Performing Ensemble I-Voice Major Performing Ensemble II-Voice Major Performing Ensemble III-Voice Major Performing Ensemble IV-Voice Junior Recital-Voice

CODE
MUSG 131 MUSG 132 MUSG 253 MUSG 254 MUSG 151 MUSG 152 MUSG 263 MUSG 264 MUSG 320

COURSE TITLE
Primary Applied Instrument I-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument II-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument III-Guitar Primary Applied Instrument IV-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble I-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble II-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble III-Guitar Major Performing Ensemble IV-Guitar Junior Recital-Guitar

Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0

Total Credits for Required Voice Specialization Courses

16

Total Credits for Required Guitar Specialization Courses

16

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

REQUIRED COURSES FOR PIANO SPECIALIZATION
MUSP 131 MUSP 132 MUSP 253 MUSP 254 *** *** *** *** MUSP 320 Primary Applied Instrument I-Piano Primary Applied Instrument II-Piano Primary Applied Instrument III-Piano Primary Applied Instrument IV-Piano Major Performing Ensemble I Major Performing Ensemble II Major Performing Ensemble III Major Performing Ensemble IV-Piano Junior Recital-Piano 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0

REQUIRED COURSES FOR PAN SPECIALIZATION
MUSS 131 MUSS 132 MUSS 253 MUSS 254 MUSS 151 MUSS 152 MUSS 263 MUSS 264 MUSS 320 Primary Applied Instrument I- Pan Primary Applied Instrument II-Pan Primary Applied Instrument III-Pan Primary Applied Instrument IV-Pan Major Performing Ensemble I-Pan Major Performing Ensemble II-Pan Major Performing Ensemble III-Pan Major Performing Ensemble IV-Pan Junior Recital-Pan 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0

Total Credits for Required Piano Specialization Courses

16

Total Credits for Required Pan Specialization Courses

16

REQUIRED COURSES FOR WOODWIND AND BRASS SPECIALIZATION
MUSW 131 MUSW 132 MUSW 253 MUSW 254 MUSJ 151 MUSJ 152 MUSJ 263 MUSJ 264 MUSW 320 Primary Applied Instrument I-Wind Primary Applied Instrument II-Wind Primary Applied Instrument III-Wind Primary Applied Instrument IV-Wind Major Performing Ensemble I-Jazz Major Performing Ensemble II-Jazz Major Performing Ensemble III-Jazz Major Performing Ensemble IV-Jazz Junior Recital-Wind 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 0

Total Credits for Required Piano Specialization Courses

16

*** There is no piano ensemble. Piano majors will be required to participate in one of the other ensemble classes.

Associate in Applied Science - Graphic Design The Associate degree in Applied Science in Graphic Design is a comprehensive graphic arts programme which Students learn the basic theories of advertising, layout, type, colour and illustration and become proficient in the use of electronic technologies for graphic communications. develops students’ skills in the latest technologies, while building a solid foundation in traditional art and design.

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science - Graphic Design To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Graphic Design, students must successfully complete 66 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

39 credits 24 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

66 credits

63

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
GRDE 122 GRDE 123 GRDE 124 GRDE 130 GRDE 153 GRDE 182 GRDE 215 GRDE 230 GRDE 234 GRDE 244 GRDE 245 GRDE 253 GRDE 255

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
CR
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Principles of Design Introduction to Drawing and Painting Visual Thinking and Advertising Concepts Typography I (Calligraphy and Letterform) Image Manipulation Vector Graphics Digital Photography Typography II (Logos and Creating Identities) Publication Design 3D Design: Rendering and Storyboarding Art History Introduction to Motion Graphics Graphic Design Practicum

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 MATH 116 LIBS 130 SOCI 102 ENTP 210 BUSI 203 PSYC 103

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Contemporary College Math Fundamental Research Skills Introduction to the Study of Society Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Leadership and Ethics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity

CR
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES ITEC 240 Web Page Design

24

3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major Guided prerequisite course
GRDE 128 Introduction to Commercial Design

39
3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

3

Career Options: Entry • • • • • • • level in a range of occupations requiring good design skills, such as those listed below: Advertising Illustration Web design Package design Publishing Film and television Photography studios

Full-Time Faculty Profile – Fine and Performing Arts Nadine Gonzales Department Chair Senior Lecturer - Voice M.M., BM Research Interests: Music Education Wayne Bruno Senior Lecturer - Guitar M.M., BM Withnold Green Senior Lecturer - Piano F.T.C.L., BM Renwick Paul Senior Lecturer - Music Education M.Ed., BM

David Hugh Spicer Senior Lecturer - Graphic Design MFA, BFA Research Interests: Contemporary Typography regarding the development of logos in the Southern Caribbean

Julie Gouveia Ferguson Lecturer - Graphic Design BFA Research Interests: Technological advancements in visual arts

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Course Descriptions
ANTH 250 Caribbean Anthropology

This course provides a general introduction to the field of anthropology and places emphasis on the diversity

of Caribbean peoples and cultures. Students will cover the history of the discipline, its sub-fields, the major 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

theories, methodologies and the variety of ways in which Caribbean peoples experience and interpret the world.

ARTS 119 Foundations of Art and Music

This course introduces students to the history of Western European art and music and the rich cultural diversity

that defines the musical traditions of Trinidad and Tobago. The course is comprises an overview of Western function of art within cultural expression. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 104 Language and Communications Skills

art and music, a study of local and regional artists, the evolution of the music of Trinidad and Tobago and the

This course is designed to enhance students’ grasp of the fundamental elements of standard English and elements of grammar, vocabulary, comprehension exercises and business communications. Emphasis will be placed on the correct use of grammar and vocabulary in oral situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 117 Fundamentals of Writing

improve their oral and written communication skills in their specific work environment. As such it will combine

This course strengthens students’ writing skills with a focus on critical thinking and non-fiction writing as

imperatives of effective communication. Students will complete a range of tasks that will enable them to write clearly and concisely. This course will also enhance students’ command and critical appreciation of various rhetorical modes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 118 Communication in the Workplace

This course will engage students in learning and practising an array of oral and written communication skills relevant to the workplace. The objective is to produce a graduate who will be confident and effective in responding to the diverse demands of the modern workplace. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 119 Advanced Grammar for Office Professionals

This course is designed to enhance the communicative competency of students, with special emphasis on accuracy in grammar and mechanics in written business forms. Students will learn to write effectively in Standard English by correctly using subject verb agreement, pronoun concord, sentence construction and more complex

sentence structures. Their editing skills will be honed by correcting errors in memos, agenda, minutes, business letters and reports. They will also be required to convert point form notes and conversations into continuous prose formats in various business forms. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co–requisite: COMM 118 COMM 121 Introduction to Mass Communication

This course provides an introduction to the principles and concepts of communicating to mass audiences in an ever changing global environment. Students will examine different cultures and the historical impact of different types of media, advertising and public relations on society. In addition, the course will explore the theories and effects of mass communication, media freedom, regulation and ethics in today’s world. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

65

COMM 125 English for Court Transcription

This course is intended to build or improve students’ ability to recognize, manipulate and produce Standard

English grammar in both oral and written contexts. Students will be able to distinguish between local dialect competencies in Standard English. 5 Credits/ Prerequisites: None

and Standard English linguistic structures. Emphasis will be placed on the development of oral and written

COMM 130 Communication III: Understanding Human Communication

This course offers an in-depth study of the dynamics of human communication and reviews communication at the interpersonal, intra-personal and group levels. Students will examine theories of mass communication. They will also examine ways of improving business communication. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 135 Voice and Presentation

This course is designed to develop speaking, presenting, listening and interviewing skills. Emphasis is placed

on voice and non-verbal forms of communication, including spatial and body movements (body language), of presentation – voice, expression, use of eyes and tone. Effective use of posture, gestures, dress and different modes of delivery will also be explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 140 Speech Writing

cues and signals which are continuously encoded and decoded. Students will also learn and practice elements

Students will learn how to write and present speeches for various audiences and occasions.

introduced to the elements of speech writing: formulating, focusing, organizing and rewriting. The theories of None

They will be

understanding and engaging the audience verbally and non-verbally will be explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

COMM 151 Communication in Nursing (Formerly NURS 103)

In this course, students focus on the development of communication skills utilised in professional nursing.

Students will acquire verbal and non-verbal communication skills which will enable them to develop effective, ers and groups is discussed. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None. COMM 350 Communication via Social Networking

caring human relationships with a diverse population of clients. The relationship of the individual with self, oth-

This is a dynamic course which shows how social media has affected the ways in which people discover, create

and share news and information. The course explores in detail the similarities and distinct differences among permanence of social networking sites (SNS). 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 365 Audience and Reception

social and industrial media and issues such as the accountability, reach, accessibility, usability, currency and

This course exposes students to some key concepts and thinkers who have shaped the ways in which researchers of movies, radio, television and news media. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 450 Music as Communication

have addressed how audiences engage with different modes of communication. Students will examine audiences

In this course, students will examine the use of music as a tool of communication and explore the different genres of music and the feelings of religiosity, patriotism, romance or revolt that music promotes. In addition, they will gender identity. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: COMM 365 also assess the impact of music on an individual’s personal, national, regional, cultural, ethnic, generational and

66

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
COMM 452 Film as Communication

Through the viewing of selected films and film clips, students will examine the interplay among the elements of film which create the production of meaning(s) and how this then reflects, impacts upon and shapes society. COMM 365 They will also become more critically aware and conscious consumers of media. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

COMM 499 Senior Project - Mass Communications

This is a guided independent research project which may take the form of a written project or an audio-visual project in the field of mass communication. The topic selected by the student must have lecturer approval and should either be something new or a continuation of work previously undertaken in the field. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None / Co-requisite: JOUR 455 COPR 010 Life Skills

In this course, students will develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that promote personal development, health and well-being. Upon completion, they will be more balanced individuals poised to successfully maneuver through the tertiary level environment and life’s most challenging moments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COUN 100 Counselling

The course introduces the students to the basic tenets of counselling. It emphasizes the need for theory in a concise frame of reference. The student is encouraged to appreciate and practice such skills as listening; summarizing and diagnosing which can facilitate referrals. Students are encouraged to understand “work” in various forms and trace developmental stages through vocational theory. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENGL 121 Introduction to Poetry

This is a foundation course that focuses on the study of poetry through reading, discussion, and analysis of the reading, understanding and enjoying poetry. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENGL 122 Introduction to Drama

structure and meaning of poems from various genres, periods and styles. Students will develop techniques for

This foundation course examines the key elements, genres, periods and styles of drama. Students will become familiar with the principles and practices of drama, from the influence of ancient Greek dramatists to contemporary experimental theatre. They will be introduced to a variety of plays and will also gain an appreciation of drama as distinguishing features of drama. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENGL 123 Introduction to Prose Fiction

a performed art. The practical component of this course will help students to interpret, analyze and discuss the

This is a foundation course that examines the key elements, genres, periods and styles of prose fiction, and is designed to expand the student’s ability to interpret, interact with, and write about prose fiction. It focuses on some of the major works of fiction written in English in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will examine and analyze the importance and relevance of the historical, social and cultural backgrounds of these None works, as well as the changing modes of fiction writing over these two centuries. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ENGL 130 The Shakespearean Century

In this course, students examine the major plays of Shakespeare, Ben Jonson and Christopher Marlowe. The course also includes the study of the metaphysical poets and builds on the skills acquired in ENGL 121 and ENGL 122. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENGL 121 and ENGL 122

67

ENGL 131 Oral Literatures

In this course, students will explore various genres of oral literature from the perspective of folklore studies, cultural anthropology and literatures in English. They will also examine the oral genres that have been handed down from generation to generation in the West Indies and other parts of the world. A variety of theories and None

methods applied to oral literature studies will be introduced in readings and lectures. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ENGL 200 Comparative Literature

This course introduces students to examples of nationally and internationally acclaimed literary works. Students will develop critical thinking skills through the analysis of selected texts. understanding of literary elements, terms, concepts and genres. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENGL 230 Introduction to Caribbean Prose Fiction They will consequently gain an

This course covers a selection of the major 20th century Caribbean prose writers such as Naipaul, Rhys, Selvon, Lovelace, Lamming and Kincaid. Students will build upon skills acquired in ENGL 123 and focus on specific Caribbean elements and issues in literature. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENGL 123 ENGL 240 20th Century Commonwealth Literature

This course is designed to introduce students to 20th century literature of the English-speaking Commonwealth. Students will study, and learn to appreciate, a selection of major works of fiction which reflect the political, social and ENGL 123 and cultural norms of the societies from which they originate. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENGL 121, ENGL 122

ENGL 241 Introduction to 20th Century American Literature

This course covers a selection of major works of 20th century American poetry, drama and fiction. Some of the unique American concerns and issues that students will discuss and analyze include the American West, the 123 American Dream, Individualism and Race Relations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENGL 121, ENGL 122 and ENGL

ENGL 242 Caribbean Poetry and Drama

This course builds upon ENGL 121, 122 and 230 by focusing on a selection of major Caribbean poets and dramatists. Students will study the works of authors such as Walcott, Carter, Brathwaite, Scott, and Hill. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENGL 122 and ENGL 121 ENGL 250 The Moderns

In this course, students are introduced to the Modernist movement and the major Modernist writers of the 20th century, whose works redefined the way literature was written, perceived and thought. The course will focus on Eliot’s The Wasteland, Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist As A Young Man and Woolf’s The Lighthouse. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENGL 121, ENGL 122 and ENGL 123 ENGL 251 Introduction to Critical Theory

This course introduces students to a basic overview of current major literary theories – Feminist, Marxist, Psychoanalytical and Post-Colonial. In addition, students will examine the Liberal Humanism critical approach. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENGL121, ENGL122and ENGL123 ENGL 270 Creative Writing

This is an introductory writing course which provides students with a forum for creating short stories, poems

68

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 and sketches. Students will focus on their West Indian cultural background and use it as a source of inspiration

for their writing. They will also be required to critically assess the work of their peers. The course assumes that level writing skills are essential. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None FREN 100 Introduction to French

students do not possess the writing skills of experienced novelists, poets, and playwrights. However, college

This is an introductory course designed to develop the functional skills in speaking, listening, reading and writlanguage skills while developing an awareness of the target culture so as to meet a number of basic survival needs. Focus is placed on the development of oral and aural skills. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None GERM 100 Introduction to German

ing required to interact formally and informally with native speakers. It seeks to equip participants with specific

This is an introductory course designed to develop functional skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing as required to interact formally and informally with native speakers. It seeks to equip participants with specific needs. Focus is placed on the development of oral and aural skills. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: None GRDE 095 Introduction to Drawing language skills while developing an awareness of the target culture so as to meet a number of basic survival

This is an entry level course in which students’ gain an understanding of the indispensable role of drawing as

an important aspect of art making. Upon completion of this course, students will develop a keen, sensitive eye

for detail and an understanding of the function and types of drawing material used in graphic design. They will None

learn the importance of choosing the right drawing material to suit drawing subjects. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

GRDE 098 Introduction to Painting

This is an introductory studio art course in which students will develop skills and techniques in painting. Through lectures and hands-on studio experience, they will become familiar with the history, process and discipline of Prerequisite: None painting; and consequently develop an appreciation of painting as it relates to artistic expression. 3 Credits/

GRDE 122 Principles of Design

This course is designed for students who wish to understand and use design principles and elements effectively in their careers. Students will acquire a comprehensive understanding of the discipline of graphic design. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-requisite: COMM 117 GRDE 123 Introduction to Drawing and Painting

This course focuses on the fundamentals of drawing and painting. Students will acquire an understanding of the elements and principles of dry and wet media. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None GRDE 124 Visual Thinking and Advertising Concepts

This course provides students with a strong foundation in the fundamental aspects of the graphic designer’s art. Students will develop creativity and ideation skills, learn the elements of visual design and then apply this - will be emphasized. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None / Co-requisite: COMM 117 GRDE 127 Digital Communication Design knowledge to a wide range of graphic design problems. Communication in all forms - visual, verbal and written

In this course, students will gain basic knowledge of the design and production of newspapers, magazines and

6

other mass media publications using industry-standard desktop publishing and design programs. They will also

be taught design theory, creative problem solving, and computer publishing skills. On completion of this the course, students will have developed a public relations piece to add to their portfolios. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

GRDE 128 Introduction to Commercial Design

This is an entry level course for students who wish to explore commercial design via computer graphics. It is designed to build awareness and skill in creating design, using industry-based software. Students will learn None the principles of design and image manipulation as well as effective design theories. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

GRDE 130 Typography I (Calligraphy and Letterform)

This course covers the history, theory, practice and fundamental principles of letterforms and typography as they apply to graphic design, advertising and other areas of design and visual communication. Students are introduced to strategies of visual communication through type and will explore the expressive potential of 122

typography in a variety of exercises dealing with the evolution of typography. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GRDE

GRDE 153 Image Manipulation

This course focuses on the skills required by the graphic designer to utilize industry-standard desktop publishing software and hardware to create digital photomontages and special effects. In addition students will learn to apply knowledge, practical skills and image adjustment techniques to develop captivating advertising for print. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GRDE 122 and GRDE 124 GRDE 182 Vector Graphics

This course focuses on developing the advanced vector art skills and techniques needed to create graphic design are essential in visual identity and advertising. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GRDE 122 and GRDE 124 GRDE 215 Digital Photography

pieces. Students are introduced to the crisp accuracy in the placement and proportion of lines and letters which

This course covers the photography terms and concepts essential for gaining an appreciation of the foundations of photography. Students will learn how to edit photos in post-production and create surreal images using 19th 20th and 21st century photography masters. industry-standard software. They will also examine the advancements in photography made by many of the 3 credits/ Prerequisites: GRDE 122, GRDE 124 and GRDE 153 GRDE 230 Typography II: Logos and Creating Identities

Students will explore the philosophy and process behind the design of a logo with particular emphasis on typography and fonts. They will learn the importance of creating identities and the different stages of a typical on type through form, rhythm, orientation, color and texture. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GRDE 130 GRDE 234 Publication Design logo design project. In addition, they will be introduced to strategies of visual communication through focusing

In this course, students will focus on the production of print-ready files using industry-standard desktop publishing software. They will learn the process of delivering images as well as how to produce print-ready electronic files. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GRDE 153 and GRDE 182

70

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
GRDE 244 3D Design: Rendering and Storyboarding

Students will cover the basics of designing and producing 3-D computer animation. They will learn how to develop storyboards with an emphasis on clarity of storyline, camera moves, and rendering techniques. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GRDE 153 and GRDE 182 GRDE 245 Art History

Students will gain an appreciation and understanding of the impact and relevance of the artists in various art Prerequisite: GRDE 123

movements in the Western Art World. They will also look at local and regional art and artists. 3 Credits/

GRDE 253 Introduction to Motion Graphics

In this course, students will cover basic skills in motion graphics - color, form, typography, design and movement of design elements. They will also utilize industry-standard desktop publishing and design programmes to create compositions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GRDE 153 GRDE 255 Graphic Design Practicum

This course provides students with an opportunity to further develop their design skills through an internship/practicum programme. They will be required to develop portfolios (physical and electronic) and will learn ment in companies after graduation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GRDE 130, GRDE 234 and GRDE244 HIST 210 History of Trinidad and Tobago strategies for managing workflow, client relationships and creative teams which will prepare them for employ-

The course examines the history of Trinidad and Tobago during the period 1797 to 1990. It focuses on key

events in the historical narrative and on social rather than political or economic history. Students will gain an None

appreciation of the power relations among the various social and ethnic groups. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

JOUR 123 Fundamentals of Reporting

Students will learn the techniques of newsgathering; the standard rules of news and feature writing; elements of

news judgment; and the guidelines used for effective interviewing. They will become proficient in the “inverted such as those used by the New York Times and other media houses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None JOUR 131 Ethics in Journalism and Public Relations

pyramid” style of news reporting and gain an understanding of the importance of using in-house style guides,

This course focuses on ethical issues in public relations and in journalism and challenges students to have a Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ). 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None JOUR 135 Photo Journalism

view on these issues. The ethical codes of local public relations associations are examined as well as that of the

This course provides an introduction to photography techniques for newspaper and print media production. In addition, students will learn basic composition and layout techniques and how to utilize theoretical and Prerequisite: None practical approaches. Evaluation will include the assessment of student portfolios and field projects. 3 Credits/

JOUR 139 Introduction to Strategic Public Relations

Students are exposed to the concepts of public relations planning and the use of integrated communication strategies to promote the image of organizations and to various publics and target audiences. Prerequisite: None 3 Credits/

71

JOUR 221 Image, Etiquette and Protocol

This course is designed to improve the student’s personal image and to facilitate an understanding of the potential impact of appropriate etiquette and protocol in business and social settings. Students will examine a variety of topics such as greetings, introductions, correct forms of address, personal aesthetics and image management, effective verbal and non-verbal communication and the impact of cultural practice on perception. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

JOUR 244 Media/Public Relations Internship

In this course, students are assigned to an on-the-job training programme for a minimum of 120 working hours.

The internship is intended to provide students with work experience in a press, radio or television environment and year 2 courses.

or in a major PR department. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least 75% of year 1

JOUR 275 Critical Analysis of Media and TV coverage

In this course, students will gain an understanding of the role of the media in society and the extent to, and ways in which the media influences and shapes societies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None JOUR 281 Broadcast News Writing

This course is designed to expose students to the practical requirements of broadcast journalism and involves actual news writing. At the end of the course, students will be able to function in the very demanding world of broadcast journalism with its tight deadlines and constantly changing requirements of listeners. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: JOUR 123

JOUR 290 Introduction to Video Production

The course seeks to provide an environment where students engage with the technology that currently exists and operates in modern newsrooms. Students will be exposed to voice recording techniques and equipment for and manage a production team. 3 credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-requisite: JOUR 281 JOUR 340 Mass Media in the Global Context (Formerly JOUR 279) both television and radio; video and audio editing software; and shall be taught how to effectively work within

This course introduces students to the major trends and issues affecting media industries and their clients world-wide. Students will examine how media scholars discuss the role of the media in the construction and deconstruction of national identities. In addition, they will examine the development of the media throughout various regions and assess the extent to which colonialism has shaped the media in these regions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: JOUR 275

JOUR 351 Applied Public Relations Planning

This course is a follow up to JOUR 139. Students will learn how to apply the concepts introduced in the previous course to real life situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: JOUR 139 JOUR 353 Investigative Reporting

This course is designed to enhance students’ skills in information gathering, news and feature writing. Story Students will be able to focus on areas of interest. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: JOUR 123 JOUR 455 Media/Public Relations Practicum

development, news judgment, computer assisted reporting, interviewing skills and ethics will also be addressed.

Students will be required to spend a minimum of 120 hours in a press, radio, television or public relations

72

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 environment, under the supervision of experienced professionals approved by the Department. An additional Credits/ Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least 75% of the degree courses. JOUR 460 Newspaper and Magazine Editing

fifteen (15) hours will be devoted to guidance, reflection, critical analysis, and oral and written feedback. 4

This course is intended for those students who plan to pursue a career in newspapers and magazines, not so much as reporters but as editors, and it is designed to equip them with the essential skills required for desk work processes that generate high-quality news products. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: JOUR 123 LAST 120 Introduction to Latin American Studies in print newsrooms. Students will learn the rudiments of the editing process and be exposed to the production

Students will examine the major themes and issues in Latin America’s development into the 21st century. The of the region’s development from Pre-Columbian times to the present. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAST 121 International Relations and Latin America

course also provides a basic framework for understanding the dynamics of Latin America today through analysis

This course is designed to provide the student with a framework for understanding international relations within the Latin American context. Students will be introduced to the major ideas in Latin America’s development as a region and as individual actors in the global arena. In addition, the course looks at predominant issues, both 20th century and into the new millennium. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAST 225 Doing Business in Latin America

internal and external (regional and international), that have shaped Latin American foreign policy during the

The course will enable the student to better understand the concepts and reality of the conduct of business in the region. In conjunction with the other core courses on Latin America, the student will acquire general and LAST 121 specific knowledge to function effectively in any business sphere. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LAST 120 and

MATH 091 Pre Algebra

Students who have never been exposed to arithmetic or have been away from the subject for quite some time

will benefit from this course. In this course students will improve and review mathematical skills and concepts continued studies and success in college mathematics and other areas. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MATH 092 Basic Algebra

as well as gain an appreciation for operations on numbers. They will acquire the mathematical foundation for

Students who have never been exposed to algebra or have been away from the subject for quite some time will benefit from this course. In this course students improve and review basic algebraic skills and concepts. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 091 MATH 093 Intermediate Algebra

In this course, students will build on and acquire the reasoning skills and mathematical tools necessary to be

successful in college-level mathematics courses. While developing mathematical skills, students will focus on connections to life experiences. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 092 MATH 103 Introduction to Biostatistics

in-depth understanding of concepts that will enable them to apply mathematical skills and make meaningful

This course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of statistics which would be required by those

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working in the medical records and medical transcriptionist fields. It will provide the students with the ability to summarize and analyze data and information. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC Mathematics or equivalent MATH 106 Laboratory Mathematics

This course will provide the necessary background for simple mathematical operations which the medical

laboratory technician must undertake while on the job. That is, the preparation of samples and reagents, the diluting of specimens, recording and storage of data, calculations of results and quality control. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC Mathematics or equivalent MATH 108 Dosage Mathematics

This course provides students with the mathematical skills required to be effective in the health science

professions requiring competence in dosage calculations. Students will review number systems, fractions, decimals, approximation, percentages, basic algebra, ratio, proportion, subject of the formula and indices. Students will also be exposed to the use of mathematics in everyday life. Mathematics or equivalent MATH 111 Geometry 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC

This course will explore geometric topics in an organized, logical fashion, with an emphasis on proof. The

course covers topics in Euclidean geometry and will include: inductive and deductive reasoning, points, lines, planes, angles, 2 and 3 dimensional geometric figures, triangle relationships, congruency and similarity, right CXC Mathematics or equivalent MATH 114 Trigonometry angle trigonometry, straight edge and compass constructions and analytic geometry. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

This course will focus on the power and versatility of trigonometric functions derived from the fact that their domains can be viewed as either angles or real numbers. any situation that exhibits periodic behaviour. They will understand the relationship between trigonometry and complex numbers and use this relationship to model various situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC Mathematics or equivalent The student will use these functions to model

MATH 116 Contemporary College Mathematics

This is an introductory course to modern applied mathematics. It is not intended as a numeracy course, or for the remediation of algebraic shortcomings: computational complexity is minimal, and mathematics prerequisites are absent. Instead, the methodology of mathematics is addressed: the use of unambiguous language and

simplification to model practical problems, the types of answers the discipline can provide, and the notions of generalization and “open” problems. The course will allow students to develop a sense of the nature of mathematics as a discipline, and an appreciation of its role in the modern world. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC Mathematics or equivalent

MATH 117 College Algebra

This course will provide the student with a firm foundation on which they can advance through higher college-level math courses. The topics include linear equations, inequalities, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, variables. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC Mathematics or equivalent MATH 118 Pre-Calculus exponents and radicals, equations of straight lines, graphing, functions and systems of linear equations in two

This course will provide the student with the opportunity to gain a higher level of mathematical sophistication

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 using a problem analysis approach to questions. The student will focus on functions and graphing and the integration of mathematical modeling, along with the use of technology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 117 MATH 119 Finite Mathematics

This course will introduce students to the practical applications of mathematics in the fields of business, economics, through substantial practice with modeling and solution of real-world problems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC Mathematics or equivalent

life sciences and social sciences. This course will strengthen the students’ mathematical knowledge and skills

MATH 121 Mathematical Methods I

This is the first course of a three part series that provides students with a strong and broad foundation upon which the subsequent courses of the series can be based. The population of students most likely to select this subject will be those who expect to go on to study subjects which have significant mathematical content, Mathematics or equivalent

for example, physics, chemistry and various engineering degree programmes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC

MATH 122 Mathematical Methods II

This is the second course of a three part series that provides students with a strong and broad foundation upon

which the subsequent course of the series can be based. The population of students most likely to select this example, physics, chemistry and various engineering degree programmes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 121

subject will be those who expect to go on to study subjects which have significant mathematical content, for

MATH 123 Mathematical Methods III

Mathematics Methods III is the last installment of a three part series. This course continues to introduce elementary

mathematical ideas useful in the study of Engineering, placing particular emphasis on algebraic structure and and an introduction to Laplace transforms. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 122 MATH 126 Introduction to Financial Mathematics transactions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 118 MATH 143 Discrete Mathematics

methods. It covers further techniques and applications of integration, reduction formulas, differential equations

This course provides a basic understanding of the mathematical functions and applications of financial

This course provides the student with an understanding of the specific language and vocabulary needed for

communication and proof in mathematics. The course explores logic, quantified logic statements and basis of proofs, fundamentals of number theory and methods of proof, sequences and mathematical induction, set MATH 118 theory, probability, functions and relations, recursion, and graph and trees theory. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MATH 145 Business Calculus

This course will give business students the mathematical foundation to handle the level of mathematical Finance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 119 MATH 150 Linear Algebra I

complexity within Managerial Economics along with the ability to do post-graduate studies in Business and

This course forms the basis for understanding general and specific applications of linear and vector functions in

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mathematical modeling. It explores linear equations, matrix operations, the inverse of a matrix, the transpose, dimension and rank. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 118 MATH 151 Linear Algebra II

partitioned matrices, matrix factorizations, LU factorizations, subspaces of Rn, column space, null space,

This course delves deeper into the mathematical applications of linear and vector functions in mathematical modeling. It highlights the use of vector spaces and their applications to real world modeling. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 150 MATH 160 Calculus I

This course is the first in a sequence of four calculus courses in the associate degree. It forms the foundation on which further study of differentials and integrals will be based. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 118 MATH 161 Calculus II

This course continues to build a solid foundation for the continued study of differentials and integrals and their use in modeling real world situations. It explores numerical integration, applications of the integral, exponential Prerequisite: MATH 160 and logarithmic functions, the calculus of transcendental functions and techniques of integration. 3 Credits/

MATH 257 Differential Equations I

This course combines all the structures and basic knowledge gained in calculus courses to develop equations

that model and predict real-world situations given specific conditions. It explores definitions, elimination of homogeneous coefficients, exact equations, the linear equation of order one, the general solution of a linear of order one. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 161. MATH 258 Differential Equations II

arbitrary constants, equations of order one, separation of variables, homogeneous functions, equations with equation, Bernoulli’s equation, the Riccatti equation, elementary applications, and additional topics on equations

This course builds on the structures developed in MATH 257. It explores linear differential equations, linear equations with constant coefficients, non-homogeneous equations: undetermined coefficients, variation of 257 parameters, reduction of order, the Laplace transform, inverse transforms. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH

MATH 260 Calculus III

This course explores the fundamental structures and techniques for solving different types of modeling equations constructed, using single variable differential and integral functions. It explores polar coordinates and plane coordinates. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 161 MATH 261 Calculus IV curves, conic sections, infinite series (in depth), vectors, curves and surfaces in space, cylindrical and spherical

In this course, students will explore the fundamental structures and techniques for solving different types

of modeling equations constructed using multi-variable differential and integral functions. The course covers multivariate calculus, derivatives of multivariable functions, multiple integrals (double and triple), the calculus of vectors-line, and surface integrals. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 260 MATH 340 Abstract Algebra I

This course prepares students for more advanced mathematical work, giving them the foundation principles for

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 the solution of multi-dimensional modeling equations. It explores groups, sub-groups, Lagrange’s theorem, homomorphisms and normal subgroups, factor groups, the homomorphism theorems, Cauchy’s theorem; Direct products, finite Abelian groups, conjugancy and Sylow’s theorems, symmetric group, cycle decomposition, odd and even permutations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 143 MATH 341 Abstract Algebra II

This course continues the study of the principles for the solution of more advanced multi-dimensional modeling equations. It explores rings, ideals, ring homomorphism, quotient rings, maximum ideals, polynomial rings, and constructability, and roots of polynomials. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 340 MATH 350 Numerical Analysis polynomials over rationals, field of quotients of an integral domain, fields, vector spaces, finite field extensions,

This course provides the mathematical background which justifies the numerical techniques used to solve equations, ordinary differential equations which cannot be solved by analytical methods. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MATH261 and MATH258

MATH 360 Partial Differential Equations

This course explores various means by which some real-world situations can be modeled and solved. It explores classification of partial differential equations, separation of variables, orthogonal functions, applications, Laplace transform methods and numerical solution. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MATH261 and MATH258 MATH 450 Complex Variable Theory I

Fourier series, derivation of equations, heat equation and Laplace equation, solution of the wave equation,

This course introduces the concepts, operations and structures of complex numbers which will form the basis for more advanced work with differential equations. It is an introduction to complex analysis, functions, limits and continuity, complex differentiation and the Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration and Cauchy’s theorem, Cauchy’s Integral formulas and related theorems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH261 MATH 451 Complex Variable Theory II

This course continues to build on the concepts, operations and structures of complex numbers. It explores Fourier

series, derivation of equations, heat equation and Laplace equation, solution of the wave equation, classification of partial differential equations, separation of variables, orthogonal functions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 450

MATH 460 Real Analysis I

This course develops the rigorous tools for working with analysis. It explores sets, families and product of sets, algebraic concepts, the real number system, the integers and rational numbers, the completeness axiom, completeness. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MATH 261 and MATH 341 MATH 461 Real Analysis II inequalities, metric spaces, open sets, cluster points and closed sets, continuous functions, compactness and

This course builds on MATH 460 and the structures underlying more advanced mathematical concepts. This course explores real sequences, continuous real functions on a metric space, continuous real functions on a compact metric space and uniform convergence, differential calculus, Rolle’s theorem and the first mean-value theorem, sequences of function, the Riemann integral, the fundamental theorem, integration by substitution and integration of sequences and extensions of the Riemann integral. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 460

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MUSC 003 Introduction to Music Theory

In this course, students will understand the most basic principles of music theory. Areas covered in this course 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

include: the notes on the keyboard (chromatic), major scales, intervals, triads, time signatures and key signatures.

MUSC 004 Introduction to Aural Skills

In this course students will explore sight reading and ear training. They will develop audiation skills as well as basic dictation and notation skills. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MUSC 155 Music Theory I

This course reviews the rudiments of music theory and introduces the student to different types of scales,

modes, complex intervals and time signatures, transposition and Italian terms, signs and abbreviations. Students examination, have successfully completed the COSTAATT Pre-College course MUSC 003, or possess prior

wishing to pursue this course must have proven prior knowledge of music theory as determined by a challenge certification in a theory examination at the Grade 3 level or higher, from a recognized institution. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 003 or success at a challenge examination or prior certification/ Co-requisite: MUSC 157

MUSC 156 Music Theory II

This is an intermediate theory course which builds on topics covered in MUSC 155. It focuses on all classical

scale forms, simple arrangements, four-part harmonic writing and other aspects of intermediate music theory.

Students wishing to pursue this course must have a Grade C or higher in MUSC 155, or possess prior certification prior certification (Grade 3)/ Co-requisite: MUSC 158 MUSC 157 Aural Skills I

at the Grade 5 level or higher from a recognized institution. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 155 (Grade C) or

This is a practical course which is designed to be taken in conjunction with MUSC 155. Students will acquire

sight-reading skills which will include time-signatures, notation, pitch and rhythmic patterns. The course will also focus on the development of ear-training skills which will include scale identification, harmonic and melodic None/ Co-requisite: MUSC 155 MUSC 158 Aural Skills II intervals, chords and cadences, sol-fa notation and the dictation of simple melodies. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite:

In this course, students will develop advanced skills in sight-reading and ear-training and will be required to MUSC 156

notate more complex melodic and rhythmic combinations. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 157/ Co -Requisite:

MUSC 185 History of Music in Western Europe I

In this course, students examine the history of Western music from the Middle Ages to the Baroque era. The

course covers the musical genres, lifestyles and careers of prominent composers and musicians as well as musical styles and compositional techniques. It also examines philosophical, cultural and technological changes in art and music and explores and makes connections between music of the past and present. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: COSTAATT English Placement Test (60%) or WRIT 097 and READ 098 MUSC 205 Basic Conducting

This course introduces students to basic conducting patterns in duple, triple and quadruple time. Students will also learn good conducting posture, entry and cut-off. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
MUSC 290 Music Theory III

In this music theory course, emphasis is placed on advanced four-part harmonic writing, secondary function chords, modulation, musical form and other aspects of advanced music theory. Students wishing to pursue this course must have a Grade C or higher in MUSC 156 or a prior certification at the Grade 7 level or higher, from a recognized institution. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 156 (Grade C) or prior certification (Grade 7) MUSC 294 History of Music in Western Europe II

In this course, which builds on MUSC 294, students will examine Western Art Music from the Baroque era to the present. The course also examines the effects of outside influences on the course of music history. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 185

MUSC 303 Movement and Acting

This course teaches students stage positions and also includes singing, acting and dance components. Students wishing to pursue MUSV 403 must first complete this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MUSC 312 Introduction to Music Therapy

This course introduces students to the principles and most common practices of music therapy and will expose students to current research in the area. In addition, students are required to consider the effects of outside influences on the course of music history. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: COMM 117 MUSC 315 Computers and Music

This course outlines the history of computers and Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI). Students are introduced to computer applications used in the music industry and MIDI, computer-assisted music writing,sequencing, sampling to pursue this course must be computer literate MUSC 329 Survey of the Music Industry and various types of electronic music production are also explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Students wishing

This course examines the recording industry, copyright law, contracts, promotions, song writing, music publishing and alternative career options. In addition, students will explore the differences among the various types of music businesses and the implications of each. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MUSC 405 Intermediate Conducting

This course reinforces knowledge gained in MUSC 205 and introduces students to more complex rhythms such as compound duple and compound triple time signatures as well as to asymmetrical rhythms such as 5 and 7. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSC 205

MUSC 408 World Music and Caribbean Aesthetics

This course introduces students to various music cultures and the instruments that are indigenous to those cultures. The Caribbean aesthetic provides students with an opportunity to examine different aspects Caribbean music culture and the various influences that define its uniqueness -particularly the syncopated rhythms. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

MUSC 409 Poetry and Lyrics in Music

In this course, students examine the use of poetry in the lyrical composition of music. Emphasis is placed on local music. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENGL 200

7

MUSC 410 History of Calypso

This course provides an overview of the history of calypso, highlighting some of the factors (social, economic Prerequisite: COMM 117

and political) that have influenced the many manifestations this indigenous art form has undergone. 3 Credits/

MUSC 411 Jazz History

This course covers the origins and innovators of Jazz, its development (blues, bebop, ballad and swing) and the most popular contributors (Count Basie, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald and B.B. King). 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: COMM 117

MUSC 412 The Art of Transcription

This course teaches students the importance of accurate spacing in the bar/measure; the correct grouping of notes within the bar/measure; proper stemming method and precise placement of rests. In addition, it builds on and the older practice of artistic transcription by hand. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 315 MUSC 413 Musical Theatre History the skills acquired in MUSC 315 and provides students with the skills to transcribe, using computer technology

Students examine the origins of the musical theatre – Broadway and also look at innovators, popular composers, arrangers, lyricists and performers in this area. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: COMM 117 MUSC 414 Calypso Arranging

In this course, students learn the fundamentals of arranging specifically for calypso. Emphasis is placed on the rules of tonal voice leading principles and jazz theory. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 490. MUSC 490 Music Theory IV

This course is built on the skills acquired in MUSC 290. Students are exposed to composition, transcription discretion of the lecturer. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 290 or lecturer approval. MUSC 495 Big Band Arranging (Formerly MUSC 415)

and orchestration. Students who have not completed MUSC 290 may be allowed to pursue this course at the

In this course, students learn the art of writing music for a larger orchestra that consists of a heavier brass section than the calypso orchestra. Focus is placed on a repertoire that consists mostly of jazz standards. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 490

MUSC 499 Senior Project - Music

This is a research course which requires students to submit a research paper on an approved topic. The Prerequisite: MUSE 311

course is supervised by an assigned lecturer and is a requirement for the music education major. 3 Credits/

MUSD 121 Secondary Applied Instrument I: Percussion

This course is intended for students who are unable to perform at the required level of proficiency for Primary Applied Instrument study. These students will be required to complete four levels of the Secondary Applied enable them to pursue course at the primary level. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None MUSD 122 Secondary Applied Instrument II: Percussion Instrument course and will not advance to primary level until they have developed the required proficiency to

This is Level II of the Secondary Applied Instrument course. It builds on the skills and techniques introduced in

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
MUSD 121. Students must complete two additional levels before advancing to the Primary Applied Instrument courses. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSD 121

MUSD 123 Secondary Applied Instrument III: Percussion

Level III of this four-level course, builds on the skills and techniques acquired in MUSD 122. Students must complete MUSD 124 before they can advance to the Primary Applied Instrument courses. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSD 122

MUSD 124 Secondary Applied Instrument IV: Percussion

This is the final Level of a four-level course. On successful completion of all four levels, students will advance to the Primary Applied Instrument courses. Students are expected to obtain the necessary skills to advance to the Primary Applied Instrument courses. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSD 123 MUSD 131 Primary Applied Instrument I: Percussion

Level I of a four-level course, this course will help students develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and ear-training skills. All students are required to begin at level one and complete the four levels of the percussion specialization study. Foundation work will be done at this level to ensure that (Grade III or higher), MUSD 124 (90%) or departmental audition. MUSD 132 Primary Applied Instrument II - Percussion

students are technically fit to advance to the next higher level. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Prior certification

Level II of a four-level course, this course requires that students further develop technique and build repertoire technically competent to advance to Level III. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSD 131 MUSD 253 Primary Applied Instrument III - Percussion

while reinforcing sight-reading and ear-training skills. The work done at this level will ensure that students are

This course is the third level of the four-level Primary Applied Instrument sequence. It builds on the technique and skills acquired in MUSD 132. On successful completion of this course, students will advance to Level IV. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSD 132

MUSD 254 Primary Applied Instrument IV - Percussion

In this course students will further develop technique and skills acquired at Level III. On successful completion of this course, students will perform in a junior recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSD 253 MUSE 311 Music Education I

This course covers the theory and practice of music education and includes lesson planning and class room management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 156

MUSE 325 Recital Attendance – Music Education

In this course, all performance and music education majors are required to attend 12 recitals in order to complete the recital attendance component. No credits will be awarded. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: None MUSE 411 Music Education II

This course deals with the practical aspect of music education. Students will be required to complete 120 hours of supervised practice in the music department of selected secondary schools. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 311

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MUSG 121 Secondary Applied Instrument I – Guitar

This course is intended for students who are unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study. These students will be required to complete four levels of the Secondary Applied enable them to pursue course at the primary level. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None MUSG 122 Secondary Applied Instrument II – Guitar Instrument course and will not advance to primary level until they have developed the required proficiency to

This is Level II of 4 levels of the Secondary Applied Instrument courses. Students must complete this course in

order to advance to the next higher level and must complete three additional levels before advancing to the PriMUSG 121

mary Applied Instrument courses. This course builds on skills acquired in MUSG 121. 1 Credit/ Pre-requisite:

MUSG 123 Secondary Applied Instrument III - Guitar

This course builds on the skills and techniques acquired at Level II. Students must complete this course in order Instrument courses. This course builds on skills acquired in MUSG 122. 1 Credit/ Pre-requisite: MUSG 122. MUSG 124 Secondary Applied Instrument IV - Guitar

to advance to the next higher level and must complete MUSG 124 before advancing to the Primary Applied

This is the final level of the Secondary Applied Instrument courses. On completion of this course, students will advance to the Primary Applied Instrument courses. 1 Credit/ Pre-requisite: MUSG 123 MUSG 131 Primary Applied Instrument I - Guitar

Level I of a six-level course, this course will help students develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing technically fit to advance to the next higher level.

sight-reading and ear-training skills. Foundation work will be done at this level to ensure that students are higher) or MUSG 124 (90%) or departmental audition. MUSG 132 Primary Applied Instrument II - Guitar

3 Credits/Prerequisite: Prior certification (Grade III or

Level II of a six-level course, this course requires that students further develop technique and build repertoire technically competent to advance to Level III. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSG 131 MUSG 151 Major Performing Ensemble I – Guitar

while reinforcing sight-reading and ear-training skills. The work done at this level will ensure that students are

This is a performance oriented class intended to enhance aural skills, ensemble awareness musical sensitivity and overall performance. Students will be required to sight-read pieces, prepare sections of the score for class rehearsals and perform pieces for ensemble credits. This course builds on the competencies developed at

primary applied instrument classes. Piano majors are required to participate in any of the other ensembles as there is no piano ensemble. All pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSG 254

MUSG 152 Major Performing Ensemble II - Guitar

In this course, students will build on the skills acquired at the first level. Students will be required to further

develop tone, technique and stamina thus performing at a higher level of proficiency. It will reinforce the competency acquired at primary applied instrument classes. All pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSG 254

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
MUSG 253 Primary Applied Instrument III – Guitar

Students will build on knowledge acquired and skills developed from the previous level of this course. More difficult pieces will be assigned as well as a more strenuous warm-up routine as emphasis is placed on the recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSG 132 development of stamina to sustain good performance practice and cater to the performance of the required

MUSG 254 Primary Applied Instrument IV – Guitar

This is the Level IV of the six-level Primary Applied Instrument course. Students will be expected to build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous levels of this course. Repertoire with a greater level of difficulty will be assigned. Following the final jury (examination, successful students will be required to perform 253

and pass a recital hearing in order to perform the junior recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MUSG 152 and MUSG

MUSG 263 Major Performing Ensemble III - Guitar

This course will assist students to acquire more tonal consistency, healthier performance practice, greater understanding of form in music, and exhibit more awareness of the characteristics and performance practice Credit/ Prerequisites: MUSG 152 and MUSG 254 specific to various eras in music. All pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1

MUSG 264 Major Performing Ensemble IV – Guitar

This course builds on MUSC 263 and the competencies developed at primary applied instrument classes. All MUSG 263

pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisites: MUSG 254 and

MUSG 304 Guitar Literature

In this course, students examine the history of the stringed instruments from as early as the Baroque era. Focus is also placed on instruments that preceded the guitar, such as the lute and vihuela. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

MUSG 305 Guitar Pedagogy

This course focuses on the art of teaching the guitar and examines different approaches to teaching and utilizing the instrument for solo performances and accompaniment. In addition, students will also focus on suitable Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSG 253 repertoire, approaches to sight reading and the correct technique to be employed in playing the instrument. 2

MUSG 313 Guitar Accompaniment

This course is designed specifically for music education majors and teaches the art of accompaniment on

the guitar. It also focuses on musical and accompaniment sensitivity. Students wishing to pursue this course completed the pre-college course MUSC 003. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSG 253 MUSG 320 Junior Recital – Guitar

should have prior certification at the Grade I or higher level from a recognized institution or have successfully

In this course, performance majors are required to perform a minimum of 30 minutes of repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer and with the permission of both the lecturer and Department Chair. A pass/fail grade will be assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSG 352

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MUSG 351 Primary Applied Instrument V - Guitar

The technique and skills acquired at the four previous levels will be further developed. On completion of this course, students will advance to the sixth and final level of the Primary Applied Instrument courses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSG 254

MUSG 352 Primary Applied Instrument VI – Guitar

In this course, students build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous level and will be assigned pieces of a greater level of difficulty. Following the final jury (examination) students will be required to perform the senior recital within one year of completing the level VI requirements. Failure to do so will result in the 351

student having to repeat level VI primary study as well as the hearing and recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSG

MUSG 435 Recital Attendance – Guitar

This course is for all performance and education majors who are required to attend 12 recitals in order to complete the recital attendance component. No credits will be awarded. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSG 320 MUSG 455 Senior Recital - Guitar

This course is intended for all performance majors. Students are required to perform a minimum of 45 minutes of repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer with the permission of both the lecturer and Department Chair. A pass/fail grade is assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSG 435 MUSG 485 Major Performing Ensemble V - Guitar

In this performance oriented class, students will enhance aural skills, ensemble awareness, musical sensitivity

and overall performance. At this level the focus is on building the whole musician as opposed to developing one and effective phrasing. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSG 264 MUSG 486 Major Performing Ensemble VI - Guitar

skill at a time. Students will concentrate more on tonal consistency, musical variation of tone, accuracy of rhythm

This course reinforces skills and techniques learnt in MUSG 485. At this advanced level students will demonstrate expressiveness and intermediate to advanced sight-reading skill while having developed increased stamina for lengthy performances. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSG 485 MUSI 304 Instrumental Literature

advanced technical proficiency on the instrument, healthy performance practice, musical sensitivity, musical

This course examines the history of the various woodwind and brass instruments such as the trumpet, French horn, flute and saxophone. Repertoire developed specifically for these instruments will also be introduced. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 131 MUSI 305 Instrumental Pedagogy

This course examines the art of teaching the instrument and will focus on different approaches to teaching,

utilizing the instrument for solo performance and using the instrument for accompaniment. Students will also the instrument. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSI 304 MUSJ 151 Major Performing Ensemble I - Jazz

learn suitable repertoire, approaches to sight-reading and the correct technique to be employed when playing

This course is the first level of a six-level course and the focus is on foundational work in order to ensure that students are technically fit to advance to the next level. It requires that students develop technique and build

84

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and ear-training skills. Students who wish to pursue this course Credit/ Prerequisite: Success at an audition

must pass a departmental audition. All pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1

MUSJ 152 Major Performing Ensemble II - Jazz

This is Level II of a six-level course and it builds on the skills and techniques acquired at the previous level.

It also builds on the competency acquired at primary applied instrument classes. Students will be expected to requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSJ 151 MUSJ 263 Major Performing Ensemble III – Jazz

further develop tone, technique and stamina thus performing at a higher level of proficiency. All pre-requisite

Building on skills acquired at the previous levels, students will now acquire more tonal consistency, healthier performance practice and an understanding of form in music. They will also exhibit a greater awareness of the the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSJ 152 MUSJ 264 Major Performing Ensemble IV – Jazz characteristics and performance practices specific to various eras in music. All pre-requisite requirements for

In this performance oriented class students will build on skills acquired at the previous levels. They will be

required to sight-read pieces, prepare sections of the score for class rehearsals and perform pieces for ensemble credits. This course builds on the competencies developed at primary applied instrument classes. All prerequisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSJ 263 MUSJ 485 Major Performing Ensemble V – Jazz

This course builds on the skills acquired at the previous level and also reinforces the competencies developed

in the primary applied instrument classes. At this level, the focus is on building the whole musician as opposed

to developing one skill at a time. Students will also concentrate on tonal consistency, musical variation of tone, accuracy of rhythm and effective phrasing. All pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSJ 352

MUSJ 486 Major Performing Ensemble VI – Jazz

This is the final level of the jazz performing ensemble courses and it builds on the skills acquired at the previous

levels. At this advanced level, students will demonstrate advanced technical proficiency on the instrument, healthy performance practice, musical sensitivity, musical expressiveness and intermediate to advanced sight MUSJ 485 reading skills. They will also have developed increased stamina for lengthy performances. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite:

MUSP 121 Secondary Applied Instrument I – Piano

This course is intended for students who are unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study. These students will be required to complete four levels of the Secondary Applied enable them to pursue courses at the primary level. It is expected that individuals will not require more than 4 (four) levels of secondary study. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None MUSP 122 Secondary Applied Instrument II – Piano Instrument course and will not advance to primary level until they have developed the required proficiency to

This is Level II of 4 levels of the Secondary Applied Instrument courses. Students must complete this course in order to advance to the next higher level and must complete two additional levels before, advancing to the primary courses. This course builds on skills acquired in MUSJ 121. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSP 121

85

MUSP 123 Secondary Applied Instrument III - Piano

This course builds on the skills and techniques acquired at Level II. Students must complete this course in order course builds on skills acquired in MUSP 122. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSP 122 MUSP 124 Secondary Applied Instrument IV - Piano

to advance to the next higher level and must complete MUSP 124 before, advancing to the primary courses. This

This is the final level for students who were unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study. On successful completion of this course, students will advance to primary level. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSP 123

MUSP 131 Primary Applied Instrument I - Piano

In this course, students develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and ear-training skills. Students are required to complete four levels in order to fulfill the requirements of the piano specialization level. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Prior certification or success at an audition or MUSP 124 (90%). MUSP 132 Primary Applied Instrument II – Piano study. The foundation work done at this level will ensure that students are technically fit to advance to the next

In this course, students are expected to build on knowledge obtained from the previous level of study. Additional scale patterns and exercises will be added to routine practice/warm-up regimen in order to support technically competent to advance to Level III. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSP 131 MUSP 200 Class Piano I the application of technique to the repertoire selected. The work done at this level will ensure that students are

This course introduces students to the most basic scales in music as well as right and left hand technique and (Grade I)/ Co-Requisite: MUSC 155 MUSP 201 Class Piano II

finger placement. A simple repertoire is assigned. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSC 003 or prior certification

This course builds on the techniques acquired at the previous level in MUSC 200. The student is introduced to assigned. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSC 200

more challenging scales and learns the fundamentals of right and left hand coordination. Simple repertoire is

MUSP 253 Primary Applied Instrument III – Piano

Students are expected to build on the knowledge acquired and skills developed from the previous level of this course. They will be assigned more difficult pieces and will engage in more strenuous warm up routines. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSP 132

MUSP 254 Primary Applied Instrument IV - Piano

Students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous level of this course

and are assigned a repertoire of a greater level of difficulty. Following the final jury (examination), students will be required to perform and pass a recital hearing in order to perform the junior recital. Students who fail the recital hearing will not be allowed to perform the recital and the recital must be completed within one year of completing the level four requirements. The recital must consist of a minimum of 30 minutes of music performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSP 253 MUSP 304 Piano Literature

This course examines the history of the musical instruments that preceded the piano, such as the harpsichord

86

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 and pipe organ. Students will also learn repertoire developed specifically for these instruments. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSP 131

MUSP 305 Piano Pedagogy

This course examines the art of teaching the piano and focuses on different approaches to teaching and utilizing the instrument for solo performance and accompaniment. Suitable repertoire, approaches to sight reading and None correct technique to be employed when playing the instrument are also covered. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MUSP 320 Junior Recital - Piano

This class is for performance majors who are required to perform a minimum of 30 minutes of repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer and with the permission of the Department Chair. A pass/fail grade will be assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSP 352 MUSP 325 Recital Attendance – Piano

In this course, all performance and education majors are required to attend 12 recitals in order to complete the recital attendance component. No credits will be awarded. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSP 320 MUSP 328 Keyboard Techniques Prerequisite: MUSP 131

This course teaches students various techniques that can be employed when playing the keyboard. 3 Credits/

MUSP 351 Primary Applied Instrument V – Piano

In this course, students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of technical proficiency. On completion of the course they will be required to perform a recital hearing. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSP 254 MUSP 352 Primary Applied Instrument VI – Piano

Students will build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous levels of this course and will be

assigned pieces of a greater level of difficulty. Following the final jury (examination) students will be required to perform the senior recital within one year of completing the level VI requirements. Failure to do so will result in the student having to repeat this course as well as the hearing and recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSP 351 MUSP 405 Jazz Class - Piano

This course teaches different approaches to playing jazz and looks at the ways in which it differs from playing in the classical style. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: MUSP 131 MUSP 455 Senior Recital – Piano

This is a practical course. All performance majors are required to perform a minimum of 45 minutes of repertoire assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSP 320.

under the guidance of an assigned lecturer with the permission of the Department Chair. A pass/fail grade is

MUSS 121 Secondary Applied Instrument I – Pan

Students who are unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study will be placed at Secondary Applied Instrument level where they will be expected to obtain the necessary skills. They will not advance to the primary level until the necessary proficiency is developed to begin study at this level. It is None

expected that individuals will not require more than 4 (four) levels of secondary study. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

87

MUSS 122 Secondary Applied Instrument II – Pan

This is the second level for those students who were unable to perform at the level of proficiency required advancing to the primary level. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 121 MUSS 123 Secondary Applied Instrument III - Pan

for Primary Applied Instrument study. They will be required to complete four levels of secondary study before

This is Level II of 4 levels of the Secondary Applied Instrument courses. Students must complete this course in order to advance to the next higher level and must complete two additional levels before, advancing to the primary courses. This course builds on skills acquired in MUSS 121. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 121 MUSS 124 Secondary Applied Instrument IV - Pan

This is the final level for those students who are unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study. On completion of this course, students will be able to advance to MUSS 131. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 123

MUSS 131 Primary Applied Instrument I – Pan

In this course, students will develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and

ear-training skills. All students are required to begin at level one of the six levels required for completion of the required pan specialization study. Foundation work done at this level will ensure that students are technically fit to advance to the next level. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Prior certification or success at an audition or MUSS 124

MUSS 132 Primary Applied Instrument II – Pan

Students will build on knowledge obtained from the previous level of study. Additional scale patterns and selected. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSS 131

exercises will be added to routine practice/warm-up regimen to support application of technique to repertoire

MUSS 151 Major Performing Ensemble 1 – Pan

This course requires that students develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and ear-training skills. It is the first level of a four-level course and the focus is on foundation work in order to or success at an audition or MUSS 124 ensure that students are technically fit to advance to the next level. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: Prior certification

MUSS 152 Major Performing Ensemble II - Pan

In this course, students will build on skills acquired in MUSS 151. It also reinforces the competency acquired at primary applied instrument classes. All pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 151

MUSS 253 Primary Applied Instrument III - Pan

Students are expected to build on knowledge acquired and skills developed from the previous level of this course and will now be assigned more difficult pieces and will engage in more strenuous warm up routines. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSS 152

MUSS 254 Primary Applied Instrument IV – Pan

Students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous level of this course and

will now be assigned a repertoire of a greater level of difficulty. Following the final jury (examination), students

will be required to perform and pass a recital hearing in order to perform the junior recital. Students who fail

88

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 the recital hearing will not be allowed to perform the recital and the recital must be completed within one year of completing the level four requirements. The recital must consist of a minimum of 30 minutes of music performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSS 253

MUSS 263 Major Performing Ensemble III - Pan

Building on skills acquired at the previous levels, students will now acquire more tonal consistency, healthier performance practice and an understanding of form in music. They will also exhibit a greater awareness of the characteristics and performance practices specific to various eras in music. All pre-requisite requirements for audition or MUSS 152

the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: Prior certification or success at a departmental

MUSS 264 Major Performing Ensemble IV - Pan

In this course, students will build on skills acquired at the previous levels and will now be required to sight-read pieces, prepare sections of the score for class rehearsals and perform pieces for ensemble credits. It also builds ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 263 MUSS 304 Pan Literature on the competencies developed at primary applied instrument classes. All pre-requisite requirements for the

This course examines the history and development of the steel-pan and the repertoire developed specifically for the instrument. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSS 131 MUSS 305 Pan Pedagogy

This course examines the art of teaching the steelpan and focuses on different approaches to teaching and utilizing the instrument for solo performance and accompaniment. Students will also cover suitable repertoire, covered. 2 Credits/Prerequisite: MUSS 131 MUSS 320 Junior Recital – Pan approaches to sight reading and the correct technique to be employed when playing the instrument are also

This course is a requirement for all performance majors who are required to perform a minimum of 30 minutes of repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer and with the permission of the Department Chair. A pass/fail grade will be assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 264 MUSS 351 Primary Applied Instrument V – Pan

In this course, students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of technical proficiency and on completion perform the senior recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSS 254 MUSS 352 Primary Applied Instrument VI - Pan

of the course will be required to perform a recital hearing. The recital hearing is required if students are to

Students will build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous level of this course and will now be assigned pieces of a greater level of difficulty. Following the final jury (examination), students will be required to perform the senior recital within one year of completing the level VI requirements. Failure to do so will result in MUSS 351

the student having to repeat level VI primary study as well as the hearing and recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MUSS 404 Acoustics/Pan Technology

This course introduces students to the process that transforms an oil drum into a steel pan. Students are required to burn, sink, groove and tune the oil drum. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: None

8

MUSS 435 Recital Attendance – Pan

In this course, all performance and education majors are required to attend 12 recitals in order to complete the recital attendance component. No credits will be awarded. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 320 MUSS 455 Senior Recital – Pan

In this course the performance majors are required to perform a minimum of 45 minutes of repertoire under the 0 Credit / Prerequisite: MUSS 320

guidance of an assigned lecturer and with the permission of the Department Chair. A pass/fail grade is assigned.

MUSS 485 Major Performing Ensemble V - Pan

Building on the skills acquired at the previous levels, students will be required to sight-read pieces, prepare

sections of the score for class rehearsals and perform the pieces for ensemble credit. This level of ensemble

focuses on building the whole musician as opposed to developing one skill at a time. Students will focus more on MUSS 264

tonal consistency, musical variation of tone, accuracy of rhythm and effective phrasing. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite:

MUSS 486 Major Performing Ensemble VI – Pan

In this course, students are required to sight read pieces, prepare sections of the score for class rehearsals and

perform the pieces for ensemble credit. At this advanced level, students will demonstrate advanced technical

proficiency on the instrument, healthy performance practice, musical sensitivity, musical expressiveness and performances. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSS 485

intermediate to advanced sight reading skills. They will also have developed increased stamina for lengthy

MUSV 121 Secondary Applied Instrument I – Voice

Students who are unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study will be placed at Secondary Applied Instrument level where they will be expected to obtain the necessary skills. They will not advance to the primary level until they have developed the required proficiency is developed to begin study at this level. It is expected that individuals will not require more than 4 (four) levels of secondary study. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None MUSV 122

This is the second of four levels. Students will be required to complete two additional levels of secondary study before advancing to the primary level. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 121 MUSV 123 Secondary Applied Instrument III - Voice

Secondary Applied Instrument II – Voice

This is third of four levels of the Secondary Applied Instrument courses. Students must complete this course in order to advance to the next higher level and must complete one additional level before advancing to the primary courses. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 122

MUSV 124 Secondary Applied Instrument IV - Voice 131. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSS 123

This is the final level of secondary study. On completion of this course, students will be able to advance to MUSV

MUSV 131 Primary Applied Instrument I – Voice

In this course, students will develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and eartraining skills. All students are required to begin at level one of the six levels required for completion of the required voice specialization study. Foundation work done at this level will ensure that students are technically

0

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 fit to advance to the next level. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Prior certification or success at an audition or MUSV 124

MUSV 132 Primary Applied Instrument II - Voice

Students will build on knowledge obtained from the previous level of study. Additional scale patterns and selected. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSV 131

exercises will be added to routine practice/warm-up regimen to support application of technique to repertoire

MUSV 151 Major Performing Ensemble I - Voice

This course requires that students develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and that students are technically fit to advance to the next level. All the prerequisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: Prior certification or success at an audition or MUSV 124 MUSV 152 Major Performing Ensemble II - Voice

ear-training skills. It is the first level of a six-level course and the focus is on foundation work in order to ensure

In this course, students will build on skills acquired in MUSS 151. It also reinforces the competency acquired at primary applied instrument classes. All pre-requisite requirements for the ensemble of choice must be met. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 151

MUSV 253 Primary Applied Instrument III - Voice

Students are expected to build on the knowledge acquired and skills developed from the previous level of this course. They will be assigned more difficult pieces and will engage in more strenuous warm up routines. 3 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 252

MUSV 254 Primary Applied Instrument IV - Voice

Students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous level of this course and

a repertoire of a greater level of difficulty is now assigned. Following the final jury (examination) students will be required to perform and pass a recital hearing in order to perform the junior recital. Students who fail the recital hearing will not be allowed to perform the recital. The recital must be completed within one year of completing the level four requirements. Failure to do so will result in the student having to repeat level four applied study as of vocal performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSV 253 MUSV 263 Major Performing Ensemble III - Voice

well as the recital hearing and recital performance process. The recital must consist of a minimum of 30 minutes

This course is intended to enhance aural skills, ensemble awareness musical sensitivity and overall performance. Students are required to sight-read pieces, prepare sections of the score for class rehearsals and perform pieces for ensemble credits. Students will build on the skills acquired in MUSV 152 and will also display a greater on competencies acquired at primary applied instrument classes. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 152 MUSV 264 Major Performing Ensemble IV - Voice

awareness of the characteristics and performance practices specific to various eras in music. This course builds

This course builds on the previous levels of this course. Students are required to sight read pieces, prepare competencies developed at primary applied instrument classes. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 263 MUSV 301 Diction for Singers I

sections of the score for class rehearsals and perform pieces for ensemble credits. This course builds on the

In this course, students will study Latin and Italian diction to support the required study of Latin repertoire

1

and 16th, 17th and 18th century Italian Art Songs. They will learn the rules of both these languages and the exceptions to these rules that govern the treatment of vowel and consonant combinations for singing. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

MUSV 302 Diction for Singers II

Students will study French and German diction to support standard classical repertoire and the treatment of vowels and consonants as they pertain to singing. They will learn the open and closed vowel sounds and Prerequisite: MUSV 301 umlauted vowels associated with French and German as well as the pronunciation of consonants. 2 Credits/

MUSV 320 Junior Recital - Voice

All performance majors are required to perform a minimum of 30 minutes of repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer and with the permission of the Department Chair. A pass/fail grade will be assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 264

MUSV 351 Primary Applied Instrument V - Voice

In this course, students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of technical proficiency. On completion of this level, students will be required to perform a recital hearing. The recital hearing is required if students are to perform the senior recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSV 254 MUSV 352 Primary Applied Instrument VI – Voice

In this course students build on the knowledge and skills developed at the previous levels of this course and will be assigned pieces of a greater level of difficulty. Following the final jury (examination) students will be required to perform the senior recital within one year of completing this course. Failure to do so will result in the student having to repeat level VI primary study as well as the hearing and recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSV 351 MUSV 403 Opera Theatre Workshop.

This course combines the elements of drama and singing and builds upon the skills acquired in MUSC 303. Students will be now required to perform a Broadway programme in the first semester and another larger work in the second semester. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSC 303 MUSV 435 Recital Attendance

All performance and education majors are required to attend 12 recitals to complete the recital attendance component. No credits will be awarded. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 320 MUSV 455 Senior Recital – Voice

This is a practical course in which all performance majors are required to perform a minimum of 45 minutes of Chair. A pass/fail grade is assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 435 MUSV 485 Major Performing Ensemble V - Voice

repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer with the permission of both the lecturer and Department

This course builds on previous levels and at this level, the ensemble focuses on building the whole musician as tone, accuracy of rhythm and effective phrasing. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 264 MUSV 486 Major Performing Ensemble VI – Voice

opposed to developing one skill at a time. Students will focus more on tonal consistency, musical variation of

This is the final level of the ensemble courses. In this course, students are now required to sight read pieces,

2

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 prepare sections of the score for class rehearsals and perform the pieces for ensemble credit. At this advanced level, students will now demonstrate advanced technical proficiency on the instrument, healthy performance also have developed increased stamina for lengthy performances. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 485 MUSW 121 Secondary Applied Instrument I – Wind practice, musical sensitivity, musical expressiveness and intermediate to advanced sight reading skills. They will

Students who are unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study

will be placed at Secondary Applied Instrument level where they will be expected to obtain the necessary skills. They will not advance to the primary level until they have developed the required proficiency to begin study at Prerequisite: None this level. It is expected that individuals will not require more than 4 (four) levels of secondary study. 1 Credit/

MUSW 122 Secondary Applied Instrument II – Wind

This is the second of four levels which students who were unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for

Primary Applied Instrument must study. Students will not advance to primary level until the necessary proficiency require more than 4 (four) levels of secondary study. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 121 MUSW 123 Secondary Applied Instrument III - Wind

is developed to undertake the Primary Applied Instrument level of study. It is expected that individuals will not

This is Level III of the four-level course at the secondary applied instrument level for those students who will be required to complete four levels of secondary study before advancing to the primary level. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 122

were unable to perform at the level of proficiency required for Primary Applied Instrument study. Students

MUSW 124 Secondary Applied Instrument IV - Wind 131. 3 Credits/ Pre-requisite: MUSS 123

This is the final level secondary study. On completion of this course, tudents will be able to advance to MUSW

MUSW 131 Primary Applied Instrument I – Woodwind/Brass

This course requires that students develop technique and build repertoire while reinforcing sight-reading and

ear-training skills. All students are required to begin at level one of the six levels required for completion of the

required woodwind/brass specialization study. The foundation work done at this level will ensure that students audition or MUSW 124

are technically fit to advance to the next level. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Prior certification or success at an

MUSW 132 Primary Applied Instrument II – Woodwind/Brass

This course builds on knowledge and skills acquired at the previous level. Additional scale patterns and exercises will be added to routine practice/warm-up regimen to support application of technique to repertoire selected. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 131

MUSW 253 Primary Applied Instrument III – Woodwind/Brass

Students are expected to build on the knowledge acquired and skills developed from the previous level of this course. Students who wish to pursue this course must have prior certification at the Grade 3 level or above from the department. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 252 or MUSW 132 or MUSW 124 or prior certification or successful audition. a recognized institution, or have attained a score of 90% in MUSW 124, or have undergone an audition with

3

MUSW 254 Primary Applied Instrument IV – Woodwind/Brass

Students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous level of this course and

a repertoire of a greater level of difficulty is now assigned. Following the final jury (examination) students will be required to perform and pass a recital hearing in order to perform the junior recital. Students who fail the recital hearing will not be allowed to perform the recital. The recital must be completed within one year of completing

the level four requirements. Failure to do so will result in the student having to repeat level four applied study as of music performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 253 MUSW 320 Junior Recital – Woodwind/Brass

well as the recital hearing and recital performance process. The recital must consist of a minimum of 30 minutes

All performance majors are required to perform a minimum of 30 minutes of repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer and with the permission of the Department Chair. A pass/fail grade will be assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSV 264 MUSW 351

In this course, students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of technical proficiency. On completion of this level, students will be required to perform a recital hearing. The recital hearing is required if students are to perform the senior recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 254 MUSW 352 Primary Applied Instrument VI – Woodwind/Brass

Primary Applied Instrument V - Woodwind and Brass.

In this course students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills developed from the previous level of

this course. They will be assigned pieces of a greater level of difficulty. Following the final jury (examination) students will be required to perform the senior recital within one year of completing this course. Failure to do so will result in the student having to repeat level VI primary study as well as the hearing and recital. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MUSW 351

MUSW 435 Recital Attendance – Woodwind/Brass

All performance and music education majors are required to attend 12 recitals to complete the recital attendance component. No credits will be awarded. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSW 325 MUSW 455 Senior Recital – Woodwind/Brass

Students are required to perform a minimum of 45 minutes of repertoire under the guidance of an assigned lecturer with the permission of both the lecturer and Department Chair. A pass/fail grade is assigned. 0 Credit/ Prerequisite: MUSW 320

POLI 150 Introduction to Politics

This course introduces students to normative political theories. It depicts the norms within a political environment

and the hierarchical structure and functions of political parties. This course also examines the culture of politicians and political parties locally, regionally and internationally. Students will also gain an understanding of the relationship that exist between partisan politics and government. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None PSYC 103 Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity

This course provides an introduction to the study of human behavior. Students will explore ways to construct others and society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: NONE

coherent and sound theoretical analyses of psychological phenomena that are pertinent to understanding self,

4

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
PSYC 106 Psychology for the Health Professional

This course will examine the relationships between health and a variety of psychological and social factors

that affect people’s lives as clients and as caregivers. Topics include health and illness, the impact of diversity, gender and lifestyle on illness prevention, behaviour modification techniques, and models of health related behaviour. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None PSYC 122 Foundations of Psychology

This course is a general overview of the field of psychology. It is designed to encourage the student to think Prerequisite: PSYC 103 (minimum Grade C required) / Co-requisite: COMM 117 PSYC 205 Social Psychology

critically about everyday occurrences and become familiar with the scientific nature of the discipline. 3 Credits/

This course focuses on the scientific study of human influences on social interactions. In addition, the course explores the ways people think about, affect, and relate to each another. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 122 PSYC 212 Life Span Development

This course provides a broad overview of contemporary psychological perspectives on human development from conception to death. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: PSYC 122 and BIOL 109 or BIOL 113 PSYC 220 Applied Psychology

This course delves into the amazing array of practical applications spawned by psychology from Industrial to Clinical Psychology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 122

PSYC 233 Psychology Seminar I – Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides students with an opportunity to explore current multicultural and ethical issues that have relevance to our society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 220 or PSYC 107 PSYC 261 Psychology of Adjustment

The course examines how individuals adjust to the demands of everyday life as well as the developmental, emotional, and social factors involved in the adjustment process. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 103 PSYC 325 Human Development

This course explores the concepts of continuous human development throughout the adult life span. It focuses on the cognitive, physical and psychosocial changes that occur throughout the life of an individual. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 261

PSYC 350 Culture, Diversity and Behaviour

This course is the scientific study of the influence of culture on human behaviour. It focuses on lifestyle preferences, beliefs, attitudes and issues of diversity. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 6 credits of PSYC PSYC 360 Theories of Individual Differences

This course is designed to show how psychologists define and use the concept of personality. Students will become acquainted with both the historical roots and contemporary basis of personality theory. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 212

PSYC 370 Theories of Learning

This course explores the theories of learning in their historical context and theoretical development. It examines of PSYC

concepts that have shaped our understanding of learning over the years. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 9 credits

5

PSYC 410 History of Psychology

This course explores the history and practice of psychology through an examination of its philosophical and empirical foundations. Through this course, students will broaden their understanding of the impact of research on the science of psychology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 9 credits of PSYC PSYC 425 Research Designs and Analysis

This course introduces students to the principles and methods of psychological research. It focuses on the exploration of the scientific method and examines the importance of systematic exploration in scientific research. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: STAT 120

PSYC 430 Foundations of Psychopathology

This course is designed to critically examine the biological and psychological factors that account for abnormal behaviour. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 360

PSYC 433 Psychology Seminar II-Field Experience

In this course, students are exposed to the varied applications of psychology in real world settings. Primarily, they will observe practice under supervision in order to bridge theory with the delivery of psychological services in society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 9 credits of PSYC at the 300 level PSYC 445 Educational Psychology

This second level course forms part of the core Psychology programme of studies for the Associate Degrees in make them aware of the characteristics of students of all ages and stages of cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development as these apply to the classroom environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 370 PSYC 448 Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Psychology. It is designed to help the student apply the insights of psychology to current educational issues, to

Industrial and Organizational Psychology is an investigation and analysis of the psychological principles, theory and applications that manifest themselves in the work environment. It spans the key issues related to the selection and recruitment, psychological testing, appraisal, training, motivation and job satisfaction of employees. This course also explores the fundamentals of leadership factors which promote satisfactory working conditions, BUSI 203 health and safety as well as consumer psychology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 6 credits of PSYC courses and

PSYC 457 Psychology of Work

This course explores the nature of work and the changing concepts of work and career and provides an to examine work as a means of survival and power, social connection, and self determination. Some topics

opportunity for students to prepare him/herself for the changing world or work. It is designed to allow students covered include psychology and the experience of working, traditional perspectives of working, social barriers and working, career concepts and development, and the changing nature of work in the 21st century. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 448

PSYC 462 Physiology of Behaviour

This course focuses on the role of physiological mechanisms in the mediation and control of behaviour. A components are arranged into systems and subsystems as they influence behaviour. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 9 credits of PSYC excluding PSYC 103

thorough investigation and strong focus will be placed on the components of the nervous system and how those

6

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
PSYC 468 Cognitive Psychology

This course looks at human cognition through an examination of the ways in which information is processed and knowledge acquired. Topics include perception, memory, attention and performance, language production and comprehension, learning, and reasoning. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 9 credits of PSYC excluding PSYC 103 PSYC 499 Senior Thesis - Psychology

This course is intended to help the student develop an understanding of psychological research through practice Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 425

in research design, data collection, interpreting and critiquing, and practice in writing a research paper. 3

READ 094 Introduction to Academic Reading I

This is the first of three reading courses offered in the COMPASS programme. In this course, students will focus on word attack strategies that will help them to engage in academic reading with more confidence. These strategies include phonic strategies, word analysis and context clues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None READ 096 Introduction to Academic Reading II

In this reading course students will understand that reading is thinking. They will have the opportunity to improve their comprehension and study skills and their academic vocabulary. Students will also learn strategies that will help them to engage in academic reading with more confidence. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: READ 094 READ 098 Introduction to Academic Reading III

In this third reading course students will continue to perceive reading as thinking. Students will have the opportunity to acquire advanced academic vocabulary, comprehension and study skills which will better prepare them to cope with their academic reading assignments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: READ 096 RELI 205 Comparative Religion

This course surveys world religions ranging from Christianity, Islam and Judaism to Rastafarianism, Vodun and Orisha. Students will gain an appreciation for the origins of various religious traditions, rituals and beliefs, with plural society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None a view to encouraging greater understanding and tolerance of diversity necessary for peaceful coexistence in a

SOBE 247 Introduction to Addiction Studies

This course examines the relationship of substance abuse and addiction to individual functioning and emotions, social values, criminality, stress and family organization. Primarily it applies the bio-psycho-social-spiritual model of addiction to behavioural compulsions such as sex, eating, violence and gambling before reviewing methods of treating and preventing addiction from this perspective. Other perspectives and models of addiction are also explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 3 credits PSYC or 3 credits SOWK SOBE 322 Intervention for Non-Chemical Dependency

This course will address those addictive behaviours that are not derived from psychoactive substances. It would 6 credits SOWK or 6 credits PSYC

look at issues such as gambling, gaming, sexual and food addictions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: SOBE 247 and

SOBE 326 Prevention and Intervention for Addictive Behaviours

This course provides an overview of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies, with an emphasis on community mobilization approaches. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 6 credits of SOWK or 6 credits of PSYC

community and educational prevention approaches. A major focus of the course will be upon proven effective

7

SOBE 328 Theories of Addiction and Treatment

This course addresses the phases and processes used in the treatment of addiction. It covers a range of

perspectives on treatment including emotional, cognitive, legal, social, family and systemic interventions as

well as relapse prevention. It examines the biological, psychological and systemic nature of substance abuse and addiction, their overlap with other mental and physical disabilities and relationship to the process of rehabilitation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: SOBE 321 and 6 credits PSYC or 6 credits SOWK SOBE 335 Introduction to Conflict Resolution

This course will examine conflict as an omnipresent component of any decision-making environment. It would offer tools for understanding the nature of conflict, for devising individual and group strategies that minimize identify solutions that are satisfactory to all involved. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 118 or PSYC 261 SOBE 375 Introduction to Career Guidance the destructive consequences of conflict. It would also provide participants with tools that would allow them to

This course is designed to foster an awareness of how personal characteristics, values, abilities and aptitudes work together with academics to encourage the best career choice for the individual. The course will survey the major theories in career guidance. There will be a strong focus on the principals involved in creating career interest and ultimately career choice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PSYC 212 SOBE 420 Theories of Guidance and Counselling

This course introduces the student to theories of guidance and counselling. Students will cover the major theories in the discipline. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOBE 375 SOBE 428 Pharmacology and Substance Abuse

This course will examine the interactions of psychoactive substances on the human body. It would also address medicinal treatment options. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 9 credits of SOWK or 9 credits of PSYC SOBE 438 Interventions and Treatment for Special Population

The focus of this course is to provide opportunities for students to explore current research on the most effective prevention models for a variety of populations. Such populations include adolescents, young adults, pregnant women and older adults. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOBE 326 SOCI 100 Introduction to Sociology

Students will examine the historical development of the discipline of sociology. Co-requisite: COMM 117

introduced to some of the works and key issues of some of the major theorists. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/

In addition, they will be

SOCI 101 Caribbean Sociology I

This course is designed to give students a detailed understanding of the critical theories of sociology. Students 102

examine the issues of methodology and research in the Caribbean. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or SOCI

SOCI 102 Introduction to the Study of Society

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the society in which they live and related contemporary social problems. Students will examine and analyse competing explanations for common sociological phenomena and social trends. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

8

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
SOCI 104 Caribbean Sociology II

This course enables students to examine the works of major sociological theorists. It facilitates the application work. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 101 SOCI 105 Caribbean Sociology III

of concepts towards an understanding of the social processes involved in the institutions of religion, family and

The final course in the three-part Caribbean Sociology module examines the social phenomena of poverty, crime and deviance, development and urbanization in the Caribbean community. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 101 SOCI 215 Introduction to Gender Studies

This course introduces students to basic concepts and theories used to explain gender differences. It explores

the inequalities faced by males and females in all spheres of society. It examines the way various agents of socialization maintain the existing power imbalances between men and women. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 103

SOCI 220 Quantitative Research Methods

In this course, students will be introduced to quantitative research methods used in sociological research.

They will get an understanding of theoretical perspectives and practical procedures used in the conduct of quantitative research projects as well as ethical concerns and investigative limitations of specific approaches. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 SOCI 230 Qualitative Research Methods

This course introduces students to qualitative research methods which are used in sociological investigation and non-numerical data collection. Students will be exposed to guiding theoretical perspectives and practical instruction in conducting qualitative research. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 101 SOCI 240 Sociology of Education

This course explores the sociological view of education and the historical development of the sociology

of education. It will also look at the sociological processes involved in the educational institution, and the relationships among the school, the society and the social order. Discussions will focus on key concepts such as culture, community, class, environment, status, role, accommodation and assimilation as well as a treatment of socio-educational problems and a cross-societal analysis of educational situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 102

SOCI 250 Exploring Caribbean Social Problems

This course will expose students to some of the social problems in the Caribbean. The course will take a solutions-oriented approach to examine these issues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 101 SOCI 274 Fundamentals of SPSS

This course is designed to teach students to use the SPSS software package for conducting statistical analyses and generating tables and graphs that summarize data. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: STAT 121 SOCI 278 Aging and the Family

The course examines aging and its dynamics within the family. It will explore holistically those issues that impact upon the lives of individuals as they age as well as the implications for family life. PSYC 212 and SOCI 104

3 Credits/ Prerequisites:



SOCI 281 Research Project I

This is the first of a two-part course in which students are required to design and conduct a research project qualitative methodologies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 220 or SOCI 230 SOCI 282 Research Project II

of their choice, based on discussions with the lecturer. This project may be based on either quantitative or

This is the second of a two-part course in which students are required to design and conduct a research project of their choice, based on discussions with the lecturer. This project may be based on either quantitative or report and the sharing of the findings. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI 281 SOCI 327 Conflict Management and Resolution qualitative methodologies. The focus of this course is on the conduct of the research, the writing of the research

In this course, students will examine theories in conflict management and dispute resolution and their application in various contexts. Specifically, they will explore elements of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), such as 103 context, culture, relationship and values as key strategies for conflict resolution. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOCI

SOWK 116 Introduction to Social Work

(Formerly SOCI 116)

This course will introduce the student to the profession of social work and to the history and development of None

social welfare and social service systems with emphasis on the Caribbean region. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

SOWK 119 Community Intervention for Social Work Practice

This course will introduce the social work student to the knowledge, skills and techniques involved in community work practice. During this course it is expected that students will be exposed to knowledge of the theoretical approaches and models within the practice of community social work. the Caribbean. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 116 SOWK 122 Case Work Practice for Social Work Additionally, students are expected to

develop an understanding of the various systems existing within the communities, with particular emphasis on

(Formerly SOCI 117)

This course will introduce the student to the direct practice of social casework. Students will be exposed to the knowledge, skills and techniques required for an introduction to social work practice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 116

SOWK 124 Social Work with Children and Families

This course will provide students with opportunities to examine social work theories, practice modalities and ethical standards while working with children and their families. It will explore the functions of the family and its impact on its individual members. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 116 SOWK 218 Group Work Practice for Social Work
(Formerly SOCI 118)

This course will introduce students to group work practice within the social work profession. Students will be exposed to the knowledge, skills and techniques of group work practice. It will provide students with an understanding of the process while exposing them to different types of theoretical approaches. Prerequisite: SOWK 122 3 Credits/

SOWK 234 Social Welfare in the Caribbean

This course will provide an opportunity for students to gain an understanding of social welfare in its broadest

100

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 terms and the profession of social work. It will focus on the events that emerged as a result of the historical eras. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 116

development of Caribbean societies from the colonial, post-colonial, independence, and post independence

SOWK 236 Legal and Ethical Issues in Social Work (Formerly SOCI 200)

The aim of this course is to enable students to have a working knowledge of the law with emphasis on professionalism and competency. Students will examine the court systems, legislation and legal processes in relation to the practice of social work. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 116 SOWK 241 Introduction to Practicum
(Formerly SOCI 201)

This course is designed to orient the student to field training via classroom instruction. Students will be provided

with the foundation needed to prepare them for practicum during the programme. Students will be helped to critically review their decision to become social workers. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-requisite: SOWK 122

SOWK 245 Practicum I: Human Skills Lab

(Formerly SOCI 290)

The Human Skills Laboratory is a 90 contact hour preparatory process to help learners develop a deeper

understanding of who they are and how the self is used in Social Work practice. Built on a series of self workplace and for interacting both with clients and their colleagues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 241 SOWK 248 Counselling Skills for Social Workers

exploration exercises and guided intervention, the Human Skills Lab helps learners prepare for entry into the

This course seeks to expose social work students to skills and techniques used in the therapeutic interviews Students will learn a combination of theoretical and practical knowledge while pursuing this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 218

with clients. The content of this course will compliment knowledge acquired in SOWK 122 and SOWK 218.

SOWK 255 Practicum II

(Formerly SOCI 291)

Practicum II builds on the practical experiences that social work students were exposed to in Practicum I. qualified social worker. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 245 SOWK 318 Residential Social Work

Students are required to complete 180 contact hours at a social service agency under the supervision of a

This course aims to introduce students to the various types of residential services and the fundamental residential care/rehabilitation in a residential centre. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 316 SOWK 323 Social Work Management & Administration

philosophy, theories and practice models of residential social work in helping individuals who are in need of

This course will expose students to theoretical knowledge that is applicable to the managing of human service organizations. The issue of entrepreneurship in social work will also be explored. Students will be encouraged to critically review operations of Local NGO’s that cater to the needs of the social sector. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 316

SOWK 324 Social Work Intervention with Substance Abusers

The course will explore the dominant cultural views of substance abuse and alternative perspectives. Special social worker’s role in working with substance abuse populations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOBE 218

emphasis will be placed on gender roles, family systems theory and treatment modalities. It will also review the

101

SOWK 326 Social Research Methods

This course introduces students to the principles and methods of basic social work research, and the ethical

conduct of research within the context of social work purposes and values. In addition, formulation of problems for study that address the social needs of diverse population groups will be explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 314 and STAT 120 SOWK 355 Practicum III

This course provides students with the opportunity to expand their practicum experience under the supervision of a qualified social worker. Students will be assigned to various social service agencies where they will complete 180 hours of field work. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 255

SOWK 357 Social Work Intervention with the Elderly

This course aims to equip students with a systematic, humanistic, and integrative perspective when working are pertinent to the practice of social work. SOWK 426 Advocacy in Social Work 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: SOWK 116 and PSYC 212

with older people. It introduces students to some of the major gerontological policies and available services that

This course will assist students in developing the repertoire of macro knowledge, skills, and values needed to welfare. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: 9 credits of SOWK SOWK 455 Practicum IV

analyze and assess organizations, communities, social policies and political systems as they relate to client

This course provides students with the opportunity to expand their practicum experience under the supervision of a qualified social worker. Students will be assigned to various social service agencies where they will complete 180 hours of field work. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 355

SOWK 499 Senior Project - Social Work

Students will undertake the study of current issues impacting social workers or the populations they serve. This research will be conducted in pairs to maximize support for students. Each dyad of students will be supervised by a member of the social work faculty. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SOWK 455 SPAN 100 Introduction to Spanish

This introductory course in Spanish is designed to develop basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills,

required to enable the student to interact with native speakers in formal and informal contexts. The course also provides basic knowledge in the target culture necessary to meet key survival needs. Heavy emphasis is placed on the development of listening and speaking skills. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None SPAN 104 Spanish for Communication I

This is an introductory course designed to develop functional skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while developing an awareness of the target culture so as to meet a number of basic survival needs. These skills include basic greetings and introductions, describing oneself and others, giving personal information, development of oral and aural skills. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: None SPAN 106 Spanish for Communication II

as required to interact formally and informally with native speakers. It equips participants with specific language

stating one’s likes and dislikes, telling the time and discussing one’s daily routine. Focus is placed on the

This course is designed to develop the functional skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing required to

102

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 interact formally and informally with native speakers. It seeks to equip participants with specific language skills while developing an awareness of the target culture so as to meet a number of basic survival needs. These skills include completing basic transactions at immigration, at a hotel, a bank, a restaurant as well as while shopping and moving around the city. Focus is placed on the development of oral and aural skills. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 104 or Proficiency as Demonstrated in Oral Placement Test SPAN 109 Spanish for Communication III

This course is designed to develop the functional skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing required

to interact formally and informally with native speakers. It equips participants with specific language skills while developing an awareness of the target culture so as to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks. These include recounting events in the simple past, talking about occupations and about childhood memories, talking about one’s community and certain cultural features of Trinidad and Tobago. as Demonstrated in Oral Placement Test

education, talking about oneself and other family members, comparing and contrasting family life, talking Focus is placed on the development of oral and aural skills. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 106 or Proficiency

SPAN 121 Advanced Conversational Spanish

This course is designed to develop students’ oral/aural proficiency in Spanish with a specific focus on increasing fluency and grammatical accuracy when interacting with Spanish speakers. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 109 SPAN 122 Spanish for Business I

This course is designed to develop participants’ oral/aural proficiency as well as reading and writing skills in

Spanish with an aim toward establishing business contracts with native speakers of Spanish. Some focus will also be given to cultural norms in the business setting and the operations and classification of companies. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 121

SPAN 123 Spanish for Business II

As a follow up to SPAN 122, this course seeks to further develop students’ communicative ability by introducing broader discussion around topics such as banking and insurance, manufacturing and trade. Prerequisite: SPAN 122 4 Credit/

SPAN 130 Spanish Stylistics I

This course is designed to equip participants with a superior level of grammatical and lexical skills with an environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 123

aim to develop more effective oral and written communication with native speakers in a social and business

SPAN 210 Latin American Civilisation and Culture I

This is the first of two (2) courses designed to deepen students’ knowledge and appreciation of Latin American for native Spanish speakers. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 123

culture and civilisation and their ability to understand authentic unedited print, audio and video material intended

SPAN 211 Latin American Civilisation and Culture II

This is the second of two (2) courses designed to deepen students’ knowledge and appreciation of Latin American development of selected countries in Latin America. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 210

culture and civilisation. Students will acquire a sound understanding of the history, politics and socio-economic

103

SPAN 230 Introduction to Translation

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic principles and techniques of Spanish to English translation. The theory of translation is introduced in so far as it provides an intellectual framework and a conceptual background to the practice of translation. Students are introduced to the format, features and related 130 and SPAN 210

translation methods and techniques in translating business correspondence. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: SPAN

SPAN 241 Introduction to Interpreting Techniques

This course is designed to introduce participants to the cognitive processing skills that are components of the practices of consecutive interpreting, including the role of the interpreter, professional behaviour and the ethics of interpreting. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: SPAN 130 and SPAN 211 SPAN 247 Study Abroad

complex process of interpretation. Students are introduced to the basic theories, guidelines, principles and

This two-week study abroad experience in a Spanish-speaking context will provide students with the opportunity AAS programme. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: SPAN 241 SPAN 277 Independent Study

to contextualise and consolidate linguistic and cultural knowledge and skills obtained over the duration of the

This Independent Study is one of the final courses to be completed by students pursuing the Associate Degree

in Foreign Languages for Business. It is a guided independent research project which takes the form of a written project and an oral presentation - both in Spanish. The topic of this research must be agreed upon by the supervisor and the student and should either be something new or a continuation of work previously undertaken SPAN 241 in a field relevant to the courses comprising the Associate Degree in Business Spanish. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

SPCH 092 Oral Communication

In this course students will focus on the verbal, visual and written aspects of public speaking. Students will learn

how voice and body language can be used as powerful tools of communication. They will also learn different and WRIT 097

ways of organizing a speech so as to enhance the delivery of a message. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: READ 098

STAT 120 Fundamentals of Statistics

This course introduces the student to key concepts in both descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn

how to collect, describe, display and interpret both raw and summarized data in meaningful ways. 3 Credits/ 121

Prerequisite: Any one of the following math courses – MATH 108, MATH 117, MATH 116, MATH 119, MATH

STAT 121 Introduction to Inferential Statistics

This course continues to build on the concepts and skills that were developed in STAT 120, and introduces the principles of decision theory. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: STAT 120 STAT 122 Business Statistics

This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of business statistics and the associated course

mathematical principles that form the basis of the discipline. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Any college level Math

104

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
STAT 200 Mathematical Probability and Statistics I

This course investigates univariate probability distributions and introduces some advanced statistical analysis. The topics are: the mathematics of discrete variables and discrete probability distributions, the mathematics generating functions, further sampling distributions and estimation, further linear regression and correlation, hypothesis testing, K-sample case: Anova one–way classification, multiple comparison procedures. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: STAT 121 and MATH 161 of continuous variables and continuous probability distributions, transformation of variables and moment

STAT 400 Mathematical Probability and Statistics II

This course builds on STAT 200 and delves into the principles of multivariate calculus-based probability

distribution analysis. It investigates bivariate and multivariate distributions, marginal and joint conditional

distributions; functions of random variables, determination of power and sample size, two-way ANOVA and introduces some non-parametric tests. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: STAT 200 and MATH 161 STAT 401 Advanced Statistical Inference

statistical control using the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). It also looks at other correlation coefficients and

This course continues the exploration into decision theory using two-sample tests of hypotheses, further linear correlation and regression, multiple linear regression and certain non-linear regression models, goodness- ofprocedures, statistical quality control methods. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: STAT 400 WRIT 093 Introduction to Academic Writing I fit tests and categorical data analysis, multi-factor analysis of variance, non-parametric and distribution free

This is the first of three writing courses offered in the COMPASS programme, all of which are designed to prepare focus on the major parts of speech, subject and predicate, the application of spelling strategies and rules of None

students to effectively address the requirements of academic writing at the College. In this course students will punctuation and differentiating between sentence fragments and complete sentences. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

WRIT 095 Introduction to Academic Writing II

In this course, students will acquire skills to become more effective writers. They will learn the functions and fragments and complete sentences. They will also be able to use various types of sentences and paragraph organization in their writing. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRIT 093 WRIT 097 Introduction to Academic Writing III

uses of major parts of speech, and will be able to apply spelling strategies to differentiate between sentence

In this writing course students will be launched on the pathway to academic discourse and successful negotiation of academic writing requirements at the College. Students will hone their writing skills by using a variety of sentence structures and appropriate diction. They will also continue to improve their mastery of the rules of academic writing. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRIT 095.

grammar and to enhance their paragraph writing and essay writing skills so as to more confidently engage in

105

106

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

School of Business and Information Technologies
The School of Business and Information Technologies provides access to a world-class and work-relevant education, focused on achieving institutional and national goals of workforce development. The School of Business and Information Technologies consists of three departments: • Department of Entrepreneurship and Management • Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies

• Department of Information Science and Technology

These departments provide the public with a range of academic services to meet a growing number of careers and opportunities locally, regionally, and globally.

Mission
The School of Business and Information Technologies is devoted to the development and preparation of students graduates who: who are able to confront the challenges of the fast-paced, dynamic work environment. The school produces

- are professional and ethical;

- are adept at creative problem-solving; - can adapt to a rapidly evolving world.

- embrace technological advancement; and

We will accomplish this through value-based relationships with the business and national communities-creating a learner-centered curriculum dedicated to student success.

107

Department of Entrepreneurship and Management
The Department of Entrepreneurship and Management has entrepreneurship as a viable career option for students. It supports the concept that entrepreneurship is a as its primary focus the development of

primary driver for the development of a nation’s economy. In addition to offering a bachelor’s degree in throughout the department’s entire curriculum to and financial disciplines. Entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship has been infused support and enhance programmes in the managerial professionals prepared to lead the entrepreneurial

In this way, a cadre of

enterprise will be available to support achievement of entrepreneurial activity.

the national goal of economic diversification through

Programmes
The Department of Entrepreneurship and Management offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor’s Degree Programmes BA BA BA BBA BBA BBA Accounting Public Sector Management Financial Management Entrepreneurship Human Resource Management Marketing Associate Degree Programmes AS AAS AAS AAS Management Studies for the Protective Services Business Administration Management with Accounting Office Administration

Bachelor of Business Administration - Entrepreneurship
The BBA in Entrepreneurship provides the 21st century student with the foundations for functioning in, and managing the 21st century business. This integrated programme focuses on the importance of entrepreneurship in a knowledge-driven society. It provides the foundation for leadership within organisations and promotes key skills in entrepreneurship and business development needed to develop and drive a modern economy. Students will be exposed to a course of study that spans the major managerial functions, promoting flexibility of movement within the organisation, entrepreneurial, independent and critical thinking, creative problem solving and life-long learning as the fundamentals of an educated citizen who form the next generation of community Administration after the first 64 credits. and national leaders. Students enrolled in the BBA degree in Entrepreneurship will earn the AAS – Business

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Business Administration - Entrepreneurship
To be awarded the BBA degree in Entrepreneurship, students must successfully complete 127 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

108

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Required courses in the major area of study

Required courses in Entrepreneurship specialization Support courses

55 credits 76 credits 48 credits 3 credits 21 credits

Total Courses in Major Area of Study

Core curriculum courses

Total Credits Required for Graduation

127 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 126 ACCT 210 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 ECON 405 FINC 205 FINC 310 HURM 310 LAWW 310 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MGMT 200 MGMT 210 MGMT 300 MGMT 310 MGMT 410 MGMT 420 MKTG 205 MKTG 340

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 119 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SPAN 100 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Accounting Cost and Management Accounting Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Managerial Economics Financial Management Corporate Finance Human Resource Management Business Law Principles of Management Management Information Systems Events Management or Introduction to Project Management Organisational Behaviour Production and Operations Management Quality Management Strategic Modeling Principles of Marketing Market Research

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study SPECIALIZATION COURSES
ENTP 220 ENTP 310 ENTP 377 ENTP 410 ENTP 420 ENTP 499 MKTG 212 Caribbean Business Environments Managing Family Enterprise Cases in Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management Senior Project - Entrepreneurship Advertising for the Entrepreneur

55
3 3 2 3 3 4 3 MATH 145

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES
Business Calculus

48 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

Total Credits in Entrepreneurship Specialization

21

Career Options:
• Business manager or owner

Bachelor of Business Administration - Marketing
Effective marketing is a key requirement for every successful business. The BBA in Marketing is designed to and marketing management. Graduates of this programme can enter the industry as marketing managers, brand the BBA degree in Marketing will earn the AAS – Business Administration after the first 64 credits.

provide graduates with a broad foundation in business administration and specialized competencies in marketing managers, retail managers, customer service supervisors or marketing research officers. Students enrolled in

10

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Business Administration: - Marketing
To be awarded the BBA in Marketing with a minor in Entrepreneurship, students must complete 129 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Elective courses in marketing specialization Entrepreneurship minor requirements Support courses Core curriculum courses

Required courses in marketing specialization Total Courses in Major Area of Study

40 credits 15 credits 9 credits

64 credits 14 credits 48 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

129 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
ACCT 126 ACCT 210 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 FINC 205 FINC 310 LAWW 310 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MGMT 200 MGMT 210 MGMT 300 MGMT 310 MKTG 205

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 119 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 122 Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics

CODE

Fundamentals of Accounting Cost & Management Accounting Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Financial Management Corporate Finance Business Law Principles of Management Management Information Systems Events Management or Introduction to Project Management Organisational Behaviour Production and Operations Management Principles of Marketing

COURSE TITLE

COURSE TITLE

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3

3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Courses in the Major

40

Total Core Curriculum Courses

48

SPECIALIZATION COURSES

ELECTIVE COURSES IN SPECIALIZATION
Students are required to choose 3 courses from the list below for a total of 9 credits

MKTG 320 MKTG 325 MKTG 340 MKTG 405 MKTG 450

Consumer Behaviour Integrated Marketing Communication Market Research Customer Relationship Management Marketing Management

3 3 3 3 3

JOUR 139 MKTG 305 MKTG 310 MKTG 315 MKTG 330 MKTG 420

Intro. to Strategic Public Relations Fundamentals of Selling Retailing Services Marketing International Marketing Pricing and Logistics

3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Specialization Courses

15

Total Elective Courses

9

COURSES IN MINOR AREA OF STUDY
ENTP 220 ENTP 310 ENTP 377 ENTP 410 MKTG 212 Caribbean Business Environments Managing Family Enterprise Cases in Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneurship Advertising for the Entrepreneur 3 3 2 3 3 MATH 145

SUPPORT COURSES
Business Calculus 3

Total Support Course

3

Total Credits for Entrepreneurship Minor

14

110

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Career Options:
• Marketing managers or specialists • Retail managers • Brand managers • Account managers

Bachelor of Business Administration: - Human Resource Management
This degree in human resource management prepares students to function as HRM professionals within public and private sector organizations, locally and internationally. Students gain insight into cutting edge practices in HR for the 21st century organization and acquire a wide range of skills in core HR competencies such as training

and development, industrial relations, strategic human resource management, compensation management and human resource information systems. Specific attention is paid to HR as a key strategy in public sector Administration after the first 64 credits. reform. Students enrolled in the BBA degree in Human Resource Mangagement will earn the AAS – Business

Graduation Requirements: BBA - Human Resource Management
To be awarded the Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Human Resource Management, with a minor the following distribution:

in Entrepreneurship, students must successfully complete 131 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to

Required courses in the major area of study Required courses in HRM specialization Entrepreneurship minor requirements Support courses Core curriculum courses Total Courses in Major Area of Study

34 credits 63 credits 14 credits 48 credits 6 credits 29 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

131 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 126 ACCT 210 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 FINC 205 LAWW 310 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MGMT 210 MGMT 300 MKTG 205

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 119 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Accounting Cost and Management Accounting Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Financial Management Business Law Principles of Management Management Information Systems Introduction to Project Management Organisational Behaviour Principles of Marketing

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study

34

HURM 310 HURM 315 HURM 320 HURM 325

Human Resource Management HRM for the Public Sector Employee Development and Training Compensation Management

SPECIALIZATION COURSES

3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

48

111

HURM 333 HURM 334 HURM 400 HURM 410 HURM 420 HURM 430 HURM 450

Human Resource Information Systems Employee Assistance Programmes Organization Design and Transformation

1 1 3

SUPPORT COURSES
Critical Issues in HRM Human Resource Planning Industrial Relations Integrated Strategic HRM 3 3 3 3 MATH 145 LAWW 320 Business Calculus Employment Law 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

6

Total Credits in HRM Specialization

29

COURSES IN MINOR AREA OF STUDY
ENTP 220 ENTP 310 ENTP 377 ENTP 410 MKTG 212 Caribbean Business Environments Managing Family Enterprise Cases in Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneurship Advertising for the Entrepreneur 3 3 2 3 3

Total Credits in Entrepreneurship Minor

14

Career Options:
• Human resource assistant • Human resource officer • Human resource administrator

Bachelor of Arts – Public Sector Management
Public sector reform is fundamental to ensure the efficient delivery of services to the general public. This degree

helps students acquire critical and contemporary knowledge and skills in the areas of public sector management, efforts to infuse the efficiencies of private sector management into public sector practices.

and organizational development and transformation. Graduates will be well equipped to lead or participate in

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Arts - Public Sector Management
To be awarded the BA degree in Public Sector Management, students must successfully complete 125 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study

Required courses in public sector management specialization Support courses

49 credits 68 credits 48 credits 9 credits 19 credits

Total courses in major area of study

Core curriculum courses

Total credits required for graduation

125 credits

112

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 126 ACCT 210 ACCT 320 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 ENTP 220 FINC 205 LAWW 310 MGMT 220 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MGMT 210 MGMT 300 MKTG 205 LAWW 315

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 119 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Accounting Cost and Management Accounting Public Sector Financial Management Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Caribbean Business Environments Financial Management Business Law Public Sector Project Management Principles of Management Management Information Systems Introduction to Project Management Organisational Behaviour Principles of Marketing Administrative Law and Regulatory Practices Business Elective

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics

Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study
SPECIALIZATION COURSES ADMN 300 ADMN 305 ADMN 315 ADMN 333 ADMN 400 ADMN 499 Public Sector Management I Public Sector Management II Change Management in the Public Sector Public Sector Management Seminar Public Policy Development Senior Project - Public Administration

49
3 3 3 3 3 4 POLI 150 HURM 315 HURM 430

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Introduction to Politics HRM for the Public Sector Industrial Relations

48

3 3 3

Total Credits in Public Sector Mgmt Specialization

19

Total Support Course Credits

9

Career Options:
• Managers in the public sector • Job analyst • New systems facilitators

• Change management positions

Bachelor of Arts – Accounting
The BA in Accounting provides students with technical financial accounting skills which are complemented with a solid foundation in business management and general education competencies that enhance workplace performance. The programme is relevant to individuals seeking careers in financial services in a variety of – Management with Accounting after the first 67 credits.

related fields in the public and private sector. Students enrolled in the BA degree in Accounting will earn the AAS

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Arts - Accounting
To be awarded the BA degree in Accounting, students must successfully complete 128 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

113

Required courses in the major area of study

Required courses in accounting specialization Support courses

46 credits 77 credits 48 credits 3 credits 31 credits

Total courses in major area of study

Core curriculum courses

Total credits required for graduation

128 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 126 ACCT 210 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 ENTP 220 ENTP 310 ENTP 410 FINC 205 FINC 310 LAWW 310 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MGMT 210 MGMT 300 MKTG 205

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 119 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Accounting Cost and Management Accounting Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Caribbean Business Environments Managing Family Enterprise Social Entrepreneurship Financial Management Corporate Finance Business Law Principles of Management Management Information Systems Introduction to Project Management Organisational Behaviour Principles of Marketing

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study
SPECIALIZATION COURSES ACCT 215 ACCT 216 ACCT 222 ACCT 250 ACCT 310 ACCT 410 ACCT 415 ACCT 420 ACCT 450 ACCT 499 Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Accounting Systems and Applications Auditing Business Tax Advanced Financial Reporting Advanced Auditing Advanced Cost and Management Strategic Decision Making in Financial Accounting Accounting Simulation

46
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 LAWW 400

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Corporate Law Total Support Course Credits

48

3 3

Total Credits in Accounting Specialization

31

Career Options:
• Financial manager • Budget analyst • Auditor

• Cost Accountant

• Taxation Consultant

Bachelor of Arts – Financial Management
The scope of finance and financial management is wide. This programme aims to provide businesses with trained financial management professionals who have the required competencies to control and successfully manipulate financial assets to improve the efficiency and profitability of businesses. It also prepares individuals

114

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 for careers in banking and other institutions in the financial sector. Students enrolled in the BA degree in Financial Management programme will earn the AAS – Management with Accounting after the first 67 credits.

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Arts - Financial Management
To be awarded the BA degree in Financial Management, students must successfully complete 130 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study

Required courses in financial management specialization Support courses

55 credits 79 credits 48 credits 3 credits 24 credits

Total courses in major area of study

Core curriculum courses

Total credits required for graduation

130 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 126 ACCT 210 ACCT 215 ACCT 216 ACCT 250 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 ENTP 220 ENTP 310 ENTP 410 FINC 205 FINC 310 LAWW 310 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MGMT 210 MGMT 300 MKTG 205

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 119 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Accounting Cost and Management Accounting Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Auditing Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Caribbean Business Environments Managing Family Enterprise Social Entrepreneurship Financial Management Corporate Finance Business Law Principles of Management Management Information Systems Introduction to Project Management Organisational Behaviour Principles of Marketing

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Courses in the Major
SPECIALIZATION COURSES FINC 305 FINC 330 FINC 340 FINC 410 FINC 420 FINC 425 FINC 450 Entrepreneurial Finance Financial Markets and Institutions Investment Analysis and Management Money and Banking Futures and Options Markets International Financial Management Financial Planning

55

Total Core Curriculum Courses
SUPPORT COURSES

48

3 3 3 4 3 4 4

MATH 145

Business Calculus

3

Total Credits in Financial Management Specialization

24

Total Support Course Credits

3

Career Options:
• Treasury manager • Banker • Investment advisor

• Financial Analyst/ Planner

115

Associate in Applied Science – Business Administration
Business today requires individuals who are trained in a myriad of disciplines. The AAS degree in Business Administration prepares the student for entry into a business environment, ensuring that they understand value-added courses in project management and information systems, students are well prepared to take up a role to support managerial and business functions at the end of this programme. the fundamental operations of any business, including accounting management, finance and marketing. With

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – Business Administration
To be awarded the AAS in Business Administration degree, students must successfully complete 64 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Guided elective courses Support courses

28 credits 30 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

64 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE ACCT 126 ACCT 210 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 MGMT 125 FINC 205 MKTG 205 ENTP 220 MGMT 205

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr. 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 LIBS 130 MATH 119 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Accounting Cost and Management Accounting Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Principles of Management Financial Management Principles of Marketing Caribbean Business Environments Management Information Systems

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics

Cr. 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study
GUIDED ELECTIVES IN MAJOR MGMT 200 MGMT 210 Events Management Introduction to Project Management Choose one of the two above

28

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES

30

3 3 3

MATH 145

Business Calculus

3

Total Support Course Credits

3

Career Option:
• Entry level employee in business

Associate in Science – Management Studies for the Protective Services
This programme is designed to provide participants from the Protective Services with the needed competencies to improve efficiencies in their supervisory roles and to prepare them to be change agents in the various services. Participants are exposed to managerial concepts as well as practical aspects of managing resources Sector Management.

in an efficient and effective manner. This programme will allow participants to access the BA degree in Public

116

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Graduation Requirements: AS- Management Studies for the Protective Services
To be awarded the AS degree in Management Studies for the Protective Services, students must successfully complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support Courses

33 credits 24 credits 6 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

63 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 204 ADMN 300 HURM 315 HURM 430 LAWW 125 LAWW 130 LAWW 135 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MGMT 210 MGMT 300

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENTP 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Financial Procedure and Budgeting Public Sector Management I HRM for the Public Sector Industrial Relations Ethics Caribbean Legal Systems Constitutional Law Principles of Management Management Information Systems Introduction to Project Management Organisational Behaviour

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Business Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study

33

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

SUPPORT COURSES
COUN 100 OSHE 120 Counseling Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health 3 3 MATH 091 MATH 092 MATH 093

COMPASS PREPARATORY COURSES
Pre-College Algebra Basic Algebra Intermediate Algebra 3 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

6

Total COMPASS Courses

9

Career Option:
• Promotion within the Protective Services

Associate in Applied Science – Office Administration
This programme is designed to develop skilled paraprofessionals in the field of office administration. It combines sound theoretical foundations in management studies with the practical skills required to ensure that graduates perform efficiently and professionally.

The programme comprises an office administration core that focuses on the development of the administrative the managerial functions of key elements in organizations and a general education core that facilitates critical thinking, social responsibility and lifelong learning as fundamental requirements all COSTAATT graduates.

skills and aptitudes necessary for optimal operations in the modern office setting, a business core to support

117

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – Office Administration
To be awarded the AAS degree in Office Administration, students must successfully complete 70 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study

Courses in office administration specialization Core curriculum courses Support Courses

22 credits 40 credits 27 credits 3 credits 18 credits

Total Courses in Major Area of Study

Total Credits Required for Graduation

70 credits

COURSES IN MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 204 BUSI 120 HURM 310 LAWW 310 MGMT 125 MGMT 200 MGMT 225 MKTG 114

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENTP 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 MATH 119 PSYC 103 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Financial Procedure and Budgeting Business Orientation Human Resource Management Business Law Principles of Management Events Management Procurement and Inventory Management Customer Service Fundamentals

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics or Finite Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study

22
2 2 3 1 2 2 2 2 2

Total Core Curriculum Credits

27

SPECIALIZATION COURSES
OFAD 120 OFAD 125 OFAD 135 OFAD 200 OFAD 215 OFAD 221 OFAD 231 OFAD 236 OFAD 288 Word Processing I Word Processing II Administrative Office Management Speed Development Spreadsheet Design and Processing Database Design and Processing Desktop Publishing & Presentation Tools Office Communications Management Office Administration Portfolio COMM 119

SUPPORT COURSES
Grammar for Office Professionals 3

Total Support Course Credits

3

Total Credits in Office Admin. Specialization

18

Career Options:
• Administrative assistant • Executive assistant • Personal assistant

• Office administrator

Associate in Applied Science – Management with Accounting
The accounting programme was developed along the guidelines of the ACCA syllabus for accounting professionals.

This AAS degree in Management with Accounting prepares students to proceed to the ACCA Level I required

for accounting technicians. The programme serves as the gateway to the bachelor’s degree programmes for in the associate degree will be transferred to either the BA degree in Accounting or Financial Management.

individuals seeking careers in financial services either in accounting or financial management. All credits earned

118

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – Management with Accounting
To successfully complete the AAS degree in Management with Accounting, students must complete 67 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Total credits required for graduation

37 credits 67 credits 30 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ACCT 126 ACCT 210 ACCT 215 ACCT 216 ACCT 250 BUSI 120 ECON 120 ECON 125 FINC 205 MGMT 125 MGMT 205 MKTG 205 FINC 310

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 LIBS 130 MATH 119 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 122

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Accounting Cost & Management Accounting Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Auditing Business Orientation Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics Financial Management Principles of Management Management Information Systems Principles of Marketing Corporate Finance

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability Fundamental Research Skills Finite Mathematics Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Business Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Credits in Major Area of Study

37

Total Core Curriculum Credits

30

Career Options:
• Accounting Technician

Full-Time Faculty Profile – Management and Entrepreneurship
Kirwin Pyle-Williams Department Chair
Management and Law Heather – Dawn Charles Senior Lecturer - Public Administration, Customer Service M.Sc. LCCI, PRM Research Interest: Change Management from the customer server’s perspective Anthea Davis Senior Lecturer - Human Resource Management PG Dip., BA Research Interest: Entrepreneurship and HRM - growth of SME Jerome Khan Senior Lecturer - Business Management, Accounting M.Sc., ACCA, B.Sc. Research interest: Entrepreneurship Ambica Medine Senior Lecturer - Business Management MSc., BA Research Interest: Pioneering Entrepreneurship in T& T in the secondary school system

Awai-King, Sarah Senior Lecturer – Human Resource Managemnt MA, PG Dip. Research Interest: Mother Friendly work environments and connection with productivity and efficiency environments

11

Dianne Bartholomew Senior Lecturer - Management B.Sc. Research Interest: Cultural anthropology and organizational behaviour

Roger Gopaul Senior Lecturer – Accounting, Economics, Business Management MBA, BBA Research Interest: SME’s use of financial and non financial indicators to ensure sustainability Sajjad Hamid Senior Lecturer - Business Management, Entrepreneurship MBA, B.Sc. Research Interest: History of the development of Entrepreneurship in Trinidad and Tobago and evolutionary approach Terriann Humphrey Lecturer - Event Planning, Business Management B.Sc. Research Interest: The future of Tourism in the Eastern Caribbean and Jamaica Karen Inniss Senior Lecturer - Project Management M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interest: Project Management

Charmaine Mungaldeen Senior Lecturer - Accounting ACCA Research Interest: Small business development

Clinton Benjamin Senior Lecturer - Strategic Planning, Business Management MBA , BBA Research Interest: Entrepreneurial profiles; information technology research

Jennifer Prince Senior Lecturer - Accounting, Business Management MBA, ACCA, BA Research Interest: SME’s use of financial and non financial indicators to ensure sustainability Kyra Santana Senior Lecturer - Marketing M.Sc., BA Research Interest: Marketing communication, marketing for small business development and sustainability Soogrim, Carlton Senior Lecturer - Economics MBA, BA Research Interest: International business, trade, economics and marketing Samantha Joseph Senior Lecturer – Economics Msc.,Bsc Research Interest:Economic development and migration – Caribbean integration and tourism

Wayne S. Bissoo Senior Lecturer - Economics B.Sc. Research Interest: Business education; curriculum, assessment

Clayton Blackman Senior Lecturer - Public Administration, Business Management M.Sc., PG .Dip., BA Research Interest: Public sector reform and social entrepreneurship Arlene Saunders-George Senior Lecturer – Human Resource Management Msc., Bsc., Dip. Research Interest: Carol Pitt-Braithwaite Senior Lecturer – Office Administration Bsc., AA Research Interest: Human Behaviour (Attrition of Adult Learners)

Ronald Phillip Senior Lecturer – Management MBA, M.ed., Bsc., Dip. Ed. Research Interest: Management, Organisational Development

120

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Department of Information Science and Technology
The Department of Information Science and Technology offers cutting-edge library science. Students enrolled in the information technology programmes have access to state-of-the-art computer labs and option of completing parallel certification in CISCO or ORACLE. faculty with significant industry experience. They also have the The Associate degree in Library and Information Studies is the only one of its kind in the Caribbean and exposes students to a unique blend of the theoretical and practical aspects of library science. The Department also partners with NALIS to provide students are work-place ready upon graduation. programmes in information technology and

students with work-based, supervised practicums to ensure that

Programmes

The Department of Information Science and Technology offers the following degree programme options:

Bachelor’s Degree Programmes B.Sc. IT - Computer Information Systems B.Sc. Information Technology – Networking B.Sc. Internet Technology

Associate Degree Programmes AAS IT – Information Systems Development AAS IT – Operating Systems Management AAS IT – Internet Technology AAS Library and Information Studies

Bachelor of Science - Information Technology: Computer Information Systems
The Bachelor of Science degree in Information Technology - Computer Information Systems is closely aligned to the curriculum of the Oracle Academy, of which COSTAATT is a member. Oracle is the world leader in database technology and business intelligence, and is the second largest information technology company in the world. and teaching aids, which have all been designed to the highest international standards.

Students enrolled in this programme have access to Oracle’s advanced computer science courses, curriculum

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - Information Technology: Computer Information Systems
To be awarded the B.Sc. in Information Technology (CIS) degree, students must successfully complete 127 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Core courses in information technology major

Required courses in area of specialization (Computer Information Systems) Core curriculum courses Support courses

30 credits 72 credits 51 credits 4 credits 42 credits

Total required courses in major area of study

Total credits required for graduation

127 credits

121

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ITEC 120 ITEC 122 ITEC 133 ITEC 229 ITEC 235 ITEC 236 ITEC 240 ITEC 250 ITEC 260 ITEC 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30

COURSE TITLE
CORE COURSES IN THE MAJOR Introduction to Computer Hardware Introduction to Operating Systems Programming I Human and Computer Interface Design Object Oriented Programming I Object Oriented Programming II Web Page Design Computer Networks, Architecture and Protocol Information Security Standards and Control Database Design I Total Credits for Core Courses in the Major COURSES IN AREA OF SPECIALIZATION Commercial and Industrial Information Systems Systems Analysis Systems Design Principles of Information Technology Data Structures Information Systems Implementation Database Design II Database Programming with SQL Database Administration I Microcomputer Applications in Business Building Internet Ready Applications Database Programming with PL/SQL Database Administration II Senior Project – Information Technology

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
GENERAL EDUCATION CORE Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Science Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

ITEC 140 ITEC 225 ITEC 228 ITEC 249 ITEC 292 ITEC 294 ITEC 371 ITEC 372 ITEC 374 ITEC 375 ITEC 376 ITEC 472 ITEC 474 ITEC 499

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

51

BUSI 120 MATH 118

SUPPORT COURSES Business Orientation Pre-Calculus

1 3

Total CIS Specialization Credits

42

Total Support Course Credits

4

Career Options:
• Business systems analyst • Database administrator • Database developer

• Trainee systems analyst

• Oracle database developer

• Database application specialist

Bachelor of Science - Information Technology: Networking
This programme is designed for individuals seeking a career in information technology, with an emphasis on

networking. Students acquire sound foundational skills in key areas such as network administration, network systems commonly found in business environments; discover how information systems support organizational success; and how the technologies that comprise the network infrastructure allow for successful transfer and use of mission critical business information. In addition, students install, configure, secure, administer,

security, network architecture and wireless communication. Students get hands-on training in network

and troubleshoot network systems; address the management of users, shared resources, and various other Students who are successful in this programme will have acquired the competencies to complete the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) and Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) professional examinations.

network components such as routers and switches in LANs, WANs, wireless and mobile network environments.

122

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Information Technology: Networking
To be awarded the B.Sc. in Information Technology: Networking, students must successfully complete 127 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Core courses in information technology major

Required courses in area of specialization (Networking) Core curriculum courses Support courses Total credits required for graduation

30 credits 75 credits 48 credits 127 credits 4 credits 45 credits

Total required courses in major area of study

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ITEC 120 ITEC 122 ITEC 133 ITEC 229 ITEC 235 ITEC 236 ITEC 240 ITEC 250 ITEC 260 ITEC 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
DISCIPLINARY CORE Introduction to Computer Hardware Introduction to Operating Systems Programming I Human and Computer Interface Design Object Oriented Programming I Object Oriented Programming II Introduction to Web Page Design Computer Networks, Architecture and Protocol Information Security Standards and Control Database Design I

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
GENERAL EDUCATION CORE Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Science Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3

Total Credits for Core Courses in the Major
COURSES IN AREA OF SPECIALIZATION ITEC 124 ITEC 244 ITEC 251 ITEC 285 ITEC 322 ITEC 351 ITEC 352 ITEC 360 ITEC 363 ITEC 451 ITEC 452 ITEC 453 ITEC 456 ITEC 457 ITEC 499 Operating Systems Platform Internet Technology Network Management I Client Server Technology Advanced Operating Systems Platform Advanced Routing Protocol Concepts LAN Switching and VLANs Security Management Network Security Network Management II WAN Technologies Introduction to Mobile Technologies Wireless Networking Data Centre Construction Fundamentals Senior Project

30

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

48

BUSI 120 MATH 118

SUPPORT COURSES Business Orientation Pre-Calculus

1 3

Total Networking Specialization Credits

45

Total Support Course Credits

4

Career Options: • Computer operator • Cabling technician

• Networking technician • Network administrator • VoIP technician

• Network security personnel • Helpdesk technician

• Wireless network administrators and technician

123

Bachelor of Science – Internet Technology
This degree specialisation will provide students with the fundamental skills necessary to develop and maintain the changes required in this dynamic and challenging field. Students will learn the basics of internet application development and the importance of security of the internet as part of a well-rounded programme of instruction. The programme addresses both the technical aspects of the field, as well as the many emerging business applications. The graduate will have the advantage of being able to work in diverse environments within the information technology industry. The practical knowledge gained from the programme provides a foundation of systems analysis, project management, e-commerce, or any number of fields within the industry. This programme is designed to equip students to sit the Certified Internet Webmaster (CIW) professional examinations. information technology skill-sets that can be used in web site development, network management, programming,

Graduation Requirements: Bachelor of Science – Internet Technology
To be awarded the B.Sc. in Internet Technology, students must successfully complete 127 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Core courses in information technology major

Required courses in area of specialization (Internet Technology) Core curriculum courses Support courses Elective courses

30 credits

Total required courses in major area of study

72 credits 48 credits 4 credits 3 credits

42credits

Total credits required for graduation

127 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ITEC 120 ITEC 122 ITEC 133 ITEC 229 ITEC 235 ITEC 236 ITEC 240 ITEC 250 ITEC 260 ITEC 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE DISCIPLINARY CORE
Introduction to Computer Hardware Introduction to Operating Systems Programming I Human and Computer Interface Design Object Oriented Programming I Object Oriented Programming II Web Page Design Computer Networks, Architecture and Protocol Information Security Standards and Control Database Design I

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE GENERAL EDUCATION CORE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3

Total Credits for Core Courses in the Major
COURSES IN AREA OF SPECIALIZATION Operating Systems Platform Introduction to XML Programming Internet Technology Introduction to Scripting Languages Network Management I Client Server Technology Time-Based Media Programming Three-Tier DBMS Application Advanced XML Programming Web Client-Side Programming and Libraries Local and Remote Data Integration Scripting for System Administration

30

ITEC 124 ITEC 243 ITEC 244 ITEC 245 ITEC 251 ITEC 285 ITEC 291 ITEC 342 ITEC 343 ITEC 345 ITEC 443 ITEC 445

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES BUSI 120 GRDE 128 Business Orientation Introduction to Commercial Design Total Support Course Credits

48

1 3 4

124

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

ITEC 456 ITEC 499

Wireless Networking Senior Project – Information Technology

3 3

ELECTIVE COURSES Any college-level course offered by the College

3

Total Networking Specialization Credits

42

Total Elective Credits

3

Career Options: • SAP functional developer • JAVA/J2EE • Web objects architect • PERL developer • UI Architect • Cold fusion developer • Web applications programmer • Infrastructure analyst • Programmer analyst • Web logic administrator

Associate in Applied Science – Information Technology: Information Systems Development
This degree programme essentially comprises the first two years of the B.Sc. in Information Technology: Computer

Information Systems. Students pursuing a B.Sc. in Information Technology (CIS) can exit with an AAS degree in Information Technology (ISD) once they have completed the prescribed list of courses below. Graduates will be analysts and database administrators. prepared for technician or technologist entry level positions in the job market such as programmers, systems

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Information Technology: Information Systems Development
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Information Technology (ISD), students must complete 70 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Core courses in information technology major Courses in ISD specialization Core curriculum courses Support courses

24 credits 18 credits 24 credits 70 credits 4 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ITEC 120 ITEC 122 ITEC 133 ITEC 229 ITEC 240 ITEC 250 ITEC 270 ITEC 260

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
DISCIPLINARY CORE
Introduction to Computer Hardware Introduction to Operating Systems Programming I Human and Computer Interface Design Web Page Design Computer Networks, Architecture and Protocol Database Design I Information Security Standards and Control

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
GENERAL EDUCATION CORE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

125

Total Credits for Core Courses in the Major
SPECIALIZATION COURSES ITEC 140 Commercial and Industrial Information Systems ITEC 225 Systems Analysis ITEC 228 Systems Design ITEC 235 Object Oriented Programming I ITEC 236 Object Oriented Programming II ITEC 292 Data Structures

24
3 3 3 3 3 3 BUSI 120 MATH 118

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Business Orientation Pre-Calculus

24
1 3

Total Support Course Credits

4

Total ISD Specialization Credits

18

Career Options:
• Systems developer • Systems analyst • Data modeling technician Associate in Applied Science – Information Technology: Operating Systems Management This degree programme essentially comprises the first two years of the B.Sc. in Information Technology: Networking. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Networking can exit with an AAS degree in Information Graduates will be prepared for technician or technologist entry level positions in the job market such as back office support technicians, end-user support personnel and networking technicians. Technology: Operating Systems Management once they have completed the prescribed list of courses below.

Graduation Requirements: AAS - Information Technology: Operating Systems Management To be awarded the AAS in Information Technology (OSM) students must successfully complete 70 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Core courses in information technology major Courses in OSM specialization Core curriculum courses Support courses

24 credits 18 credits 24 credits 70 credits 4 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ITEC 120 ITEC 122 ITEC 133 ITEC 229 ITEC 240 ITEC 250 ITEC 260 ITEC 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

COURSE TITLE
DISCIPLINARY CORE
Introduction to Computer Hardware Introduction to Operating Systems Programming I Human and Computer Interface Design Web Page Design Computer Networks, Architecture and Protocol Information Security Standards and Control Database Design I

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
GENERAL EDUCATION CORE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Core Courses in the Major SPECIALIZATION COURSES
ITEC 124 ITEC 235 ITEC 236 Operating Systems Platform Object Oriented Programming I Object Oriented Programming II

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES
BUSI 120 MATH 118 Business Orientation Pre-Calculus Total Support Course Credits

24
1 3 4

3 3 3

126

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ITEC 244 ITEC 251 ITEC 285 Internet Technology Network Management I Client Server Technology 3 3 3

Total OSM Specialization Credits

18

Career Options:
• Back office support technician • End user support personnel • Networking technician

Associate in Applied Science – Information Technology: Internet Technology
This degree programme essentially comprises the first two years of the B.Sc. in Internet Technology. Students

pursuing a B.Sc. in Internet Technology can exit with an AAS degree in Information Technology: Internet Technology once they have completed the prescribed list of courses below. Graduates will be prepared for technician or technologist entry level positions in the job market such as web developers, web applications programmers, systems developers an programmers.

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Information Technology: Internet Technology
To successfully complete the AAS in Information Technology: Internet Technology, students must complete 70 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Core courses in information technology major Courses in internet technology specialization Core curriculum courses Support courses

24 credits 18 credits 24 credits 70 credits 4 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ITEC 120 ITEC 122 ITEC 133 ITEC 229 ITEC 240 ITEC 250 ITEC 260 ITEC 270

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
DISCIPLINARY CORE
Introduction to Computer Hardware Introduction to Operating Systems Programming I Human and Computer Interface Design Web Page Design Computer Networks, Architecture and Protocol Information Security Standards and Control Database Design I

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
GENERAL EDUCATION CORE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Core Courses in the Major SPECIALIZATION COURSES
ITEC 124 ITEC 235 ITEC 243 ITEC 244 ITEC 245 ITEC 285 Operating Systems Platform Object Oriented Programming I Introduction to XML Programming Internet Technology Introduction to Scripting Languages Client Server Technology

24

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES

24

3 3 3 3 3 3

BUSI 120 GRDE 128

Business Orientation Introduction to Commercial Design

Total Support Course Credits

1 3 4

Total Internet Technology Specialization Credits

18

127

Career Options:
• Web objects junior architect • Junior system developer

• Web applications junior programmer

Associate in Applied Science - Library and Information Studies
Programme Description:

Graduates of this programme qualify for employment in a variety of paraprofessional positions in schools, and

public, academic and special libraries or in any other organization engaged in library-related and information management activities. The course content covers areas such as library organisation, library reference services, technical services in libraries, media management and library standards and practices.

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – Library and Information Studies
To be awarded the AAS degree in Library and Information Studies, students must successfully complete 70 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Required courses in the major area of study Guided electives courses in the major Core curriculum courses Support courses Total courses in major area of study 38 credits 44 credits 25 credits 1 credits 6 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

70 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
LIBS 135 LIBS 136 LIBS 140 LIBS 145 LIBS 200 LIBS 201 LIBS 248 LIBS 249 LIBS 255 LIBS 256 LIBS 267 LIBS 274 LIBS 299

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 2 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
DISCIPLINARY CORE
Introduction to Libraries and Information Services Introduction to Information Resources in Libraries Computer Applications in Libraries Introduction to Technical Services in Libraries User Services I User Services II Introduction to the Organization of Knowledge: Cataloguing Introduction to the Organization of Knowledge: Classification Library Practicum I Library Practicum II Integrated Marketing Communications for Libraries Introduction to Caribbeana and Its Sources Senior Project – Library and Information Studies

CODE
ARTS 119 COMM117 COMM118 ENVS 121 OR ENVH 121 MATH 116 LIBS 130 SCIE 121 SOCI 102 SPAN 100

COURSE TITLE
GENERAL EDUCATION CORE
Foundations of Art and Music Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Environmental Issues and Sustainability World Issues in Public Health Contemporary College Math Fundamental Research Skills Foundations in Natural Sciences Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish

Cr.
3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES BUSI 120 Business Orientation

25

1

Total Credits in the Major Area of Study
LIBS 270 LIBS 273 LIBS 278 LIBS 279 RCMT 150 GUIDED ELECTIVE COURSES (Choose any 2) Introduction to Serials Management Introduction to Children’s Literature Management of Special Libraries Management of Academic Libraries Introduction to Records Management

38
3 3 3 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

1

Total Guided Elective Credits

6

128

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Career Options:
Graduates qualify for employment in a variety of paraprofessional positions in school, public, academic and special libraries or in any other organization engaged in library related activities.

Anisa Powder - Department Chair Senior Lecturer - Web development, networking, network security, graphic design. M.Sc., Dip. Ed., B.Sc. Research Interest: Network security, wireless and mobile communication, haptics Dexter Absalom Senior Lecturer – Computer hardware, operating systems, network architecture, client server. M.Sc., MRP, MBA, BA Research Interest: Telecommunications Nicole Alexander Lecturer - Programming and program design, Microsoft Office Suite B.Sc. Research Interest: Educational technology, distance learning Kathleen Awai Senior Lecturer - Database design, programming, mathematics M.Sc., Dip Ed., PGDip., B.Sc. Research Interests: Database technologies, e-learning technologies Roger Chung Senior Lecturer – Database and Internet Technology Msc., Bsc. Research interests: Knowledge management and warehousing

Edward Cameron Senior Lecturer – Security management, operating systems, computer hardware. PGDip., B.Sc. Research Interests: Information and network security; ICT use tertiary level instruction; Web 2.0 Alicia Dennis-Nagee Lecturer – Programming, database design and management B.Sc. Research Interest: Data warehousing and security Maneka Gokool Senior Lecturer - Library Science M.Sc. Research Interests: Literacy, curriculum development, library and information science. Vijay Ramkissoon Senior Lecturer - Web Development M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Role of eastern arts in adult learning Gemma Lashley Senior Lecturer – Library Science MHEd., PGDip., B.A. Research Interests: Curriculum design

Wayne Second Senior Lecturer - Computer networking, network security. M.Sc. Dip.Ed., B.Sc. Research Interests: Networking

Andrea Seepersad Senior Lecturer-Web design and development, system analysis, data modeling. M.Sc. PGDip.Ed., AAS Research Interest: Mobile and social networking technology Stacy Williams Lecturer - Programming B.Sc. Research Interest: Wireless technologies Michelle Wooding Senior Lecturer - Library Science M.Sc. Research Interests: User services, online/distance learning, children’s literature and educational technologies.

12

Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies
The Department of Criminal Justice is the successor body to the Joint Services Staff College which was established in 1978 and

tasked with ensuring that members of the protective services and Defence Force had the necessary professional and technical fell under their purview. In 2000, the College incorporated into COSTAATT.

competencies to manage the agencies which was one of the six tertiary level institutions

Programmes

The Department of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies offers the following degree programme options: Bachelor’s Degree Programmes B.Sc. – Criminal Justice (January 2011) Associate Degree Programmes AAS Criminal Justice: Police Science

Associate in Applied Science – Criminal Justice
The Criminal Justice programme is targeted at professionals in the Protective Services and the security industry as well as at persons interested in careers in these areas. The aim of the programme is to enhance the student’s programme will transfer to the B.Sc. Criminal Justice. professional competence to confront the challenges of crime, justice and public safety. All credits earned in this

Graduate Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – Criminal Justice
To be awarded the AAS in Criminal Justice degree, students must successfully complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study

Elective courses in the major area of study

27 credits 3 credits

Guided electives in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Elective courses

6 credits

Total credits in the major area of study

36 credits 24 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

63 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CORR 210 CRIM 125 CRIM 160 CRIM 200 CRIM 230 CRIM 240

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Probation and Parole Introduction to Criminal Justice Foundations in Criminal Justice Research Victimology Criminology Ethics in Criminal Justice

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Math Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3

130

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
LAWW 130 LAWW 135 LAWW 140 Caribbean Legal Systems Constitutional Law Criminal Law 3 3 3 SCIE 121 SOCI 102 Foundations in Natural Science Introductory to the Study of Society 3 3

Total Required Credits in Major Area of Study ELECTIVE COURSES IN THE MAJOR
Students must choose at least two of the courses listed below CORR 220 Restorative Justice CRIM 135 Introduction to Forensics CRIM 170 Crime Mapping POLC 210 Police and Community Relations POLC 220 Comparative Policing

27

Total Core Curriculum Credits GUIDED ELECTIVES IN THE MAJOR

24

3 3 3 3 3

Students must choose one of the two courses listed below CORR 127 Introduction to Corrections POLC 127 Introduction to Law Enforcement Total Guided Elective Credits

3 3 3

Total Major Electives Courses

6

GENERAL ELECTIVE Any course from the College

3

Career Options:
• Law Enforcement Officer • Police Officer • Probation Officer or Correctional Treatment Specialist • Detective or Criminal Investigator • Security Manager • Security Officer

• Loss Prevention Manager • Loss Prevention Agent • Security Supervisor • Security Director (Physical, Personnel, Grounds, et al) • Correctional Officer • Fraud Investigator

• First-Line Supervisor/Manager of Police and Detectives • Private Detective or INvestigator • Loss PRevention Investigator • Corrections Officer • Security Officer Armed

Faculty Information:
Charrise Clarke-Hensby Senior Lecturer – Criminal Justice MA, BA Research Interest: International human rights, children’s rights, cultures of punishment, corporate crime, policing, and media representations of race, class and gender Keron King Senior Lecturer – Criminal Justice B.Sc., PhD Candidate Research Interest: Policing, restorative justice and corrections Keith Second Senior Lecturer – Criminal Justice MA, BA Research Interest: Corrections and substance abuse Latoya Gibson Research Interest: Media influence on the job satisfaction among members of the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service

131

Course Descriptions
ACCT 126 Fundamentals of Accounting (Formerly ACCT 125) This course assumes no accounting background on the part of the student. Students gain an understanding of financial statements. Topics covered include the valuation of business assets, the measurement of net income and the study of partnership and company accounts. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ACCT 204 Financial Procedures and Budgeting

the complete accounting cycle, from recording of transactions in journals to the preparation of various types of

In this course, students learn the basic accounting and financial principles required to prepare and monitor budgets, using a programme/output budgeting model. They also learn how to measure outputs. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

ACCT 210 Cost and Management Accounting

(formerly ACCT 203)

In this course, students learn about the basic accounting procedures, techniques that are used to determine,

accumulate and control the cost of production, and distribution of goods and services in today’s economy. The

accumulation, interpretation and control of costs by job order and process cost systems are also examined, along ACCT 126

with a study of break-even analysis, budgeting and other cost control techniques. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ACCT 215 Intermediate Accounting I

(formerly ACCT 201)

Building on previous concepts learned in ACCT 126, this course offers a detailed study of the various elements of engage in deeper analysis of accounting theory and practice, after review of basic accounting procedures. Topics include the accounting cycle and more in-depth study of temporary investments, receivables, inventories, plant assets, and investments in stocks and bonds. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ACCT 126 or ACCT 125 ACCT 216 Intermediate Accounting II
(formerly ACCT 202)

a balance sheet, as it reflects income and expenditure, and relative to different types of business entities. Students

Students gain further exposure to the preparation and presentation of financial statements with emphasis on accounting for groups, interpretation of financial statements and items which impact the financial statements during the preparation of accounts and after the balance sheet date. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to analyse and use financial statements for decision-making purposes and to apply their technical knowledge to assess the performance of companies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ACCT 215 or ACCT 201 ACCT 222 Accounting Systems and Applications

This course introduces students to software used by accountants. Students learn how to use the software as a problem-solving tool to resolve various accounting and financial issues. They also acquire skills in performing Prerequisite: ACCT 125 or ACCT 126 ACCT 250 Auditing
(Formerly ACCT 211)

accounting transactions, and printing financial statements and reports using the software application. 3 Credits/

In this course, students learn about the fundamental principles of audit practice and procedures, including the verification of balance sheets and income statement items; the preparation of audit working papers; the ACCT 201 compilation of audit reports, and the audit of accounting records. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ACCT 215 or

ACCT 310 Business Tax

This course examines aspects of local and regional business taxation. Students acquire an understanding

132

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 of the impact of legislation on tax liability and learn to calculate tax liability when presented with different scenarios. Some of the topics covered include value added tax (VAT), personal income tax, corporation tax and tax exemption issues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ACCT 216 or ACCT 202 ACCT 320 Public Sector Financial Management

Financial management and budgeting play an important role in determining the efficiency with which the government is able to carry out its operations. In this course, students learn about Government’s budgetary practices, financial reporting, revenue generation, and capital budgeting and debt management activities. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: FINC 205

ACCT 410 Advanced Financial Reporting

In this course, students acquire the theoretical knowledge and practical skills needed to understand and apply including groups. Students learn how to apply a conceptual and regulatory framework for financial reporting, and to prepare and present financial statements which conform to international accounting standards. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ACCT 210 ACCT 415 Advanced Auditing

accounting standards to the preparation, analysis and interpretation of financial statements for business entities,

This course provides in-depth coverage of advanced auditing topics, including statistical sampling, information systems auditing, and small business auditing. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ACCT 250 ACCT 420 Advanced Cost and Management

The aim of this course is to develop students’ knowledge and skills in the application of management accounting

techniques to quantitative and qualitative information for planning, decision-making, performance evaluation, ACCT 210

and control. It builds on the skills and concepts which students learned in ACCT 210. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ACCT 450 Strategic Decision Making in Financial Accounting

This course provides students with the required knowledge and skills to apply accounting and managerial

knowledge to the analysis of a company’s strategic position. It develops the student’s ability to identify and

formulate strategic options for improved efficiency and growth of the business, along with the techniques essential for evaluating the financial and non-financial impact of decisions made. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MGMT 125, ACCT 210 and ACCT 216 ACCT 499 Accounting Simulation

Students are required to critically review the financial accounting systems of a company; through the analysis of the financial accounting data generated by the company. The project report shall draw conclusions from Credits/ Prerequisites: ACCT 410, ACCT 420 and ACCT 450 ADMN 300 Public Sector Management I this analysis and make recommendations to the business owner on how to improve the accounting system. 4

This course in public sector management provides students with a strong theoretical base and exposes them to

principles and concepts in public administration. Students will examine the evolution of public administration MGMT 125

and establishes importance of the public sector as a major actor in the economy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ADMN 305 Public Sector Management II

In this course, students acquire the skills, knowledge and insights required to effectively perform their roles and functions as managers in the public sector. Theoretical knowledge of public sector management is

133

complemented with case-studies of past, current and future-oriented public sector management. Students Trinidad and Tobago and the wider Caribbean. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ADMN 300 ADMN 310 Public Administration
(Formerly ADMN 125)

develop an appreciation for key functions, operations and relational issues in public sector management in both

This course introduces students to concepts, principles and techniques in public administration in contemporary the public sector and students will have an opportunity to examine some of the issues and problems in public Prerequisite: MGMT 125

society. The course is intended to enhance the student’s understanding of the principles of administration in administration, with special emphasis placed on public administration in Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/

ADMN 315 Change Management in the Public Sector

In this course, students learn about theories and models of change management. The rationale for change in the public sector is discussed as well as approaches to managing the challenges of public sector reform. A historical understanding the dynamics of change management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 300 ADMN 333 Public Sector Management Seminar perspective on public sector reform in Trinidad and Tobago and the wider Caribbean provides a context for

The course comprises three seminars, covering the following topics: (a) enhancing public sector performance

through culture change (lecture); (b) politics and public sector management (panel discussion); and (c) the of the major discussions of each seminar. Mandatory attendance is required for successful completion of this course. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: ADMN 310 ADMN 400 Public Policy Development

impact of technological change on the public sector (lecture). Students will be required to produce a summary

This course focuses on how the government’s decisions on policy making are influenced by the internal and external environments in which they operate. ADMN 300 affecting policy choices, development, controversies and solutions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: POLI 120 and Students explore the social, economic and political factors

ADMN 499 Senior Project – Public Administration

This course provides students with an opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills attained in their major

area of study to an applied project. Students may select one of the two options (a) students provide evidence of persistent and unresolved problem within the public sector through newspaper research, reports on the public sector, personal experience or from any other documented source; or (b) students identify an area where bestsupporting evidence. A project report and oral presentation of findings are required for successful completion of this course. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: ADMN 400 BUSI 120 Business Orientation

practice or a high level of efficiency and effectiveness in public sector performance has been demonstrated with

This course focuses on helping students develop critical workplace skills needed to assure their success in the world of work. Workplace skills such as teamwork, time management and business etiquette will be addressed. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None

BUSI 130 Perspectives in Business Ethics

The course examines the philosophical underpinnings of ethical issues and moral challenges that arise in organizations between employer and employee, or between business and society. Discussion focuses on appropriate responses to ethical challenges and students are encouraged to reflect on their own values and responses to difficult moral choices. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

134

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

BUSI 203 Leadership and Ethics

This introductory course focuses on leadership theories and the importance of ethical practices to ensure good governance. Students will be encouraged to analyse personal attitudes and values, and focus on the application of leadership principles learned throughout the course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None BUSI 333 Business Seminar

In this seminar, students are required to research and discuss current issues in the business landscape. Classes meet for 15 hours per semester. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None CCNA 120 Network Fundamentals

This course introduces students to the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. At the end of this practical course, students build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

configurations of network devices such as routers and switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes.

CCNA 121 Routing Protocols and Concepts

In this course, students learn about the architecture, components, and operation of routers, the principles of routing and routing protocols. They analyze, configure, verify and troubleshoot the primary routing protocols RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF. Upon completion of this practical course, students are equipped to identify and correct common routing issues and problems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: CCNA 120 CCNA 122 LAN Switching and Wireless

In this course, students acquire theoretical knowledge, and practical skills in the technologies and protocols design model and how to select devices for each layer. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: CCNA 121 CCNA 123 Accessing the WAN

needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network

Students of this course learn about the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications

in enterprise networks. The Cisco Network Architecture is used to introduce integrated network services and Prerequisite: CCNA 122

show students how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet network requirements. 4 Credits/

CORR 127 Introduction to Corrections

This course introduces students to the field of corrections as it relates to the justice system. Students are

provided with a comprehensive overview of the history of corrections, probation, institutional programmes, community-based correctional programmes, sentencing, correctional workers, juvenile justice system, and reentry programmes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CRIM 125

CORR 210 Probation and Parole

In this course, students learn about the origin, philosophical underpinnings and evolution of probation. The practices, and the characteristics and risks associated with the current probation population. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

organization and administration of paroling authorities is discussed and students examine modern sentencing

135

CORR 220 Restorative Justice

In this course, students learn about the history of the development of restorative justice and examine current practices in this area. A comparison of restorative justice with the retributive model of justice is presented, along programmes, and victim/offender reconciliation programmes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COTR 102 Introduction to Court Transcription with an introduction to the variety of restorative initiatives including family/group conferencing, reconciliation

This course is designed to introduce students to the art of transcription, typewritten-transcription and audio typing. Students are required to possess a very high degree of speed and accuracy in transcription skills to prepare for the work requirements of the judicial system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COTR 110 Orientation to Court Processes

Students are required to complete a one-week orientation session at the Hall of Justice. Participants receive Completion of Court Transcription Certificate programme CRIM 125 Introduction to Criminal Justice
(formerly CRIM 120)

a certificate if they are present on all the days on which the orientation is held. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite:

This course introduces students to the foundations of the criminal justice system: police, courts and corrections. contemporary issues such as democratic policing and restorative justice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None CRIM 135 Introduction to Forensics
(Formerly CRIM 210)

Throughout the course, students explore issues from historical, sociological and legal perspectives and discuss

This course exposes students to some of the fundamental areas of forensic science and is designed to develop

students’ analytical skills for processing and interpreting evidence at crime scenes. At the end of this course, conclusions on evidence obtained from crime scenes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CRIM 125 CRIM 160 Foundations of Criminal Justice Research

students will be able to perform basic tests and measurements, conduct research, make inferences and draw

This course introduces students to the foundations of research in the social sciences with specific attention to criminal justice research. Students are expected to critically evaluate existing research, identify appropriate methods for conducting research, and design their own research project. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None CRIM 170 Crime Mapping

In this course, students are provided with a theoretical and practical introduction to the use of geographic

information systems (GIS) for law enforcement. The course explores spatial analysis methods used in crime mapping, and engages students in the design and implementation of GIS applications to prevent crime, solve problems and enhance public safety. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 116 CRIM 200 Victimology

In this course, the focus of instruction is on the impact of crime on the victim. Students trace criminological under-reporting of crime by victims and the development of victim-related services in Trinidad and Tobago, as well as in other countries. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CRIM 125 and PSYC 103 CRIM 230 Criminology
(Formerly CRIM 130, CRIM 202)

perspectives on the victim from the past to the present. Topics covered include victim precipitation, reasons for

In this course, students learn about the major theories of crime and deviance and develop an understanding of basic criminological concepts. Students engage in critical analysis of race, class and gender issues as they intersect with theory, research and policy development in criminology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CRIM 125

136

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
CRIM 240 Ethics in Criminal Justice (Formerly CRIM 140, CRIM 225)

This course introduces students to the major theories underlying ethics and ethical practice as it applies on organizational credibility and legitimacy when institutions act without due regard for ethical practices. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CRIM 125

to individuals and organizations operating within the criminal justice system. Students examine the impact

ECON 110 Introduction to General Economics

This course is specifically designed to provide non-business students with an exploration of key micro and macro-economic concepts that provide insight into how an economy works; how their activities affect the economy; and how the performance of the economy affects their lives. This course will not count towards degree credits for students majoring in a business discipline. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ECON 120 Principles of Microeconomics

Economics is the study of how society and individuals use limited resources to meet their needs. Microeconomics

focuses on consumer demand, supply, market structures, pricing, resource allocation and distribution. Students learn to apply micro-economic principles to the analysis of events and phenomena in the wider society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

ECON 125 Principles of Macroeconomics

This course focuses on macro-level aspects of the national economy such as unemployment, inflation, recession, gross domestic product (GDP), financial markets, money and banking. Students examine the impact of globalization on the economy and explore macro-economic models and approaches, such as national income accounting, circular flow, aggregate demand and aggregate supply, and fiscal and monetary policy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

ECON 230 Introduction to Environmental Economics

Environmental economics assumes the need for societies to balance the goals of economic activity against pollution in the context of environmental protection imperatives. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ECON 110 ECON 405 Managerial Economics

environmental considerations. In this course, students will examine issues of resource usage, depletion and

In this course, students apply their knowledge of micro and macro-economics to the resolution of business problems relating to cost, price, revenue, profit and competitive strategies. Instruction integrates theory and 120, ECON 125 and STAT 122 or MATH 166 or MATH 167 ENTP 210 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship practice to enable students to improve their ability to analyse economic issues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ECON

This course is designed for students interested in learning how to start and manage a small business. It begins by defining and explaining the nature of small business and entrepreneurship in the context of the free enterprise system. Topics discussed include identifying business venture opportunities, franchising, developing 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENTP 220

a business plan, evaluating locations, developing financing sources, and legal aspects of small business.

In this course students learn about the challenges of establishing and doing business in the region through analysis of the major factors affecting entrepreneurs, investment opportunities, and the development of trade the socio-cultural conditions of Caribbean and Latin America, and emergence of the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME). 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125 relations. Special attention will be paid to the role of CARICOM in respect of the concept of open regionalism,

Caribbean Business Environments

137

ENTP 310 Managing Family Enterprise

This course explores the business, personal, and interpersonal issues associated with family-owned and managed companies which dominate every local economy. Students explore topics related to effective management of family businesses, including strategic business planning, succession planning, family business communications and conflict resolution, ownership and estate planning. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENTP 210 ENTP 377 Cases in Entrepreneurship

This course is designed to enable students to prepare and present case studies based on research conducted in ENTP 310 or ENTP 410. In writing the case, students apply theoretical perspectives on entrepreneurship to realPrerequisite: None / Co-requisite: ENTP 310 or ENTP 410 ENTP 410 Social Entrepreneurship world examples of family business enterprise and social entrepreneurship in Trinidad and Tobago. 2 Credit /

This course introduces students to the core concepts, practices and challenges of social entrepreneurship. systemic change through local interventions and collaboration. In addition, students have the opportunity to

Students develop a strategic perspective on social change and learn how social entrepreneurs can stimulate partner with local organizations to design, develop and/or implement outreach projects that target specific community or social needs. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENTP 210 ENTP 420 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management

This course adopts a process-based approach to the identification and evaluation of new business opportunities. new business ventures, and in devising appropriate responses to the daily challenges of operating new ventures. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENTP 210

Students are expected to leverage their creative and innovative capabilities in the development of proposals for

ENTP 499 Senior Project - Entrepreneurship

Students will prepare a comprehensive business plan using the cumulative knowledge acquired over the programme. This project will be evaluated by a team of faculty and industry experts for a final grade. It is expected that students can take this plan and source financing for a start-up company. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENTP 420

FINC 205 Financial Management

(formerly FINC 203)

The course introduces students to some of the basic tools and concepts in financial management and illustrates their application to practical problems faced by individuals and businesses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ACCT 125 and ACCT 126

FINC 305 Entrepreneurial Finance

This course exposes students to sources and types of capital financing available for start-up enterprises. The operations of new businesses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: FINC 205 FINC 310 Corporate Finance

student will learn how to create financial documents and manage, monitor and evaluate day-to-day financial

Students examine issues impacting financial decision making in the modern corporation, including capital budgeting, corporate investment, capital structure, corporate sources of funding, dividend policy and corporate contingent claims, international finance and financial risk management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: FINC 205 FINC 330 Financial Markets and Institutions

This course helps students acquire an understanding of the mechanisms of various financial markets and

institutions such as banks, stock exchanges and brokerage firms. Students develop a basic awareness of the

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 theoretical and practical problems associated with regulating financial markets and learn about the roles and innovations of major financial institutions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: FINC 310

FINC 340 Investment Analysis and Management

This course acquaints students with the techniques, vehicles and strategies for implementing investment goals in or institutional portfolios. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None FINC 410 Money and Banking

light of risk-return tradeoffs. Students learn about the key factors that determine the composition of individual

Money and Banking is concerned with the operations of the commercial banking sector and the central bank and ECON 220

system. Students examine the effect of monetary policy on the economy. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: FINC 310

FINC 420 Futures and Options Markets

In this course, students acquire knowledge and techniques related to the pricing of futures and options, and Credits/ Prerequisite: FINC 310

examine the framework used in the analysis of hedging and investment decisions, using futures and options. 4

FINC 425 International Financial Management

This course develops students’ knowledge of the international financial environment and provides them with the tools for the analysis of international investments, multinational companies, exchange rate risks and global economic forces. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: FINC 310 FINC 450 Financial Planning

This course is the culmination of a study of financial management. The student will, in consultation with faculty and business owners, collect relevant data needed to create a comprehensive financial plan for an organization 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: FINC 340 that will match their current financial demands as well as chart a path for future growth for the company.

HURM 224 Human Resource Development (HRD).

This course provides students with in-depth exposure to the theory and practice of human resource development maximization of benefits to the organization and the employee, and promotes employee development by 210 and HURM 310 Students explore ways in which human resource development offers an integrated framework for

fostering an orientation towards continuous learning and capacity building. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: HURM

HURM 310 Human Resource Management

(Formerly HURM 210)

This course introduces students to the principles, practices, and techniques used in the design, development and of employment, training, compensation, labour relations, health and safety, and legislation governing human resource management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125

implementation of an effective human resource/personnel management programme. It includes a discussion

HURM 315 Human Resource Management for the Public Sector sector administration and management.

In this course, students apply general knowledge of human resource management theory and practice to public impact on HR development and management strategies and practices, and explore the role of HR as a key driver of public sector reform. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: HURM 310 Students examine how public service regulations and legislation

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HURM 320 Employee Development and Training

(Formerly HURM 224)

In this course, students acquire knowledge and skills in the design, development, administration and evaluation of employee training and development programmes. Topics covered include needs assessment, training design and evaluation, career planning and development, and aligning individual and organizational performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: HURM 310

HURM 325 Compensation Management

(Formerly HURM 225)

Globalization, the changing nature of work and the information age call for compensation systems that cater to the needs of a new profile of employee. In this course, students learn about the theory and practice of systems and schemes that attract and retain high performing staff. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: HURM 310 HURM 333 Human Resource Information Systems compensation management and acquire knowledge and skills in the design and administration of compensation

This seminar provides students with an understanding of human resource information systems (HRIS) and how it facilitates the effective management of an organization’s human resources. Through a series of hands-on labwork, lectures and exercises, students will explore the various components of an HRIS, examine how information HURM 310

can be used to enhance the HR functions and the steps required to implement an HRIS. 1 credit/ Prerequisite:

HURM 334 Employee Assistance Programmes

This seminar will expose students to some of the psycho-social factors that can affect an employee’s performance in the work place and measures that can be taken to reduce the possible negative impacts on the workplace. This is an intense two-day seminar to prepare the HR professional for some of the real life issues they will

encounter in the workplace and strategies that can be adopted to deal with these issues. This course counts towards students’ credits and as such attendance at both sessions is mandatory. 1 credit/ Prerequisite: MGMT 300

HURM 400 Organizational Design and Transformation

Organizational design is a conscious, planned process of structuring an organization’s operations to attain and sustain an optimum level of performance, relative to both operational and strategic goals. In this course, culture, technology and size. They also learn about the methods, models, and processes used to plan for organizational design and change. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: HURM 310 HURM 410 Critical Issues in Human Resource Management students examine key factors which shape organizational design and change such as strategy, environment,

This course is about managing people in the 21st century. The theories and practices which guide human course, students critically examine the present state of human resource management and explore contemporary Credits/ Prerequisite: HURM 310

resource management for most of the 20th century are all being revisited, re-examined and revised. In this issues and the emerging trends and practices that are shaping the future of human resource management. 3

HURM 420 Human Resource Planning (Formerly HURM 234)

In this course, students discuss the role of human resource planning as a mission – a critical function which

ensures that the organization has the optimal mix of knowledge, skills and abilities to achieve its strategic goals and objectives. They also learn about contemporary techniques and tools used for effective human resource planning. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: HURM 310

HURM 430 Industrial Relations (Formerly HURM 236)

In this course, students examine the evolution of the theory and practice of industrial relations from inception

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 to the modern day. Topics covered include the changing nature of management-labor relations, collective bargaining, employee discipline, workers’ rights, grievance and arbitration. Contemporary approaches to conflict management and resolution, and the industrial relations implications of the impact of globalization 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125 on emerging trends such as outsourcing and the use of contract and immigrant labour are also discussed.

HURM 450 Integrated Strategic Human Resource Management

This course synthesizes all the areas of HRM that have been taught in the entire BBA programme. Students will be required to undertake a project within an organization which will allow them to diagnose the HRM issues that the organization faces within the context of its external and internal environmental peculiarities. Students will be required to identify the issues, analyze them, prepare realistic solutions and a plan for implementation. This is an individual assignment and students will be required to present their paper at the end of the programme. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: HURM 325 and HURM 400 INTC 216 Introduction to International Business

International business is the study of cross-border commercial transactions among governments, industries the success or failure of international transactions. Some of these factors include international cultural barriers, differences in economic and legal systems, and challenging political climates. Students are also introduced to framework of a globalized economy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None INTC 500 The World Trading System

and individuals. Students examine the forces driving international commerce and the factors that determine

the fundamentals of international trade, regional integration, and the international financial markets within the

This course provides students with an understanding of the world trading system and multilateral trade

negotiations in the areas of goods and services; and an overview of the legal, economic and political dimensions of the global trading system, and examines key issues addressed by international trade forums. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

INTC 510 International Trade Theory and Policy

This course provides students with foundation knowledge in the principles of economics. Students are introduced to the principles of international economics and acquire a basic understanding of trade theory and trade policy. events. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ECON 120 and ECON 125 INTC 520 Regional Integration The use of case studies provides students with an opportunity to apply theoretical principles to real-world

In this course, students examine the rise of regional integration movements within the context of globalization. system is discussed, while integration agreements in Europe, North America, Latin America and the Caribbean 500

Regional integration as a driver of economic development and an important aspect of the multilateral trading provide the basis for analysis of the impact of regional integration movements. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC

INTC 525 International Monetary Theory and Policy

This course is a post-graduate course for undergraduate students who have foundation knowledge in the principles of economics. Students learn about the principles of international economics and international finance. Topics covered include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets and the macroeconomics of international transactions. The use of case studies provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge of international monetary issues to real-world events. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ECON 120 and ECON 125

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INTC 530 Trade and Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property (IP) plays a significant role in the advancement of economic development and in the facilitation of international trade through treaties for multilateral protection. This course provides students with a broad overview of key aspects of IP and of the role that intellectual property plays in the international trade Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) and intellectual property rights issues in the Doha Development Agenda. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 533 The Politics of Trade agenda. Students learn about the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreement on Trade-Related aspects of

This seminar helps students develop an understanding of the political forces that influence the multilateral

decision-making process. Issues to be covered will include the political aspect of U.S. foreign trade policy and its influence in international trade negotiations; the power of emerging economies--Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC)-- to influence negotiating mandates; the power of the European Union; and the role of coalition groupings such as the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group, Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Small Island Developing States (SIDS), Small and Vulnerable Economies (SVEs), Group of 20 (G20), and Group of 33 (G33). 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 534 International Negotiations

In this seminar, students explore the principles, processes, and techniques involved in interest-based negotiation. Students learn about the various stakeholders involved in international trade negotiations (government ministries, resolving trade problems. Through a simulation exercise, students develop negotiating skills in the international trade arena. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 535 Trade and Climate Change non-government groups, industries) and use objective criteria to examine stakeholder interests and options for

This course examines the impact of climate change on the environment and the global economy, with special

attention paid to the relationship between the multilateral trading system and the emerging international regime

on climate change. Students explore the linkage between trade and climate change through critical analysis of 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: INTC 510 and INTC 520 INTC 540 International Partnerships

relevant reports by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Trade Organization (WTO).

This course is designed to introduce students to several of the issues, problems and decisions associated with creating and managing various forms of international collaborations and partnerships. Instruction incorporates the use of student teams, case-based, discussion and interactive formats, with active learning and problem solving on a daily basis. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 545 Transportation Logistics for Trade Facilitation

In this course, students examine the relationship between the growth of trade and transportation costs, with particular focus on Latin America and the Caribbean. Maritime transport, which accounts for 80 percent of which seeks to secure improvements in the efficiency of the processes associated with trading goods across national borders. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 550 Competition Law and Policy the world’s merchandise trade, is also addressed. Students also develop an understanding of trade facilitation

This course introduces students to the main categories of analysis for applying antimonopoly law: monopolies, cartels, horizontal agreements, vertical agreements and structural changes and are provided with the practical between competition policy and the multilateral trading system. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: INTC 500 tools for monopoly analysis. Students also examine competition policy in the Caribbean and the relationship

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ITEC 091 Introduction to Computers

In this course students will explore the basics of computers and the Windows environment. Students will understand features of the desktop; develop techniques for efficiently using the keyboard and mouse; and 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None acquire skills in file management and manipulation, multi-tasking, directories, files extensions and finding files.

ITEC 092 Introduction to Word Processing

This course adopts a hands-on approach to assisting students with developing the skills necessary for preparing format documents to produce professional-level documents. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: ITEC 091 ITEC 093 Introduction to Spreadsheets

electronic documents through word processing. They will utilize basic word commands to create, edit and

In this course students will acquire the skills necessary to prepare electronic spreadsheets, using a handsmanagement features for opening, saving and printing. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: ITEC 092 ITEC 094 Introduction to Slide Presentations

on approach. They will utilize basic excel commands to create and manipulate worksheets that include file

By completing this course students will be able to clearly convey information using slides as a presentation tool. Using a hands-on approach, students will use features to transform slides into professional presentations for different types of audiences. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: ITEC 093 ITEC 095 Introduction to the Internet

At the end of this course students will be able to appropriately and effectively use the internet. Through a hands-on approach students will learn to use features of the Internet to enhance their learning experience. Prerequisite: ITEC 094 These will include the use of e-mail and an exploration of security issues associated with internet use. 1 Credit/

ITEC 120 Introduction to Computer Hardware

This course introduces students to the organization and operation of computer hardware. Students learn about the various hardware components that comprise a computer system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ITEC 121 Productivity Tools

In this course, students acquire the skills needed to prepare documents in the Microsoft Office Suite environment; specifically Word, Excel and PowerPoint. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ITEC 122 Introduction to Operating Systems

In this course, students learn the basic concepts in operating systems theory and how computer resources are effectively managed. Microsoft Operating Systems and the Linux-based operating systems provide the basis for instruction. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 120 ITEC 124 Operating Systems Platform

The course helps students acquire a working knowledge of the various operating system platforms used by microcomputers. For each operating system studied, students learn about its features, system configuration and covery from system problems, installing new application software, batch programs, and networking capabilities. 122 installation, post-installation customization of the system, file and device management, diagnosing of and reOperating systems selected from the following: MS-DOS, Windows, and Linux. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC

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ITEC 130 Programme Design programming constructs.

This course introduces computer programming with emphasis on problem solving and use of structured

pseudo-code, without reference to a particular programming language. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Test out of pre-college math or MATH 093 ITEC 133 Programming I

Solutions to simple business problems are expressed as algorithms written in

Using the Java programming language, this course is intended to introduce students to fundamental concepts level programming courses. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to illustrate the applicability structural programming language. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Test out of pre-college math or MATH 093

and practices of programming. It sets the foundation for the development of analytical skills required for higher of solving problems using programming concepts learnt and will have the knowledge to programme in any

ITEC 140 Commercial and Industrial Information Systems

In this course, students learn about information systems theory and the role of information in an organization. the accounting system. They also learn basic form design and code design. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ITEC 225 Systems Analysis

Students are exposed to accounting transaction processing, the need for control, and the nature of controls in

This course will provide an in-depth look at information systems and the critical issues relating to the development process, as businesses seek to gain competitive advantage. Students will be exposed to past and current trends in system development methodologies, as well as the tools and techniques available for system development. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 133 ITEC 228 Systems Design

This course equips students with the skills needed to engage in structured system design. Students learn how to identify a well-designed system and to utilize output from the analysis phase to design a system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 225

ITEC 229 Human and Computer Interface Design

Students acquire skills and competence in the design of the interface between man and machine. Various techniques and standards are presented and practised. Visual Basic is used in the teaching of design of the interface. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

ITEC 235 Object Oriented Programming I

This course is intended for students with programming experience and builds on the ITEC 133 course. Students

will learn to decompose problems, code, decode, analyse, maintain and document programs using established

software engineering principles. Knowledge of the concepts and material presented in this course will give students better problem-solving skills, using an object oriented approach. At the end of this course, the student will be able to use built-in classes from the Java API and come up with comprehensive solutions. Prerequisite: ITEC 133 3 Credits/

ITEC 236 Object Oriented Programming II

This project-based course serves to consolidate the skills learnt in ITEC 335 as well as extend the student’s knowledge into more advanced topics in Java. Some of the pillars of Information Technology would be incorporated and demonstrated using the Java language. The course focuses on consideration for good design and at the Prerequisite: ITEC 235

end of the course students will be able to design comprehensive solutions for various scenarios. 3 Credits/

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ITEC 240 Introduction to Web Page Design

This course provides students with knowledge of how to design, create and host a web page. Students gain an appreciation of how web sites are used to facilitate content delivery and how the intranet serves as a tool for corporate communications. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ITEC 243 Introduction to XML Programming

This course focuses on the use of extensible markup language (XML) to create structured data. Emphasis will be methods of creating structured data and meta data. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 133 ITEC 244 Internet Technology

placed on the conceptual framework of XML, key components and practices of XML design, XML standards and

Students are introduced to the web and all related technologies, including both client side and server side programming. In addition, students use the Internet to connect web sites to online databases. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 133

ITEC 245 Introduction to Scripting Languages

This course introduces students to various scripting languages such as JavaScript, Ajax, and VBscript which paradigms with writing of effective scripts for website manipulation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 133 ITEC 249 Principles of Information Technology

are used to build effective web-based applications. Students are challenged to blend traditional programming

This course provides a unified treatment of data communications? networks from the perspective of data communication principles, components and services, line control techniques and network requirements and design. Topics include transmission principles and media, data encoding and channel capacity, modems and technologies, common carriers’ services and facilities, and regulatory requirements. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

modulation techniques, error and line control techniques, protocols, data compression techniques, switching

ITEC 250 Computer Networks, Architecture and Protocol

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of computer networking with a focus on the Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) model, TCP/IP protocol stack, Local Area Network (LAN) planning and design and basic Wide more advanced courses. All labs will be demonstration labs. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 122 ITEC 251 Network Management I Area Network (WAN) technology. Emphasis is on understanding the theoretical concepts that will be needed in

Students engage in an in-depth examination of the role of TCP/IP in the design of larger networks and acquire

basic troubleshooting skills. They learn about network interconnect hardware such as switches and routers and which all students must complete the laboratory requirements. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 250 ITEC 260 Information Security Standards and Control

are expected to design and build a network based on specifications given by the lecturer. This is a lab course in

In this course, students are introduced to the standards and controls required for security in the information technology environment within organizations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ITEC 270 Database Design I

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the relational database model and its use in designing working databases. The role of the database management system (DBMS) in facilitating database development is also examined. Students are expected to design and implement a database application using desktop database software. Students also learn how to use SQL (Structured Query Language) for data retrieval. Prerequisite: ITEC 133 3 Credits/

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ITEC 285 Client Server Technology

In this course, students are introduced to the requirements of creating and managing distributed systems. The roles of networking, middleware, and client-side and server-side software are examined in detail. The role of 250 and ITEC 133 internet technology in the context of distributed computing is also examined. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ITEC

ITEC 291 Time-Based Media Programming

In this course, students learn the fundamentals of designing and implementing multimedia applications using time-based multimedia software. They acquire skills in the storage, retrieval and management of multimedia communication protocols. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ITEC 244 and GRDE 128 ITEC 292 Data Structures

current web browser and http server technology. Students construct interactive cross-platform applications using content such as text, audio, images and video, both locally and remotely, using varied server technologies and

This course introduces students to advanced data structures, their implementation and application. Data structures covered include linear lists using contiguous storage and dynamic storage, stacks and queues as special cases of linear lists and binary trees. Hashing and internal sorting techniques such as insertion sort, data structures covered. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 235 ITEC 294 Information Systems Implementation

quick sort and shell sort are presented. Students are expected to develop software applications based on the

Using the case study approach, students analyze and critique information systems implementation projects. Case studies are compared to the theoretical models presented in the classroom setting. Students are expected to plan and implement an actual information system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 225 ITEC 322 Advanced Operating Systems Platform

This course introduces students to the Linux file system, group administration, and system hardware controls. Topics include installation, creation and maintaining file systems, NIS client and DHCP client configuration, NFS, SMB/Samba, Configure X, Gnome, KDE, basic memory, processes, and security. Upon completion, students will workstation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 124 ITEC 342 Three-Tier DBMS Applications protocols and technologies of the

be able to perform system administration tasks including installation, configuring and attaching a new Linux

In this course, students learn about the server-side of web application development, including the underlying content, web services, online content management and security. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 244

World Wide Web, dynamic generation of web pages, accessing database

application, using standard DBMS product, and construct a web server and establish client/web server connectivity.

Students implement a three-tier DBMS

ITEC 343 Advanced XML Programming

In this course, students learn how to leverage XML to achieve interoperability between programmes. Topics

include a hands-on approach to parsing and generating XML, and web services. Students use techniques

and technologies such as SXLT and XSL-FO to transform XML documents into readable documents such as HTML pages and PDF files. Special emphasis is placed on XSLT syntax and processing, XPATH and XPOINTER. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 243 ITEC 345

This course explores the possibilities and purpose of client side scripting over the Internet. Students learn to

Web Client-Side Programming and Libraries

use both native and plug-in technologies to build interactive interfaces that are both usable and effective. Key

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 features addressed include browser compatibility, object reusability (bandwidth issues), and different scripting environments. Proficiency in programming is required. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ITEC 244 and ITEC 245 ITEC 351 Advanced Routing Protocol Concepts

In this course, students learn how to design and implement classless IP addressing schemes for a network. Emphasis is placed on advanced configuration commands with implementing protocols such as RIP V2, OSPF and EIGRP. Students apply configuration commands to evaluate routing updates and acquire skills to implement the IPv6 addressing. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 251 ITEC 352 LAN Switching and VLANs

In this course, instruction focuses on helping students to develop troubleshooting skills in common network problems at Layers 1, 2, 3 and 7, using a layered model approach. Students learn how to interpret network diagrams; how to perform and verify initial switch configuration tasks, including remote access management, and how to configure, verify and troubleshoot VLANs, interVLAN routing, VTP trunking and RSTP operations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 251 ITEC 360 Security Management

The course introduces students to the concepts of the management of information security as outlined in the IEC27005:2005 code of practice identifies twelve (12) domains (topic areas) with which security students must be knowledgeable. This course covers seven (7) of these domains in-depth, along with other relevant security certification exams. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 260 ITEC 363 Network Security

Information Technology Code of Practice for Information Security Management (ISO/IEC27002:2005). The ISO/

topics. The course will also meet some of the requirements of students studying for information security

This course introduces students to more advanced features of networks, with a particular emphasis on security.

Students develop an understanding of the roles of Layer 2 and 3 networks, how traffic is routed between them, and how access between networks can be securely managed. A holistic overview is provided of network security within data network environments, and students learn the specifics of security hardware such as firewalls, virtual private networks (VPNs), demilitarized zones and intrusion detection systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 351

ITEC 371 Database Design II

In this course, students will explore advanced database management system design principles and techniques. Topics covered include database access methods, query processing and optimization, transaction processing, ITEC 270 distributed databases, object-oriented databases, data warehousing and data mining. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ITEC 372 Database Programming with SQL

In this course, students build on the knowledge of SQL gained in ITEC 270. Students will use the data definition language to create tables and constraints and the data manipulation language to insert, update and delete data. and indexes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 270 ITEC 374 Database Administration I Emphasis will be placed on creating queries and database objects such as views, sequences, synonyms, aliases

In this course, students learn how to install and maintain an Oracle database. They will gain a conceptual

understanding of the Oracle database architecture and how its components work and interact with one another. They will also learn how to create an operational database and properly manage the various structures in an backup/recovery techniques. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 270 effective and efficient manner including performance monitoring, database security, user management and

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ITEC 375 Microcomputer Applications in Business

The Microcomputer Business Applications course prepares students for microcomputer (personal computer) want to use microcomputer business software to create business solutions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 270 ITEC 376 Building Internet Ready Applications

business applications specialist jobs. It is intended for students who are employed in businesses that use or

The aim of this course is to provide application software developers with the skills to build enterprise-scale 270

internet applications using the Oracle10g ODS Forms product. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ITEC 240 and ITEC

ITEC 443 Local and Remote Data Integration

In this course, students acquire skills in using XML to address issues of data integration between computer

programmes of disparate languages platforms. Students learn how to leverage the loose coupling of serviceoriented architectures to address issues of data integration between these types of computer programmes, when executing across domains. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ITEC 236 and ITEC 243 ITEC 445 Scripting for System Administration

This course provides students with a survey of the tools and techniques used for scripting common tasks in

operating systems environments. It offers a blended approach between traditional programming paradigms and scripting languages for the OS environment. Students are introduced to a system administration programming language such as Perl and learn how to create and install modules; how to set up and manipulate user accounts, and how to install them for use on computing systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ITEC 244 and ITEC 245 ITEC 451 Network Management II

This course covers the fundamentals of network management, network operations and network fault triage. With

a focus on industry-standard network management tools that are based on the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), students learn how to monitor the network for issues, and how to respond to issues using a standard escalation policy. Particular emphasis is placed on network analysis, including network component ITEC 251 ITEC 452 testing, end-to-end testing, component isolation, network repair and design review. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

In this course, students examine the impact of applications (Voice Over IP and Video Over IP) on network

WAN Technologies

operations. They practise configuring, verifying and troubleshooting DHCP and DNS operations on a router. In routers, and a frame relay on routers. Students also learn how to troubleshoot a WAN implementation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 251 ITEC 453

addition, they learn how to configure and verify a basic WAN serial connection and a PPP connection between

This course will introduce students to the different types of mobile telephone technologies and systems from 1st generation analog to 4th generation digital broadband and beyond. Students learn to compare different types of these services have evolved over the years. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 250 ITEC 456 Wireless Networking wireless voice, data and information services, key commercial systems, and platforms used, and examine how

Introduction to Mobile Technologies

This course introduces students to wireless networks, including the wireless personal area network (WPAN),

wireless local area network (WLAN) and wireless wide area network (WWAN). Topics covered include physical

layer standards, medium access control, building and securing WLANs, including cellular data networks. Theory

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 classes are supplemented with labs to enhance practical knowledge in integrating, testing, commissioning, and managing wireless networks. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 250 ITEC 457 Data Centre Construction Fundamentals

This course introduces students to data centre architecture and its realization. Building on knowledge and skills acquired in previous courses on equipment deployment, interconnection and wiring, network documentation and project management, Data Centre Construction Fundamentals brings together several critical network and data centre security are also discussed. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 250 ITEC 472 Database Programming with PL/SQL construction skills. Technology trends such as storage area networks, server farms, network redundancy, and

This course introduces students to PL/SQL, Oracle’s procedural Language extension to SQL. Students learn to create and execute PL/SQL blocks of application code and to develop stored procedures, functions, packages and database triggers. They also learn about declaring variables, trapping exceptions and declaring and controlling cursors. Students are also introduced to managing PL/SQL programme units, managing dependencies and using some of the Oracle-supplied packages. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 372 ITEC 474 Database Administration II

Students develop proficiency in loading, modifying, backing up, recovering, and tuning DB2 databases, using DB2 utilities, services aids, and catalogue tables. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ITEC 374 ITEC 499 Senior Project – Information Technology

Students will be required to complete a senior project, consisting of the development, design, implementation, testing and documentation of a current real world problem. Projects will be selected by students in consultation department chair. Team sizes may not exceed three (3) students. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 115 Introduction to Legal Aspects of Records Management with the lecturer. Project descriptions and the size of project teams must be approved in advance by the

This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of legislative provisions affecting the management of records. It focuses on the relationship of record keeping with the law. It also enables students to understand volved in the action within a business transaction. 3 credits/ Prerequisite: RCMT 150 the intrinsic connection between the law and the role of records as the evidence of an action and of those in-

LAWW 120 Introduction to Legal Terminology

This course introduces students to legal terminology relevant to the field of court reporting. Students acquire working knowledge of the language and documents most commonly used in the legal profession. Topics guidelines, and examples of routine legal documents and their uses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 122 Law, Governance and Society
(formerly LAWW145)

covered include definitions, spellings and pronunciations of legal terms, basic court procedures, court rules and

This course presents and integrates three major areas in the functioning of modern day Caribbean society. Students acquire a sound knowledge of law and the working of legal systems; governance in the Caribbean and how it functions; and the nature and composition of the Caribbean society and the challenges it faces as it grows. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 125 Ethics

This course introduces students to the major theories of human behavior which underlie ethical behavior and practices in individuals and organizations. Students examine the impact on organizational credibility and

14

legitimacy when institutions act without due regard for ethical practices, and explore contemporary challenges to maintaining professional ethics in small island developing states. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 130 Caribbean Legal Systems
(formerly CRIM 220)

In this course, students build on basic understanding of the characteristics of the law, and acquire more indepth knowledge and appreciation of the nature and technical meaning of certain legal terms and the provisions for criminal offences of the laws of Trinidad and Tobago. Students learn about the procedures to be followed by the police in the performance of their duties-especially as it relates to detained persons-and the role of the courts in ensuring that agents of the state fully comply with the law. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 133 Law and the Community
(formerly LAWW 330)

This course is an overview of one’s legal rights and responsibilities as a socially responsible citizen of Trinidad and Tobago. It addresses recurring legal themes such as crime, family matters, contract, company law, constitution and intellectual property. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 135 Constitutional Law
(formerly LAWW 102)

This course assumes that students have accepted and appreciated the concept of a constitution. In this course, students examine the fundamentals of the constitution; the fundamental rights and freedoms which it enshrines; 220 and constitutional institutions and their roles and functions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LAWW 130 and CRIM

LAWW 140 Criminal Law

(formerly CRIM 201)

In this course, students develop an understanding of criminal law in Trinidad and Tobago, and examine acts which society has labeled a crime. At the end of this course, students gain an understanding of criminal liability in the context of the complex set of rules and principles which govern society. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 165 Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy (formerly ENVS 165)

In this course, students examine the formulation and establishment of environmental law and policy. They will examine Trinidad and Tobago’s legal system as well as some of the major concepts in environmental law and policy. In addition, students are sensitised to the structure and function of the United Nations system and how ENVS 160

international law affects national laws and policies for managing the environment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite:

LAWW 270 Laws Affecting Journalism and Public Relations

This course is designed to expose students to the laws of Trinidad and Tobago as they relate to the practice

of journalism and public relations. As future journalists, this course introduces students to laws such as libel, establishment of publishing houses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 310 Business Law
(formerly BUSI 102)

slander, defamation, sedition, intellectual property and those relating to the award of broadcast licenses and the

The course introduces students to Trinidad and Tobago’s legal system and laws, with particular focus on the commercial paper, criminal law, and agency and partnership. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 315 Administrative Law and Regulatory Practices

study of legal principles applied to business transactions. Topics covered include torts, contracts, court systems,

This course focuses on the legal framework which governs operations in the public sector. Students develop an and regulations governing the public sector. Students are exposed to the origination, creation and development of laws, as well as the judicial review process (Act No. 60 of 2000 passed by The Trinidad and Tobago Parliament).

understanding of the balance of power among the executive, judiciary and the legislature and learn about laws

150

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Students also study the constitution of Trinidad and Tobago, and in particular, the sections relevant to the public sector. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LAWW 310 LAWW 320 Employment Law

This course provides students with an appreciation of both the common law and the statutory position of individual employee / employer relationships. The course covers those areas of law that are important to understanding the employment relationship, with particular emphasis on the definition of the contract of

employment, the formation of the employment relationship, the law governing collective agreements, the role and function of the industrial tribunal and the distinction between wrongful dismissal and unfair dismissal. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LAWW 310 LAWW 400 Corporate Law

The aim of this course is to develop the skill set necessary for the accounting professional to understand the general legal framework and specific legal areas relating to businesses. Topics covered include legal aspects BUSI 102 of a company, a partnership, a sole trader and corporate governance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LAWW 310 or

LIBS 130 Fundamental Research Skills

In this course, the basic steps of the research process are identified and the tasks associated with each of the

steps are thoroughly explored. Students engage in information-based activities that are integral to pursuing and completing the steps in the research process. A group research project that involves delivery in both oral and written formats is assigned as coursework and is one of the key assessment components of student competencies developed from class instruction. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LIBS 135 Introduction to Libraries and Information Services

This course provides students with a general understanding of the world of libraries and information centres. Students are presented with an overview of the history and development of libraries and examine each Prerequisite: None/ Co-requisite: LIBS 136 type of library for its history, role and function, organizational structure, services and resources. 3 Credits/

LIBS 136 Introduction to Information Resources in Libraries

This course provides an introduction to the various types of print and non-print material and online resources found in libraries and information centres. Students will also be required to examine the various types of material. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-requisite: LIBS 135 LIBS 140 Computer Applications in Libraries furniture and equipment required for the proper storage, display and utilization of both print and non-print

the computer hardware, software and applications relevant to library systems and services, and of their practical and to create simple web pages in compliance with standards and good practice in web authoring. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 136

This course enables students to perform effectively in a computerized library environment. Students learn about

application to library work and administration. The course helps students to understand and use the internet,

LIBS 145 Introduction to Technical Services in Libraries

In this course, students gain knowledge of the operations of the technical services unit and its relationship with other departments. They are presented with an overview of the technical processes performed in the technical services department of the library, including acquisition of resources, serials management and collection maintenance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 136

151

LIBS 200 User Services I

This course introduces students to the basic reference sources and services in libraries and information centres. Students will also examine the use of the internet and other technology resources in the provision of reference and information services. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 136 LIBS 201 User Services II

In this course, emphasis is placed on understanding the range of users of library services, their needs and

the services available in library and information centres. Students learn about the history of circulation and

circulation-related methods of delivering material to users and examine traditional and current methods of access to information sources and the implications of such methods, especially with the use of new technologies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 200

LIBS 248 Introduction to the Organization of Knowledge: Cataloguing

The purpose of this course is to educate students on the importance of organizing library materials and to teach

them the methods used to ensure effective information retrieval. It covers the standards and procedures for to perform descriptive and subject cataloguing up to AACR2R level two. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 145. LIBS 249 Introduction to the Organization of Knowledge: Classification

copy cataloguing and some aspects of original cataloguing. Students will be provided with the necessary skills

This course serves to promote understanding of the importance of organizing library materials and to provide students with the skills to effectively use three of the major classification schemes: DDC, LC and UDC. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 248

LIBS 255 Library Practicum I

The library practicum comprises supervised work in a fully functioning library/information centre under the general direction of an internship practicum coordinator and under the guidance and supervision of a qualified professional librarian in the participating library. 2 Credits/ Prerequisites: LIBS 201 and LIBS 249 LIBS 256 Library Practicum II

This practicum comprises supervised work in a fully functioning library/information centre under the general direction of an internship practicum coordinator and under the guidance and supervision of a qualified professional librarian in the participating library. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 255 LIBS 267 Integrated Marketing Communications for Libraries

This course introduces the students to the concept of integrated marketing communications in library and information centres. It examines the principles of marketing communication theory as it relates to products and services provided by libraries and information centres. Students analyse the various elements of the 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 200

promotional mix and evaluate the advantages and limitations of each advertising/promotional tool used.

LIBS 270 Introduction to Serials Management

This course provides an overview of the management of serials in libraries. Students will focus on the selection, acquisition and bibliographic control of serials. They will also examine current trends and issues in serials LIBS 145 and LIBS 201 management and both manual and automated methods of serials control. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LIBS 136,

LIBS 273 Introduction to Children’s Literature (Guided Elective)

This course seeks to expose students to the range of literature and literature-based programming for children, from infancy to pre-pubescence. It will provide students with the basic techniques for evaluating fiction and

152

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 non-fiction material for children. It will also introduce students to the range of promotional reading and literacy 136

activities and programmes developed in Children’s libraries and School libraries. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS

LIBS 274 Introduction to Caribbeana and Its Sources

This course introduces students to the information resources of the Caribbean. Prerequisite: LIBS 136

better understanding of the Caribbean through the study and appreciation of its literary heritage. 3 Credits/ LIBS 278 Management of Special Libraries

It seeks to promote a

The course will provide an introduction to the management of different types of special libraries, including institutional, academic, business and government libraries. 3 credits/Prerequisites: LIBS 200 and LIBS 201 LIBS 279 Management of Academic Libraries

This course provides students with the skills necessary to assist professional librarians in the effective management of academic libraries as well as to enable them to plan, implement and evaluate academic library management. It examines key concepts in the management of academic libraries through the exploration of their historical evolution. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LIBS 145 and LIBS 201 LIBS 299 Senior Project – Library and Information Studies

In this course, students will use the cataloguing, classification, and acquisition skills previously developed. They area. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LIBS 269

will be required to examine the development, use and evaluation of a library collection in a specified subject

MGMT 125 Principles of Management

This introductory course exposes students to both the theory and application of the principles, practices, understanding of the evolution of management theories and practices, the role which such theories and practices

techniques and tools that underlie and inform the discipline of management. Students acquire a fundamental have played in shaping the dynamics of management thinking and management behavior, and the processes by Prerequisite: None

which these theories and practices are applied in organizations in the pursuit of business activities. 3 Credits/

MGMT 200 Events Management

This is an introductory course in the field of event management. Event management is the coordinated effort to

plan, promote, execute and evaluate an event in a business context. This course applies the basic foundations None

of managerial theory to the event management activities which all business performs. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MGMT 205 Management Information Systems

A manager is required to understand the macro-perspective of the organization and the impact of the shift

from the industrial to the information age. This course focuses on the management of information as a valuable of managing information systems in organizational contexts. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125 MGMT 210 Introduction to Project Management

business resource. Students are presented with a conceptual overview of information systems and the challenges

In this course, students learn the fundamental principles of the field of project management and acquire the essential skills used by project management professionals. On completion of this course, students will have gained the foundation knowledge and skills needed to proceed to an intermediate and then advanced level course in project management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125

153

MGMT 220 Public Sector Project Management

This course in project monitoring and evaluation introduces students to the fundamentals of project monitoring and evaluation in the more efficient and effective delivery of projects. It exposes them to the concepts, processes and tools required to give proper oversight and evaluation of public sector projects. Students will be able Prerequisite: MGMT 210

to scientifically and more accurately monitor and evaluate project implementation and success. 3 Credits/

MGMT 225 Procurement and Inventory Management

This course covers concepts on optimizing inventory management and managing the complete flow of materials cal experience in using the procurement processes. They will be able to calculate operations through accurate investment.

along the supply chain. Full utilization of this course gives students an opportunity to gain first-hand practiforecasting, setting and achieving goals, managing all aspects of the supply chain, and maximizing return on 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 210 MGMT 300 Organisational Behaviour
(formerly BUSI 103)

This course enables students to develop an understanding of how the internal and external environmental forces impact on individuals and organizations. In addition, students will acquire knowledge of the tools and techniques available to effectively plan and manage change. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: MGMT 125 MGMT 310 Production and Operations Management

In this course, students acquire knowledge and skills in production and operations management. Topics

covered include product design and process selection, design of forecasting systems, capacity planning and facility location, layout of the physical system, quality control systems and related problems, job design and work measurement, production planning and scheduling systems, and inventory management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MGMT 125 and STAT 122 (MATH 166/167) MGMT 410 Quality Management

In this course, students acquire knowledge and techniques related to the management of quality in service/ manufacturing organizations. Topics covered include theory and practice in design, process planning and control for quality. Recent developments in the field of quality management, cases in statistical quality control, Taguchi Method, quality circles, and total quality management will also be discussed. The importance and impact of 310 international quality standards such as ISO 9000 Series are also emphasized. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT

MGMT 420 Strategic Modeling

Persons operating in today’s business environment are required to plan and implement effectively to compete

in the global marketplace. The understanding of the planning process at the organizational level is fundamental to survival in the global economy. This course exposes students to both the theory and practice of strategic planning and to the principles and techniques of strategic management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125 MKTG 114 Customer Service Fundamentals

This course introduces students to the basic tools and skills needed to provide a consistent level of excellence in service to customers and clients. Instruction focuses on developing skills in the areas of personal and telephone etiquette, analysis of the communication process, solving customer problems, and developing customer loyalty through a programme of service excellence. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MKTG 205 Principles of Marketing
(formerly MKTG 102)

This introductory marketing course provides a realistic examination of how marketing is practiced in businesses

154

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 today. Students are exposed to marketing as a total system of business action and not as an assortment of fragmented functions. Emphasis is placed on the importance of understanding customers and meeting their needs. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

MKTG 210 Principles of Advertising

(Formerly MKTG 202)

This course gives students insight into the advertising process, its role, methods, capabilities and limitations. corporate plans, marketing plans and advertising plans. Elements of creative and media planning are explored

The relationship between marketing and advertising planning is examined, along with the interaction between and discussed and students are given an overview of out-of-home, direct response and interactive and business205

to-business advertising, sales promotion, event marketing and public relations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG

MKTG 212 Advertising for the Entrepreneur

This course covers in detail the advertising process, its role, methods, capabilities and limitations as they apply to

entrepreneurs. Advertising will be presented from a business and marketing perspective to aid entrepreneurs in MKTG 205

their efforts to successfully promote and grow their businesses with limited resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MKTG 305 Fundamentals of Selling (formerly MKTG201)

This course examines the factors involved in effective selling of products, services or ideas; methods of

conducting the sales presentation; and application of psychological and persuasive selling techniques. Emphasis will be on developing confidence and professionalism in the selling interaction, and enhancing the student’s communications, listening, team participation and problem solving skills. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG 205 MKTG 310 Retailing

The aim of this course is to enable students to become good decision makers in retail management. It focuses

on the highly dynamic nature of the retail sector and emphasizes businesses’ ability to adapt to change. Students learn about the growth and development of major retail institutions and general retailing concepts and practices such as trading areas, location and site analysis, merchandising, store positioning and transfer of retail technology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG 205 MKTG 315 Services Marketing

In this course students are exposed to the core principles, concepts and marketing strategies which are specific

to the services sector. It explores service processes and delivery, customer loyalty, pricing, communications and capacity by studying businesses in a variety of service industries. In addition, instruction expands the 4Ps concepts to include 8Ps for the services sector. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG 205 MKTG 320 Consumer Behavior
(formerly MKTG220)

This course addresses both the fundamentals and complexities of consumer behavior. Students analyse the consumer buying process and its contributing factors and explore the increasing use of consumer behavior buying behavior and business buying behavior is made with respect to buying processes and impacting factors, so that students can differentiate between these processes and determine the importance of each behavior type to diverse firms. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MKTG 205 and PSYC 103 MKTG 325 Integrated Marketing Communications analysis as an essential ingredient in a firm’s overall marketing strategy and tactics. A comparison of consumer

In this course, students examine the creation, use and management of promotional tools by businesses. The course provides an integrative approach to the study of the promotion mix, including advertising, publicity, personal selling, and sales promotion. Topics covered include evaluation of the role of promotion in marketing

155

and the economy; formulation and analysis of promotional goals; planning, organizing, and controlling the promotion function; creative planning; and budgeting and media selection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG 205

MKTG 330 International Marketing (formerly MKTG 211)

This course exposes students to the concepts and practices in international marketing. Emphasis is placed on the impact of globalization on the marketing strategy and practices of a firm and major trends in the international marketplace. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG 205 MKTG 340 Market Research
(formerly MKTG 285)

This course provides students with a solid understanding of marketing research practices and processes, and

the tools available to assist business decision-making. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of qualitative and quantitative research design, data collection and analysis and communication of the results. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MKTG 205 and STAT 122 (or MATH 166 or MATH 167) MKTG 405 Customer Relationship Management

This course focuses on customer relationship management (CRM) and the customer-driven, market-based management practices that enable a business to attract, satisfy, and retain customers. Students learn to use CRM value of the customer. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG 205 MKTG 420 Pricing and Logistics effectively to accurately evaluate the market place, competitors and their positioning, and determine the lifetime

This course takes a functional approach to the topic of pricing and logistics, so that students are better equipped to operate in any marketing environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MKTG 205 MKTG 450 Marketing Management

This course is designed to help students understand the importance of marketing management in analysing, buyers for the purpose of achieving organizational objectives.

planning, implementing programmes designed to create, build, and maintain beneficial exchanges with target importance of all marketing techniques in the success or failure of any business in its given industry. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MKTG 220, MKTG 325, MKTG 340, and MKTG 405 OFAD 100 Keyboarding

Emphasis is placed on understanding the

In this course students aim to master keyboarding skills to a speed of 80 words per minute. In addition, they 4 credits/ Prerequisites: None

will acquire skills in the preparation, proof reading and electronic storage of business and legal documents.

OFAD 120 Word Processing I

This practical course is designed to develop students’ basic skills in electronic document production and

management for the office. It focuses on various forms of office correspondence and develops the speed and

accuracy of students’ typing skills while introducing techniques of proof reading, editing, document planning and generation processes, and basic dictation. To successfully complete this course, students must acquire a speed of at least 50 wpm with an accuracy rating of at least 85%. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: A typing speed of at least 45wpm as evidenced by placement speed test score OR COMPASS OFAD 010 OFAD 125 Word Processing II

This course builds on the skills developed in OFAD 120. Students learn to prepare legal documents, technical reports, proposals and other business documents. Advanced activities in the use of mail merge, referencing, citation, table design, page layout and others are also covered. Accuracy and speed are emphasized and

156

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 successful completion of this course requires an exit speed of between 70-80 wpm with an accuracy rating of at least 95%. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: OFAD 120 OFAD 135 Administrative Office Management

In this course students are introduced to management practices and challenges in the modern office environment through an examination of the evolution of management practice, specific administrative activities and the emerging issues affecting administrative professionals. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MGMT 125 and OFAD 120 OFAD 200 Speed Development

This is a self-directed course designed for students to attain the typing speed necessary to graduate from the students attain the minimum speed or above, they can seek certification through a challenge examination after all Year I prerequisites have been completed. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: OFAD 125 OFAD 215 Spreadsheet Design and Processing

OFAD programme: 80wpm which is the minimum speed requirement for administrative professionals. Once

This course develops students’ knowledge and skills in the effective use of spreadsheet software. It includes spreadsheet essentials, creating and editing a workbook, formatting cells and ranges, worksheet formatting, managing worksheets, working with data, using basic formulas and functions, creating charts from data, using advanced data filtering, sorting, merging and linking sheets and workbooks and exporting and imbedding worksheets. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: OFAD 120 OFAD 221 Database Design and Processing

This course develops students’ skills and knowledge in the use and application of database software required for the efficient functioning of the office. It includes database essentials, creating database tables, forms, reports and queries. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: OFAD 120

OFAD 231 Desktop Publishing and Presentation Tools

This course develops students’ ability to effectively use office presentation and publishing software. Students learn to design multimedia presentations and other types of documents (brochures, booklets, flyers, posters culminates in student presentations of portfolios of various types of publications and multimedia presentations. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: OFAD 120 and signs) for the dissemination of information in an attractive, compelling and professional format. The course

OFAD 236 Office Communications Management

Effective communication is a critical requirement in successful modern day organizations. In this course, students

learn to use technology resources to improve and manage office communications. They develop skills in the effective use of internet and intranet technologies, and an appreciation of the need for continuous learning to keep abreast of advances in communication technologies. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: OFAD 120 OFAD 288 Office Administration Portfolio

This capstone course is designed to allow students to compile a portfolio of work which showcases the developmental path of the student during the course of study.

competencies in such areas as document production, spread sheet design, database design, multimedia presentations, desktop publishing and other skills and aptitudes accomplished during their study. The completed programme. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: OFAD 120 POLC 127 Introduction to Law Enforcement

The portfolio provides evidence of their

portfolio can then be utilized to assist students in seeking employment upon the successful completion of the

(formerly CRIM 103)

This is an introductory course designed to expose students to some of the core concepts in law enforcement.

157

Discussions include the history and development of policing, role of the police, police powers, police discretion and accountability. Specific emphasis is placed on police agencies and their functions, organization and problems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CRIM 125

POLC 210 Police and Community Relations

(Formerly CRIM 211)

In this course, students explore the relationship between members of the community and police officers and the role of this relationship in the facilitation of crime prevention. Topics covered include police discretion, prejudice and discrimination. The role of the modern police officer is examined in relation to the challenge of crime control versus individual human rights. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

158

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences

The School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences offers programmes in a range of distinct disciplines

and sub-disciplines. It is the primary provider of postsecondary nursing programmes up to the baccalaureate

level in Trinidad and Tobago. In addition, it is the premier provider of professional allied health programmes

in critical areas such as radiation therapy, radiological sciences and medical laboratory technology. These programmes and those in the area of environmental studies highlight the benefits of the College’s close partnerships with its industry stakeholders.

The School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences comprises four departments: • Nursing

• Health Science Technologies • Environmental Studies • Natural and Life Sciences

15

Mission
• To provide the environment and resources for students to transform their innate desires into tangible • To produce confident and competently trained individuals to support key health care policies and initiate • To embrace research as a core requirement to inform professional practice. change as pioneers in their fields careers, applicable to the overall development of the nation

Department of Nursing
The Department of Nursing, formerly known as the College of Nursing, was established under the National Institute of Higher Education Research Science and Technology (NIHERST) in 1990. Over the twenty years of its existence, the department’s programme offerings have developed from an apprenticeship programme to an associate degree, with two options in general nursing and psychiatric nursing. In 2009, the associate degree programmes were upgraded to bachelor’s level, consistent with international trends in nursing education. continuously improving the services offered to its students and industry stakeholders. The department continues to play a critical role in training for the health sector and remains committed to

Programmes
The Department of Nursing offers the following degree programme options: Bachelor Degree Programmes B.Sc. Nursing (General) B.Sc. Nursing (Psychiatric) Associate Degree Programmes AS Nursing (General) AS Nursing (Psychiatric)

Bachelor of Science - General Nursing (BSN)

The Bachelor of Science degree programme in Nursing is suitable for new applicants who want to enter the nursing

profession as well as for practicing nurses who wish to upgrade their professional status. The programme has two tracks: general nursing and psychiatric nursing and it is designed to produce nursing professionals who are equipped to function more efficiently and effectively in the constantly changing dynamics of the modern health care environment. Through the curriculum, students develop an in-depth understanding of nursing philosophy, skills and the ability to engage in evidence-based practice, professional reflection and visioning, thereby and Tobago.

nursing theory and conceptual frameworks that underpin nursing practice. They also acquire critical thinking ensuring their readiness to make a meaningful contribution to nursing leadership and management in Trinidad

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - General Nursing
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (General Nursing track), students must successfully complete 135 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

160

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses 66 credits 48 credits 135 credits 21 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function in a clinical environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously throughout the programme to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.

Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)

3280 hours

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
NURS 115 NURS 150 NURS 156 NURS 160 NURS 211 NURS 220 NURS 223 NURS 260 NURS 275 NURS 295 NURS 306 NURS 312 NURS 320 NURS 324 NURS 334 NURS 337 NURS 401 NURS 411 NURS 445 NURS 447 NURS 499

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Nursing Practice Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Health Promotion and Maintenance Nutrition I Nursing Science Pathophysiology I The Childbearing Family Nutrition and Disease Pharmacology in Nursing Epidemiology Health Assessment Mental Health Pathophysiology II Paediatric and Adolescent Care Adult Nursing Nursing Informatics Gender Issues in Health Care Professional Development and Management Critical Care Nursing Gerontology Senior Project - Nursing

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES
BIOL 171 BIOL 172 BIOL 221 CHEM 121 COMM 119 COMM 151 MATH 108 Structure and Function I Structure and Function II Microbiology for Nursing Bio-chemistry Sign Language Communication in Nursing Dosage Mathematics

48

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

66

4 4 3 3 2 2 3

Total Support Course Credits

21

Career Option:
• Nurse

Bachelor of Science degree – Psychiatric Nursing Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - Psychiatric Nursing
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (Psychiatric Nursing track), students must successfully complete 136 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

161

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

Total Credits Required for Graduation

136 credits

21 credits

48 credits

67credits

Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function in a clinical environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously throughout the programme to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.

Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)

3280 hours

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
NURS 115 NURS 116 NURS 150 NURS 154 NURS 160 NURS 211 NURS 220 NURS 224 NURS 250 NURS 261 NURS 276 NURS 295 NURS 306 NURS 325 NURS 326 NURS 336 NURS 337 NURS 401 NURS 411 NURS 441 NURS 448 NURS 499

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Nursing Practice Foundations in Psychiatry Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Health Promotion and Maintenance Nutrition I Nursing Science Pathophysiology I The Childbearing Family (Psyc.) Psycho - Pathophysiology Nutrition and Disease (Psyc.) Psycho - Pharmacology Epidemiology Health Assessment Paediatric and Adolescent Care (Psyc.) Introduction to Medical-Surgical Nursing Care of the Mentally Ill Adult Nursing Informatics Gender Issues in Health Care Professional Development and Management Psychiatric Emergencies Psycho - Gerontology Senior Project - Nursing

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 171 BIOL 172 BIOL 221 CHEM 121 COMM 119 COMM 151 MATH 108 SUPPORT COURSES Structure and Function I Structure and Function II Microbiology for Nursing Bio-chemistry Sign Language Communication in Nursing Dosage Mathematics

48
4 4 3 3 2 2 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

67

Total Support Course Credits

21

Career Option:
• Psychiatric Nurse

Associate in Applied Science – General Nursing
The Associate in Applied Science degree programme is appropriate for persons who wish to enter the nursing profession. This programme has two tracks: general and psychiatric nursing. The main aim of the programme is to prepare nurses with the critical thinking, analytical, evaluation and technology skills and competencies that provides a sound foundation for further studies in nursing or other health science professions.

will equip them to provide quality patient care in any local, regional or international health care setting. It also

Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – General Nursing
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in General Nursing, students must successfully complete

162

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
74 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses 37 credits 13 credits 24 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

74 credits

Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function throughout the programme to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.

in a clinical environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously

Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)

3280 hours

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
BIOL 221 COMM 151 NURS 115 NURS 141 NURS 150 NURS 156 NURS 160 NURS 220 NURS 223 NURS 260 NURS 275 NURS 290 NURS 295

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Microbiology for Nursing Communication in Nursing Foundations of Nursing Practice Emergency Care Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Health Promotion and Maintenance Nutrition I Pathophysiology I The Childbearing Family Nutrition and Disease Pharmacology in Nursing Introduction to Adult Nursing Epidemiology

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 SCIE 121 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Foundations of Natural Sciences Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES
BIOL 171 BIOL 172 CHEM 121 COMM 123 Structure and Function I Structure and Function II Biochemistry Sign Language

24

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

37

4 4 3 2

Total Support Course Credits
NURS 371 NURS 372 NURS 372 NURS 373 Clinical Experiences (Level I Practical Examination) Clinical Experiences (Level II A Practical Examination) Clinical Experiences (Level II B Practical Examination) Clinical Experiences (Level III Practical Examination)

13
NC NC

GUIDED ELECTIVE COURSES
DRAM 101 ARTS 100 Drama Steel Pan Appreciation

Total Credits Clinical Hours

3280

Career Option:
• Nurse

Associate in Applied Science – Psychiatric Nursing Graduation Requirements: AAS – Psychiatric Nursing
To successfully complete the Associate in Applied Science degree in Psychiatric Nursing, students must complete 77 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

43 credits 13 credits 24 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

80 credits

163

Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function in a clinical environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously throughout the programme to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.

Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)

3280 hours

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
BIOL 221 COMM 151 NURS 115 NURS 116 NURS 141 NURS 150 NURS 156 NURS 160 NURS 220 NURS 224 NURS 250 NURS 261 NURS 276 NURS 290 NURS 295

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Microbiology for Nursing Communication in Nursing Foundations of Nursing Practice Foundations of Psychiatry Emergency Care Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Health Promotion and Maintenance Nutrition I Pathophysiology I The Childbearing Family (Psyc.) Psycho-Pathophysiology Nutrition and Disease (Psyc.) Psycho-Pharmacology Introduction to Adult Nursing Epidemiology

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 116 PSYC 103 SCIE 121 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Foundations of Natural Sciences Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Structure and Function I Structure and Function II Biochemistry Sign Language

24

BIOL 171 BIOL 172 CHEM 121 COMM 123

4 4 3 2

Total Credits – Required Courses in the Major
NURS 371 NURS 372 NURS 372 NURS 373 NURS 236 Clinical Experiences (Level I Practical Examination) Clinical Experiences (Level II A Practical Examination) Clinical Experiences (Level II B Practical Examination) Clinical Experiences (Level III Practical Examination) Psycho - Pathophysiology

43
DRAM 101 ARTS 100

Total Support Course Credits GUIDED ELECTIVE COURSES
Drama Steel Pan Appreciation

13
NC NC

Total Clinical Hours

3280

Career Option: • Psychiatric Nurse Faculty Profile - Nursing
Rupert Jones, Department Chair Senior Lecturer - Nursing M.Phil, B.A, Dip, Cert Research Interest: Nursing education Carolyn Bascombe-McCave Senior Lecturer - Medical/Surgical nursing, gynecology, obstetrics and ICU M.Ed., B.Sc., RN, LM, CCN Research Interest: Nursing education Abraham Bremnor Senior Lecturer - Nursing and Psychology MA, , B.Sc, ASD (M.Phil in progress) Research Interest: Nursing education Catherine E Dalrymple Lecturer - Mental/Orthopedic Nursing B.Sc., BA, Cert, RGN, RN, RM Research Interest: Nursing education Marina Fraser Lecturer - Nursing, psychiatry and midwifery ASD, B.Sc., Dip, RN Research Interest: Nursing education Maureen Giddings-Estwick Lecturer - Nursing M.Ed. RN, LM Research Interest: Nursing education Steve Mohammed Senior Lecturer – General and Psychiatric Nursing M.Ed., Dip, Cert, RN Research Interest: Nursing education Shirley Rajkumar Senior Lecturer - Nursing, midwifery Dip, Cert, RN, RM, Research Interest: Maternity and child care Daisy S. Ramperad-Rattan Senior Lecturer – Nursing, midwifery and research M.Phil, B.Sc., RN, RM, Research Interest: Tobacco control

164

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Beryl Brewster Senior Lecturer - General Nursing and health visiting M.Sc., BA, ASD, Dip, Cert, RN, RNT, R.M Research Interest: Nursing education Avril Wilba Carter Clinical Instructor Psychiatric Nursing ASD Research Interest: Nursing education Linda Lewis-Suite Lecturer - Gerontology/clinical nursing RMN, RN Research Interest: Nursing education Ruhee Mir-Mohammed Senior Lecturer – Nursing, health sciences M.Sc., B.Sc., Dip, RGN, CCN Research Interest: Nursing education Henry Sandy Lecturer - Gerontology, medical/ surgical nursing Post cert, RN, AHA, Dip. Research Interest: Nursing education Ynolde Sitahall Senior Lecturer - Nursing M.Sc., Cert, RN Research Interest: Nursing education

Department of Health Science Technologies
The Department of Health Science Technologies offers certificates, diplomas, associate and bachelor’s degree programmes in the fields of medical laboratory technology, health records science, pharmacy assistant, cytology, radiography, and radiation therapy. The curriculum emphasizes competency-based learning, and students are practical sessions which directly link theory to workplace competencies. Students are also required to complete for the workplace upon graduation.

exposed to the most modern equipment and up-to-date techniques in the laboratory environment, through a clinical internship at approved public and private health care facilities, thereby ensuring that they are ready

Programmes
The Department of Health Science Technologies offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes B.Sc. Medical Lab Technology B.Sc. Radiation Therapy B.Sc. Radiography Associate Degree Programmes AAS Medical Lab Technology

Bachelor of Science – Medical Laboratory Technology
Medical laboratory technology is an important sub-discipline within the allied health sciences. The medical provision of quality diagnostic laboratory work. Students in the programme acquire knowledge and practical

laboratory technologist is an important member of the health care team and plays a critical support role in the skills in microbiology, haematology, immunohaematology, clinical chemistry, health policy, molecular biology, applied research and clinical appraisal. The curriculum is organized around a sound foundation in the natural and social sciences and develops the cognitive and psychomotor skills needed for clinical pathological testing. Instructional activities are designed to allow students to demonstrate growth, empathy, competence and confidence; to apply scientific principles, and to develop problem-solving skills which will enable them to easily adjust to changes and function effectively as allied health professionals and members of society.

165

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Medical Laboratory Technology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Technology, students must successfully complete 134 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses 48 credits 48 credits 134 credits 38 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
HLED 100 HLED 225 HLED 410 MDLT 120 MDLT 121 MDLT 125 MDLT 227 MDLT 228 MDLT 229 MDLT 297 MDLT 298 MDLT 230 MDLT 231 MDLT 281 MDLT 282 MDLT 283 MDLT 284 MDLT 286 MDLT 287 MDLT 329 MDLT 340 MDLT 371 MDLT 411 MDLT 455 MDLT 479 MDLT 499

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 1 2 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 NC NC NC NC NC NC 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 121 ENVH 102 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 106 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT120

COURSE TITLE
First Aid and Occupational Health Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Health Policy MLT Orientation Medical Terminology Phlebotomy and Laboratory Techniques Immunology and Serology Histology Clinical Chemistry I Medical Microbiology I Medical Microbiology I: Laboratory Hematology I Immunohematology Histopathology Internship Immunology and Serology Internship Clinical Chemistry Internship Bacteriology Internship Blood Bank Internship Hematology Internship Clinical Chemistry II Hematology II Research Project - MDLT Quality Management in the Laboratory MDLT Simulated Practicum Community Project Research Proposal Development

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Environmental Issues and Sustainability World Issues in Public Health History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamentals of Research Laboratory Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Survey of Organic and Biochemistry Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Genetics Cell Biology Genetics and Molecular Diagnostics Medical Microbiology II

48

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

48

CHEM 134 BIOL 173 BIOL 174 BIOL 240 BIOL 241 BIOL 362 BIOL 397

4 3 3 3 3 3 4

Total Support Course Credits

38

Career Options:
• Hospital laboratory technician

• Research laboratory technician • Sales/Technical representative • Laboratory administrator • Medical technology educator

Associate in Applied Science - Medical Laboratory Technology
The Associate in Applied Science degree in Medical Laboratory Technology prepares students to become health-

care professionals. Graduates work in all areas of the clinical laboratory, including blood banking, chemistry,

166

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 hematology, immunology, and microbiology. They perform a full range of laboratory tests – from simple prenatal blood tests, to more complex tests . They uncover diseases such as HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and cancer, thus supporting diagnostic prognoses that are critical in the area of health care. Often, the medical laboratory programme is currently the required qualification for entry into the profession.

technician is responsible for interpreting and communicating critical patient results to the physician. This

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Medical Laboratory Technology
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Medical Laboratory Technology, students must successfully complete 79 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses 28 credits 24 credits 79 credits 27 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
HLED 100 HLED 225 MDLT 120 MDLT 121 MDLT 125 MDLT 227 MDLT 228 MDLT 230 MDLT 231 MDLT 281 MDLT 282 MDLT 283 MDLT 284 MDLT 286 MDLT 287

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 1 2 4 4 4 4 NC NC NC NC NC NC COMM 117 COMM 118 ENTP 210 RELI 205 MATH 106 PSYC 103 SOCI 102 SPAN 100

COURSE TITLE
First Aid and Occupational Health Legal and Ethical Issues in Health MLT Orientation Medical Terminology Phlebotomy and Laboratory Techniques Immunology and Serology Histology Hematology I Immunohematology Histopathology Internship Immunology and Serology Internship Clinical Chemistry Internship Bacteriology Internship Blood Bank Internship Hematology Internship

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Comparative Religion Laboratory Mathematics Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
CHEM 134 CHEM 229 BIOL 173 BIOL 174 BIOL 240 BIOL 241 BIOL 297 BIOL 298 SUPPORT COURSES Survey of Organic and Biochemistry Clinical Chemistry I Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Genetics Cell Biology Medical Microbiology I Medical Microbiology I : Lab

24
4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

28

Total Support Course Credits

27

Career Options:
• Laboratory assistant

• Medical laboratory technician I • Sales/Technical representative • Laboratory administration • Medical laboratory educator

Programme Requirements: Health Science Degree Access Certificate
To successfully matriculate into the B.Sc. Radiography or Radiation Therapy programme, students must complete 37 pre-clinical credits with a minimum GPA of 2.5, according to the following distribution:

167

Foundation courses required for major area of study Core curriculum courses Total Credits Required for Graduation

13 credits 37 credits 24 credits

The other requirements for entry into the B.Sc. programmes in Radiological Sciences include completion of 40 of good character.

hours approved volunteer service, certification in first aid/CPR computer literacy and a recent police certificate

FOUNDATION COURSES for MAJOR
CODE
BIOL 114 HLED 225 PHYS 102 PSYC 106

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
4 3 4 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology/Medical Terminology Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Introduction to Physical Principles Psychology for the Health Professionals

CODE
BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 LIBS 130 MATH 121 STAT 120 ECON 110 SPAN 100

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Fundamentals of Statistics Introduction to General Economics Introduction to Spanish

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Foundation Courses

13

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

Bachelor of Science - Radiation Therapy
The Bachelor of Science degree in Radiation Therapy is designed to prepare the student, through a combination

of classroom, laboratory and clinical education, to treat cancer patients by applying ionizing radiation safely and

accurately, using a variety of complex techniques and equipment, assessing the physical and emotional needs of students learn to analyze, reason, work independently or collaboratively, take appropriate actions in accordance

patients, while minimizing the effects of cancer and its treatment to patients. Through an integrated curriculum, with practice standards and evaluate the care delivered to patients through reflection, critical thinking and research. Students enrolled in this programme are expected to exhibit exceptional professional conduct and as radiation therapists at public and private hospitals and radiation therapy centers. Graduates have the option international standards in radiation therapy education and graduates of the programme are eligible to apply Medicine, for registration to practise in Trinidad and Tobago. communicate effectively. Graduates of this programme are in high demand and qualify for entry level positions of advancing in medical radiation dosimetry, education or management. The curriculum is benchmarked against through the Board of Radiographers of Trinidad and Tobago, to the Council for the Professions Related to

Admission to the Programme: Due to occupational safety standards, students must be at least 18 years of age

before entering the degree programme. In general, students are admitted to this bachelor’s degree programme after completion of a one (1) year pre-clinical radiological sciences programme called the Health Science Degree Access (HSDA) Certificate. Due to the intensity and rigour of the training in the major area of study, students are encouraged to complete as many college core courses as possible before entering the radiation therapy

programme. Achievement of a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the HSDA certificate programme is required for admission into the bachelor’s degree programme in radiation therapy. Courses in the radiation therapy major in college physics and math courses. Other entry requirements include completion of 40 hours of approved and a criminal background check are also criteria for selection. require strong competence in math and physics, therefore applicants should have minimum grade ‘B’ or higher volunteer service, certification in first aid/CPR and computer literacy. Proof of immunizations, medical clearance

168

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Once enrolled in the degree programme, radiation therapy students must achieve a grade of “C” or higher in all radiation therapy major courses to continue in and graduate from the programme.

The radiation therapy programme can only be pursued on a full-time basis because of the clinical experiences needed to fulfill course requirements and develop the level of competency necessary for the profession.

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Radiation Therapy
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Radiation Therapy, students must successfully complete 136 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution: Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Elective courses 97 credits 24 credits 11 credits 136 credits 4 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CTIM 341 RADG 213 RADG 275 RADG 312 RADG 371 RADG 481 RADG 498 RADG 499 RADT 222 RADT 241 RADT 242 RADT 254 RADT 255 RADT 273 RADT 274 RADT 295 RADT 311 RADT 353 RADT 354 RADT 363 RADT 364 RADT 395 RADT 454 RADT 456 RADT 465 RADT 466 RADT 467 RADT 493 RADT 494

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 4 1 3 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 5 2 3 4 ARTS 119 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 201 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
CT Imaging Basic Anatomic Pathology Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine I Imaging Correlations with Sectional Anatomy Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine II Research Methodology Senior Research Project I Senior Research Seminar Radiation Sciences Radiation Physics I Physics and Instrumentation I Radiation Therapy I Radiation Therapy II Clinical Practice I Clinical Practice II Treatment Planning I Radiation Protection and Cellular Response Clinical Techniques I Clinical Oncology I by PBL Clinical Practice III Clinical Practice IV Treatment Planning II Clinical Techniques II Clinical Oncology II by PBL Clinical Practice V Clinical Practice VI Clinical Practice VII Treatment Planning III Treatment Planning Lab

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 1 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

BIOL 176 BIOL 276 PHAR 251

SUPPORT COURSES Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II Introduction to Pharmacology for Radiographers

4 4 3

Total Support Course Credits
ELECTIVE COURSES

11

One of any Imaging or Health Science elective courses

4

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

97

Career Options: • Radiation therapist o o

• With relevant, formal post graduate certification: Clinical educator Radiation therapy educator

16

o o o

Dosimetrist

Brachytherapy technologist Applications specialist

Bachelor of Science - Radiography
The Bachelor of Science degree in Radiography is designed to prepare students to operate x-ray equipment,

position patients for x-ray procedures, practise radiation safety, produce x-ray images of human anatomy and deliver quality patient care through a combination of classroom, laboratory and clinical education. Through an integrated curriculum, students learn to analyze, reason, work independently or collaboratively, take appropriate actions in accordance with practice standards and evaluate the care delivered to patients through reflection, critical

thinking and research. Students enrolled in this programme are expected to exhibit exceptional professional level positions as radiographers at public and private hospitals and imaging centers. They are also well-prepared

conduct and communicate effectively. Graduates of this programme are in high demand and qualify for entry to pursue advanced certification in medical imaging specialties such as diagnostic medical ultrasound, nuclear standards in radiography education and graduates of the programme are eligible to apply through the Board of to practise in Trinidad and Tobago.

medicine and magnetic resonance imaging, to name a few. The curriculum is benchmarked against international Radiographers of Trinidad and Tobago, to the Council for the Professions Related to Medicine for registration

Admission Requirements: Due to occupational safety standards, students must be at least 18 years of age before entering the degree programme. In general, students are admitted to this bachelor’s degree programme after Access (HSDA) Certificate. Due to the intensity and rigour of the training in the major area of study, students are completion of a one (1) year pre-clinical radiological sciences programme called the Health Science Degree encouraged to complete as many college core courses as possible before entering the radiography programme. Achievement of a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the HSDA certificate programme is required for admission into the bachelor’s degree programme in radiography. Other entry requirements include completion of 40 hours medical clearance and a criminal background check are also criteria for selection.

of approved volunteer service, certification in first aid/CPR and computer literacy. Proof of immunizations,

Once enrolled in the degree programme, radiography students must achieve a grade of “C” or higher in all radiography major courses in order to be able to continue in and graduate from the programme.

The radiography programme can only be pursued on a full-time basis because of the clinical experiences required to fulfill course requirements and develop the level of competency necessary for the profession.

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Radiography

To successfully complete the B.Sc. in Radiography, students must complete 130 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses Elective courses

88 credits 24 credits 14 credits 130 credits 4 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

170

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CTIM 341 RADG 201 RADG 213 RADG 245 RADG 246 RADG 253 RADG 254 RADG 260 RADG 261 RADG 275 RADG 312 RADG 331 RADG 343 RADG 344 RADG 353 RADG 354 RADG 363 RADG 364 RADG 371 RADG 444 RADG 455 RADG 465 RADG 466 RADG 481 RADG 498 RADG 499 RADT 222

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 5 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 1 3 BIOL 176 BIOL 276 MGMT 125 PHAR 251 ARTS 119 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 201 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
CT Imaging Fundamentals of Radiological Sciences Basic Anatomic Pathology Science and Instrumentation I Science and Instrumentation II Imaging Procedures I Imaging Procedures II Clinical Practicum I Clinical Practicum II Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine I Imaging Correlations with Sectional Anatomy Quality Assurance in Medical Imaging Science and Instrumentation III Science and Instrumentation IV Imaging Procedures III Imaging Procedures IV Clinical Practicum III Clinical Practicum IV Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine II Medical Digital Imaging Imaging Procedures V Clinical Practicum V Clinical Practicum VI Research Methodology Senior Research Project I Senior Research Project II - Seminar Radiation Sciences

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 1 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES
Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II Principles of Management Introduction to Pharmacology for Radiographers

24
4 4 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

14

ELECTIVE COURSES
Any one of the imaging of health science electives 4

Total Elective Credits

4

Total Credits Required Courses in the Major

88

Career Options:
• Radiographer o o o o o o o o o

• With relevant, formal post graduate certification: CT technologist MRI technologist

Radiography educator Clinical coordinator Mammographer Health policy specialist Ultrasonographer

Echocardiographer

Applications specialist

Faculty Profile
Suzette Thomas Rodriguez Department Chair Senior Lecturer - CT imaging, radiography, science and instrumentation, radiation medicine B.Sc., Dip. Ed, Cert. Kerry Edghill Lecturer - Science and Instrumentation, radiography B.Sc., M.Sc. Research Interest: Science education Collette Reyes-Bivins Lecturer Clinical techniques, radiation therapy B.Sc., ARRT Research Interests: The effect of early cancer detection methods employed in the Caribbean and how it impacts survival rate in cancer patients

171

Sandra Ashiboe-Mensah Lecturer - Immunology/serology, phlebotomy, organic and biochemistry B.Sc. Research Interests: Immunity to infectious disease Edward Cazabon Senior Lecturer - Histology, hematology, health and health policy B.Sc., DVM, Dip. Path, MRCVS Research Interests: factors affecting student performance and choice of academic career Wilma Collins Lecturer - Radiography, medical imaging DCR (R+T), Dip.Ed Research Interests: Science education

Derek Emmanuel Senior Lecturer - Genetics, molecular biology, clinical chemistry PhD, M.Phil., B.Sc. Research Interests: Metabolic anomalies, DNA Testing Shashiprabha Mohansingh Clinical Coordinator AASD Research Interests: The effects of gluthione level on HIV positive individuals and gluthione on aging process Francis Pierre Lecturer - Hematology B.Sc., ASD Research Interests: Hematology

Florence Ricketts Clinical Cordinator Imaging Procedures DCR, Cert. Dip. Research Interests: Science education

Ferlin Santiago Lecturer - Immunology/serology, hematology, organic and biochemistry, phlebotomy B.Sc. Research Interests: Phlebotomy, Hematology

Department of Environmental Studies
The Department of Environmental Studies plays a major role in preparing citizens to take on the challenges posed by the complex environmental problems facing

local and regional communities. The curriculum is designed to ensure that students have a good balance of theoretical knowledge can make informed

and practical skills so that they in the workplace in respect of restorative or preventive action. Graduates-who are readily decisions

employed in private enterprises, the industrial sector and state agencies, including the Environmental Management Agency (EMA), Solid Waste Management Company, the Water and Sewerage Authority (WASA) and several other agencies-are proactive problem solvers who are leading the way in promoting responsible stewardship of the environment.

172

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Programmes
The Department of Environmental Studies offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes B.Sc. Environmental Management B.Sc. B.Sc. Associate Degree Programmes AAS Environmental Health

Water Resources Management and Technology Water and Wastewater Management Services and Technology

AAS AAS AAS AAS AAS AAS

Environmental Management Environmental Technology

Geographic Information Systems Occupational Safety and Health Water Resources Management and Technology Water and Wastewater Management Services and Technology

Bachelor of Science - Environmental Management
Environmental management has become a key issue in the pursuit of sustainable development for small island states, with fluctuating economies and fragile natural environments. The purpose of this programme is to produce graduates who are knowledgeable about the complex environmental issues facing society. The curriculum is

comprehensive and action-oriented. In addition to being aligned to established standards for best practice in will be able to make meaningful interventions in the prudent management of our resources, and to promote behaviors that support sustainable development.

environmental management, students also have an opportunity to conduct research, thereby ensuring that they

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Environmental Management credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:

To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Management, students must complete 141

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

69 credits 48 credits 141 credits 24 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160 ENVS 217 ENVS 256 ENVS 257 ENVS 260 ENVS 263 ENVS 270 ENVS 300 ENVS 305 ENVS 310 ENVS 316 ENVS 318 ENVS 413 ENVS 414 ENVS 415 ENVS 420

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I Disaster Management Air Quality Control Soil Science Environmental Studies II Water Quality Control Solid Waste Management Environmental Ethics Negotiating Environmental Issues Land Use Management Tropical Forest and Wildlife Management Hazardous Waste Management Energy Efficiency and Conservation Coastal Zone Management and Technology Risk Management Sustainable Development

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1

173

ENVS 460 ENVS 462 ENVS 465 ENVS 499 LAWW 165 OSHE 245 WRMT 200

Analysis and Problem-Solving in Environmental Management Human Health and the Environment International Perspectives on Environmental Politics Senior Research Project – Environmental Studies Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy Occupational Health and Safety Management Wastewater Management

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 123 CHEM 111 CHEM 112 ECON 230 GEOG 121 GISY 172 MATH 122 PHYS 102 SUPPORT COURSES General Biology Concepts in Chemistry I Concepts in Chemistry II Introduction to Environmental Economics Concepts in Geography Intro . to Geographic Information Systems Mathematical Methods II General Physics I

48
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

69

Total Support Course Credits

24

Career Options:
• Environmental officer • Compliance officer • Conservation officer

• Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) officer • Bio-remediation technician • Environmental research officer

Associate in Applied Science – Environmental Management
Environmental management has become a key issue in the pursuit of sustainable development for small island states with fluctuating economies and fragile natural environments. The purpose of this programme is to educate participants to be sensitive, articulate, knowledgeable and action-oriented about the complex environmental consideration for all life forms-with a view to creating improved standards of environmental behavior and an context.

issues facing society. The degree addresses ethical considerations of environmental management-including appreciation for the importance of prudent management of natural resources, within a sustainable development

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Environmental Management
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Environmental Management, students must successfully complete 69 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

30 credits 24 credits 69 credits 15 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160 ENVS 217 ENVT 256 ENVS 257

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 BUSI 103 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I Disaster Management Air Quality Control Soil Science

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics

Cr.
3 3 3 3

174

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ENVS 260 ENVS 263 ENVS 270 LAWW 165 OSHE 245 WRMT 200 Environmental Studies II Water Quality Control Solid Waste Management Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy Occupational Health and Safety Management Wastewater Management 3 3 3 3 3 3 LIBS 130 MATH 121 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Courses SUPPORT COURSES
BIOL 123 CHEM 111 GEOG 121 PHYS 102 MATH 122 General Biology Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I Concepts in Geography General Physics Mathematical Methods II

24

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

30

3 3 3 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

15

Career Options:
• Environmental technologist • Environmental officer • Recycling officer • Pollution control officer • Compliance officer.

Associate in Applied Science - Environmental Technology
The Environmental Technology programme is designed to provide students with the education and training in the basic and engineering sciences, with an emphasis on practices related to pollution prevention and control. and equips students to formulate appropriate interventions and solutions.

necessary to advance in the expanding environmental field. The programme affords students a sound foundation The curriculum develops students’ understanding of the origin and actions leading to environmental problems,

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Environmental Technology
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Environmental Technology, students must successfully complete 66 credits with a minimum of GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

30 credits 24 credits 66 credits 12 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 161 ENVS 204 ENVS 256 ENVS 257 ENVS 261 ENVS 263 ENVS 270 LAWW 165 OSHE 245

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Monitoring Techniques I Surveying and Drawing Air Quality Control Soil Science Environmental Monitoring Techniques II Water Quality Control Solid Waste Management Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy Occupational Health and Safety Management

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH121 SOCI 102 STAT120

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Introduction to the Study of Society Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Courses

24

175

WRMT 255

Wastewater Engineering

3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

30
BIOL 123 BIOL 222 CHEM 111 PHYS 100

SUPPORT COURSES
General Biology Environmental Microbiology Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I Introduction to Physics 3 3 3 3

Total Support Course Credits

12

Career Options: • Air sampling and monitoring technician • Environmental engineering technician • Emergency spill response technician • Field sampling technician • Pollution control officer

Bachelor of Science - Water Resources Management and Technology
The programme is designed to help students acquire a sound knowledge of specific water-related disciplines curriculum facilitates an integrated outlook on water resources development and a multi-disciplinary approach to water resources management. In addition to developing the competencies that students need to address

and of current and emerging technologies that support modern water resource management operations. The

current local and international issues in the water industry, the programme offers a strategic, future-oriented profession, wherever they may be employed.

perspective on water resources management, thus positioning graduates to be on the cutting-edge of their

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Water Resources Management and Technology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Water Resources Management and Technology, students must complete 138 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

69 credits 48 credits 138 credits 21 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160 ENVS 204 ENVS 209 ENVS 260 ENVS 263 ENVS 300 ENVS 310 ENVS 414 ENVS 415 ENVS 420 ENVS 460 ENVS 499 LAWW 165

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I Surveying and Drawing Quantitative Methods Applications Environmental Studies II Water Quality Control Environmental Ethics Land Use Management Coastal Zone Management and Technology Risk Management Sustainable Development Analysis and Problem-Solving in Environmental Management Senior Research Project – Environmental Studies Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy

CODE
BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3

PSYC 103
RELI 205

Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity
Comparative Religion

3
3

176

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
WRMT 180 WRMT 190 WRMT 201 WRMT 202 WRMT 203 WRMT 205 WRMT 290 WRMT 301 WRMT 302 WRMT 410 Hydrometeorology Hydraulics I Surface Water Hydrology I Groundwater Hydrology I Drainage and Irrigation Watershed Management and Soil Conservation Hydraulics II Surface Water Hydrology II Groundwater Hydrology II Hydrological Database Development 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120 Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics 3 1 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
CHEM 111 CHEM 306 ECON 230 GEOG 201 GISY 172 MATH 122 PHYS 102 SUPPORT COURSES Concepts in Chemistry I Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Introduction to Environmental Economics Concepts in Geography Intro. to Geographic Information Systems Mathematical Methods II General Physics I

48
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

69

Total Support Course Credits

21

Career Options: • Water analyst/technician • Assistant hydrologist • Water supply technical operator • Hydrological technician

Associate in Applied Science - Water Resources Management and Technology
The programme essentially comprises the first two years of the B.Sc. degree in Water Resources Management and Technology. Students pursuing the bachelor’s degree programme can exit with an Associate in Applied Science degree in Water Resources Management and Technology, once they have completed the prescribed list of courses below. Graduates will be prepared for technician or technologist entry level positions in the job market such as assistant hydrologists, hydrological technicians and water supply technicians/operators.

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Water Resources Management and Technology
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Water Resources Management and Technology, students must successfully complete 69 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

39 credits 24 credits 69 credits 6 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160 ENVS 204 ENVS 209 ENVS 260 ENVS 270 LAWW 165 OSHE 245 WRMT 190 WRMT255 WMRT 280 WRMT 282

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I Surveying and Drawing Quantitative Methods Applications Environmental Studies II Solid Waste Management Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy Occupational Health and Safety Management Hydraulics I Wastewater Engineering Introduction to Wastewater Operations and Maintenance Introduction to Wastewater Collection Systems

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 LIBS 130 MATH 121 PSYC 103 SOCI 102 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to Study of Society Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

177

WRMT 284 WRMT 286

Wastewater Treatment Process Wastewater Planning and Development

3 3

SUPPORT COURSES CHEM 111 PHYS 100 Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I Introduction to Physics 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

39

Total Support Course Credits

6

Bachelor of Science - Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
As our country and region continue along the path of development and diversification, appropriate measures must be put in place to ensure that expansion trends are managed in a sustainable manner. Within this context, provision of adequate wastewater management services. The programme will provide the requisite skills, theory these skills within the work environment. there is a critical need for competent professionals who can make effective and efficient use of resources in the and training for students who work in the field of wastewater management, as well as the ability to implement

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Wastewater Management, Services and Technology, students must complete 141 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

75 credits 18 credits 48 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

141 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160 ENVS 204 ENVS 209 ENVS 260 ENVS 270 ENVS 300 ENVS 309 ENVS 415 ENVS 460 ENVS 499 LAWW 165 OSHE 245 WRMT190 WRMT 255 WRMT 280 WRMT 282 WRMT 284 WRMT 286 WRMT 288 WRMT 290 WRMT 317 WRMT 425 WRMT 427 WRMT 430 WRMT 432

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 121 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I Surveying and Drawing Quantitative Methods Applications Environmental Studies II Solid Waste Management Environmental Ethics Environmental Quality Assurance Risk Management Analysis and Problem-Solving in Environmental Management Senior Research Project – Environmental Studies Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy Occupational Health and Safety Management Hydraulics I Wastewater Engineering Elements of Wastewater Plant Operation and Maintenance Introduction to Wastewater Collection Systems Wastewater Treatment Process Wastewater Planning and Development Advanced Wastewater Treatment Hydraulics II Biological Principles of Water and Wastewater Management Water and Wastewater Plant Operations and Maintenance Water and Wastewater Collection Systems Membrane Technology Water Resources Management

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Comparative Religion Foundations of Natural Sciences Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
CHEM 209 CHEM 111 GEOG 121 MATH 122 PHYS 102 SOBE 335 SUPPORT COURSES Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Operations Concepts in Chemistry I Concepts in Geography Mathematical Methods II General Physics I Introduction to Conflict Management

48
3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

75

Total Support Course Credits

18

178

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Career Options:
• Assistant hydrologist

• Wastewater analyst/technician • Wastewater technical operator • Hydrological technician

AAS - Water and Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
The programme essentially comprises the first two years of the B.Sc. degree in Water and Wastewater Management, Services and Technology. Students enrolled in the bachelor’s degree programme can exit with an Associate completed the prescribed list of courses below. Graduates will be prepared for technician or technologist entry level positions in occupations such as water supply technical operator, engineering assistant, systems operator and assistant hydrologist. in Applied Science degree in Water and Wastewater Management, Services and Technology, once they have

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Water and Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
To be awarded the Associate of Applied Science degree in Water and Wastewater Management, Services and below:

Technology, students must complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

33 credits 24 credits 63 credits 6 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160 ENVS 260 ENVS 263 LAWW 165 WRMT 180 WRMT 190 WRMT 201 WRMT 202 WRMT 203 WRMT 205 WRMT 215

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CHEM 111 PHYS 100

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I Environmental Studies II Water Quality Control Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy Hydrometeorology Hydraulics I Surface Water Hydrology I Groundwater Hydrology I Drainage and Irrigation Watershed Management and Soil Conservation Hydrometry

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 LIBS 130 MATH 121 SPAN 100 SOCI 103 STAT120

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Introduction to Spanish Perspectives on Contemporary Issues Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES
Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I Introduction to Physics

24
3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

33

Total Support Course Credits

6

Associate in Applied Science – Environmental Health
The programme is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and find solutions for environmental problems that adversely affect the health of communities. Students learn about the operations of efficient health management systems and are kept up to date on scientific advances in the field. In addition, they are made aware of current regional developments in the management of environmental health systems.

17

Graduation Requirements:
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Environmental Health, students must successfully complete 72 credits, with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

24 credits

45 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

72 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVH 121 ENVH 122 ENVH 211 ENVH 212 ENVH 213 ENVH 215 ENVH 220 ENVH 221 ENVH 223 ENVH 266 ENVS 217 HLED 110 OSHE 123 OSHE 201

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 BIOL 113

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Epidemiology Vector Control Building Science and Construction Environmental Health I Environmental Health II Community Health Food and Food Hygiene I Food and Food Hygiene II Environmental Health Administration and Legislation Environmental Health Internship (8 wks) Disaster Management Health Education and Promotion Intro. to Occupational Safety and Health First Aid and CPR

CODE
BUSI 103 COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 MATH 116 SOCI102 SPAN100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Contemporary College Mathematics Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

SUPPORT COURSES Anatomy and Physiology

3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

45

Total Support Course Credits

3

Career Options:
• Environmental health officer

• Environmental health educator

Associate in Applied Science - Geographic Information Systems
The Geographic Information Systems programme allows students to view, understand, question, interpret and visualize data in many ways that reveal relationships, patterns and trends in the form of maps, reports and forms of information. The use of this technology has expanded rapidly and GIS professionals are now in demand in many different types of public and private sector agencies, regionally and internationally. charts. The GIS programme integrates hardware, software and data for managing, analyzing and displaying all

Graduation Requirements: AAS – Geographic Information Systems
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Geographic Information Systems, students must successfully complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

180

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses 30 credits 24 credits 9 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

63 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160 ENVS 204 GISY 172 GISY 174 GISY 175 GISY 272 GISY 274 GISY 276 GISY 299 LAWW 165

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 GEOG 201 ITEC 115 ITEC 130

COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I Surveying and Drawing Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Introduction to Remote Sensing Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Programming Spatial Database Design Principles of Cartography Geographic Information Applications in the Workplace Senior Project - Geographic Information Systems Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 LIBS 130 MATH 121 PSYC 103 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES Concepts in Geography Information Systems Project Management Program Design

24
3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

30

Total Support Course Credits

9

Career Options:
• GIS technician/technologist

Associate in Applied Science - Occupational Safety and Health
The programme is designed to meet the local needs in occupational safety and health and to keep students abreast

of the changing industrial environment. Students will learn the various methods used in the identification of potential hazards and other major issues associated with challenges in the workplace and develop the necessary skills for the necessary corrective/preventive measures.

Graduation Requirements:
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Occupational Safety and Health, students must successfully complete 71 credits with a minimum of GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Support courses

44 credits 24 credits 71 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 217 ENVS 245 OSHE 123

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Disaster Management Occupational Health and Safety Management Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 LIBS 130 MATH 116

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Fundamental Research Skills Contemporary College Mathematics

Cr.
3 3 3 3

181

OSHE 132 OSHE 141 OSHE 160 OSHE 201 OSHE 232 OSHE 241 OSHE 260 OSHE 290 OSHE 292 OSHE 299

Safety Technology I Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene I Techniques of Safety Management I First Aid and CPR Safety Technology II Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene II Techniques of Safety Management II Legal Aspects of Occupational Safety Management Pollution Control and Environmental Impact Assessment Senior Project - OSH

3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3

PSYC103 SCIE 121 SPAN100 STAT120

Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Foundations of Natural Sciences Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits SUPPORT COURSES
BIOL 113 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology

24

3

Total Support Course Credits

3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

44

Career Options:
• Occupational safety and health technician • Safety manager Faculty Profile:
Glenda Charles Harris Department Chair Senior Lecturer Research Interests: Science education Ramona Boodoosingh Senior Lecturer - OSH, Chemistry MSc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Epidemiology, community Health Dirk Chin Leung Senior Lecturer – Environmental engineering MSc., BSc. Research Interests: Contaminant fate and support, water and wastewater treatment Vanessa Elliot Senior Lecturer – Geographic Information Systems Research Interests: Science education Sochan Laltoo Senior Lecturer - Environmental management M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Environmental analysis Dereck Mejias Senior Lecturer - Occupational safety, industrial hygiene M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Industrial hygiene Deryck Pattron Senior Lecturer - Health education, community Health Research Interests: Food and food hygiene Karen Paul Senior Lecturer - Environmental management Dip. Ed., B.Sc. Research Interests: Techniques in environmental monitoring Albert Skair Senior Lecturer - Health education, disaster preparedness RSH, B.Sc. Research Interests: Disaster preparedness and management

Department of Natural and Life Sciences
The Department of Natural and Life Sciences offers degree programmes in biology, chemistry, physics and geography. The Department also provides support courses for degrees in the health sciences and is responsible for the delivery of core curriculum courses designed to ensure that all COSTAATT students have a sound foundation in the natural sciences.

182

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Programmes
The Department of Natural and Life Sciences offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes B.Sc. B.Sc. Biology Geography

Associate Degree Programmes AS AS AS AS Biology Geography Chemistry Physics

Bachelor of Science - Biology
The Bachelor of Science degree in Biology is designed for students who wish to pursue professions directly

related, or allied to, biology. The programme is structured to enable students to select from minors in ecology required academic foundation for a medical career; while those who elect a minor in ecology will focus on to equip students with the requisite competencies for entry level research positions. In addition, this degree Examination (GRE), medical college admission tests, or entry to professional schools.

or biomedical sciences. Students who choose the biomedical sciences route will be able to strengthen the developing solutions to environmental issues. Strong emphasis is placed on the acquisition of research skills covers material appropriate to preparation for: general graduate admissions tests such as the Graduate Records

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - Biology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, the student must successfully complete 135 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution: Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Elective courses

75 credits 48 credits 135 credits 12 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

REQUIRED IN MAJOR COURSES
CODE
BIOL 121 BIOL 122 BIOL 198 BIOL 231 BIOL 241 BIOL 242 BIOL 256 BIOL 281 BIOL 291 BIOL 433 BIOL 455 BIOL 473 CHEM 131 CHEM 132 CHEM 204 CHEM 205

CORE CURRICULUM CREDITS
Cr.
4 4 1 3 3 3 3 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology I (with lab) Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology II (with lab) Philosophy of Biology Ecology I Genetics Cell and Molecular Biology Microbiology Animal Diversity Diversity of Green Plants Biology Seminar Biology Practicum Animal Physiology General Chemistry I General Chemistry II Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry II

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 201 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 3

183

CHEM 208 CHEM 215 CHEM 216 PHYS 121 PHYS 122 MATH 118 MATH 160 SCIE 199 SCIE 299 SCIE 399 SCIE 499

Biochemistry Organic Chemistry I- Lab Organic Chemistry II- Lab College Physics I College Physics II Pre-Calculus Calculus I Research Project I Research Project II Research Project III Research Project IV

3 1 1 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1

SPAN 100 STAT 120

Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS (Choose any four courses) Biomedical Sciences Option Vertebrate Anatomy Animal Development Parasitology Histology Immunology Ecology Option Ecology II: Systems Ecology Biogeography Animal Behaviour Ecology III: Surveys and Methods Energy Efficiency and Conservation

48

BIOL 378 BIOL 371 BIOL 420 BIOL 426 BIOL 478

3 3 3 3 3

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

75
BIOL 331 BIOL 337 BIOL 381 BIOL 431 ENVS 413 3 3 3 3 3

Total Elective Credits

12

Career Options:
The degree will be of interest to those aspiring to teach or seek employment as scientists in the biological and as medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary science.

environmental sciences. In addition, it is a solid preparation for graduate or professional degrees in areas such

Associate in Science - Biology
The Associate of Science degree in Biology is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in the fundamental principles of biology. It aims to foster greater understanding of the need to conserve and protect natural biodiversity, with special emphasis on local and regional ecosystems. As students of this programme lifestyle choices in areas related to nutrition, exercise and safe sexual practices.

increase their understanding of life processes they will develop an appreciation of the importance of responsible

Graduation Requirements: AS - Biology
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Biology, students must successfully complete 65 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Total Credits Required for Graduation

41 credits 65 credits 24 credits

REQUIRED IN MAJOR COURSES
CODE
BIOL 121 BIOL 122 BIOL 198 BIOL 231 BIOL 241 BIOL 243 BIOL 256 BIOL 281 BIOL 291 CHEM 131 Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology I (with lab) Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology II (with lab) Philosophy of Biology Ecology I Genetics Cell and Molecular Biology Microbiology Animal Diversity Diversity of Green Plants General Chemistry I

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
4 4 1 3 3 3 3 4 4 4

COURSE TITLE

CODE

COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 SOCI 102 SPAN 100

Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish

COURSE TITLE

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

184

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
CHEM 132 SCIE 199 SCIE 299 General Chemistry II Research Project I Research Project II 4 2 2

Total Credits Required for Courses in the Major

41

Career Options:
This programme prepares students for transfer into a baccalaureate programme in biology or in a related field of study. These may include baccalaureate degrees in, biochemistry, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary also gain employment at the technician’s level in the areas of laboratory or field work, research, or in teaching. medicine, nursing, radiological sciences, environmental health or medical laboratory technology. Graduates may

Bachelor of Science - Geography
The Bachelor of Science degree in Geography examines the relationship between nature and its influence on human development, including the impact of human activity on natural environments. Students will explore topics in physical and human geography, techniques such as mapping and geographic information systems, as pursue minors in tourism, urban planning or natural hazards. well as qualitative and quantitative research methods for geographers. Students of this programme may opt to

Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - Geography
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Geography, students must successfully complete 126 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses

Courses in the minor area of study

57 credits
(Choose one of three)

21 credits 126 credits 48 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
BIOL 337 GEOG 131 GEOG 132 GEOG 141 GEOG 142 GEOG 228 GEOG 231 GEOG 236 GEOG 238 GEOG 241 GEOG 301 GEOG 325 GEOG 331 GEOG 334 GEOG 336 GISY 172 GISY 274 SCIE 199 SCIE 299 SCIE 399 SCIE 499

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 1 1

COURSE TITLE
Biogeography Introduction to Physical Geography Applied Physical Geography Introduction to Human Geography Applied Human Geography Cultural Geography Geography of Agriculture Physical Hydrology Advanced Geomorphology Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean History and Philosophy of Geography Geography of Development Meteorology and Climatology General Geology Humid Tropical Environments Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Principles of Cartography Research Project I Research Project II Research Project III Research Project IV

CODE
ARTS 119 BUSI 203 COMM 117 COMM 118 ECON 110 ENGL 200 ENTP 210 ENVH 102 ENVH 121 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 RELI 205 SCIE 201 SOCI 102 SPAN 100 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music Leadership and Ethics Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace Introduction to General Economics Comparative Literature Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship World Issues in Public Health Environmental Issues and Sustainability History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Comparative Religion Contemporary Issues in Science Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits MINOR – TOURISM
ENVS 310 Land Use Management

48

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

57

3

185

MINOR – URBAN PLANNING
ENVS 310 GEOG 322 GEOG 422 GEOG 429 GEOG 436 GEOG 440 GEOG 485 Land Use Management Geography of Transportation Advanced Themes in Urban Geography Historical Preservation in Urban Planning Natural Hazards Applied Demography Natural Resources Conservation 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

ENVS 414 GEOG 429 GEOG 440 GEOG 443 GEOG 470 GEOG 475

Coastal Zone Management and Technology Historical Preservation in Urban Planning Applied Demography Geopolitics & International Relations Geography of Tourism Ecotourism - Practice and Management

3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Minor Credits MINOR – NATURAL HAZARDS
ENVS 310 ENVS 414 ENVS 415 GEOG 436 GEOG 440 GEOG 465 GEOG 485 Land Use Management Coastal Zone Management and Technology Risk Management Natural Hazards Applied Demography Global Climate Change Natural Resources Conservation

21

Total Minor Credits

21

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Minor Credits

21

Career Options:
A degree in geography serves as a strong foundation for graduate studies in geography, other social and natural and conservation and development work.

sciences, and for careers in government, journalism, teaching, GIS, cartography, urban and regional planning,

Associate in Science – Geography
The Associate of Science degree in Geography examines major physical and other factors influencing human development. Students explore topics such as climate change, globalization, poverty and disparities in levels of the world as a laboratory and develop basic research skills. development which are related to geographical phenomena. The approach to instruction allows students to see

Graduation Requirements: AS - Geography
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Geography, students must successfully complete 61 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Elective courses

34 credits 24 credits 3 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

61credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
GEOG 131 GEOG 132 GEOG 141 GEOG 142 GEOG 231 GEOG 236 GEOG 238 GEOG 241 GEOG 301

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Physical Geography Applied Physical Geography Introduction to Human Geography Applied Human Geography Geography of Agriculture Physical Hydrology Advanced Geomorphology Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean History and Philosophy of Geography

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 117 PSYC 103 SCIE 121 SOCI 102

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills College Algebra Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity Foundations of Natural Sciences Introduction to the Study of Society

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

186

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
GISY 172 SCIE 199 SCIE 299 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Research Project I Research Project II 3 2 2

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

34

ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS Select any course worth at least 3 credits, for which either, there are no pre-requisites or, they have already been met.

Career Options:
At the end of this programme, students may wish to establish careers in forestry, teaching, real estate, tourism, natural resource management, urban planning, or census data collection and analysis. The programme is also designed to allow students to transfer into baccalaureate programmes in human and physical geography, areas.

environmental management and science, water resource management and geology & geophysics, amongst

Associate in Science - Chemistry
The Associate of Science degree in Chemistry convinces students that the knowledge of chemistry is essential Biological or Physical science. The interesting applications in this programme will help students to increase

to the understanding of all disciplines, thereby preparing them for any profession that they may pursue in any their problem-solving skills and to think critically, thereby making them successful in today’s world. The degree integrates all the major areas of Chemistry, placing emphasis on the physical principles, inorganic compounds, biochemistry and analytical techniques. Students graduate with strong practical skills, making them adequately qualified for many professional adventures.

Graduation Requirements: AS - Chemistry
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Chemistry, students must successfully complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Total Credits Required for Graduation COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CHEM 131 CHEM 132 CHEM 133 CHEM 202 CHEM 204 CHEM 205 CHEM 208 CHEM 210 CHEM 211 CHEM 215 CHEM 216 MATH 122 SCIE 199 SCIE 299

63 credits CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 1 1 3 2 2

24 credits

39 credits

COURSE TITLE
General Chemistry I General Chemistry II Physical Chemistry Food Chemistry Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry II Introduction to Biochemistry Introduction to Analytical Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry I - Lab Organic Chemistry II - Lab Mathematical Methods II Research Project I Research Project II

CODE
COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 121 PSYC 103 SOCI 102 SPAN 100

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society Foundations of Spanish

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits

24

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

39

187

Career Options:
This programme prepares students for transfer into a baccalaureate programme in Chemistry or a related field.

These may include baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, pharmacy, and medical laboratory technology. However, graduates may also gain employment at the technical level in the areas of laboratory or field work, quality control, research, or in teaching.

Associate in Science - Physics
The Associate degree in Physics is the gateway to the modern world with its technological emphasis producing graduates at all levels of familiarity with physical principles. The Associate degree in Physics is aimed at producing a graduate with a view of the world that will stimulate interest in and care for the environment in relation to the environmental impact of physics and its applications. The degree has a richly detailed and highly developed

system of laws and theories, which confers a high degree of mathematical rigour and makes possible quantitative in a technological world and are able to take or develop an informed interest in matters of scientific import.

investigation over an extremely wide range of phenomena. Graduates can therefore become confident citizens

Graduation Requirements: AS – Physics
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Physics, students must successfully complete 65 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:

Required courses in the major area of study Core curriculum courses Elective courses

35 credits 24 credits 6 credits

Total Credits Required for Graduation

65 credits

COURSES IN THE MAJOR
MATH 122 MATH 123 PHYS 151 PHYS 152 PHYS 153 PHYS 154 PHYS 155 PHYS 201 PHYS 202 SCIE 199 SCIE299

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 COMM 117 COMM 118 HIST 210 LIBS 130 MATH 121 PSYC 103 SOCI 102 SPAN 100

CODE

Mathematical Methods II Mathematical Methods III Mechanics and Dynamics Waves, Light and Oscillations Electricity and Magnetism Heat and Thermodynamics Nuclear and Atomic Physics Introduction to Electronics and Microprocessors Science of Materials Research Project I Research Project II

COURSE TITLE

CODE

Fundamentals of Writing Communication in the Workplace History of Trinidad and Tobago Fundamental Research Skills Mathematical Methods I Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity Introduction to the Study of Society Introduction to Spanish

COURSE TITLE

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Core Curriculum Credits
ELECTIVE COURSES Select one from below and any other college course for which the prerequisites have been met. Introduction to Geology and Geophysics Environmental Physics Medical Physics

24

Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major

35

PHYS 203 PHYS 204 PHYS 205

3 3 3

Total Elective Credits

6

Career Options:
This programme prepares students for transfer into a baccalaureate programme in Physics, Engineering or related field. These may include baccalaureate degrees in pure and applied physics, mechanical engineering, electrical

188

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 engineering, civil engineering, and Telecommunications. However, graduates may also gain employment at the technical level in the areas of laboratory or field work, research, or in teaching. Faculty Profile:
Delamae Wilson, Department Chair Senior Lecturer - Biology M.Sc, B.Sc. Research Interests: Microbiology, antimicrobials Sheldon Bidaisee Senior Lecturer - Geography M.Sc., B.A., Dip Ed Research Interests: Physical planning and the conservation of historical buildings Patrick Campbell Senior Lecturer – Biology PhD., MSc., BSc. Research Interests: Immunology, HIV Nyron Bovell Senior Lecturer - Biology M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Animal behaviors and impacts on ecological systems Nyan Gadspy-Dolly Senior Lecturer-Chemistry Ph.D, Dip.Ed., B.Sc. Research Interests: Chemical education and research, organic catalysis Risha Kalloo Senior Lecturer - Chemistry M.Phil., B.Sc. Research Interests: Diabetes and metabolism Anthony Lalla Senior Lecturer - Chemistry MPhil., B.Sc. (Ph.D. candidate) Research Interests: Pharmacogenetics Karen Louison Senior Lecturer - Physics M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: Biomedical engineering; rehabilitation engineering Patrick Medford Senior Lecturer - Chemistry M.Sc., B.Sc. Research Interests: The retina: the isolation of photoreceptor cell terminals. Jeffrey Mohammed Lecturer- Physics B.Sc. (M.Sc. candidate) Research Interests: Environmental Physics Michelyn Phillips Lecturer - Biology B.Sc. (M.Phil candidate) Research Interests: Human anatomy; immunology, specifically autoimmune diseases. Sanjiv Ramcharan Senior Lecturer – Biology MSc. BSc. (PhD candidate) Research Interests: Environmental pollutants in water and its impact on water quality Saeeda Sattar Senior Lecturer – Biology PhD., BSc. Research Interests: Reproductive Biology Shireen Seenarine Gajusingh Senior Lecturer - Chemistry B.Sc. Research Interests: Synthesis, characterization and testing of complexes for anticancer and antiviral properties Anuradha Singh Senior Lecturer - Biology MPhil., B.Sc. Research Interests: Marine biology, animal physiology, crustacean biology

Karyn David Lecturer - Biology B.Sc. Research Interests: Genetics

Leone De Souza Senior Lecturer - Biology MPhil, B.Sc. Research Interests: Human health and nutrition

18

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BIOL 090 Through this course, students acquire basic knowledge of key biological principles and gain an understanding of the world of biology. Through laboratory and field work, lectures and tutorials, students explore the following topics: the organization of life, ecology, energy transfers, transport in living systems and the structure and function of cells. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None Introduction to Concepts in Biology I

BIOL 092 Introduction to Concepts in Biology II

Through this course, students acquire basic knowledge of key biological principles and obtain an understanding of the world of biology. Through laboratory and field work, lectures and tutorials, students explore the following excretion and disease. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 090 BIOL 109 Introduction to Human Biology topics: reproduction and the principles of inheritance, coordination and control, movement and support,

In this course, students gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of human biology as it relates to the ways in which the human body functions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None BIOL 113 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology

This course is designed for persons who have never been exposed to the study of science. Students in this course None.

will gain a fundamental knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:

BIOL 114

This course introduces students to the structure of medical terms by means of roots, prefixes and suffixes. It also examines the structure and functions of various organs and systems in the body. Laboratory demonstrations provide students with an appreciation of the various structures in situ. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: None BIOL 119 Anatomy and Physiology

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology with Medical Terminology

In this introductory course, students focus on musculoskeletal, circulatory, respiratory, special senses and reproductive systems. They develop an understanding of medical terminology from an analysis of relevant roots, prefixes and suffixes. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: None BIOL 121 Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology I

In this course, students learn how life at the cellular level affects life at the multi-cellular level and develop an process energy and materials through photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and the mammalian respiratory, (or equivalent) or BIOL 090 and BIOL 092 BIOL 122

understanding of life’s diversity and the principles of taxonomy. They also learn how organisms acquire and circulatory and digestive systems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: CSEC (CXC)/GCE Ordinary Level pass in Biology

In this course, students learn that movement and support, response to stimuli, control of the internal environment, and reproduction are all complex and vital parts of life. They also gain an understanding of the genetic basis of inheritance--particularly Mendelian genetic inheritance-- and of the ecological concept of an organism as a part of a larger system of other living organisms. 4 Credits / Prerequisites: BIOL 121

Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology II

10

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
BIOL 123 General Biology
(formerly BIOL 106)

Students learn about aspects of sub-organism biology such as cell structure, hormonal control, reproduction, also examined. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: Passing Grade in CSEC (CXC)/GCE Ordinary Level Science Subject or Completion of COMPASS Biology sequence BIOL 136 Principles of Ecology

genetics and enzymes. Evolution and the diversity of plants and animals, including plant and animal taxa are

This course focuses on the study of plants and animals in relation to their environments. Students investigate populations, communities, ecosystems, behavioural patterns and the impact of human activities on the environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 123 BIOL 171

This course looks at human physiology and examines the functions of the body in relation to health and disease. 092.

Structure and Function of the Human Body I

4 Credits/ Prerequisites: CSEC (CXC) Passing Grade in Biology, Human and Social Biology, or BIOL 090 and BIOL

BIOL 172

This course examines the role of organ systems and their processes, in the maintenance of life. Students explore the interrelationships between different organ systems and their homeostatic functions. Students will also be exposed to topics related to cellular function and metabolism. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 171 BIOL 173 Anatomy and Physiology I

Structure and Function of the Human Body II

In this course, students learn about the structure and function of the human body, including the study of cells, tissues and the skeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. MLT students are required to obtain a grade of BIOL 090 and 092 BIOL 174 “C” or higher in this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CXC passes in Biology, Human and Social Biology or

In this course, students learn about the structure and function of the gastro-intestinal tract and the reproductive, urinary, nervous and endocrine systems of the human body. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 173 BIOL 176 Anatomy and Physiology I - Radiological Sciences

Anatomy and Physiology II

In this course, students learn to interpret and analyze images accurately. They also acquire detailed knowledge of the appendicular skeleton, the skull and vertebral column and the muscular, urinary and reproductive systems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 114 BIOL 198

Through discourse, debate and reflection, students learn to appreciate science from a philosophical point of view as well as the significance of biology to humanity. This course is designed to be a point of convergence of the history, philosophy and ethics behind traditional and emerging theories and concepts in biology. Students discuss the ethics and challenges involved in the treatment of patients, test organisms and in reporting research. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: BIOL 121 BIOL 221

Philosophy of Biology

Students in this course study the main cellular and structural features of a diverse range of micro-organisms.

Microbiology for Nursing

They examine the physiology of micro-organisms and the factors that affect their growth. They also explore the pathogenicity and epidemiology of the major infectious diseases which affect the human body. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 171

11

BIOL 222 Environmental Microbiology (formerly called ENVS 141)

The study of terrestrial and aquatic microorganisms and their significance within the context of environmental and water. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 123 BIOL 231 Ecology I

applications is the focus of this course. Students examine the role of microorganisms in the treatment of soils

In this course, students gain a thorough understanding of the field of general ecology. They learn the language of ecology and design and conduct basic assessments of habitats and communities. They also examine how basic ecological concepts can be used in applied fields such as environmental management and conservation biology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 122 BIOL 241 Genetics
(formerly BIOL 131)

Students learn about genetic principles and their application to some commonly occurring phenomena. They study inheritance patterns through carefully designed exercises that allow them to quantify and predict outcomes according to established genetic principles. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 122 or BIOL 174 BIOL 242 Cell Biology
(formerly BIOL 132)

This course focuses on cells as basic units of living organisms, and on their grouping into tissues and organs.

Constituents of cells – water, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; fluid mosaic models of membrane structure; movement of substances into and out of cells; enzymes; nucleic acids and their roles are also examined. This course is designed to meet the needs of MLT students. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 174 BIOL 243 Cell and Molecular Biology
(formerly BIOL 133)

In this course, students explore the structural and molecular approaches to studying the biology of a cell.

They examine the significance, history and philosophy of cell theory and identify the advances in science and BIOL 122. BIOL 256

technology and their application to genetic variations and possible disorders within cells. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

This course focuses on pharmacology; methods of microbial control and the importance of micro-organisms to

Microbiology (formerly BIOL 223)

health and industry. It allows students to examine the basic cellular and structural features of a diverse range of groups of micro-organisms. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of microbiology and apply these principles to commonly occurring phenomena. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 122 BIOL 276 Anatomy and Physiology II - Radiological Sciences

In this course, students learn about the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hepato-biliary, respiratory, nervous (including central nervous system) and endocrine systems. They will learn about the physiology of organs and the imaging of their functionality via various modalities in order to be able to interpret and analyze images accurately. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 176 BIOL 281 Animal Diversity

Students acquire a thorough understanding of the origin and diversity of animals. They learn the language of zoology, and are able to recognise and describe animals from a variety of phyla. At the end of the course, 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 122 students will be able to demonstrate competence in the classification, relatedness and evolution of animal phyla.

12

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
BIOL 291 Diversity of Green Plants

In this course, students examine kingdom plantae as a continuum of decreasing dependence on water for

reproduction and survival. They develop an understanding of the structures and adaptations that allow plants to survive and play a distinctive role in human survival. They also explore the anatomy and biology of green plants 122 with respect to advancements in reproduction and movement away from water. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL

BIOL 299

In this course, students acquire the necessary skills to design and implement a biology research project. At the Prerequisites: Recommendation by faculty advisor and completion of a minimum of 49 credits. BIOL 331 Ecology II: Systems Ecology

Biology Research Project

end of the course, students submit a written report and present their data to a panel of lecturers. 4 Credits/

The focus of this course is the study of the ecology of major ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on tropical and on the factors that lead to dwindling global fisheries. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 231 BIOL 337 Biogeography

systems, a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, the regional management of marine resources,

This course bridges the fields of biology and geography through the study of the distribution of plants and

animals across the planet. Students identify and explore how historical, physical, and biological factors affect Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 122 or GEOG 132 BIOL 362

present and past geographical distributions of individuals, species, communities, ecosystems, and biomes. 3

In this course, students learn the fundamentals of gene structure, function and transmission; methods of genetic manipulation, regulation and phenotypic difference determination. They also examine the aspects of critical thinking that are fundamental to genetics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 242 BIOL 371 Animal Development

Genetics and Molecular Diagnostics

Students examine the basic patterns, processes and mechanisms of animal development in vertebrates. They also explore the processes of fertilization, morphogenesis, organogenesis, and postembryonic developmental phenomena at both the cellular and molecular levels. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243 BIOL 378 Vertebrate Anatomy

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the interrelationships between the structure and function

of the human body in an applied context. All physiological systems are studied with an emphasis on their functionality, associated diseases and good health practices. The course also emphasizes a number of basic research principles in anatomy and physiology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243 BIOL 381 Animal Behaviour

In this course, students learn methods of observing animal behaviour and techniques for analysing large data sets to observe trends. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243 BIOL 420 Parasitology

The study of parasites and parasitism is the focus of this course. Students explore the breadth of parasitic

agents known to infect wildlife, domestic animals and humans globally as well as the parasitic agents of disease

in tropical regions. The course covers the patterns of development of various parasitic agents and the basis

13

of their successful transmission from host to host. Students also explore the ecology of parasitism and the strategies currently employed to control some parasites. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 256 BIOL 426 Histology

This course focuses on the structure and function of normal mammalian tissues and organs. Through the use of electron micrographs, and light microscopy, students examine details of tissue and organ anatomy and relate for recording their observations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243 BIOL 431 Ecology III: Surveys and Methods structures to their functions. They acquire skills in recognising and identifying tissue layers, and learn methods

In this course, students will focus on methods of assessing biodiversity with an emphasis on applications in

conservation biology. They will get hands-on experience in the design and practice of ecological surveys in three Students will gain an appreciation of how these methods feed into conservation efforts and environmental management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 231 BIOL 433 Biology Seminar

main ecosystems: a tropical terrestrial forest, a tropical river system and the near shore marine environment.

This course is designed to expose students to current and emerging fields of study and research in the area methods and procedures. Through discussion and reflective writing, they explore the potential and importance of the pursuit of science and gain an appreciation for the value of collaborative learning and are able to recommendation of faculty advisor BIOL 455 Biology Practicum

of biology in Trinidad and Tobago. Students attend research presentations to observe, analyze and critique

identify opportunities for future research. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum 95 credits and

In this course, students acquire work experience in a biology-related occupation (medical, nutritional, environmental, business or educational). They are placed within participating organisations and assigned tasks that utilize the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom setting and enhance their understanding of the and completion a minimum of 109 credits BIOL 473 Animal Physiology

practical aspects of work in the field of biology. 1 Credit/Prerequisites: Recommendation of faculty advisor

This course provides an in-depth look at how animals use and metabolise oxygen, food and water; how they respond to changes in temperature and how they move and acquire information. At the end of this course, students will have gained an appreciation of the strategies animals display in dealing with environmental Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and BIOL 243. BIOL 478 Immunology

adversity. Instruction focuses primarily on mammalian physiology, with comparisons to the human condition. 4

In this course, students gain an understanding of the cellular, molecular and biochemical aspects of the immune system and the function of its major components. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241, BIOL 243 and BIOL 256.

development of the immune system and the immune response. Instruction focuses on the development of the

CHEM 090 Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I

This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Through to everyday life. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

laboratory work, lectures and tutorials, students focus on understanding matter and learn to relate chemistry

14

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
CHEM 092 Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry II

This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Through laboratory work, lectures and tutorials, students learn to depict compounds and chemical reactions through the use of formulae and equations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 090 CHEM 111 Concepts in Chemistry I

In this course, students gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry and appreciate the use of chemistry in everyday life. 3 Credits/Prerequisite(s): None CHEM 112 Concepts in Chemistry II

This course seeks to expand on the basic principles of chemistry. Students develop a deeper understanding

of scientific thought and processes as they relate to modern technology. They apply scientific theories to practical situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 CHEM 121 Biochemistry for Nursing

environmental situations and explore the usefulness, limitations, and interrelationship of scientific theories with

This course introduces students to biochemistry and the importance of biochemistry in understanding living organisms. Students examine the chemical structure and basic biochemistry of the four fundamental classes of biological macromolecules. They also selected clinical conditions for defects in the metabolism and/or structure CHEM 090 and CHEM 092.

of these macromolecules. 3 Credits/Prerequisites: Passing Grade in CSEC (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level Chemistry or

CHEM 131 General Chemistry I

This course focuses on the quantitative aspects of general chemistry. Using the law of conservation of mass, the laws of definite and multiple proportions, the mole concept and Avagadro’s number and law, students create balanced chemical equations to perform various general calculations. This course has ten (10) concurrent CSEC (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level Chemistry or CHEM 090 and CHEM 092 CHEM 132 General Chemistry II

chemistry labs reinforcing the application of concepts learned. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: Passing Grade in

In this course, students study the fundamental principles, theories and laws of chemistry. Topics include atomic

theory, and the structure of the atom, states of matter, periodicity, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and the concepts learned. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 131 CHEM 133 Physical Chemistry

liquid and gaseous states. This course has ten (10) concurrent chemistry labs reinforcing the application of

This course builds on the topics covered in CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 and covers chemical thermodynamics,

reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibria and electrochemistry. Students learn how to determine of certain reactions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132

the spontaneity of chemical reactions, analyze kinetic data, determine rate laws and understand the mechanisms

CHEM 134 Survey of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

(formerly CHEM 241)

This course is designed for MLT students and focuses on the biological role of various classes of organic

chemicals. Their chemical and physical properties such as structures, nomenclature, preparations and reactions are explored. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: Passing Grade in CSEC (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level Chemistry or CHEM 090 and CHEM 092

15

CHEM 202

In this course, students learn about the fundamental chemistry of food constituents. They learn about the components in foods and discuss the effects of chemical changes during processing and storage on the quality and nutritional aspects of several food categories. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132 CHEM 204 Organic Chemistry I

Food Chemistry

chemical and physical properties of the major food components. They also examine the functions of the various

This course provides a general introduction to organic chemistry. Students learn about structure, bonding, IUPAC nomenclature, stereochemistry and functional group chemistry with emphasis on reactions and reaction Prerequisite: CHEM 132 CHEM 205 mechanisms. The functional groups include: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols alkyl halides. 3 Credits/

This course builds on knowledge acquired in CHEM 240, with additional emphasis on the structure, nomenclature, properties, and reactions of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid derivatives, amines, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, peptides. Students learn about modern instrumental and analytical methods including: ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 204 CHEM 208

Organic Chemistry II

In this course, students are introduced to the chemical structure and basic chemistry of the four fundamental classes of biological substances. They learn about the various types, structures and reactions of glucose and the extent of polymerization to form different carbohydrates. They examine fatty acids as components of lipids and the structure and chemistry of nucleic acids. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 204 and CHEM 211 CHEM 209 Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Management
(formerly CHEM 306)

Introduction to Biochemistry

This course is designed for water and wastewater professionals. In this course, students will gain a thorough appreciation of chemistry. They will also be able to accurately perform and understand the chemical phases of 112 treatment including coagulation, sedimentation, softening, and disinfection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM

CHEM 210

In this course, students learn about fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry. Topics covered include titration methods, volumetric analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, and chromatographic analysis. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132 CHEM 211

Introduction to Analytical Chemistry

statistical treatment of data, laboratory techniques, advanced concepts of equilibrium, gravimetric analysis, and

In this course, students explore, the descriptive chemistry of Period 2 elements, the main group elements and the first row transition elements. They gain an understanding of the chemistry of selected representative main group elements and their compounds as well as transition metals and coordination compounds. The principles for identification of anions and cations will also be addressed. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132 CHEM 212 Inorganic Chemistry II

Inorganic Chemistry I

In this course, students learn the intermediate principles, theories and laws of inorganic chemistry. Topics include modern atomic theory, the symmetry of compounds, atomic and molecular orbital theory, hydrogen bonding and other weak interactions, packing in solid inorganic compounds. compounds and their reactions. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: CHEM 211 Students also study the coordination

16

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry I - Laboratory

This course comprises ten laboratory sessions that complement CHEM 204. Students acquire knowledge of of functional groups introduced in CHEM 204. They also practice stereo-chemical modeling and learn how to requisite CHEM 204 CHEM 216

experimental techniques of modern organic chemistry, with an emphasis on reactions and reaction mechanisms identify organic unknowns by spectroscopic and chemical methods. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132 /Co-

This course comprises ten labs that complement CHEM 205. Students acquire knowledge in experimental techniques of modern organic chemistry with an emphasis on the substitution and reactions of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives. 1 Credit/Prerequisites: CHEM 204 and CHEM 215 CHEM 299 Research Project

Organic Chemistry II – Laboratory

In this chemistry research project, students will learn the fundamental tools necessary for choosing a research project and conducting and presenting the findings of that project. At the end of the course, they will be required recommendation of Faculty Advisor and Completion of a minimum of 49 credits CTIM 341 Computer Tomography (CT) Imaging (formerly RASC 450) to submit a written report, as well as orally present their data to a panel of lecturers. 4 Credits/Prerequisite(s):

This course introduces students to computed tomography (CT). Students learn about the principles and covers image acquisition, storage, processing, contrast enhanced images as well as retrieval, display and transmission of the CT image. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 201 EMCM 101 Emergency Care Management I

instrumentation of CT and how to manipulate CT images using simulated computer programmes. The course

In this course, students will gain an appreciation of the importance of emergency medicine. They will learn assessment techniques and develop the skills necessary to assist individuals in emergency situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None EMCM 102

In this course, students will learn the best way to meet patients’ needs. Students will understand the concept of unique situation of the emergency. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 101 EMCM 103 Emergency Care Management III

Emergency Care Management II

an overall emergency care plan which incorporates the patient’s individual priorities and decisions based on the

This course builds on knowledge gained in EMCM 102. Students will be exposed to specific medical and psychological emergencies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 102 EMCM 104 Emergency Care Simulation and Field Experience

Students develop additional skills and increase their understanding of their roles and functions in relation to principles, procedures, and practices involved in emergency care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 103 EMCM 105 Clinical Practice

Students will gain further understanding of their roles and functions in relation to procedures, principles and

practices involved in the emergency care. This eight-week course also includes 2 weeks of practical experience at the Adult Priority Care Facility and the Pediatric Priority Care Facility at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 104

17

ENVH 102

In this course, students examine critical issues that impact public health at national, regional and international

World Issues in Public Health

levels. They discuss topics such as access to potable water, availability of life-saving medication and the importance of proper sanitation in the maintenance of health and hygiene standards. Students develop an Prerequisite: None appreciation for the impact of the individual on creation and resolution of environmental problems. 1 credit/

ENVH 121 Introduction to Epidemiology

(formerly ENVH 261)

The course introduces the concepts and history of epidemiology and its relevance to the field of public health public health. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENVH 122 Vector Control

practice. This includes the use of epidemiological tools in evaluation and decision-making regarding matters of

(formerly ENVH 106, ENVH 129)

This course is designed to help students understand the biological basis of public health by providing knowledge importance, the diseases which they transmit and related control measures. 3 Credits / Prerequisite: None ENVH 211 Building Science and Construction
(formerly ENVH 121)

of different characteristics and species of protozoa, helminthes, fungi, arthropods and rodents of public health

This course is designed to familiarize students with the correct practices in building construction as it pertains to the general health and well-being of residents and members of a community. Students are made aware of the necessity for developing standards of practice in the building trade and of the potential health hazards in construction. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENVH 212 Environmental Health I

(formerly ENVH 100)

This course covers the treatment regimes utilized for the production of potable water, with coverage of the infrastructural, chemical, biological and physical treatment methods utilized. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENVH 213 Environmental Health II

The different methods and technologies used for the treatment and disposal of waste water and solid waste are impacts of improper waste disposal. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVH 212 ENVH 215 Community Health

covered, with focus placed on the legislative requirements of waste disposal and the environmental and human

This course is designed to provide students with a systematic approach to assessing the health status of a community, including families and population groups at risk. It introduces students to basic models for planning health programmes and monitoring relationships between needs and services, resources and consumer demands, to the health problems of that community are also addressed. 3 credits/ Prerequisite: None ENVH 220 Food and Food Hygiene I
(formerly ENVH 111)

and goals and results. Related social, cultural, economic, psychological and environmental factors that contribute

This course covers the basic principles of food safety, sanitation and hygiene. It involves the identification, None

investigation, and understanding of food groups and associated food borne diseases. 3 Credits / Prerequisite:

ENVH 221 Food and Food Hygiene II

(formerly ENVH 211)

This course deals with various food types, preservation, storage, premises inspection and understanding of the spread of diseases through poor food handling practices. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVH 220

18

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ENVH 223 Environmental Health Administration and Legislation
(formerly ENVH 244)

This course introduces students to public health law and administration, including the study of legal powers and an overview of the agencies involved in environmental health. An overview is provided of the hierarchy of the health services in Trinidad and Tobago, including management, principles of supervision, leadership, motivation, time management and people management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENVH 266 Environmental Health Internship

under which environmental health officers operate; recognition and management of some of the legal problems,

This course is a supervised field experience in which students apply their knowledge of environmental health health practice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses in the major area of study ENVS 121 Environmental Issues and Sustainability

theory and skills in an actual work setting. It is intended to strengthen student competencies in environmental

This course introduces students to important environmental issues facing societies worldwide. Students will and loss of biodiversity. 1 Credit / Prerequisite: None ENVS 160 Environmental Studies I

explore the economic, cultural and social impact of topics such as environmental degradation, climate change

In this course, students are systematically introduced to various natural and man–made environments, together with the variety of problems associated with these environments. efforts to protect and preserve our natural environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENVS 161 Environmental Monitoring Techniques I
(formerly ENVS 150)

They examine government and community

Students in this course gain the practical laboratory knowledge and skills necessary for analyzing chemical substances in the environment. Instruction focuses on the use of apparatus in the laboratory as well as basic laboratory methods of analysis, including separation techniques. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 112 ENVS 204 Surveying and Drawing
(formerly ENVS 101)

In this course, students learn about different types of engineering designs and drawings in the technical dimensioning, auxiliary and sectional drawings. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 121 ENVS 209 Quantitative Methods Applications
(formerly ENVS 209)

field and how to use drafting instruments. Topics covered include orthographic and geometric construction,

In this course, students will acquire basic problem-solving skills for use in their roles as water resources practitioners. The course introduces concepts in linear programming, spreadsheet analysis, sensitivity analysis, MATH 121 model building, probability, uncertainty and risk evaluation and review techniques. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ENVS 217 Disaster Management

In this course, students examine issues related to disaster preparedness and contingency planning. They learn Credits/ Prerequisites: HLED 130, HLED 110 or ENVS 160 ENVS 256 Air Quality Control

the methods, logistics, and responsibilities of incident commanders in responding to situations of disaster. 3

In this course, students explore the fundamentals of air quality control. They learn about air pollution, factors influencing air quality, and the pollution abatement and control strategies used by industries to improve air quality. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 160

1

ENVS 257 Soil Science

In this course, students examine the physical, chemical and biological properties of the dynamic soil system. issues in respect of the management of soil resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 111 ENVS 260 Environmental Studies II

Topics covered include soil formation, soil structure and function and related environmental and agricultural

In this course, students gain an understanding of the social, cultural and economic causes of environmental problems, and are exposed to the most modern perspectives and experiences in resolving environmental ENVS 160 problems through participatory means, conflict resolution and policy instruments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ENVS 261 Environmental Monitoring Techniques II

(formerly ENVS 250)

In this course, students learn to apply the knowledge and skills gained in ENVS 161 to analyse and assess environmental samples. They will gain hands-on experience with field and modern analytical equipment including those used in spectroscopy and chromatography. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 161 ENVS 263 Water Quality Control

In this course, students learn about the defining features and causes of water pollution, the parameters affecting water quality, and the measures used to protect and improve water quality. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 111

ENVS 270 Solid Waste Management

In this course, students learn about solid waste and the methods used in its collection and disposal. Topics incineration and hazardous waste. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 160 ENVS 300 Environmental Ethics

covered include the generation and collection of waste, landfill designs and operations, separation processes,

In this course, students develop an appreciation for different perspectives on, and attitudes towards, the environment and ecological decisions. They examine how almost every important environmental issue discussed, assessed and acted upon is related, directly or indirectly, to ethics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LAWW 165 ENVS 305 Negotiating Environmental Issues

In this course, students acquire the skills necessary for affective communication and negotiations which will enable them to address issues and problems in environmental management in an ethical, professional, effective and efficient manner. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: COMM 108 and ENVS 160 ENVS 309 Environmental Quality Assurance

In this course, students learn to balance the legal requirements of quality assurance and health and safety with checking to ensure conformity with specified requirements. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260 ENVS 310 Land Use Management

the practical needs of industry. They develop an understanding of quality assurance as a systematic process of

In this course, students gain a comprehensive understanding of the role of land use planning and development control in the management of our natural resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260 ENVS 316 Tropical Forest and Wildlife Management

In this course, students learn about forestry and wildlife management and examine critical issues related to effective management of these natural resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ENVS 318 Hazardous Waste Management

In this course, students learn the principles of hazardous waste management and procedures for identifying waste, managing it on site and preparing it for shipment. In addition they will examine topics such as waste 245 storage, disposal facilities and record keeping for compliance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 132 and ENVS

ENVS 413 Energy Efficiency and Conservation

In this course, students examine the correlation between social growth and increased energy utilization and its gas, and strategies for monitoring and managing energy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 100 ENVS 414 Coastal Zone Management and Technology

effects on the environment. Instruction focuses on a critical analysis of the use of fossil fuels, particularly oil and

In this course, students learn about coastal morphology and develop an understanding of the requirements for the implementation of a coastal zone management plan in order to coordinate and manage the coastal environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENVS 316 and ENVS 318 ENVS 415 Risk Management

In this course, students acquire the skills and techniques to identify, manage and minimize health, safety and environmental risk. They will also examine risk assessment models, the business planning process and tools utilized in project risk modeling. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260 or WRMT 209 ENVS 420 Sustainable Development

In this course, students learn about the principles and practices of sustainable development. They examine the

evolution of sustainable development as a special field of study and explore the challenges and critical issues 260

involved in achieving sustainable development locally, regionally and globally. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS

ENVS 460 Analysis and Problem Solving in Environmental Management

In this course, students examine environmental problems within a social context, identifying stakeholders who

contribute to the resolution of these problems. They gain an understanding of the participatory techniques these techniques may be used in the analysis and resolution of resource management problems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260

of planning, policy formulation, research and management and are exposed to the circumstances in which

ENVS 462 Human Health and the Environment

(formerly ENVS 365)

In this course, students are made aware of the ways in which interaction with the environment can affect human health. Instruction focuses on the maintenance and promotion of public health safety standards. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 245

ENVS 465 International Perspectives on Environmental Politics (formerly ENVS 360)

Students examine major international conventions and the agenda of the international organizations which

generated them. They learn about the ways in which these conventions and organizations shape national and LAWW 165

international environmental policies, plans, laws, regulations, standards and strategies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

ENVS 499 Senior Research Project - Environmental Studies

(formerly ENVS 482)

In this seminar, students conduct research on a topic approved by the lecturer, write a thesis detailing their

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research findings, and present and defend this thesis over a three-day period before a panel of examiners. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: Successful completion of all other courses in the programme GEOG 121 Concepts in Geography
(Formerly GEOG 201)

In this course, students will explore aspects of physical and human geography. They will focus on elements of and degraded environments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None GEOG 131 Introduction to Physical Geography

the natural environment including climatology, landforms, biogeography, and the geography of tropical, coastal

In this course, students will acquire a sound foundation for completing more advanced courses in the Geography

programme. In addition, students will be able to define the individual elements of the physical environment wasting, rivers and biomes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None GEOG 132 Applied Physical Geography

as well as the environment as a whole. Topics covered include plate tectonics, vulcanicity, weathering, mass

This course is designed to complement GEOG 131. Through practical laboratory experience, lectures, discussions, theoretical concepts of physical geography. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None / Co-requisite: GEOG 131 GEOG 141 Introduction to Human Geography

presentations and case study analysis, students will gain a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the

Students who have had no prior exposure to human geography will benefit from this course. They will acquire the foundation needed to pursue more advanced courses in the Geography programme. Issues covered in this course include the nature and evolution of human geography, basic concepts in population and settlement and industrial activity. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None. GEOG 142 Applied Human Geography

This course is designed to complement GEOG 141. Through practical laboratory experience, lectures, discussions, theoretical concepts of human geography. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None / Co-requisite: GEOG 141 GEOG 228 Cultural Geography

presentations and case study analysis, students will gain a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the

In this course, students will examine western and non-western cultures in terms of their origins, population, agriculture, politics, language, religion, folk and popular culture, ethnicity and cities. They will also focus on cultural geographic patterns in Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 GEOG 231 Geography of Agriculture

Students will gain an understanding of the study of spatial patterns in agricultural activity.

topics such as variations in agricultural activity, the delimitation of agricultural regions, and the way in which agricultural systems change with levels of development. Special attention will be given to the future of agriculture in Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None GEOG 236 Physical Hydrology

They will explore

In this course, students will gain a greater understanding of the basic principles of the water cycle and environmentally relevant applications. Topics include global issues related to water resources such as pollution GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 control, environmental rehabilitation, sustainable development and climate change. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
GEOG 238 Advanced Geomorphology

In this course, students will study the surface of the earth and the geologic processes that modify it. They will also explore theoretical approaches to studying geomorphology and selected geomorphologic environments Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 such as desert landscapes, tropical humid landscapes, coastal landscapes, karsts and limestone landscapes. 3

GEOG 241 Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean

Students will study the physical and human geography of Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will address Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141

the physical, socio-political and economic characteristics of the Latin American and Caribbean regions. 3 Credits/

GEOG 301 History and Philosophy of Geography

In this course, students will explore the different bodies of thought which have shaped geography as a field of study from the late 19th century to the present. They will examine the intellectual trends in human and physical geography, as well as the science of geographic information systems and will gain useful perspectives GEOG 141

on similarities and differences in contemporary geographic subfields. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and

GEOG 322 Geography of Transportation

In pursuing this course students will gain an understanding of the dynamics involved in transporting goods, services, and people from area to area. They will explore the development of regions and the role of transportation Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 GEOG 325 Geography of Development planning in shaping the future of urban systems. Special attention will be given to transportation issues in

This course examines the measurement and practice of development throughout the world. Emphasis is placed

on the critical evaluation of the different development models used globally, including those in the Caribbean and Trinidad and Tobago. Global patterns of inequalities in health, education and nutrition will also be covered in this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 GEOG 331 Meteorology and Climatology

In this course, students will study atmospheric properties and processes that control temperature, wind,

precipitation, and storm systems. They will discuss weather forecasting, air pollution, and the ways in which 141

climate change has impacted upon the earth’s climate system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG

GEOG 334 General Geology

In this course, students will focus on selected topics in general geology. They will study rocks and minerals, 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 GEOG 336 Humid Tropical Environments

structural geology and geological resources. Students will be exposed to both laboratory and practical settings.

Students will acquire a more in depth understanding of tropical ecosystems and the development experience humid tropical environments, indigenous peoples and commercial activities undertaken to promote economic development in frontier areas. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141

in tropical regions. Focusing on Amazonia, they will examine the biophysical characteristics of the various

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GEOG 422 Advanced Themes in Urban Geography

This is a senior-level course that provides an opportunity for students to explore current issues faced by cities

and metropolitan areas, both domestically and internationally. Students will focus on broad themes such as governability, sustainability, mobility, diversity, livability and economic restructuring. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 325

GEOG 429 Historical Preservation in Urban Planning

This course provides an overview of the legal, economic and political issues involved in the preservation of and other resources to be saved and ultimately preserved. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 325 GEOG 436 Natural Hazards

historical sites. Students will focus on the planning techniques that allow buildings, districts, structures, sites

In this course, students examine, through case studies, the potential effects of natural hazards on the landscape hardships and consequences of natural disasters, as well as the scientific analyses of the nature of the hazards and precautions to minimize damage and casualties. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 GEOG 440 Applied Demography

of the Earth in general, and on populated areas specifically. They focus on both the short-term and long-term

In this course, students acquire an understanding of the science of demography. They will examine world Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141

demographic patterns and issues surrounding the importance of population to public health. 3 Credits/

GEOG 443 Geopolitics and International Relations

In this course, students will explore the geographical context in which political decisions are taken. Particular 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 411

attention will be given to geopolitical issues in the Caribbean such as the Caribbean Single Market and Economy.

GEOG 465 Global Climate Change

In this course, students will consider the rate of climate change, and the steps to be taken to reduce carbon emissions. Elements of this course include the history of the Earth’s climate, climate change and weather, change. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 GEOG 470 Geography of Tourism physical impacts of climate change, social impacts of climate change and factors that militate against climate

Using examples from a range of international contexts, students will gain an understanding of the key concepts between tourism and recreation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141 GEOG 475 Ecotourism - Practice and Management

related to the geographies of contemporary tourism and recreation. They will also explore the relationships

In this course, students will examine the costs and benefits of ecotourism; cases of ecotourism around the involvement in ecotourism enterprise establishment and management and current ecotourism trends. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 470

world, approaches to ecotourism, issues of cultural tourism, policies and laws relating to ecotourism, community

GEOG 485 Natural Resources Conservation

This course examines the past, present and future of resource conservation by explaining the basic ecological

principles on which modern resource management is based. Students will consider each major resource in terms

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 of its value to humans, its exploitation or degradation, and how it can be restored and sustainably managed. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141

GISY 172 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

(formerly ENVS 172)

In this course, students learn about the principles and concepts which define geographic information systems and about different types of geographic information systems. They examine the main technical components of a GIS and gain the hands-on experience in GIS design in a laboratory setting. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None GISY 174 Introduction to Remote Sensing
(formerly ENVS 174)

In this course, students gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of remote sensing and discuss the satellite and sensor systems that are employed in the capture of images. They examine the most important systems as a precursor to choosing the most appropriate image for a particular study and will discuss the unique imaging characteristics of the American LandSat, French SPOT and the European ERS systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

GISY 175 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) Programming

(formerly ENVS 175)

Students will learn to use the Visual Basic for Applications [VBA] programming environment to add customized skills that can be readily applied in the workplace. Students do not require prior programming experience in order to pursue this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172 GISY 272 Spatial Database Design
(formerly ENVS 272)

functionality to ArcMap. On successful completion of this course, students would have acquired knowledge and

In this course, students explore introductory-level spatial database design and development. They learn to Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172

organise spatial and non-spatial data into databases and acquire skills for the efficient management of data. 3

GISY 274 Principles of Cartography for GIS

(formerly ENVS 274)

In this course, students will understand the ways in which maps function as visual abstractions of the real world.

They will explore the relationship between GIS and map making, as well as the peculiarities associated with standard industry software packages. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172 GISY 276 Geographic Information Applications in the Workplace

preparing spatial datasets for the cartographic process through the use of cartographic tools available through

(formerly ENVS 276)

This course develops intermediate level skills in the use of geographic information systems in the workplace. applications necessary to design and implement basic GIS projects. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172 GISY 299 Geographic Information Systems Senior Project
(formerly ENVS 290)

Instruction emphasizes applied exercises in a variety of subject areas and students develop skills in GIS software

In this course, students acquire practical experience in the design and implementation of a small geographic each successive stage—from inception to final presentation. At the end of this course, students will be able 272

information system in a real world setting. Working with a real client, they will organize a project through to complete a small GIS project confidently and professionally. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GISY 174 and GISY

HISM 101 Health Records Science I

This course is designed to prepare students to develop the technical skills necessary to maintain medical record systems consistent with national medical, administrative, and ethical requirements.

Students will examine

205

theories of health records management, the role and responsibility of health records personnel including legal and ethical and legal obligations, as well as the importance of health records as a management tool. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None HISM 102

In this course, students learn specific tools and techniques for using the library and internet to conduct research in

Health Information Resources

the health care field. Students are taught to evaluate the validity, authenticity and currency of health information resources and to search for articles in major online databases such as PubMed/Medline, CINAHL, PSYCinfo. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None

HISM 103 Health Records Science II

In this course, students will apply knowledge gained in the courses: Health Records Science 1, Anatomy and

physiology and the Introduction to Medical Terminology. Students will be able to interpret and code medical

information using the ICD-10 layout. They will also undertake an in-depth study of hospital statistics, focusing on sources, definitions and methods of collection. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the laws governing the release of patient information. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: HISM 101 HLED 100 First Aid and Occupational Health

This course is designed for persons working in, or about to enter the field of allied health sciences. It equips them with the knowledge and skills required to adopt safety measures and carry out first aid work in the home or in the community at large. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None HLED 110 Health Education and Promotion

This course covers a wide variety of health problems in the community. It also looks at the collection and analysis health programmes in the community. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None HLED 225 Legal and Ethical Issues in Health

of vital statistics; the evaluation of health care services; the principles of planning, and the implementation of

This course introduces students to issues in medical ethics and to the study of the sociology of relations that enhance or inhibit ethical practice. Emphasis will be placed on the dynamics of the client-professional relationship respect, and the rights of the professional in a modern clinical setting. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None HLED 410 Health Policy and will focus on the clinical environment. Particular attention will be paid to patient rights, confidentiality and

This course provides an introduction to the laws of Trinidad and Tobago pertaining to health and includes a care system in Trinidad and Tobago and the agencies involved. Management principles related to leadership, None

study of the legal powers of healthcare providers. Students examine the organizational structure of the health supervision, motivation and human resources in the health sector will also be discussed. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MDLT 104 Introduction to Medical Terminology

This course offers an introduction to medical terminology as it relates to the work of practitioners in the field. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the language and documents most commonly used in the health of basic anatomical parts. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None professions. The course will include definitions, spellings and pronunciations of medical terms and definitions

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
MDLT 120 Medical Laboratory Technology Orientation
(formerly MDLT 103)

This course provides an introduction to the field of medical laboratory technology. Students will examine the role and function of medical laboratory technologists in the health care system of Trinidad and Tobago. Particular emphasis is placed on laboratory safety and specimen collection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None MDLT 121 Medical Terminology (formerly MDLT 101)

This course will focus on the many components of a medical term and how a medical term can be broken

by simply knowing the meaning of the prefix or suffix. It also shows students how, by learning individual Prerequisite: BIOL 173 MDLT 125

parts of a medical word, they will not need to memorize hundreds of medical terms and conditions. 1 Credit/

In this course, students will learn phlebotomy techniques and the proper use of laboratory tools and equipment the potential biological and chemical hazards encountered in routine specimen handling and processing. The None

Phlebotomy and Laboratory Techniques

including microscopy and pipetting. Safe operating guidelines are introduced and emphasized, highlighting significance of statistical tools as a quality management strategy is also examined. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MDLT 227

Students will pursue immunological and serological studies including antigen - antibody tests, syphilis serology and serological tests. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 133 MDLT 228 Histology

Immunology and Serology

Students will acquire skills in the preparation, orientation, embedding, staining and mounting of histological interpretation of results. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 132 and BIOL 174 MDLT 229 Clinical Chemistry I
(formerly MDLT 229)

specimens. Emphasis will be placed on the proper preparation of specimens for microscopic examination and

In this course students will cover theory, principles and analysis in advanced clinical chemistry and biochemistry. CHEM 134 MDLT 230

Emphasis is placed on the chemistry of physiological systems within the human body. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite:

Students will study and review blood cells and tissues including the origin, morphology, and function and blood cells and diseases including anaemias and leukemias. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 173 MDLT 231 Immunohematology

Hematology I

dysfunction of blood cells. They will also examine normal hematoproteins; abnormal morphological forms of

The student will be introduced to coagulation mechanisms and blood banking with emphasis on the history of blood group systems, the study of blood cells, principles and procedures of blood grouping and compatibility. The course also examines testing, screening of donors, collection, separation, preservation and storage of blood 230

components. It deals mainly with major blood grouping and typing systems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT

MDLT 281

Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in processing histology specimens in a histology laboratory. will sensitize students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 230

Histopathology Internship

Skills acquired will increase proficiency in the performance of routine, special and automated procedures and

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MDLT 282 laboratory. 227

Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in immunology and serology in an immunology/serology procedures and sensitize students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT Skills acquired will increase proficiency in the performance of routine, special and automated

Immunology and Serology Internship

MDLT 283

Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in biochemistry (in a biochemistry laboratory). Skills acquired to the patient-technologist relationship.0 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 229 MDLT 284 Bacteriology Internship

Clinical Chemistry Internship

will increase proficiency in performance of routine, special and automated procedures and will sensitize students

Students will gain clinical and laboratory experiences in bacteriology (in a microbiology laboratory). Skills acquired will increase proficiency in performance of routine, special and automated procedures and will sensitize students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 297 MDLT 286 Blood Bank Internship

Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in a blood bank laboratory. The skills acquired will increase to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 231 MDLT 287 Hematology Internship

their proficiency in the performance of routine, special and automated procedures. Students will also be sensitized

Students will gain clinical and laboratory experiences in haematology (in a haematology laboratory). Skills acquired will increase proficiency in performance of routine, special and automated procedures and will sensitize students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 230 MDLT 297 Medical Microbiology I

In this course, students will acquire the theoretical skills necessary to isolate and identify various classes of

micro-organisms from appropriate clinical specimens. The course also comprises the study of related diseases MDLT 229

and dysfunctions of which the root cause is microbial infection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MDLT 227 and

MDLT 298 Medical Microbiology I - Lab

This course comprises a series of labs designed to demonstrate the application of the concepts presented in organisms from appropriate clinical specimens. 4 Credits/ Co-requisites: MDLT 297 MDLT 329 Clinical Chemistry II
(formerly MDLT 329)

BIOL 297. Students will acquire the practical skills necessary to isolate and identify various classes of micro-

In this course, students will focus on the principles of detection of biochemical indictors of disease. Students and MDLT 229 MDLT 340

will be introduced to research and the concept of acquiring empirical data. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 132

Students will investigate further the pathology of blood disorders, with emphasis on white cell diseases such as leukemias, myelomas and their infiltration into secondary sites. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 230

Hematology II

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
MDLT 371 Research Project -MDLT

In this course, students will acquire critical appraisal skills in assessing evidence presented in health science, research questions in terms of both descriptive and inferential statistics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: STAT 120 MDLT 397 Medical Microbiology II
(formerly MDLT 451)

with a focus on its relevance to real life. They will explore the application of statistical methods to the study of

This course is designed to introduce the scientific applications of advanced assay systems such as polymerase mechanisms of drug resistance and in-depth models and mechanisms of infection. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 297

chain reaction (PCR). Students will explore concepts of molecular biology as well as intermediate pharmacological

MDLT 411 Quality Management in the Laboratory

This course explores the factors that impact on the delivery of optimal performance of testing and results. Organisational, process and human resource limitations are critically assessed and evaluated within the context of laboratory management application. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MDLT 455 MDLT Simulated Practicum

This course will enhance students’ awareness of the analytical process from input stages to final result output.

In this practicum, students will be required to demonstrate application of competencies developed. Deficient or Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 397, MDLT 329 and MDLT 340 MDLT 479 Community Project

weak areas of competence are diagnosed, giving the student an opportunity to focus on strengthening same. 3

Students of this course are required to utilise teamwork and interactive skills, and employ appropriate

methodologies and tools to initiate and conduct a research-based study of public health and professional

interest. As part of the project, critical thinking, problem solving and decision making must be demonstrated by the student. Management and leadership practices are applied by the student to solving community issues. 2 Credits/ Prerequisites: None

MDLT 499 Research Proposal Development

In this course the student develops a research proposal. This proposal will demonstrate the student’s critical awareness and insight in medical laboratory technology. 2 Credits/ Prerequisites: STAT 120 and MDLT 371 NURS 111 Introduction to the Profession of Nursing
(formerly NURS 101)

This course explores the historical, philosophical, scientific, ethical and legal bases for nursing practice. It examines nursing as a profession and will equip students with the requisite knowledge and skills to function successive nursing courses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None as registered nurses. The principles, concepts and foundations explored here will provide a foundation for

NURS 115 Foundations of Nursing Practice (formerly NURS 160)

This course introduces students to the basic foundations and concepts of nursing practice. It emphasizes framework and activities for addressing those needs. The experiential learning that will be gained from the nursing skills laboratory, the community and the clinical setting will further strengthen clinical competence for the delivery of quality patient care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 171

fundamental nursing skills and competencies and highlights basic needs of individuals together with the nursing

20

NURS 116 Foundations in Psychiatry

(formerly NURS 121)

This course forms the nucleus of the Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing programme. Students are introduced to

psychiatric nursing, with special emphasis on the basic psychosocial concepts which underpin practice in this field. It focuses on the delivery of basic nursing care for individuals and families with mental illness. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 171 and COMM 151 NURS 141 Emergency Care

This course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of basic emergency care. Emphasis is placed Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 220

on the skills required for the initial management of casualties prior to their admission to a health facility. 2

NURS 150 Introduction to the Profession of Nursing

(formerly NURS 101)

This course explores the historical, philosophical, scientific, ethical and legal bases for nursing practice. It examines nursing as a profession and will equip students with the requisite knowledge and skills to function successive nursing courses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None NURS 156 Health Promotion and Maintenance as registered nurses. The principles, concepts and foundations explored here will provide a foundation for

This course looks at health promotion and related strategies as an integral component of health care delivery.

Students will examine the impact of physical, psychosocial, environmental, and lifestyle factors that influence health and explore primary health care as the approach utilized in providing care to individuals, families and COMM 151 and BIOL 171 NURS 160 Nutrition I communities. The course also provides practice in basic health promotion skills. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:

(formerly NURS 110)

This course introduces students to the principles of human nutrition and current dietary trends. It will explore

the importance of certain food practices in the lives of Caribbean people. It allows the student to examine policies, programmes and interventions taken to address food-related health issues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 121 and BIOL 171

NURS 211 Nursing Science

In this course, students examine the basic philosophical, scientific and technical frameworks for nursing practice. The course also focuses on the contribution of various theorists and provides a comparative analysis of their respective nursing theories and models which serve to justify the designation of nursing as a science. Prerequisites: LIBS 130 and NUTR 160 NURS 220 Pathophysiology I as a result of disease.

The nursing process will be highlighted as the standard framework for clinical nursing practice. 3 Credits/

(formerly NURS 132)

This course introduces students to the study of the structural and physiological changes occurring in the body in body structure and function and the nursing management of patients with pathophysiological conditions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 172 Students will examine the concepts of abnormality, the sequel of diseases, alterations

NURS 223 The Childbearing Family (formerly NURS 151)

This course examines the health care experiences of the child-bearing family during pregnancy, delivery and

post partum. Students will gain an understanding of the role of parents and siblings, and of the nursing management of the mother and child during the antenatal, pregnancy, delivery and post partum periods. In the

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 associated clinical attachments, clinical teaching and assessment of the skills related to the theory covered is provided. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 156 NURS 224 The Childbearing Family

(for Psychiatric nursing students only)

This course examines the health care experiences of the childbearing family during pregnancy, delivery and post

partum. Students will examine the role of parents and siblings and the nursing management of mother and clinical teaching and assessment of the skills related to the theory covered is provided. This course is intended for psychiatric nursing students only. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 171 and NURS 150 and NURS 156 NURS 250 Psycho-Pathophysiology
(formerly NURS236)

child during the antenatal, pregnancy, delivery and post partum periods. In the associated clinical attachments,

In this course, the student gains knowledge of the nature and causes of mental health/psychiatric disorders and NURS 220

how they affect the individual’s ability to maintain psycho-physiological equilibrium. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

NURS 260 Nutrition and Disease

(formerly NURS 210)

In this course, students will examine the physiological requirement and functions of proteins, carbohydrates, chronic disease will also be explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 160 NURS 261 Nutrition and Disease for Psychiatric

fats, major vitamins and minerals as determinants of health and disease. The role of diet in the development of

(formerly NURS 210 - for Psychiatric nurses only)

In this course, students will examine the physiological requirement and functions of proteins, carbohydrates, of chronic disease will also be explored. The role of diet in the development of chronic disease will also be explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 220. NURS 275 Pharmacology in Nursing

fats, major vitamins and minerals as determinants of health and disease. The role of diet in the development

This course introduces nursing students to pharmacology, giving them a brief history of pharmacology and

information on the sources, preparation and administration of drugs. After examining the principles of pharmacology, the course guides students in examination of drugs used for disorders of all systems of the body. Students will be encouraged to research drugs not examined in the course and critique them using the various pharmacological principles learned in the course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 121, BIOL 172 and NURS 220

NURS 276 Psycho-Pharmacology

This course introduces students to pharmacological concepts and facilitates the development of their understanding of the theory and principles of pharmacology as they relate to psychiatric nursing practice. They will examine health promotion issues related to pharmacology in the context of secondary and tertiary prevention as intervention. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 116 NURS 290 Introduction to Adult Nursing

This course provides an introduction to the management of adult clients with medical /surgical conditions and focuses on the physiological, psychological, environmental and spiritual needs of clients. for the provision of care. encouraged to use critical thinking in the application of the nursing process with an appropriate nursing model clinical areas. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 220

Students will be

Practical experiences will be gained both in the simulation laboratory and in the

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NURS 295 Epidemiology

(formerly NURS 201)

This course introduces the student to the key concepts of epidemiology. It examines the modes of disease transmission, characteristics of communicable diseases, and methods of prevention at the local, regional and international levels. Students will be guided in the identification of sources of data; the use of appropriate prevention and control. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LIBS 130 and NURS 156 NURS 306 Health Assessment

measures of calculations; the analysis and interpreting of data and the application of findings to infection and

This course has distinct theoretical and practical aspects. The theoretical component focuses on helping students

to acquire the skills required to conduct a comprehensive health assessment as part of the nursing process. In the practicum, students will use interview observation, percussion, palpation, inspection and auscultation in 172, NURS 150 and NURS 277 NURS 312 Mental Health assessing clients throughout the life cycle in simulated and actual environments. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL

This course focuses on the application of the nursing process, critical thinking skills and caring therapeutic

interventions in acute, chronic and community-based psychiatric-mental health settings. Students examine members of the mental health care team. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 160, NURS 172 and NURS 220 NURS 314 Pharmacology in Nursing
(formerly NURS 233)

basic mental health concepts and issues and emphasis is also placed on client advocacy, and collaboration with

This course introduces nursing students to pharmacology, giving them a brief history of pharmacology and information on the sources, preparation and administration of drugs.

pharmacology, the course guides students in examination of drugs used for disorders for all systems of the body. Students will be encouraged to research drugs not examined in the course and critique them using the various pharmacological principles learned in the course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 172 NURS 320 Pathophysiology II

After examining the principles of

In this course the nursing students will relate the concepts and principles introduced in NURS 220 to their understanding of altered physiological states in the body systems at various stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is NURS 220 placed on aetiology, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of disease processes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

NURS 324 Paediatric and Adolescent Care

In this course, students are introduced to the field of nursing and the theory and skills relevant to the care of from infancy through adolescence. The course will include a clinical component which will focus on the delivery Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 156 and NURS 220. NURS 325 Paediatric and Adolescent Care

children and adolescents. The nursing process framework is used to examine families in the child-bearing years of nursing care that is adapted to the unique health and developmental needs of children and their families. 3

(For Psychiatric Nursing students only)

In this course, students are introduced to the field of paediatric nursing and the theory and skills relevant to

the care of children and adolescents. The nursing process framework is used to examine families in the child-

bearing years from infancy through adolescence. The course will include a clinical component which will focus their families. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 156 and NURS 220.

on the delivery of nursing care that is adapted to the unique health and developmental needs of children and

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
NURS 326 Introduction to Medical - Surgical Nursing
(formerly NURS 256)

Students in this course will acquire knowledge of common physiological dysfunctions that can affect the mentally medical/surgical nursing environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisitess: NURS 150 and NURS 220 NURS 334 Adult Nursing

ill individual. Learning is consolidated through clinical practice, which includes an eight-week placement in a

This course focuses on the care of the adult between 20 to 64 years with common acute and chronic maladaptive

states. The emphasis will be on the provision of holistic care, with the nursing process being applied to the focuses on the major health problems and prepares the students to deliver care to the specific age group in all care settings. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 260, NURS 275, NURS 312, NURS 320 and NURS 337 NURS 336 Care of the Mentally Ill Adult
(formerly NURS 257)

planning, implementation and evaluation of nursing care. The course addresses all categories of diseases;

In this course, students will acquire concepts and skills which will enable them to recognize the psychosocial,

environmental and lifestyle problems of the mentally ill adult and family. Common psychological ill health

conditions are explored and the concepts and skills acquired will be applied in meeting the patient’s basic needs NURS 211, NURS 315 and NURS 316 NURS 337 Nursing Informatics

through the nursing process and the promotion of a healthy lifestyle. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 150,

This course provides an overview of health care information technology and computer science systems to prepare students to effectively and efficiently use technology for the identification, collection, processing and management of data. The course will provide skills for information seeking and technology for evidence-based nursing practice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MATH 120, BUSI 203 and NURS 211 NURS 371 Clinical Experience and Level II A Practical Examination

This clinical experience takes place over fifteen (15) weeks. During this experience, students will acquire experience out-patient departments. Students are also assigned study days for the purpose of consolidating the clinical

in ward-based and ambulatory paediatric care and the care of clients in the community health centres and other knowledge acquired and applying theory to practice. They will also undertake Level II A Practical Examinations of programme

to determine the clinical competencies gained in these areas. 0 Credits/Prerequisite: Completion of Year I

NURS 372 Clinical Experience and Level II B Practical Examination

This clinical experience takes place over fifteen (15) weeks. During this experience, students will acquire clinical

experience in specialist areas such as accident and emergency; ear, nose and throat; neurosurgery; operating

theatre; orthopedics and gynecological nursing. Students are also assigned study days for the purpose of

consolidating their clinical knowledge and the application of theory to practice. Level II B practical examination NURS 371

is also undertaken to determine the clinical competencies acquired in these areas. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite:

NURS 373 Clinical Experience and Level III Practical Examination

This fifteen-week period marks the completion of the clinical internship. During this period, students are placed in the medical and surgical wards to gain further experience in patient care and ward management.

assigned study days for the purpose of consolidating their clinical knowledge and applying theory to practice. management. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 372

They are

Level III practical examination is also undertaken to determine students’ competency in patient care and ward

213

NURS 401 Gender Issues in Health Care

This course is designed to enhance nursing practice by exploring social, cultural and political factors that influence gendered aspects of health care. The course will examine ways in which gender and gender expectations affect health behaviors. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: SOCI 102, PSYC 103 and NURS 156. NURS 411 Professional Development and Management
(Formerly NURS 202)

This course is designed to prepare the student for supervisory and professional responsibility. It introduces

the students to the principles and practices of management, total quality management in nursing, disaster

preparedness and approaches to the management and delivery of patient care. In addition, it identifies the Credits/ Prerequisites: BUSI 203, NURS 111 and NURS 275 NURS 441 Psychiatric Emergencies

legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse and the various roles of the nurse in health care management. 3

This course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of basic emergency care. Emphasis is placed Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 250

on skills required for the initial management of causalities prior to the admission to a Health Care Facility. 3

NURS 445 Critical Care Nursing

The course provides students with the principles governing the care of casualties and the critically ill. Students will integrate knowledge and principles of the biophysical and psychosocial sciences to solve life threatening problems that affect casualties and the critically ill in a variety of health care settings. They will also apply critical thinking

skills and the nursing process in exploring case-based practice situations, thereby learning to select effective and NURS 221 NURS 447

patient care modalities as competent, caring nurses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 211, NURS 220, NURS 337

This course introduces the student to the study of gerontology and is designed to focus on the needs of the

Gerontology

elderly in states of adaptation and mal-adaptation. It highlights the basic needs of the elderly and specifies factors that disrupt biological and psychological needs based on actual and potential health problems of 220, NURS 314 and NURS 334 or NURS 156, NURS 211, NURS 221 NURS 448 Psycho-Gerontology

nursing interventions which may be necessary to maintain and promote optimum health. It also focuses on the elderly in a variety of environments and health care delivery systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS

This course will enable nursing students to develop an understanding of the complexity, rewards and challenges of working with the elderly in the context of primary health care delivery systems. Students will acquire knowledge of treatment modalities and psychiatric nursing care related to mental health and physiological challenges facing Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 211, NURS 261 and NURS 315 and NURS 221 NURS 499 Senior Project- Nursing

the elderly with a focus on specific conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression, neglect and abuse. 3

This practicum is to be undertaken throughout Year IV of the nursing programme. It will provide students with the opportunity to undertake a research project, thereby utilizing the skills acquired and demonstrating an NURS 337 and MATH 167 understanding of various techniques utilized in conducting research. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 211,

214

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
OSHE 123 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health

This course is designed to introduce students to occupational safety and health as a field of study. It outlines

health and safety hazards and identifies the responsibilities of management and supporting agencies in programme design for OSH interventions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None OSHE 124 Ergonomics
(formerly OSHE 110)

promoting good practice in occupational safety and health. It also exposes students to the principles of effective

In this course students will learn about the physical stresses that common workplace activities place on the body its use in improving the work environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None OSHE 132 Safety Technology I

and the ways in which they can be minimized. Students will also understand what constitutes ergonomics and

Students in this course learn safe working practices, how to avoid hazards and take precautions in a range of working situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

OSHE 141 Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene I

(formerly OSHE 104)

In this course, students analyze the effects of toxic substances and physical hazards on the human body. They examine aspects of epidemiology and toxicology and methods of evaluation and control of environmental and other hazards. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

OSHE 160 Techniques of Safety Management I

In this course, students acquire knowledge of the standards and codes in safety management. They also gain an understanding of management’s role in responding to hazardous situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None OSHE 201 First Aid and CPR

Students of this course acquire the requisite skills and learn the protocols needed to enable them to take the correct action in treating various types of medical traumas and emergencies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None OSHE 232 Safety Technology II

In this course, students acquire knowledge of safe working practices which can be applied in the areas of construction and demolition in the workplace. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 132 OSHE 241 Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene II
(formerly OSHE 104)

In this course, students learn about various types of hazardous material and acquire skills in identifying occupation-related and communicable diseases, and their effect on the various systems of the body. Students also engage in discussions on prevention strategies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 141 OSHE 245 Occupational Health and Safety Management

Students are introduced to the principles of the safety improvement process and acquire the skills necessary

to incorporate safety improvement into environmental management business processes. Students learn how to conduct audits and inspections, through case studies and field experiences in local industries. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 160 or OSH 120 OSHE 260

In this course, students examine plant and equipment design specifications, accident investigation reports and emergency plans to acquire the skills necessary for appraising plant safety. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 160

Techniques of Safety Management II

215

OSHE 290 Legal Aspects of Occupational Safety Management

Students in this course will develop an understanding of the legal framework which governs the occupational

safety and health field. Areas covered will include the Factories Ordinance 1948, Health and Safety Bill, the

judicial system, Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance, International Labour Organisation Convention and employers’ liability. Students also engage in discussions on policies on AIDS and substance abuse. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 123

OSHE 292 Pollution Control and Environmental Impact Assessment

In this course, students will study the causes and interrelationships of the various sources of air, land, water and noise pollution; and the measures necessary for their prevention and control. 260 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE

OSHE 299 Occupational Health Senior Project

In this course, students gain professional experience by applying knowledge acquired in the classroom to a reflection on their learning over the course of the programme to complete the senior project requirements. Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 292

real world environment. Students are also required to prepare a portfolio documenting their experiences and 3

PHAR 110 Orientation to Pharmacy Practice

In this course, students are introduced to the concept of pharmaceutical care. They learn the roles and conduct, quality control and maintenance as they relate to the pharmacy. Students also learn how to apply mathematical techniques to problems related to pharmacy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None PHAR 113 Introduction to Pharmaceutics

responsibilities of the pharmacy assistant and acquire an appreciation for the importance of professional

Students learn how medical and pharmaceutical technology relates to the practice of the pharmacy assistant. They and acquire a working knowledge of drug dosages and drug forms. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None PHAR 121 Introduction to Pharmacology

also develop an understanding of the principles involved in the dispensing and compounding of prescriptions

This course introduces students to the processes of action, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion

as well as the side-effects, indications, contra-indications and administration of some commonly used drugs. Students will also review the principles of drug action including an introduction to pharmacolodynamics and pharmacokinetics 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

PHAR 123 Pharmacy Systems and Procedures

In this course, students are introduced to the systems and procedures necessary for the smooth functioning of a pharmacy. They also develop skills in interpreting prescription and medication content as well as completing and filling prescription and medication orders. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None PHAR 133 Compounding

Students learn to create compound substances in a variety of formulations. They practise the preparation of products in a variety of dosage forms including ointments, creams and suppositories. They also learn to prepare emulsions for oral and topical use. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHAR 121 PHAR 138 Pharmacy Legislation and Ethics

The student will discuss all legislation related to pharmacy practice such as the Pharmacy Board Act and

216

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Amendments, the Pharmacy Board Regulations, the Dangerous Drug Act, the Food and Drug Act, the Antibiotics Act, the Pesticides Act and the Code of Ethics. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: PHAR 110 PHAR 251 Introduction to Pharmacology for Radiographers

In this course, students learn the basic principles of pharmacology. They discuss drug groups used in radiological

contrast, media studies and interventional procedures. Students also learn the classifications, characteristics, is required. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

uses and contraindications of contrast media used in radiological procedures. No prior knowledge of chemistry

PHYS 090 Introduction to Concepts in Physics I

In this course students will understand basic principles of physics in the areas of measurement, mechanics, heat applications to the world around us. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

and waves. They will focus on experimental inquiry, discovery and understanding of basic concepts and their

PHYS 092 Introduction to Concepts in Physics II

In this course students will understand basic principles of physics in the areas of electricity, magnetism, understanding of basic concepts and their applications to the world around us. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 090)

electromagnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. They will focus on experimental inquiry, discovery and

PHYS 100 Introduction to Physics

(formerly PHYS 171)

In this course, students will learn the fundamental principles of physics. Credits/ Prerequisite: None

understanding of basic concepts and their application to the environment from a technical perspective. 3

Emphasis will be placed on the

PHYS 102 Introduction to Physical Principles

(formerly PHYS 101)

Students in this course will learn the fundamental principles of physics relevant to radiography and radiation sciences. Topics include the interaction of mechanical and electromagnetic waves with matter, the production Credits/ Prerequisite(s): None PHYS 121 College Physics I of X-rays and the measurement and monitoring of radiation with respect to safety in a clinical environment. 4

In this course students learn the principles of mechanics, the structure of matter, waves and oscillations and

their applications. By studying these topics students will gain a better understanding of the mechanical universe, equivalent) or PHYS 090 and PHYS 092 PHYS 122 College Physics II

in terms of measurement, motion, force and energy. 4 Credits / Prerequisite: CXC level pass in Physics (or

This course covers the concepts and principles involved with electricity, magnetism, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Students will learn how these concepts and principles have impacted society through electronic devices, information technology and telecommunications. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 121 PHYS 151 Mechanics and Dynamics

Through this course students will acquire the concepts and generalizations necessary for the pursuit of mechanical Credits/Prerequisite: CXC level pass in Physics (or equivalent) or PHYS 090 and PHYS 092

physics. Emphasis is placed on measurements and units, statics and kinematics, dynamics and hydrostatics. 4

217

PHYS 152 Waves, Light and Oscillations

In this course students will study the principles of light and wave theory. Topics include simple, damped and forced oscillations, harmonic motions and examples of the applications of these motions. Students will also The course also takes a look at light, interference and geometrical optics. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS151 PHYS 153 Electricity and Magnetism study longitudinal and transverse waves and the various aspects of propagation and interaction of these waves.

Students in this course will learn the basic principles and theories of electricity, magnetism and electromagnetism. Topics include simple electrostatics; electrical theory and concepts related to current electricity, direct current (dc) circuits, electric field, and capacitance. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 151 PHYS 154 Heat and Thermodynamics

In this course students will focus on temperature, thermal properties of various materials, laws of thermodynamics, with specific reference to enthalpy and entropy reactions. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 151 PHYS 155 Nuclear and Atomic Physics

ideal gases and transfer of thermal energy. Further, students will apply this knowledge to practical situations,

Students will gain basic knowledge of quantum physics and relativity. The course is heavily theoretical and PHYS151

covers topics related to particulate matter and the structure of the atomic nucleus. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite(s):

PHYS 201 Introduction to Electronics and Microprocessors

In this course students gain a working knowledge of analogue systems, digital systems and electronics in society of electronic devices. 3 Credits /Prerequisite: PHYS153 PHYS 202 Science of Materials

and industry. Emphasis is placed on system modeling and control, and measures of performance and stability

In this course students will gain detailed knowledge of structural materials and its application to engineering structures. The content covers phases of matter, structure of materials, microstructure as it relates to properties, materials testing, cements, glasses and ceramics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS151 PHYS 203 Introduction to Geology and Geophysics

Students will be exposed to the principles of geology and geophysics in this course. They will explore the areas of earth seismology; geo-hydrology; and geophysical prospecting and interpretation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS151

PHYS204 Environmental Physics I

In this course students will gain knowledge of environmental principles. Topics include physical oceanography PHYS151

and climatology, earth materials and hydrology, and power sources and pollution. 3 Credits / Prerequisite:

PHYS 205 Medical Physics I

Students in this course will study the physics of medicine. The course covers medical imaging, physics of sight, hearing, movement; and examines the techniques of medical diagnosis and treatment. The course outlines the methods used in the diagnostics of medicine and the calculations involved. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS153

218

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
PHYS 299 Physics Research Project

In this course students will acquire the fundamental tools needed to choose and conduct a research project, use resources to review literature relevant to the project, organize and present scientific data. They will select Prerequisite: PHYS 154 a hypothesis and submit a scientific paper, which they will defend before a panel of lecturers. 4 Credits/

RADG 201 Fundamentals of Radiological Sciences

(formerly RASC 101)

Students are introduced to the profession of radiography, the variety of imaging modalities and the organization and structure of national health services. Through classroom work, integrated with regular clinical observations, function effectively in a radiology department. 4 Credits / Prerequisite: None RADG 213 Basic Anatomic Pathology
(formerly RADG 113)

students gain an understanding of the role of the radiographer and the behaviours and attitudes required to

This course is designed to introduce students to the disease processes which are frequently encountered in a medical imaging department. Students will discuss the signs, symptoms and prognosis of various diseases and 201 will also be able to correlate radiographic images with pathologic findings. 3 Credits / Prerequisite: RADG

RADG 245

This is the first of three courses through which students will understand the science of producing a radiographic image. They will be able to identify the equipment and instruments used in the production of radiographic 201 images and gain valuable experience through practice in a clinical environment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG

Science and Instrumentation I

(Formerly RADG 141)

RADG 246

In this course, students examine the components of general X-ray equipment and the accessories needed to produce an accurate image. They will also understand manual and automatic image processing, fluoroscopy Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 245 RADG 253 and image intensification and be exposed to some special techniques requiring the use of general equipment. 3

Science and Instrumentation II

(formerly RADG142)

In this course, students acquire the radiographic and clinical skills required to perform routine radiographic patient care and safety with good radiographic practice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG 201 and RADG 245. RADG 254 Imaging Procedures II (formerly RADG 152)

Imaging Procedures I (formerly RADG 151)

images of the skeleton (except for the skull and facial bones). They will also learn how to integrate high levels of

In this course, students use radiographic skills, previously learnt and practised, to develop proficiency in the performance of contrast studies. They will also acquire the skills needed to care for pediatric, geriatric and 253 acutely ill patients and they will learn how to function in the operating theatre. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG

RADG 260 Clinical Practicum I

(formerly RADG162)

In this course, students reinforce the radiographic procedures learnt thus far through practical experience

in the clinical workplace. Students’ performance will be evaluated by competency- based assessments and benchmarked against standards for professional performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG 201 and RADG 253.

21

RADG 261 Clinical Practicum II

(formerly RADG 163)

This clinical course continues the development of student’s skills in radiographic imaging with emphasis on rotate through departments to ensure practice in these areas as well as the continuation of procedures previous 260

contrast media studies in the gastro-intestinal, hepato-biliary and genito-urinary systems. The student will taught and practised. Attention to professional attitude will be emphasised. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG

RADG 275 Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine I

(formerly RADG 171)

In this course, students acquire the professional skills, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours necessary for functioning as radiographers. The course covers ethical, legal and regulatory issues relevant to the practice of and HLED 225 or BUSI 203 and RADG 261 radiography and emphasizes good communication skills and patient care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: PSYC 203

RADG 312 Imaging Correlations with Sectional Anatomy

(formerly RADG 212)

Using case-based and problem-based formats, students reinforce their knowledge of anatomy and radiography. A series of student-centered activities allows them to examine the multi-modality and relational aspect of anatomic visualization. The course covers the skeleton and all systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 213 RADG 331 Quality Assurance in Medical Imaging

The student will learn how to integrate quality assurance into the production of consistently high quality images. They will also evaluate equipment and accessories to determine their efficacy. The student will also develop a 343 and RADG 353 quality assurance programme which can be implemented in the clinical setting. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG

RADG 343 Science and Instrumentation III

(formerly RADG 241)

This course introduces the student to specialized X-ray equipment including tomography as well as mobile and

accident and emergency systems. The student will also examine the role of exposure factors in determining the quality of the image and will learn how to construct a technique chart in an imaging department. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 246 RADG 344

In this course, students learn to identify advanced medical imaging equipment and modalities. They are also exposed to equipment used in local and international clinical settings. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 343 RADG 353 Imaging Procedures III
(formerly RADG 251)

Science and Instrumentation IV

(formerly RADG 242)

In this course, students develop skills in performing radiography of the head including skull, brain and facial

structures. They will study the cranium, including sinuses, foreign body localization in the eye, sialography, systems used in this area and learn to compare resultant images. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 254 RADG 354 Imaging Procedures IV
(formerly called RADG 252)

dental radiography and orthopantomography (OPG). Students will also be introduced to the alternate imaging

In this course, students are provided with an overview of non-routine imaging procedures requiring contrast media and specialized equipment. They learn effective and efficient practice in accident and emergency situations also examine the role of the radiographer in terms of appropriate patient care, nursing and radiation safety procedures. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 353 as well as patient positioning and how to operate X-ray bone mineral densitometry equipment. Students

220

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
RADG 363 Clinical Practicum III
(formerly called RADG 262)

In this course, students perform radiographic examinations under direct and indirect supervision. Students are

taught to use the equipment of conventional tomography and are exposed to the following procedures - foreign radiography of the skeletal system, the chest and the abdomen. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 261 RADG 364 Clinical Practicum IV
(formerly called RADG 263)

body localization in the eye; contrast media studies; skull, facial and dental radiography; as well as routine

In this course, students gain wide and varied experience in the clinical setting. For a three (3)- five (5) week medicine, ultrasound, and other specialized radiological procedures. For the remainder of the period, they practice in local settings to improve their skills and technique in patient care. 5 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 363

period, they will be placed overseas in order to observe other practice and modalities including CT, MRI, nuclear

RADG 371

The course continues the focus on the psycho-social aspects of radiography and the professional skills and qualities demanded by the radiographic profession. Students will understand the concept of reflective practice; they practise the patient care and communication skills necessary for the radiographer in the patient-practitioner interface at a more advanced level. They also examine the legal and ethical framework within which the workplace. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 275 RADG 444 Medical Digital Imaging

Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine II

(formerly called RADG 271)

professional radiographer operates as well as the self regulation and accountability necessary for the changing

(formerly RADG341)

This course introduces students to the acquisition, display and archiving of digital images. Students will film environment in the areas of digital subtraction, computed radiography, CT and MRI, image processing and picture archiving. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG 353 and RADG 353 RADG 455 Imaging Procedures V
(formerly RADG 351)

compare and contrast the analogue and digital image and understand the importance and impact of the non-

In this course students are exposed to advanced techniques and alternative imaging modalities. Students are introduced to interventional imaging, comparative imaging and learn to compare the benefits, similarities and differences of these procedures. Students discuss concepts and images of nuclear medicine, Ultrasound, CT, MRI and portal imaging in radiation therapy. They are also introduced to the uses of Positron Emission Tomography and fusion imaging. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 354 RADG 465 Clinical Practicum V
(formerly RADG 361)

In this course, students are allowed to perform radiographic examinations with increased autonomy. They perform radiographic examinations in operating theatres, ICUs, wards and Accident and Emergency departments; RADG 364 they are assigned specialized, more invasive procedures and also assist in patient care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

RADG 466 Clinical Practicum VI

(formerly RADG 363)

This is a final course in which students reinforce the theoretical and practical elements of radiography so as to arranged in CT and special imaging areas and students’ performance is evaluated in accordance with established 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 465

be well grounded in the general radiography and special procedures for entry into the profession. Rotations are professional standards. Successful completion of this course certifies students as competent for the workforce.

221

RADG 471 Change Strategies for Health Professionals (Elective)

In this course, students will see change as a process. They will understand their capacity to be positive agents 275

of change and the best practices for implementing change in an organization. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG

RADG 481 Research Methodology

(formerly RADG 381)

This is the first of three courses in which students are exposed to research methodology, bioethics and presentation 130 and STAT 120

skills. Students are required to develop and present a final research proposal. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LIBS

RADG 498 Senior Research Project I - Radiography

(formerly RADG 382)

In this course, students develop a research proposal in radiography, based on data collected from primary are required to meet regularly with their lecturer to discuss progress made on the development of the proposal. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 481

sources such as public or private health care facilities, government agencies or other clinical settings. Students

RADG 499 Senior Research Project II - Seminar

(formerly RADG 383)

This final course involves the oral presentation of the research project of RADG 498. Each student will make period. The student will complete a journal outlining the project and the personal benefits gained from the information provided. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: RADG 498 RADT 222 Radiation Sciences
(formerly RADT 122)

a 30-minute presentation to peers and faculty on his/her research project followed by a question and answer

In this course, students will be taught the principles of radiation and its effects on the human body. Special PHYS 102

attention is given to radiation biology, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

RADT 241 Radiation Physics I

(formerly RADT 141)

This course introduces fundamental concepts of physics and mathematics important to the therapeutic use of of x-rays and their interactions in different media and identify applications of physics theory to radiation numerical problems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 254 RADT 242 Physics and Instrumentation I

ionizing radiation. Students review basic concepts in physics, discuss topics specific to radioactivity, production therapy treatment. Students also reinforce their knowledge through problem-based laboratory work and solving

(formerly RADT 142)

Students examine the operating principles of linear accelerators, betatrons and cobalt teletherapy units, as well

as the quality and measurement of photon beams. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of dosimetric data and the use of this data for an optimal plan. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 241/ Co-Requisite: RADT 295

RADT 254 Radiation Therapy I

(formerly RADT 151)

The course introduces the student to the hospital environment, health problems and the basic issues of safety and comfort to be considered when working with patients. The student will be able to practise a variety of RADT 241 procedures and operate equipment in the patient’s environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-Requisite:

RADT 255 Radiation Therapy II (formerly RADT 152)

222

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
In this course, students will focus on the appropriate behaviours and skills for the radiation therapist and radiographer. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 254 RADT 273 Clinical Practice I
(formerly called RADT 162)

In this course, students will practise basic technical skills and procedures required when treating patients. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-Requisite: RADT 242 and RADT 295 RADT 274 Clinical Practice II
(formerly called RADT 163)

In this course students will undergo clinical assessment three days a week over a ten-week period. They will

be placed at the National Radiotherapy Centre and other private Radiotherapy Centres where they will assist in

patient care and the planning and delivery of radiation therapy treatments under the supervision of radiation Prerequisite: RADT 273 RADT 295

therapists. Clinical coordinators will assess their clinical competency and performance evaluation. 4 Credits/

In this introductory course, students examine the concepts and principles of treatment planning for radiation

Treatment and Planning I

(formerly called RADT 192)

therapy treatment delivery. Topics covered include: the role of the radiation therapist in the treatment planning team, patient contouring and immobilization, treatment field blocking methods, and simulation (including CT simulation) for treatment planning. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADT 241 and RADT 254 RADT 311 Radiation Protection and Cellular Response
(formerly called RADT 211)

This course provides detailed study of ionizing radiation on living cells, and its controlled use in radiation

therapy. Students will focus on the variation in responses of different cell population types and life-cycle stages focus on the practical application of radiation safety regulations and recommended practices as they apply to radiation therapy. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 222 RADT 353 Clinical Techniques I
(formerly RADT 272)

as applicable to radiation therapy principles. They will discuss radiation units and safety guidelines as well as

This course combines the theory and the practice of radiation therapy into a comprehensive study of clinical

techniques. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of treatment planning, quality assurance, oncology and patient care in a problem-based learning environment so as to complete competency assessment assignments in the clinical area. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADT 255, RADT 274 and RADT 395 RADT 354 Clinical Oncology I by PBL
(formerly called RADT 252)

In this course, students examine site-specific oncology in terms of incidence, diagnosis, treatment, side-effects and results of treatment. Acute side-effects and complications of radiation therapy, assessment, developing care plans for oncology patients and case study presentations are covered. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 255 RADT 363 Clinical Practice III
(formerly called RADT 262)

This course focuses on the competency-based evaluation and assessment of students’ application of clinical techniques and procedures. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 274 RADT 364 Clinical Practice IV
(formerly called RADT 263)

This is a ten-week course that includes a three to five-week overseas clinical attachment. Students continue to participate in all aspects of patient planning and treatment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 363 RADT 395 Treatment and Planning II
(formerly called RADT 291)

223

This course is the second in a series of courses examining the concepts and applications of treatment planning principles in radiation therapy. Students discuss quality assurance as a management concept and its application deliver treatment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 295 RADT 454 Clinical Techniques II in RT practice. They also examine the different imaging and treatment techniques used to accurately plan and

(Formerly called RADT 371)

The course combines the theory and practice of radiation therapy into a comprehensive study of clinical

techniques. Students understand the principles of treatment planning, quality assurance, oncology and patient care in a problem-based learning environment. They complete competency-based assignments related to the clinical area. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 353 RADT 456

In this course, students examine site-specific oncology to include incidence, diagnosis, treatment, side-effects and results of treatment. Acute side-effects and complications of radiation therapy, assessment developing care plans for oncology patients and case study presentations will be included. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 354 RADT 465 Clinical Practice V
(formerly called RADT361)

Clinical Oncology II by PBL (formerly called RADT 351)

This course spans six weeks. Students will complete competency-based assignments and perform critical tasks. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT364 RADT466

This course provides students with practical experience in several areas of radiation therapy. Students will be

Clinical Practice VI (formerly called RADT362)

supervised by the clinical coordinator and staff radiation therapists in assigned clinical facilities, while they RADT 465 RADT 467

assist in patient care and the planning and delivery of radiation therapy treatments. 5 Credits/ Prerequisite:

This is a final clinical practicum that is competency-based and in which students fulfill critical tasks. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 466 RADT 493

Clinical Practice VII

(formerly called RADT 363)

In this course, students will examine quality assurance concepts and their application to treatment planning and delivery in radiation therapy. They will also examine the advantages and disadvantages of image quality and other imaging modalities used in the treatment planning process. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 395 RADT 494 Treatment Planning Lab
(formerly called RADT 391)

Treatment and Planning III

(formerly RADT 292)

This course provides the student with laboratory experiences to develop competency in clinical treatment

planning. Students will use manual methods to produce composite isodose distributions and examine the management of digital information that has evolved as a result of increased computerization in clinical practice. critical structures, and design optimal treatment plans. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 493 SCIE 199 Science Research Project I Using a variety of patient images, students will employ 3-D software to outline planning tumour volumes and

This course introduces students to the fundamental tools needed to choose and conduct a research project, course students will submit a hypothesis for a project. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 121 & 122

use resources to review literature relevant to the project, organize and present scientific data. At the end of the

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
SCIE 201 Contemporary Issues in Science

This course introduces students to a number of important issues in contemporary science. Students will learn the basic principles of the scientific method. Through class discussion, they will also learn how to critically assess industrial and scientific processes. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None SCIE 299 Science Research Project II

Using the hypothesis submitted in SCIE 199, students will conduct a literature review and develop a project and project proposal. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: SCIE 199 SCIE 399 Science Research Project III

proposal for testing the hypothesis. At the end of this course students will submit a written literature review

Students will conduct a research project based on a unique hypothesis. panel of lecturers. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: SCIE 299 SCIE 499 Science Research Project IV Prerequisite: SCIE 399

submissions from SCIE 299. Students will collect data and orally present their methods and results before a

This project may be based on

Students will submit a written scientific paper based on the research conducted in SCIE 399. 1 Credit/

WRMT 180 Hydrometeorology

(formerly ENVS 105)

This course gives the student an understanding of the meteorological processes that determine weather and climate. The student learns of the general features of climatology as it relates to hydrology, with particular emphasis on the energy budget of the earth, the general circulation, generation of precipitation, distribution of 160

temperature and pressure, and the effects of climate on soils and vegetation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS

WRMT 190 Hydraulics I

(formerly ENVS 103)

This course is essential to the water resources practitioner who is responsible for design operation activities. Students learn about kinematics, dynamics, statistics, pipe flow, open channel flow and introductory design of hydraulics structures. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: MATH 121 WRMT 200 Wastewater Management
(formerly ENVS 200)

Students will focus on the maintenance of standards of public health safety as well as the importance of water

conservation. They will learn the fundamental principles and practices involved in the provision of water to, and Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 111

the collection, treatment and disposal of wastewater from homes, institutions, factories and communities. 3

WRMT 201 Surface Water Hydrology I

(formerly ENVS 201)

Students in this course gain a comprehensive understanding of the processes involved in surface water hydrology. flow mechanism. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 100 WRMT 202 Ground Water Hydrology I

These processes will include precipitation, soil moisture distribution, infiltration, interception and the stream

(Formerly ENVS 202)

Students in this course acquire knowledge of the conditions under which groundwater occurs. They also learn Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 121

about groundwater movement and storage and the relationship between groundwater and surface water. 3

225

WRMT 203 Drainage and Irrigation

(formerly ENVS 203)

Students learn about the various methods of providing a continuous and reliable water supply to crops. They also acquire the skills necessary for the management and control of flooding in both urban and rural areas, and MATH 121 and PHYS 100 the computational skills for the design of various drainage and irrigation systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:

WRMT 205 Watershed Management and Soil Conservation

(formerly ENVS 205)

Water resources and environmental practitioners who pursue this course will acquire the skills necessary to conserve soil, plant and water resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 111 and ENVS 160 WRMT 215 Hydrometry (formerly ENVS 215)

Students in this course will acquire the skills and measuring techniques necessary for collecting reliable flow and sediment data. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 201

WRMT 255 Wastewater Engineering (formerly ENVS 255)

In this course, students examine the concepts of the design of wastewater treatment processes. Emphasis will be placed on the physical, chemical and biological treatment processes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 263 WRMT 280 Introduction to Wastewater Operations and Maintenance
(formerly ENVS 280)

This course is designed as an introduction to the basic concepts involved in wastewater plant operation and maintenance. It includes an overview of the elements of a typical wastewater plant and introductory operational and safety and general administrative principles are also incorporated. WRMT 282 Introduction to Wastewater Collection Systems and maintenance procedures associated with a wastewater facility. Training and knowledge of equipment, health

(formerly ENVS 282)

In this course, students examine the operations and components of a wastewater collection system. They develop degradation, while increasing the life cycle of the system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 255 WRMT 284 Wastewater Treatment Process
(formerly ENVS 284)

an understanding of the functionality and operational efficiency that is necessary to minimize environmental

Students explore the various treatment processes employed in the wastewater industry. They learn that many environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 255

aspects of the wastewater treatment process are designed to imitate the natural treatment that occurs in the

WRMT 286 Wastewater Planning and Development (formerly ENVS 286)

Students gain an appreciation of wastewater system planning and management as an integrated and holistic approach to wastewater resource management. They learn ways of minimizing overflows through retention, 280 detention, proper planning and design of the wastewater collection system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT

WRMT 288 Advanced Wastewater Treatment

(formerly ENVS 288)

This course exposes students to SCADA system architecture. Students are equipped with the general skills 280

required for maintaining the integrity of the system with real time monitoring. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT

WRMT 290 Hydraulics II

(formerly ENVS 250)

In this course, students acquire more in-depth knowledge required for the water resources practitioner who is responsible for design and operation activities. Among the topics covered are the design of hydraulic structures,

226

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 kinematics, pipe flow and open channel flow. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 190 WRMT 301 Surface Water Hydrology II
(formerly ENVS 301)

This course builds on the knowledge acquired in WRMT 201. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of 201

the processes involved in the distribution of the world’s surface water supply. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT

WRMT 302 Ground Water Hydrology II

(formerly ENVS 302)

In this course, students explore the three-phase process of utilizing groundwater resources: exploration, evaluation and exploration/management. They will learn to search for suitable aquifer yields, develop optimal Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 202 strategies and assess the interactions between groundwater exploitation and the regional hydrologic system. 3

WRMT 317 Biological Principles of Water and Wastewater Management (formerly ENVS 317)

In this course, students develop a comprehensive understanding of the major elements and processes involved issues, including treatment of water for drinking, water sanitation and the need for wastewater treatment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 111

in water and wastewater management from a biological perspective. They explore various water management

WRMT 410 Hydrological Database Development

(formerly ENVS 410)

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of database development and management as applied

to hydrology. They will explore the principles of relational database design including the organization and Credits/ Prerequisites: WRMT 301 and WRMT 302

storage of information. In addition, they will examine the functions of specific hydrological database systems. 3

WRMT 425 Wastewater Plant Operations and Maintenance (formerly ENVS 425)

In this course, students gain an in-depth understanding of the components of water and wastewater plants and systems. They explore water and wastewater design, operations, monitoring and maintenance of plants. They are also trained in equipment upkeep, safety/survival systems and administrative and organizational principles. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 282

WRMT 427 Water and Wastewater Collection Systems

(formerly ENVS 427)

Students explore the various processes involved in the accumulation and allocation of water and wastewater. They

learn about the development of water as a resource in terms of treatment, storage and distribution and identify WRMT 282

the environmental issues associated with water pollution and wastewater disposal. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

WRMT 430 Membrane Technology

(formerly ENVS 430)

In this course, students will study the principles and applications of membrane technology in developing supplemental water sources and treating wastewater effluents. They will also come to understand the importance of preserving the integrity of the environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 100 WRMT 432 Water Resources Management
(formerly ENVS 430)

Students explore the issues involved in the development of water resources. They learn about the most feasible

methods of identifying and quantifying water resources on a regional basis and will gain knowledge of the principles of surface and groundwater hydrology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: WRMT 203, WRMT 205 and ENVS 263

227

School of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning

The School of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning offers credit and non-credit continuing education and professional development courses and programmes. The school’s main focus is to provide opportunities a diverse range of adult students. for professional development through a wide array of programmes and to open the doors of COSTAATT to and delivery focuses on producing graduates who are current, knowledgeable and competent in their field.

It supports workforce development by ensuring that programme design

On successful completion of their programmes, students are able to earn diplomas and certificates and are and programmes can be transferred to relevant degree programmes offered by the academic schools.

prepared for professional certification in selected areas of study. College-level credits earned in these courses

Mission
The School of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning aims to expand access to educational opportunities at the College, by offering a variety of short term, flexible programmes aimed at upgrading skills and providing professional development opportunities.

228

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

List of Programmes
Advanced Professional Education Programmes
Diabetes Educator Certificate Ultrasound Diploma

Certificate Programmes

Continuing Education Short Courses
Basic Web Page Design Computer Literacy

International Trade and Commerce Diploma

CISCO – CCNA

Court Transcription Journalism

Health Records Science Pharmacy Assistant

Business Communication Conversational French – Level I

Records Management

Conversational German – Level I Conversational Spanish – Level I Conversational Spanish – Level II Event Planning

Records Management for the Public Sector

Conversational Spanish – Level III Geographic Information Systems Image, Etiquette and Protocol Introduction to Computer Art

Jewelry – Basic Design Techniques to Entrepreneur

Small Business Development – Idea

Certificate Programmes
Certificate - CISCO-CCNA
The CISCO-CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate) Certificate is designed for CISCO Networking Academy students. The CCNA programme provides an integrated and comprehensive coverage of networking topics, from fundamentals to advanced applications and services, and offers students the hands-on practical experience required for industry.

examinations leading to professional certification in networking. This programme normally fulfills matriculation requirements for networking engineering degree programmes.

Upon completion of this curriculum, students will be prepared to sit CISCO-CCNA

Programme Details:
CODE
CCNA 120 CCNA 121 CCNA 122 CCNA 123

COURSE TITLE
Network Fundamentals Routing Protocols and Concepts LAN Switching and Wireless Accessing the WAN

Cr.
4 4 4 4

Total Number of Credits Required

16

Career Options:
• Network technician

• Network administrator

22

Course Descriptions:
CCNA 120 Network Fundamentals This course introduces students to the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. At the end of this practical course, students build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic Credits/ Prerequisite: None configurations of network devices such as routers and switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes. 4

CCNA 121 Routing Protocols and Concepts

In this course, students learn about the architecture, components, and operation of routers, and the principles of routing and routing protocols. They analyze, configure, verify and troubleshoot the primary routing protocols correct common routing issues and problems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: CCNA 120 CCNA 122 LAN Switching and Wireless RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF. Upon completion of this practical course, students are equipped to identify and

In this course, students acquire theoretical knowledge and practical skills in the technologies and protocols design model and how to select devices for each layer. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: CCNA 120 CCNA 123 Accessing the WAN

needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network

In this course, students learn about the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications

in enterprise networks. The Cisco Network Architecture is used to introduce integrated network services and Prerequisites: CCNA 121 and 122 Certificate - Court Transcription

show students how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet network requirements. 4 Credits/

In this programme, participants are trained to produce accurate typewritten records of court proceedings including reproductions of statements, findings and verdicts.

Recording,’ is used to develop necessary skills and competencies. Applicants should have excellent listening skills, powers of concentration and above average vocabulary and punctuation skills. To ensure that they have the required foundation competencies to succeed in this rigourous certificate programme, students may be guided to do preparatory work prior to registering for required courses. In addition, applicants should possess superb computer skills. The target speed for a court transcriptionist at the conclusion of the programme is 60 to 80 words per minute.

The specialist software ‘Audio Digital Court

Programme Details:
CODE
COMM 125 COTR 102 COTR 110 ITEC 121 LAWW 120 MDLT 104 OFAD 100

COURSE TITLE
English for Court Transcription Introduction to Court Transcription Orientation to Court Processes Productivity Tools Introduction to Legal Terminology Introduction to Medical Terminology Keyboarding

Cr.
5 3 0 3 2 2 4

Total Number of Credits Required

19

230

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Career Option:
• Court Transcriptionist

Course Descriptions:
COMM 125 English for Court Transcription This course is intended to build or improve students’ ability to recognize and produce Standard English Grammar in both the oral and written contexts. It is intended to provide support for other courses by enabling students to produce suitable oral and written assignments as required by those courses. 5 Credits/ Prerequisites: None COTR 102 Introduction to Court Transcription

This course is designed to introduce students to the art of transcription, typewritten-transcription and audio typing. Students are required to possess a very high degree of speed and accuracy in transcription skills to prepare for the work requirements of the judicial system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COTR 110 Orientation to Court Processes

Students are required to complete a one-week orientation session at the Hall of Justice. Participants receive a of Court Transcription Certificate programme ITEC 121 Productivity Tools

certificate if they are present all the days on which the orientation is held. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: Completion

In this course, students acquire the skills needed to prepare documents in the Microsoft Office Suite environment; specifically Word, Excel and PowerPoint. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None LAWW 120 Introduction to Legal Terminology

This course introduces students to legal terminology relevant to the field of court reporting. Students acquire working knowledge of the language and documents most commonly used in the legal profession. Topics guidelines, and examples of routine legal documents and their uses. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MDLT 104 Introduction to Medical Terminology covered include definitions, spellings and pronunciations of legal terms, basic court procedures, court rules and

This course offers an introduction to medical terminology. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the

language and documents most commonly used in the health professions. The course will include definitions, spelling and pronunciation of medical terms and definitions of basic anatomical parts. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

OFAD 100 Keyboarding

In this course, students aim to master keyboarding skills to a speed of 80 words per minute. In addition, they Credits/ Prerequisite: None

will acquire skills in the preparation, proof reading and electronic storage of business and legal documents. 4

Certificate - Health Records Science
This programme exposes participants to new techniques and tools in health information management. Participants will acquire the knowledge and practical skills required for processing medical records, including techniques for collecting, storing, retrieving and using health information. At the end of the course, students should be able to organize and evaluate health information in accordance with established international standards.

231

Programme Details:
CODE
BIOL 113 COMM 117 COMM 118 ENVH 121 HISM 101 HISM 102 HISM 103 ITEC 121 MATH 116 MDLT 104 STAT 120

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology Introduction to Communication Workplace Communication Introduction to Epidemiology Health Records Science I Health Information Resources Health Records Science II Productivity Tools Contemporary College Math Introduction to Medical Terminology Fundamentals of Statistics

Cr.
3 3 3 2 1 1 4 3 3 2 3

Total Number of Credits Required

28

Career Options:
• Administrative assistant • Office assistant • Clerk at hospital, clinic, medical centre and any other institution engaged in medical activities.

Course Descriptions
BIOL 113 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology This course is designed for persons who have never been exposed to the study of science. Students of this course None

will gain a fundamental knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

COMM 117 Introduction to Communication

This course enables students to strengthen their writing skills. Students will learn to write clearly and concisely communication. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None COMM 118 Workplace Communication

in a variety of rhetorical modes and will develop critical thinking and analytical skills as imperatives of effective

This course will engage students in learning and practising an array of oral and written communication skills relevant to the workplace. The objective is to produce a graduate who will be confident and effective in responding to the diverse demands of communication in the modern workplace. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None ENVH 121 Introduction to Epidemiology
(Formerly ENVH 261)

The course introduces the concepts and history of epidemiology and its relevance to the field of public health practice. This includes the use of epidemiological tools in evaluation and decision making regarding matters of public health. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

HISM 101 Health Records Science I

This course is designed to prepare students to develop the technical skills necessary to maintain medical record systems consistent with national medical, administrative, and ethical requirements.

theories of health records management, the role and responsibility of health records personnel-including

Students will examine

legal and ethical obligations as well as the importance of health records as a management tool. 1 Credit/

232

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Prerequisite: None HISM 102 Health Information Resources

In this course, students learn specific tools and techniques for using the library and internet to conduct research in

the health care field. Students are taught to evaluate the validity, authenticity and currency of health information resources and to search for articles in major online databases such as PubMed/Medline, CINAHL, PSYC info. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None

HISM 103 Health Records Science II

In this course, students will apply knowledge gained in the courses: Health Records Science I, Anatomy and Physiology and the Introduction to Medical Terminology. Students will be able to interpret and code medical on sources, definitions and methods of collection. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the laws governing the release of patient information. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: HISM 101 ITEC 121 Productivity Tools information using the ICD-10 layout. They will also undertake an in-depth study of hospital statistics, focusing

In this course, students acquire the skills needed to prepare documents in the Microsoft Office Suite environment; specifically Word, Excel and PowerPoint. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MATH 116 Contemporary College Math

This is an introductory course in modern applied mathematics. It examines mathematical methodology including the use of unambiguous language and simplification to model practical problems, notions of generalization and modern world. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CXC Mathematics or equivalent MDLT 104 Introduction to Medical Terminology ‘open’ problems. Students will develop an appreciation for the discipline of mathematics and its role in the

This course offers an introduction to medical terminology as it relates to the work of practitioners in the field. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the language and documents most commonly used in the health of basic anatomical parts. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None STAT 120 Fundamentals of Statistics professions. The course will include - definitions, spellings and pronunciations of medical terms and definitions

This course introduces the student to key concepts in both descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn Prerequisite: Any one of the following mathematics courses – MATH 108, MATH 116, MATH 117, MATH 119, MATH 121

how to collect, describe, display and interpret both raw and summarized data in meaningful ways. 3 Credits/

233

Certificate - Journalism
This programme is designed to provide practitioners requiring certification and newcomers to the profession with a sound theoretical and practical introduction to areas such as reporting, photojournalism and the ethical and legal issues affecting journalists. Emphasis will be placed on practising reporting skills and understanding the role of journalists as the guardians of democracy in society. Successful completion of this certificate may also be used in partial fulfillment of matriculation requirements for journalism degrees at the College.

Programme Details:
CODE
JOUR 123 JOUR 131 JOUR 135 LAWW 270

COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Reporting Ethics in Journalism and Public Relations Photojournalism Laws Affecting Journalism

Cr.
3 3 3 3

Total Number of Credits Required

12

Career Options:
• Reporter- print, radio and television positions as: • News anchor • Sub-editor /editor – print, radio and television Students with prior experience in journalism may also use this course for career advancement in such

Course Descriptions:
JOUR 123 Fundamentals of Reporting Students learn the techniques of newsgathering; the standard rules of news and feature writing; elements of news judgment; and the guidelines used for effective interviewing. They will become proficient in the “inverted such as those used by the New York Times and other media houses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None JOUR 131 Ethics in Journalism and Public Relations pyramid” style of news reporting and gain an understanding of the importance of using in-house style guides,

This course focuses on ethical issues in public relations and journalism, and challenges students to have a view Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ). 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None JOUR 135 Photojournalism

on these issues. The ethical codes of local public relations associations are examined as well as that of the

This course provides an introduction to photography techniques for print media production including newspapers. Students will learn basic composition and layout techniques, and how to utilize theoretical and practical approaches to the discipline. Evaluation will include the assessment of student portfolios and field projects. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

LAWW 270 Laws Affecting Journalism

This course is designed to expose students to the laws of Trinidad and Tobago as they relate to the practice

of journalism and public relations. As future journalists, students are introduced to laws such as libel, slander,

234

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 defamation, sedition, intellectual property and those relating to the award of broadcast licenses and the establishment of publishing houses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None Certificate - Pharmacy Assistant This programme prepares students to perform as pharmacy assistants under the supervision of registered

pharmacists. Students will understand the basics of pharmacology including the generic, trade and chemical addition, students will gain an appreciation of medical industry safety and regulatory requirements.

names of commonly prescribed drugs. They will learn how to fill prescriptions and manage inventory. In

Programme Details:
CODE
COMM 104 MATH 108 MKTG 114 PHAR 110 PHAR 113 PHAR 121 PHAR 123 PHAR 133 PHAR 138

COURSE TITLE
Language and Communication Skills Dosage Mathematics Customer Service Fundamentals Orientation to Pharmacy Practice Introduction to Pharmaceutics Introduction to Pharmacology Pharmacy Systems and Procedures Compounding Introduction to Pharmacy Legislation and Ethics

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Number of Credits Required

27

Career Option:
• Pharmacy Assistant

Course Descriptions:
COMM 104 Language and Communications Skills This course is designed to enhance students’ grasp of the fundamental elements of Standard English and improve

their oral and written communication skills in their specific work environment. As such it will combine elements of grammar, vocabulary, comprehension exercises and business communications. Emphasis will be placed on the correct use of grammar and vocabulary in oral situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MATH 108 Dosage Mathematics

This course provides students with the mathematical skills required to be effective in the health science occupations which require dosage calculations. Students will review number systems, fractions, decimals, approximation, percentages, basic algebra, ratio, proportion, subject of the formula and indices. Students will (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level Mathematics

also be exposed to the use of mathematics in everyday life. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Passing Grade in CSEC

MKTG 114 Customer Service Fundamentals

This course introduces students to the basic tools and skills needed to provide a consistent level of service excellence in service to customers and clients. Instruction focuses on developing skills in the areas of personal customer loyalty through a programme of service excellence. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None and telephone etiquette, analysis of the communication process, solving customer problems, and developing

235

PHAR 110 Orientation to Pharmacy Practice

In this course students will examine concepts in pharmaceutical care and the role and responsibilities of the 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

pharmacy assistant. Students will also explore principles of quality control and tenets of professional conduct.

PHAR 113 Introduction to Pharmaceutics

In this course, students will examine the relationship between medical and pharmaceutical technology. In and compounding prescriptions. Chemistry

addition, they will learn to perform pharmaceutical calculations and the principles involved in dispensing 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Passing Grade in CSEC (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level

PHAR 121 Introduction to Pharmacology

In this course students will explore the physiological effects of common drugs on the human body. They will and contra-indications. Recommendations for the administration of some commonly used drugs are also

study the principles of drug action, including their absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, indications discussed. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHAR113.

PHAR 123 Pharmacy Systems and Procedures

Students will explore the systems and procedures necessary for the smooth functioning of a pharmacy, including ward stock, expiry dates and return procedures. They will develop skills in interpreting and filling prescriptions and required associated tasks. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHAR113. PHAR 133 Compounding

Students will be exposed to basic principles and skills in compounding and will be able to produce a variety of and emulsions for oral and topical use. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHAR121. PHAR 138 Introduction to Pharmacy Legislation and Ethics

formulations. They will also learn to prepare a variety of dosage forms including ointments, creams, suppositories

Students will explore the provisions of national legislation relevant to pharmacy practice including the Pharmacy Board Act, the Dangerous Drug Act, and the Antibiotics Act, as well as the code of ethics pertaining to pharmacists. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHAR110.

Certificate - Records Management
This certificate programme is designed to provide training for persons who have at least three (3) years’ work as the classification, storage, preservation, retention and disposal of records. experience in records management in a public or private sector organization. Students will examine topics such

Programme Details:
CODE
LAWW 115 LIBS 130 RCMT 150 RCMT 153 RCMT 154 RCMT 190

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Legal Aspects of Records Management Fundamental Research Skills Introduction to Records Management Fundamentals of Electronic Records Management Introduction to Archives Management Records Management Practicum

Cr.
3 3 4 4 3 3

Total Number of Credits Required

20

236

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Career Options:
• Graduates qualify for employment in a variety of para-professional positions in schools, public libraries, academic libraries or other organizations requiring a records management capacity.

Certificate - Records Management for the Public Sector
This certificate programme is designed to provide training for persons who have at least three (3) years’ work

experience in records management in a public sector organization. Students will examine topics such as the classification, storage, preservation, retention and disposal of records. In addition, students will be introduced to within the public sector environment. the basic principles of public sector management and the human resource skills required to function effectively

Programme Details:
CODE
ADMN 310 HURM 310 LIBS 130 MGMT 125 MGMT 300 RCMT 150 RCMT 152 RCMT 153 RCMT 154 RCMT 190

COURSE TITLE
Public Administration Human Resource Management Fundamental Research Skills Principles of Management Organisational Behaviour Introduction to Records Management Legal Aspects of Records Management Fundamentals of Electronic Records Management Introduction to Archives Management Records Management Practicum

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 3

Total Number of Credits Required

32

Career Options:
• Graduates qualify for employment in a variety of para-professional positions in schools, public libraries, academic libraries or other organizations requiring records management. In addition, graduates may also gain employment in the public service.

Course Descriptions:
ADMN 310 Public Administration This course introduces students to concepts, principles and techniques in public administration in contemporary

society. The course is intended to enhance students’ understanding of the principles of administration in the public sector and students will have an opportunity to examine some of the issues and problems in public administration, with special emphasis placed on public administration in Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125

HURM 310 Human Resource Management

This course introduces students to the principles, practices, and techniques used in the design, development and implementation of an effective human resource/personnel management programme. It includes a discussion resources management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MGMT 125 of employment, training, compensation, labour relations, health and safety, and legislation governing human

237

LAWW 115 Introduction to Legal Aspects of Records Management

This course seeks to provide students with an in-depth understanding of legislative provisions affecting the management of records. It focuses on the relationship of record keeping with the law. It will also enable and of those involved in the action within a business transaction. 3 credits/ Prerequisite: RCMT 150 LIBS 130 Fundamental Research Skills students to understand the intrinsic connection between the law and role of records as the evidence of an action

In this course students will identify and explore the basic steps of the research process and the tasks associated with each step. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MGMT 125 Principles of Management

This introductory course exposes students to both the theory and application of the principles, practices, techniques and tools that underlie and inform the discipline of management. Students acquire a fundamental understanding of the evolution of management theories and practices, the role which such theories and practices have played

in shaping the dynamics of management thinking and management behavior, and the processes by which these None

theories and practices are applied in organizations in the pursuit of business activities. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

MGMT 300 Organizational Behaviour

(Formerly BUSI 103)

This course enables students to develop an understanding of how the internal and external environmental forces impact individuals and organizations. In addition, students will acquire knowledge of the tools and techniques available to effectively plan and manage change. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: MGMT 125 RCMT 152 Records Management

This course seeks to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the purpose of records management and the importance of controlling and managing records in any organization. It presents an overview of records business environment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: None management terminology, concepts and procedures for successfully managing records in a modern office or

RCMT 153 Fundamentals of Electronic Records Management The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of records management in an electronic environment. It will focus on the importance of electronic records to government and business and the problems implementing electronic records management systems. 4 credits/ Prerequisites: LAWW 115 and RCMT 150 RCMT 154 Introduction to Archives Management The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop an understanding of the relationship between archives management and records management. The course will review the types of archives and their functions and the goals and objectives of archive management. Students will be exposed to a number of approaches Prerequisite: RCMT 150, RCMT 190 Practicum

associated with their management. It also seeks to identify the requisite resources and responsibilities for

to archives management. Emphasis will be placed on access to, and security of, archival records. 3 credits/

Students will be required to prepare a records management policy manual for a department in a real or imaginary institution. The manual must include a records classification scheme, a coding schedule and a record retention observations, questions, and problems, which arose, and how they dealt with them. and disposition policy. Students will maintain a weekly journal for recording their practicum experience, noting

Case studies will be

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012 assigned to assist students in problem solving. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Completion of all courses in Records Management Certificate

Advanced Professional Programmes
Diploma - International Trade and Commerce
This one year diploma programme is aimed at business and economics professionals who wish to acquire the required knowledge and skills to understand and analyse contemporary issues in international trade. Case trade activities. Topics covered include international trade theory and policy, regional integration movements, international finance and multilateral trading systems. study analysis is utilized to expose students to the economic, legal and political underpinnings of international

Programme Details:
CODE
INTC 500 INTC 510 INTC 520 INTC 525 INTC 530 INTC 533 INTC 534 INTC 535 INTC 540 INTC 545 INTC 550

COURSE TITLE
The World Trading System International Trade Theory and Policy Regional Integration International Monetary Theory & Policy Trade and Intellectual Property The Politics of Trade International Negotiations and Simulation Trade and Climate Change International Partnerships Transportation Logistics for Trade Facilitation Competition Law and Policy

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Number of Credits Required

33

Career Options:
• Persons may seek employment as policy development officers, international relations officers, trade organizations, and international organizations involved in trade-related work.

specialists, business facilitators, and project officers in the public and private sectors, non-governmental

Course Descriptions
INTC 500 The World Trading System This course provides students with an understanding of the world trading system and multilateral trade

negotiations in the areas of goods and services; and an overview of the legal, economic and political dimensions of the global trading system, and examines key issues addressed by international trade forums. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None

INTC 510 International Trade Theory and Policy

This course provides students with the foundation knowledge in the principles of economics. Students are introduced to the principles of international economics and acquire a basic understanding of trade theory and trade policy. The use of case studies provides students with an opportunity to apply theoretical principles to or experience

real-world events. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ECON 120 and ECON 125, or relevant undergraduate equivalent

23

INTC 520 Regional Integration

In this course, students examine the rise of regional integration movements within the context of globalization. system is discussed, while integration agreements in Europe, North America, Latin America and the Caribbean 500

Regional integration as a driver of economic development and an important aspect of the multilateral trading provide the basis for analysis of the impact of regional integration movements. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC

INTC 525 International Monetary Theory and Policy

This course is a post-graduate course for undergraduate students who have foundation knowledge in the principles of economics. Students learn about the principles of international economics and international finance. Topics covered include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets and the macroeconomics of international transactions. The use of case studies provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge relevant undergraduate equivalent or experience INTC 530 Trade and Intellectual Property

of international monetary issues to real-world events. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ECON 120 and ECON 125, or

Intellectual Property (IP) plays a significant role in the advancement of economic development and in the facilitation of international trade through treaties for multilateral protection. This course provides students with a broad overview of key aspects of IP and of the role that intellectual property plays in the international trade agenda. Students learn about the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreement on Trade-Related aspects of Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500

Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) and intellectual property rights issues in the Doha Development Agenda. 3

INTC 533 The Politics of Trade

This seminar helps students develop an understanding of the political forces that influence the multilateral

decision-making process. Issues to be covered will include the political aspect of U.S. foreign trade policy and China (BRIC) - to influence negotiating mandates; the power of the European Union; and the role of coalition

its influence in international trade negotiations; the power of emerging economies - Brazil, Russia, India and groupings such as the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group, Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Small Island Developing States (SIDS), Small and Vulnerable Economies (SVEs), Group of 20 (G20), and Group of 33 (G33). 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 534 International Negotiations

In this seminar, students explore the principles, processes, and techniques involved in interest-based negotiation. Students learn about the various stakeholders involved in international trade negotiations (government ministries, resolving trade problems. Through a simulation exercise, students develop negotiating skills in the international trade arena. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 535 Trade and Climate Change non-government groups, industries) and use objective criteria to examine stakeholder interests and options for

This course examines the impact of climate change on the environment and the global economy, with special

attention paid to the relationship between the multilateral trading system and the emerging international regime

on climate change. Students explore the linkage between trade and climate change through critical analysis of 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: INTC 510 and INTC 520

relevant reports by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Trade Organization (WTO).

240

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
INTC 540 International Partnerships

This course is designed to introduce students to several of the issues, problems and decisions associated with creating and managing various forms of international collaborations and partnerships. Instruction incorporates the use of student teams, case-based, discussion and interactive formats, with active learning and problem solving on a daily basis. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 545 Transportation Logistics for Trade Facilitation

In this course, students examine the relationship between the growth of trade and transportation costs, with particular focus on Latin America and the Caribbean. Maritime transport, which accounts for 80 percent of the world’s merchandise trade, is also addressed. Students will develop an understanding of trade facilitation, national borders. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC 500 INTC 550 Competition Law and Policy which seeks to secure improvements in the efficiency of the processes associated with trading goods across

This course introduces students to the main categories of analysis for applying antimonopoly law: monopolies, practical tools for monopoly analysis. 500

cartels, horizontal agreements, vertical agreements and structural changes and provides students with the relationship between competition policy and the multilateral trading system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: INTC Students also examine competition policy in the Caribbean and the

The College offers the following franchised programmes from the Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences:

• Post Graduate Certificate – Diabetes Educator • Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound

Students interested in accessing these courses must seek further information from the School of Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning:

Continuing Education Courses

241

Certificate – Basic Web Page Design (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with the skills to design and create web pages. Students will gain an appreciation of the internet as a tool for corporate communications and will understand how web sites are for IT degrees offered at the College. used to facilitate content delivery. This course may be used in partial fulfillment of matriculation requirements

Certificate – Business Communication (3 credits)

‘Business Communication’ will engage students in learning and practising an array of oral and written communication skills relevant to the workplace. The objective is to produce a graduate who will be confident and effective in responding to the diverse demands of the modern workplace. Certificate – Computer Literacy (3 credits)

Students will understand the basics of computing operating systems and the internet.

knowledge and competence in the use of popular applications such as Word, Access, Excel and PowerPoint. Students will acquire the wherewithal to increase personal efficiency and produce appropriately formatted at the College. Certificates : documents to professional standards. Students may transfer credits earned from this course to non IT degrees

They will acquire

Conversational French – Level I (4 credits)

Conversational German – Level I (4 credits)

Conversational Spanish – Level I (4 credits)

These introductory four (4) credit courses are designed to provide participants with an understanding of the target culture and the necessary functional skills to survive in a native speaker environment. Topics such as greetings and introductions, describing oneself, telling time and expressing likes and dislikes are embedded

in the context of real life situations. While emphasis is placed on the acquisition and development of speaking language.

and listening skills, students will also acquire basic competence in reading and writing effectively in the target

Certificate – Conversational Spanish – Level II (4 credits)

This is the second of a series of courses designed to develop functional skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing as required to interact formally and informally with native speakers. The course seeks to equip participants with specific language skills while developing an awareness of the target culture so as to meet a number of basic survival needs. These include completing basic transactions at immigration, at a hotel, a bank, aural skills. This course is designed for persons who have successfully completed Conversational Spanish Level I. Certificate – Conversational Spanish – Level III (4 credits) a restaurant, and while shopping and moving around the city. Focus is placed on the development of oral and

This is the last of a series of courses designed to develop a more sophisticated level of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills required to interact with native speakers in formal and informal settings. The course seeks to develop knowledge of the target culture along with the language skills to successfully handle a variety of communicative tasks including: recounting events in the simple past, discussing occupations and education, development of listening and speaking skills. completed Conversational Spanish Level II.

comparing and contrasting family life and describing one’s community. Special emphasis is placed on the This course is designed for persons who have successfully

242

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Certificate – Event Planning (3 credits)

In recent times, the traditional concept of an event as mainly a celebratory or fundraising activity has been

challenged as businesses and other organizations have increasingly recognized the value of events as tools for creating or increasing market awareness and building business relationships. In this course students will be provided with a sound introduction to the principles of event planning including the promotion, planning (e.g. utilities and permits), execution and evaluation of an event. Certificate – Geographic Information Systems (3 credits)

concept or theme development, budgeting, selection and coordination of resources including site, personnel,

Students will be introduced to fundamental theory and basic concepts related to geographic information systems,

their applications and benefits. The course emphasizes the development of practical skills through hands-on projects and group participation in planning, designing and costing a small geographic information system (GIS) tailored to the needs of a specific organization.

Certificate – Image, Etiquette and Protocol (2 credits)

This course is for those with a professional or personal interest in developing or improving a strong personal image

and understanding the potential impact of appropriate etiquette and protocol in business and social settings. Students will examine a variety of topics such as greetings, introductions, correct forms of address (including honorifics), personal aesthetics and image management, effective verbal and non-verbal communication and the impact of cultural practice on perception.

Certificate – Introduction to Computer Art (5 credits)

This course provides the basic skills necessary to utilize the three main publishing software applications used

in the graphic design industry: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign. Students will learn the fundamentals of the Macintosh operating system, as well as basic document setup, creation and printing. Principles of design, typography, image manipulation and colour theory will be included. This course provides industry.

the student with the tools and knowledge to further a career in the many areas offered in the graphic design

Certificate – Jewelry – Basic Design Techniques (2 credits)

This course provides students with a sound foundation in the basics of jewelry design, including, producing polishing stones. Students focus on developing a personal aesthetic and the practical design skills necessary to

drawings, making three dimensional design prototypes, working with various materials and casting, setting and translate ideas into reality. In addition, students are exposed to the basic principles of marketing and distribution in order to equip them to enter the market place. The course culminates in an exhibition of students’ work produced during the course.

Certificate – Small Business Development – Idea to Entrepreneur (3 credits)

This course is aimed at persons wishing to gain the theoretical and practical knowledge of how to start a

business. Students are encouraged to evaluate and choose among competing ideas for small business start-up plans based on sound principles of financial management.

ventures. They are then provided with step by step support in translating these into comprehensive business

243

COMPASS (Compensatory Programmes and Academic Support Services)

Purpose: The COMPASS Programme has been designed as an alternative pathway to tertiary level education for those students who have the aptitude and the desire to pursue tertiary education but are currently academically under-prepared.

What We Do: Through the COMPASS Programme we help students to acquire the basic knowledge, skills and

attitudes necessary to function effectively at tertiary level. We offer courses in mathematics, reading, writing,

science, computer literacy and life skills which are pitched at a level and pace to facilitate student learning. These courses are taught by qualified, experienced and trained lecturers and are offered in the day and evening at all COSTAATT sites. Tutorial support is provided through mathematics, reading and writing labs which are further support is provided in the form of guidance counseling and academic and developmental advisement. staffed by skilled educational support technicians. In addition, to facilitate students’ psychosocial resilience, How Students Transition into College Programmes: The COMPASS programme is designed to help students

gain the necessary qualifications to access the degree programme of their choice in COSTAATT. The duration of

study in COMPASS depends on students’ entry-level competencies, their performance on the placement test in English and mathematics, the admission requirements of the programme they wish to pursue at COSTAATT and their own application to study. Before students can matriculate into their chosen programmes, they must consult with their dedicated advisor who will ensure that all courses required for the pursuit of the chosen programme of courses. Once all these elements are satisfied, students gain entry to their chosen programmes.

study have been completed and that the student has earned a minimum cumulative G.P.A of 2.0 in pre-college

244

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Programme Details:
CODE
BIOL 090 BIOL 092 CHEM 090 CHEM 092 COPR 010 GRDE 095 GRDE 098 ITEC 091 ITEC 092 ITEC 093 ITEC 094 ITEC 095 MATH 091 MATH 092 MATH 093 MUSC 003 MUSC 004 PHYS 090 PHYS 092 READ 094 READ 096 READ 098 SPCH 092 WRIT 093 WRIT 095 WRIT 097

COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Concepts in Biology I Introduction to Concepts in Biology II Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry II Life Skills Introduction to Drawing Introduction to Painting Introduction to Computers Introduction to Word Processing Introduction to Spreadsheets Introduction to Slide Presentations Introduction to the Internet Pre Algebra Basic Algebra Intermediate Algebra Introduction to Music Theory Introduction to Aural Skills Introduction to Concepts in Physics I Introduction to Concepts in Physics II Introduction to Academic Reading I Introduction to Academic Reading II Introduction to Academic Reading III Oral Communication Skills Introduction to Academic Writing I Introduction to Academic Writing II Introduction to Academic Writing III

Cr.
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Descriptions:
BIOL 090 Introduction to Concepts in Biology I Through this course students acquire basic knowledge of key biological principles and gain an understanding of the world of biology. Through laboratory and field work, lectures and tutorials, students will explore the topics: cells. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None the organization of life, ecology, energy transfers, transport in living systems and the structure and function of

BIOL 092 Introduction to Concepts in Biology II

Through this course students acquire basic knowledge of key biological principles and obtain an understanding of the world of biology. Through laboratory and field work, lectures and tutorials, students will explore the topics: disease. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 090 reproduction and the principles of inheritance, coordination and control, movement and support, excretion and

CHEM 090 Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I

This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Through laboratory work, lectures and tutorials students will focus on understanding matter and be able to relate chemistry to everyday life. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None CHEM 092 Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry II

This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Through laboratory work, lectures and tutorials, students will focus on the depiction of compounds and chemical reactions CHEM 090 by the use of formulae and equations. They will also explore the concept of the molar. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

245

COPR 010 Life Skills

In this course students will develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that promote personal development,

health and well-being. Upon completion, they will become more balanced individuals poised to successfully None

maneuver through the tertiary level environment and life’s most challenging moments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

GRDE 095 Introduction to Drawing

This is an entry level course in which students gain an understanding of the indispensable role of drawing as an important aspect of art making. Upon completion of this course, students will develop a keen, sensitive eye for detail and an understanding of the function and types of drawing material used in graphic design. They will None

learn the importance of choosing the right drawing material to suit drawing subjects. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

GRDE 098 Introduction to Painting

This is an introductory studio art course in which students will develop skills and techniques in painting. Through lectures and hands-on studio experience, they will become familiar with the history, process and discipline of Prerequisite: None painting; and consequently develop an appreciation of painting as it relates to artistic expression. 3 Credits/

ITEC 091 Introduction to Computers

In this course students will explore the basics of computers and the Windows environment. Students will understand features of the desktop; develop techniques for efficiently using the keyboard and mouse; and 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None acquire skills in file management and manipulation, multi-tasking, directories, files extensions and finding files.

ITEC 092 Introduction to Word Processing

This course adopts a hands-on approach to assist students with the development of the necessary skills for preparing electronic documents through word processing. They will utilize basic word commands to create, edit and format documents to produce professional-level documents. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: ITEC 091 ITEC 093 Introduction to Spreadsheets

In this course students will acquire the skills necessary to prepare electronic spreadsheets, using a handsmanagement features for opening, saving and printing. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: ITEC 092 ITEC 094 Introduction to Slide Presentations

on approach. They will utilize basic excel commands to create and manipulate worksheets that include file

By completing this course students will be able to clearly convey information using slides as a presentation tool. different types of audiences. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: ITEC 093 ITEC 095 Introduction to the Internet

Using a hands-on approach, students will use features to transform slides into professional presentations for

At the end of this course students will be able to appropriately and effectively use the internet. Through a hands-on approach students will learn to use features of the Internet to enhance their learning experience; Prerequisite: ITEC 094 these will include the use of e-mail and an exploration of security issues associated with internet use. 1 Credit/

246

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
MATH 091 Pre Algebra

Students who have never been exposed to arithmetic or have been away from the subject for quite some time

will benefit from this course. Students will review and improve mathematical skills and concepts as well as gain and success in college mathematics and other areas. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None MATH 092 Basic Algebra

an appreciation for operations on numbers. They will acquire the mathematical foundation for continued studies

Students who have never been exposed to algebra or have been away from the subject for quite some time Prerequisite: MATH 091

will benefit from this course. Students will review and improve basic algebraic skills and concepts. 3 Credits/

MATH 093 Intermediate Algebra

Through this course, students will acquire the reasoning skills and mathematical tools necessary to be successful

in college-level mathematics courses. While developing mathematical skills, students will focus on in-depth to life experiences. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 092 MUSC 003 Introduction to Music Theory

understanding of concepts that will enable them to apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections

In this course, students will Learn the most basic principles of music theory. Areas covered in this course include: Credits/ Prerequisite: None

the notes on the keyboard (chromatic), major scales, intervals, triads, time signatures and key signatures. 3

MUSC 004 Introduction to Aural Skills

In this course students will explore sight reading and ear training. They will develop audiation skills as well as basic dictation and notation skills. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None PHYS 090 Introduction to Concepts in Physics I

In this course students will understand basic principles of physics in the areas of measurement, mechanics, heat applications to the world around us. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None PHYS 092 Introduction to Concepts in Physics II

and waves. They will focus on experimental inquiry, discovery and understanding of basic concepts and their

In this course students will understand basic principles of physics in the areas of electricity, magnetism, understanding of basic concepts and their applications to the world around us. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 090

electromagnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. They will focus on experimental inquiry, discovery and

READ 094 Introduction to Academic Reading I

This is the first of three reading courses offered in the COMPASS programme. In this course, students will focus on word attack strategies that will help them to engage in academic reading with more confidence. These strategies include phonic strategies, word analysis and context clues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None READ 096 Introduction to Academic Reading II

In this reading course students will understand that reading is thinking. They will have the opportunity to improve their comprehension and study skills and their academic vocabulary. Students will also learn strategies that will help them to engage in academic reading with more confidence. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: READ 094

247

READ 098 Introduction to Academic Reading III

In this third reading course students will continue to perceive reading as thinking. Students will have the opportunity to acquire advanced academic vocabulary, comprehension and study skills which will better prepare them to cope with their academic reading assignments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: READ 096 SPCH 092 Oral Communication

In this course students will focus on the verbal, visual and written aspects of public speaking. They will learn

how voice and body language can be used as powerful tools of communication. They will also learn different and WRIT 097

ways of organizing a speech so as to enhance the delivery of a message. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: READ 098

WRIT 093 Introduction to Academic Writing I

This is the first of three writing courses offered in the COMPASS programme, all of which are designed to prepare students to effectively address the requirements of academic writing at the College. In this course students will focus on the major parts of speech, subject and predicate, the application of spelling strategies and rules of None punctuation and differentiating between sentence fragments and complete sentences. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:

WRIT 095 Introduction to Academic Writing II

In this course, students will acquire skills to become more effective writers. They will learn the functions and uses of major parts of speech, and will be able to apply spelling strategies and to differentiate between sentence organization in their writing. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRIT 093 WRIT 097 Introduction to Academic Writing III fragments and complete sentences. They will also be able to use various types of sentences and paragraph

In this writing course students will be launched on the pathway to academic discourse and successful negotiation structures and appropriate diction. They will also continue to improve their mastery of the rules of grammar and to enhance their paragraph writing and essay writing skills so as to more confidently engage in academic writing. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRIT 095

of academic writing requirements at the College. They will hone their writing skills by using a variety of sentence

Faculty Information:
Permilla Farrell – Director M.Ed., Dip. Ed., BA Research Interest: Reading-challenged students; scaffolding students’ transition from secondary to tertiary education Joy Roach Simpson Senior Lecturer, Developmental English M.Ed., Dip. Ed., BA Jeffrey Maynard Senior Lecturer, Developmental Mathematics M.Sc. (specialisation in Mathematics Education); B.Sc. Sitara Gardner Senior Lecturer, Developmental Mathematics M.Ed., B.Ed. Leone de Souza Coordinator, Science Foundation M Phil, B.Sc., Dip. Ed. Research Interest: Human health and nutrition Patrick Medford Senior Lecturer, Chemistry M.Sc., B.Sc.

Louann Hospedales Senior Lecturer, Developmental English MA, Dip. Ed., BA Michelle Mitchell Senior Lecturer, Developmental English MA, AAS.

Hamere La Rose Senior Lecturer, Developmental Mathematics MBA, B.Sc., Dip. Ed., Dip in Business Management - 1999, ABE. Kizzy La Coa Lecturer, Developmental Mathematics B.Sc

Karyn David Lecturer, Biology B.Sc. Ishla Ali Lecturer, Developmental Mathematics BA.

248

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Stephanie Faria Senior Lecturer, Developmental English M.Ed., Dip. Ed., BA Karole George-Drue Senior Lecturer, Developmental English MA., BA. Tricia Joseph Developmental Advisor B.Sc. Kerriann Toby Guidance Counsellor M.Sc., B.Sc. Kevin Richards Lecturer, Life Skills M.Sc. Joseph De Gannes Senior Lecturer, Developmental Mathematics B.A., Dip.Ed. Camille Reid Lecturer, Life Skills B.Sc. Assata Omowale Developmental Advisor M.Sc., B.Sc. Tamara Maurice Phillip Senior Lecturer, Developmental English M.Sc., BA. Karen Louison Senior Lecturer, Physics M.Sc. Linda Darabie Senior Lecturer, Life Skills MA.,B.Sc. Shireen Gajusingh Lecturer, Chemistry B.Sc. T’shura Sempel Developmental Advisor B.Sc.

24

Academic Resources
The College provides various technological and other resources to enhance teaching and learning outcomes and to promote student success. Students are encouraged to take advantage of these resources in order to maximize learning at both the curricular and co-curricular levels.

Computer Labs
State-of-the-art computer lab facilities (MAC and PC) are available to students at all of the College’s campuses and sites for both instructional and open access purposes. are equipped with the latest computer software. COSTAATT is a Microsoft Academic licensed institution and students may purchase Microsoft software from the College for their personal use, at a minimal fee. In addition, necessary discipline-specific practical skills for the workplace. the College has outfitted several special purpose labs which are designed to ensure that students acquire the All computer labs have internet connectivity and

SMART Classrooms
The College has invested significantly in computer hardware, software and educational technologies which assist in the delivery of teaching and learning. The majority of classrooms at the College are equipped with the latest SMART classrooms at the City Campus will, in the near future, be outfitted to facilitate synchronous delivery of lectures at multiple sites.

multimedia resources and, where necessary, media carts are available for use by students. In addition, Level II

E-Classroom

250

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
COSTAATT is committed to embracing the best in technology in order to aid and improve classroom interaction and learning, and to expand access to students who may not be able to attend classes at one of our campuses or sites. The College’s e-classroom allows lecturers to deliver instruction, manage student discussions, administer

quizzes and examinations, and provide immediate feedback on performance to students in a secure internetbased environment. Some faculty utilize the e-classroom to facilitate online class discussions or to post class notes, to enhance face-to-face courses. Others use the environment to offer fully online or blended courses.

Tutorial Centres

The tutorial centres at the College provide support to students who need extra help in understanding concepts presented to them during classroom instruction. The centres are staffed by faculty members who facilitate access and work through online tutorial materials in mathematics and English at their own pace. tutoring services in mathematics and English. In addition, it is equipped with laptops so that students can

Library
Libraries in the north are located at the City Campus, the North Learning Centre, the Port of Spain General and St. Ann’s Hospitals. Libraries are also located at the Trincity Learning Centre in the East, at the South Campus in San of six days a week. The City Campus library is open for a total of 71 hours of operation. All other libraries are 40 hours of operation (please refer to COSTAATT Library Services User Guide).

Fernando and at the Tobago Campus in Scarborough. When school is in session, libraries are open a maximum open for 60 hours per week, except the East Campus library which is open five days a week and has a total of

Textual Resources
Libraries at the College’s campuses and learning centres have a combined book collection of more than 30,000 volumes.

251

Library E-Learning Resources
The COSTAATT libraries’ electronic resources network includes an EbscoHost, OCLC FirstSearch and Gale Cengage’s Academic OneFile, of OCLC, the libraries also have access to 3,457 e-books.

online catalog (COSPAC)1; access to over 21,000 full text journals from as well as a small collection of 198 e-books. In addition, as members

Registered users can utilize these resources by accessing networked or wireless computers in the libraries at the City, South and Tobago campuses. Access to the EBSCO databases is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week from any computer that has an internet connection.

The online catalogue, COSPAC which is accessible through the College’s website – www.costaatt.edu.tt or directly at http://opac.costaatt.edu.tt, provides easy access to the collections.

All new students are required to attend a library orientation session during orientation week and must also consult the Library Services Guide for information on circulation and reserve materials.

Interlibrary Loans
Loans from other institutions’ libraries are available through Interlibrary Loan (ILL) at no cost to students. ILL materials may be requested at the circulation desks. Guidelines for Use of Photocopy Machines 1. 2. For staff-assisted copying, requests for copies must be submitted on the prescribed form at least one Self-Service photocopying is available with the use of a Vendacard which can be purchased at the Circulation Desk. (1) day in advance of the date for which the copies are required.

1

COSPAC – COSTAATT’s Online Public Access Catalogue

252

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Academic Policies
Students enrolled at COSTAATT are expected to adhere to the College’s established policies and procedures which are designed to guide behavior and facilitate successful completion of their respective programmes. their tenure at the College, but students are responsible for ensuring that they avail themselves of the necessary taking such action as it may deem appropriate, against students.

Faculty and staff, including academic advisors, make every effort to assist and support students throughout information. Willful violation of or non-adherence to these policies and procedures may result in the College

Academic Advisement
Each undergraduate student enrolled at COSTAATT plans his/her programme of study under the guidance of an academic advisor. Academic advisors are responsible for guiding students on matters pertaining to career goals, and degree programme requirements, and registration for courses. selection of a curriculum and major field of specialization, planning their programme of study, meeting college

Academic advisement is beneficial to students in many ways. Through the advising process, students: • • • • • learn how to make informed decisions;

develop a sense of purpose and confidence about their plans; become involved in managing their own college experience; complete the degree as efficiently as possible. develop a sense of autonomy and responsibility for their own learning; and

The role of the student is to know the programme policies and procedures and become familiar with catalogue information on course availability, class schedules and order to make decisions about programmes and courses,

campus resources. Students must consult an advisor in develop realistic plans and check prerequisites. Students are responsible for tracking their academic progress and ensuring that they satisfy all requirements for degree completion.

College and Pre-College Credits
Students education courses in the COMPASS programme are towards the award of degrees. who successfully complete developmental

awarded pre-college credits, which are not counted

Students who successfully complete courses in degree towards the award of degrees.

programmes earn college level credits which are counted

253

Grading Scheme
A student’s academic standing, and ultimately, grade point average (GPA), is determined by his/her performance scheme is set out below:
Points % 90-100 85-89 80-84 75-79 70-74 65-69 60-64 0-59

in continuous assessment activities, including course work, and final examinations. The College’s grading

Notation Excellent Very Good Good Satisfactory Average Below Average Minimum Passing Grade Fail

Grade A B+ B C+ C D+ D F

Quality Value 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.0

Additional Non-Credit Grades
In addition to the above, students may also be assigned the following grades which indicate that no credit or quality point value has been assigned:
I – Incomplete Signifies that the student has satisfactorily completed most, but not all, course requirements due to extenuating circumstances.1 In order to change an “I” grade, a student must make arrangements with his/her instructor to complete and submit all outstanding work. This must be done before the end of the semester that immediately follows the award of the “I” grade. Signifies that a student has not passed a course in which the grade scheme is Pass/Non Pass. No quality point will be awarded, but unlike the “F” grade, this will not affect the Grade Point Average (GPA). Indicates a passing grade in which the grade scheme is Pass/Non Pass. Signifies the transfer of credits from one institution to another. For transcript purposes, transfer credits will be recorded in the semester in which the course in question is scheduled. Means a withdrawal initiated either by the student or the institution. § Student Withdrawal: Students must withdraw from a course using the approved forms, by the deadline specified in the academic calendar. Students who choose to withdraw after the deadline will be assigned an “F” grade. § Institutional Withdrawal: The College may take action to withdraw a student for a variety of reasons, including infringements of academic policy or attendance violations. Indicates that the course has not been taken for credit. The tuition and fee charges for auditing a course are the same as those for taking the course for credit, but auditing students are not evaluated and do not receive a grade.

NP – Non Pass

P – Pass T – Transfer credit

W – Withdrawn

X – Audit

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Grade Point Average (GPA), Quality Value and Quality Points

The Grade Point Average (GPA) is an indicator of student academic achievement. A quality value is a number attached to a particular letter grade: for example a grade of A has a quality value of 4. Quality points are calculated by multiplying the quality value assigned to the letter grade by the number of credits earned for a

particular course. The Cumulative Grade Point Average is a measure of a student’s academic achievement at attempted.

COSTAATT. It is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of credits

Course Fundamentals of Writing College Algebra Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship Fundamentals of Natural Science Understanding Human Behaviour TOTAL

Credits 3 3 3 3 3 15

Grade A B+ B C+ C

Quality Value 4 3.5 3 2.5 2

Quality Points 12 10.5 9 7.5 6 45

GPA = Total Quality Points Total Credits

GPA = 45 = 3.0 15

Students are required to maintain a 2.0 minimum GPA in order to graduate.

255

Transfer Credits
Transfer credits will be considered on a course by course basis. Credits for courses taken at other institutions may be transferred with the approval of the department chair. Students wishing to transfer to COSTAATT must submit transcripts from previous institutions, along with relevant course descriptions. The College will accept transfer credits amounting to no more than fifty percent (50%) of degree requirements for the programme into which the student is transferring. Transfer credits will not be used in the computation of the Grade Point Average (GPA).

Course Load
Full and part-time students, who maintain semester GPAs in the stated ranges, are normally allowed to take the number of courses per semester as outlined in the table below. Students who wish to exceed the stated the Registrar. number must seek approval from the relevant department chair and submit completed forms to the Office of

GPA 3.5 or above 2.00 – 3.49

Status Full-time Part-time Full-Time Part-time

Semester I No. of Courses 6 4 5 3

Semester II No. of Courses 6 4 5 3

Semester III (Optional) No. of Courses 3 2 2 1

Total Courses 15 10 12 7

Class Attendance
The College has set a minimum 75 percent attendance requirement for all students. Students who do not key coursework but also continuous

attend class regularly are at risk of missing not only assignments, which will impact negatively on their assessment

final grade. In addition, students who fail to meet the final examination unless such absences are supported department chair and school dean.

attendance requirement may not be eligible to sit the by valid medical certification and approval from the

Standards of Academic Progress
Good Academic Standing
Students are considered to be in good academic standing if they maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher.

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Academic Warning Students are considered on academic warning if they have attempted 12 credits or fewer and have a semester or

cumulative GPA which is less than 2.0. These students must meet with their academic advisors prior to future registration. Students on academic warning must not register for more than nine (9) credits (full-time), or six (6) credits (part-time) without the written approval of their advisor. Academic Probation After receiving an academic warning, students will be placed on academic probation for any subsequent semester

in which they earn a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0. Students on academic probation must meet regularly with their advisor and must not register for more than six (6) credits (full-time), or three (3) credits (part-time) without the written approval of their advisor. Academic Suspension Students on probation who fail to earn a GPA of 2.0 or higher will be placed on academic suspension for one (1) semester. Probation after Academic Suspension Students who resume studies at the College after academic suspension, return on probationary status. Students

are required to work closely with an academic advisor to develop an appropriate programme and study plan prior to the start of the registration session. Students are limited to a course load of six (6) credits (full-time) or three (3) credits (part-time) during any semester, while on probation.

Cumulative GPA - students will retain probationary status until they achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. Semester GPA - students must achieve a minimum semester GPA of 2.0 (or minimum C grade). Academic Dismissal Students who fail to regain good academic standing within the prescribed period will be dismissed from the the relevant school dean for readmission.

College on academic grounds for one academic year. At the end of the dismissal period, students may petition Readmission to College after Suspension and Dismissal Students dismissed on the basis of poor academic performance may petition the College for re-entry into the - Academic Dismissal of the Admissions Policy)

same or another programme of study after the prescribed period of time has elapsed (See sub-section 14.2.3 Students must allow one year from the time of academic dismissal before applying for readmission.

Repeats
A student will be permitted a maximum of three attempts per course. The highest grade earned in a repeated course will be computed in the grade point average. However, transcripts will reflect all attempts at a course including corresponding grades. Students who have failed a course twice are strongly advised to speak to completion of the course on the third attempt. their academic advisor or department chair so that an appropriate strategy can be developed for successful

257

Students may not repeat a course to improve their GPA after the award of the degree.

Grade Corrections
The responsibility for the academic evaluation of students and the assignment of final grades rests with the lecturer who has been assigned to teach that course. A student who believes that an error was made in the assignment of his/her final grade must contact his/her lecturer. The lecturer who assigned the final grade initiates the Change of Grade process. The form is signed by the lecturer and the chair of the relevant academic department and must subsequently be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar.

Grade Appeals
The responsibility for academic evaluation and the assignment of grades is that of the lecturer who has been assigned responsibility for a course. A student who feels he/she has been unfairly graded should first appeal received, the student may then appeal through administrative channels as follows: • the grade to the assigned lecturer within one week of having received his/her grade. If satisfaction is not The student should submit a written request using the Grade Appeal form to the department chair within two weeks of the first written communication about the appealed grade. This request must include the title of the course and the name of the lecturer, the assignments and/or examination (s), and the grade obtained. • • The student should give his/her grounds for appeal. Every effort will be made to resolve the issue at this level, within two (2) weeks.

If the issue is not settled at this stage, it should be referred to the Academics Sub-Committee of the College’s should be made within one (1) week thereafter. In the event that assignments will be re-marked or re-evaluated, students should note the following: a) b) c) A fee of $200.00 must be paid to secure the services of an alternate evaluator This fee will be refunded if there is a positive change in grade The reviewed grade assigned by the evaluator is final.

Academics, Research and Curriculum Committee (ARCC). A decision to re-mark and re-evaluate the assignment

Requirements for Graduation
To receive the award of any COSTAATT degree, students must satisfy stated relevant degree requirements as outlined below (and in the section on programmes in this catalogue): •

successfully complete the stated number of credits and specified courses for the award of the relevant degree (see section on programme requirements);



achieve a cumulative minimum degree GPA of 2.0;

While the College accepts up to fifty percent (50%) of relevant transfer credit from other institutions, transfer

258

CATALOGUE 2010-2012 credit is not used in the computation of GPAs. Students who are unable to fulfill the academic requirements listed above will not be eligible to graduate. In addition, students must satisfy all other outstanding obligations to the College (e.g. payment of outstanding tuition and other fees and fines, as well as the return of library books). The College reserves the right to withhold diplomas from students who are in breach of these requirements.

Application for Graduation
Students are required to apply to graduate using the Application to Graduate form in their penultimate semester relative to the expected programme completion date. The completed form must be submitted to the Office graduation session. of the Registrar by the deadline indicated on the Academic Calendar in order to be considered for the next

Honours and Awards
Graduation honours will be awarded based on the GPA earned at COSTAATT. Only credits taken at COSTAATT will be used in this evaluation. The classification is as follows: Bachelor’s Degrees

Cum laude (with praise) Magna Cum Laude (with great praise) Summa Cum Laude (with highest praise)

3.20 to 3.49 3.50 to 3.89 3.90 to 4.00

Associate Degrees

With Honours

With High Honours

3.20 to 3.49 3.50 to 3.89 3.90 to 4.00

With Highest Honours

Academic Awards
President’s List. Students who demonstrate outstanding academic success will be recognized by placement on the President’s list which will be posted at all campuses/sites at the end of every semester. Full-time students: Earn at least fifteen (15) credits during that academic semester Cumulative GPA of 3.70 – 4.0, with no grades of “I” or “F”

Part-time students:

Earn at least nine (9) credits during that academic semester Cumulative GPA of 3.70 – 4.0, with no grades of “I” or “F”

25

Dean’s List. The Dean’s List recognises those students who have achieved high academic standards during each semester. To qualify, a student must meet the following conditions: Full-time students: Part-time students: Earn at least fifteen (15) credits during that academic semester GPA of 3.4 to 3.69, with no grades of “I” or “F” GPA of 3.4 to 3.69, with no grades of “I” or “F” Earn at least nine (9) credits during that academic semester

Graduate Merit Award
For each graduating class, the graduate with the highest overall GPA (with a minimum of 3.0) in each programme is awarded the College’s Graduate Merit Award and bursary. Valedictorian This honour is conferred upon the student who achieves the highest academic ranking among the graduating class each year.

New Student Orientation

College orientation sessions are held in August and January annually. All new students are expected to participate

in orientation activities before commencing classes. The orientation sessions are designed to provide students integration into the college environment.

with critical information on key academic and administrative support services which will facilitate their successful

Departmental orientations complement the general college orientation and acquaint students with programme requirements and relevant policies and procedures. Staff and faculty members are present to provide students with pertinent information and answer questions.

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Student Rights and Responsibilities
Freedom of Expression As an academic institution, the College recognizes the value of nurturing students’ voice and freedom of expression. In the exercise of this freedom however, students are expected to respect their peers and the faculty and staff at the College by not engaging in speech or behaviour which would be considered offensive. Freedom of Association Students are free to organize and join student organizations for the purpose of pursuing or promoting their

common interests. All student organizations must comply with institutional policies, procedures and regulations. The College reserves the right to suspend the freedom of association provision where student organizations violate institutional regulations or national laws.

Student Code of Conduct
All students are required to read and familiarize themselves with and conform to college rules and regulations governing student conduct. The Student Code of Conduct is premised on the principles that the College is committed to:

• upholding values that promote integrity and quality in teaching and learning; and

• creating a stimulating and safe environment for learning, growth and personal transformation;

• creating the conditions for fair and just treatment of all members of our diverse college community. The College’s authority over student conduct extends to any college-sponsored activity, whether it takes place on or off campus. regulations. Students may be subject to disciplinary action for infringement of the College’s rules and

The following constitute actions which may be considered a breach of the Student Code of Conduct: Abuse of Privileges Pertaining to the Use of Computers The unauthorised use of another individual’s identification and password; unauthorised entry into or transfer computer network; or abusing computer time. Academic Dishonesty Engaging in academic dishonesty, which includes cheating, plagiarism or any other activity related to the advantage during an assessment.

of computer files; cyberstalking; hacking into or otherwise interfering with the operations of the College’s

misrepresentation of someone else’s work as one’s own, or using tools or other resources to secure an unfair

261

Breach of Campus Safety and Security Unauthorised access or entry to college premises or restricted access areas within the premises; unauthorised possession of college keys or access cards; tampering with fire safety equipment; or parking vehicles so as to obstruct access to college buildings.

Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages and Use of Illegal Substances Use, sale or possession of alcoholic beverages or controlled or illegal substances, on college premises, at college events or while representing the College. Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct Acting in a manner that is disruptive, lewd, or disrespectful; using vulgar or profane language; openly and persistently challenging or circumventing college authority; participating in or promoting behaviour that interferes with teaching, or any other college events or activities. Falsification of Information Furnishing false information; unauthorised alteration or misuse of any document, record or instrument of College or a student organisation or club. Gambling Wagering of money or other items while on college premises. Harassment This activity includes any unwelcome verbal, written or physical contact of a sexual or non-sexual nature which violence to a person; using a position of power to attempt to influence an individual by threatening possible positive or negative consequences for academic or employment outcomes. Infringement of Student Organisation Regulations Violating college regulations concerning student organisations and clubs. Physical Battery (including but not limited to sexual battery) Assaulting, battering, abusing or threatening another person with force on college premises or at college events. Possession of Weapons Possession or use of firearms or other weapons while on college premises.

identification; knowingly withholding required information from the College; or falsely claiming to represent the

intimidates, causes discomfort to or humiliates the victim; touching a person against his/her will; threatening

The definition of a weapon includes but is not limited to, all firearms, knives, explosives, explosive fuels, BB guns, dangerous chemicals and fireworks.

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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Stalking The repeated and unwelcome pursuit of another person including following and cyberstalking with the intention of harming, arousing anxiety or fear.

Theft Theft or possession of stolen property; misappropriation of college funds. Unauthorised Advertising, Sales and Fundraising Students may not use the College’s grounds or premises to transact business for personal gain. Registered student clubs and organisations wishing to conduct fundraising activities must apply for and secure approval boards unless the material has been approved by the relevant college authorities. Vandalism and Littering Intentional destruction, defacement or misuse of college property; littering on college premises. from the relevant college authorities. Students may not post advertising materials on the College’s bulletin

Guidelines for Appropriate Attire
It is intended that the following should serve as a guide to students with respect to the College’s expectations in terms of standards of dress: COSTAATT is committed to producing workplace ready graduates and in this regard encourages students to acquire the habit of dressing appropriately in preparation for employment or professional placements. Conduct, disregard for these practices is actively discouraged. which must be observed. While students who do not adhere to these guidelines are not considered in breach of the Student Code of Discipline-Specific Attire. Some disciplines such as nursing and allied health, have mandatory dress requirements

263

Student Government

Student government is a key mechanism through which students acquire the leadership, planning, decisionmaking and collaborative skills which will help them to become agents of change and transformation. Through participation in the formal student government system, students are able to present their views to college

administration and collaborate in building a positive and vibrant learning environment. In addition, student clubs and organizations provide opportunities for students to learn social skills and develop positive relationships with their peers.

Students who wish to serve as representatives in the student government or on the Executive of Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) must be in good academic standing. COSTAATT’s student government is structured as follows:

Student Body
The student body comprises all students currently enrolled at COSTAATT’s campuses and learning centres.

Student Councils
Student Councils are the official bodies representing students at the campus level. They offer a forum for students to share their views on topics of interest and provide opportunities for them to collaborate with democratic process. administration in actively shaping their educational experience. Council representatives are elected through a

Student Executive Council
The Student Executive Council is a college-wide body established to ensure effective coordination of student activities in alignment with the College’s mission and vision. It brings together the leadership of the campus-level student councils and comprises all student council presidents, vice-presidents, secretaries, and treasurers. The

264

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
President of the Student Executive Council is the official spokesperson for the entire student body.

Student Governance Committee
The Student Governance Committee is the overarching, authoritative body comprising staff and students, which is charged with responsibility for the coordination of the executive and student councils and adjudicating on student complaints and disciplinary matters.

Registered Student Organisations (RSOs)
Registered Student Organisations (RSOs) provide opportunities for students to participate in extra-curricular

activities through membership in clubs devoted to leisure or academic pursuits. RSOs are established on the recommendation of students, with the approval of the college administration. Students may apply, on the prescribed forms, to the Student Development Department for approval and recognition of an RSO. Student student management of RSOs and their activities, including the administration of funds.

organisations benefit from the guidance of assigned faculty advisors, whose responsibility it is to ensure effective

Student Life
Career Preparation and Internships
Rapidly graduates possess strong skills in job search, their strengths against market demand. Career Management Services changing job markets require that

personal presentation and the ability to assess Department The of

COSTAATT is committed to assisting students in

making a successful transition to the world of work by providing the necessary tools and guidance to planning. ensure sound career/employment preparation and

Career Preparation: Through individual coaching

and access to online career guidance software, students will be able to analyse personal attributes and assess aptitudes for particular careers. They

will be able to benefit from support in designing job search strategies, and training in CV/résumé preparation and interview skills. In addition, the development and soft skills relevant to the work place, such as time management and workplace communication. Internships: The College recognizes

department hosts workshops and seminars on self

that

265

participation in internship programmes is a critical part of preparation for the world of work. All students (with the exception of those pursuing degrees with an integrated internship or practicum) are encouraged to register for internships advertised through the College or to seek assistance in sourcing internships of their own. acquire skills/competencies relevant to the discipline area. All

internship programmes provide students with an opportunity to integrate theory with practical experience and Job Placement Services: As part of its commitment to supporting students’ transition to the world of work,

the Career Management Services Department will host an online recruitment service featuring a database of job events and job fairs.

vacancies for registered student subscribers. In addition, it will offer on-campus recruitment and networking

Health and Counselling Services

The College recognizes that student success

is premised not only on academic ability and application but on the positive social and emotional adjustment of the individual. Counselling Services Department (HCSD) The Health and is

responsible for the provision of basic psycho-social bay facilities and services for the differently-abled.

counselling, promotion of healthy lifestyles, sick Counselling Services: Trained counselors offer

services for students who may be experiencing

emotional or psychological problems. Counselling services are informed by principles of respect for the person and strict standards of confidentiality. Students are encouraged to be aware of their intervention with a campus counsellor. Referrals

emotional health and where necessary to seek early to campus counsellors may be made by faculty, more serious cases, campus counsellors may seek the intervention of external professional services. Students referred by counsellors for further clinical

campus liaison officers or students themselves. In

consultation may be required to bear the cost of such services, depending on the nature and/or severity of the issue to be addressed. Appointments may be made in person or by phone and emergency cases can be seen on a ‘walk-in’ basis.

of the HCSD is located at the City Campus. However, campus counselors are available at all other campuses and sites.

Accessing Counselling Services: The main office

Health Promotion: Throughout the year, the Department hosts seminars on health promotion at each campus. These are facilitated by trained personnel specializing in areas such as healthy life styles, primary health care, access information on healthy living as well as government health care services. and stress management. Students are encouraged to visit the Health and Counselling Services Department to

266

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Disability Services: The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students who are differently-abled. Students who have disclosed a disability at the point of admissions will be contacted by the registers without disclosure or discovers a disability subsequent to registration, he/she must contact the HCSD who make disclosures after the first week, but this is not guaranteed. Health and Counselling Services Department, if further information is required. In the event that a student for assistance within the first week of classes. The College will make every effort to provide services to students Sick Bay Facilities: Basic first aid and sick bay services for short term and minor illnesses are available to all students while at a COSTAATT campus or site. However, the College does not serve as a substitute for physicians or other health care providers.

In cases of sudden and/or serious illness, the College will make arrangements for students to be transported to the nearest public hospital, preferred medical practitioner or health service provider. In this regard, every effort will be made to immediately notify students’ parents, guardians, spouses or other emergency contact.

Annual Health Fair: Students can look forward to the College’s annual Health Fair which is held during the care services, including testing for blood pressure, sugar, cholesterol, vision and hearing. The programme includes drug awareness presentations and displays, as well as distribution of samples of pharmaceuticals.

month of October. This event is geared to sensitizing students to healthy lifestyles and providing primary health

Athletics
The College’s athletics programme is a key aspect of its holistic approach to the development of students. Participation in athletics is beneficial to students’ physical and mental well-being and to the skills needed for

academic success. It is therefore actively encouraged. COSTAATT students have successfully competed in tertiary

level leagues including football, basketball and netball and hope soon to broaden their scope of participation in sporting activities. The College’s new Athletics Department is currently strengthening services for all students and will focus on developing intramural and intercollegiate athletics programmes. In addition, emphasis will be placed on attracting and developing athletes who can compete on the national and international stage.

267

Student Support Services
COSTAATT’s Work Study Programme offers students structured opportunities to gain work experience while at the College. Students may choose from one of three types of work study positions, namely, work study trainee, student ambassador or peer tutor. Work study trainees are usually attached to an administrative department, while student ambassadors work alongside admissions officers and faculty in promoting the College at various disciplines. Students must apply for work study positions and selection is on the basis of stated criteria Development.

recruitment and other events. Peer tutors assist fellow students in strengthening their academic foundations in including the student’s GPA.2 Enquiries about this programme should be directed to the Department of Student

Registry Services
Transcripts
Official transcripts can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar at a nominal fee. Requests must be made

using the Transcript Request Form which must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar or the their academic history online via Banner Self-Service.

administrative offices at the Tobago and South campuses. Students can print unofficial transcripts by accessing

Letters of Verification
Requests for official letters to be sent to employers, embassies or other parties must be made via the Letter Request Form, available at the Office of the Registrar or the administrative offices at the Tobago and South campuses.

Replacement Identification Cards
Students who have had a change of name or whose ID cards have been lost or stolen must make a report to the cost of $15.00.

Office of the Registrar or the administrative offices at each site. Replacement cards are issued at each site at a

Technology Services
MyCOSTAATT (Banner Self-Service) MyCOSTAATT or Banner Self-Service offers students secure online access to register for courses, update personal information, view grades and class schedules, and manage academic progress. The Banner Self-Service User Manual for students outlines steps to viewing grades and unofficial transcripts and is available from the Office of the Registrar.

2

GPA (Grade Point Average) is used as an indicator of a student’s ability to successfully balance academic and work study requirements.

268

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Student Email
All registered students of the College are assigned a mandatory COSTAATT student e-mail address. It is the their accounts at the time of registration.

College’s official means of communicating with the student population and all students are required to activate

IT Help Desk
Students requiring assistance with IT-related services such as printing, re-setting passwords, accessing services in computer labs and student email should visit the IT help desk or seek the assistance of IT technicians at their respective campus or site.

Cafeteria
COSTAATT currently provides cafeteria services at its City Campus, Monday through Saturday during semester periods. These services include breakfast, lunch and evening meals served from 7:00 am – 7:00 pm, Monday to Friday; and 7:00 am – 5:00 pm on Saturdays.

College Store
The College Store, located on the third floor of the City Campus, offers students easy access to a range of stationery and other supplies to support their academic requirements. A range of COSTAATT logo merchandise in a variety of colours and options is also available for purchase.

26

Management Team
Divisions and Departments
ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT Office of the President
Office of the President Internal Audit Quality Assurance and Institutional Research Division of Internal Audit Campus Safety and Security

POSITION POSITION President OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Assistant to the President
Assistant to theSecretary Corporate President Corporate Secretary Director Senior Policy Advisor Chief Internal Auditor Director Vice President Chief Internal Auditor (Ag.) Director Director Director Vice President Director Director Director Director Director Director

NAME
Carla Alonzo Rhonda Earle Rodney Charles Anita Ramkalawan Cathrina Becessar

NAME

EmmanuelCONTACT INFO E. Gonsalves Carla Alonzo Rhonda Earle Anita Ramkalawan Cathrina Becessar (Ag.) Geneva Sampson Delon Haynes Liesel Gransaull-Brown Derek Philip Dawn Dookie Lisa Marajdeen Sean Corbie Dr. Merle Hoyte (Ag.) Ian Carter Vacant Michael Simmonds Helen Cumberbatch (Ag)

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS
Office of the VP, Finance and Administration Finance Campus Safety and Security Procurement Facilities Technology Services Finance Procurement Division of Student Affairs Technology Services Office of the VP, Student Affairs Career Management Services Athletics Enrolment Management Career Management Services Enrollment Management Health and Counselling Services Health and Counselling Services Registry Office of the Registrar Student Development Student Development Division of Human Resources Office of the VP, Human Resources Planning and Employment Planning and Employment Training and Development Training and Development Office of the VP, Institutional Advancement Division of Marketing and Public Relations Alumni Relations Office of the VP, Academic Affairs Geneva Sampson Delon Haynes Derek Philip Dawn Dookie Lisa Marajdeen Sean Corbie Merle Hoyte Ian Carter Vacant Helen Cumberbatch

Director Vice President Director Director Vice President (Ag.) Director Director Director Director Director Director (Ag.) Director Director Registrar Registrar Director Director Vice Vice President President Director Director Coordinator Coordinator Vice President Vice President Director Coordinator Coordinator Director Vice President Director

Magna Williams-Smith Magna Williams-Smith Rhonda Cumberbatch Rhonda Cumberbatch Clifford Sukhai Clifford Sukhai Eric Baron Eric Baron Marcia Stanisclaus Dawne Callendar Helen Cumberbatch Gillian Paul Marcia Stanisclaus Dawne Callender

June Alexis-Matthews Trevonne Gooding-Barrow Trevonne Gooding-Barrow Cumberbatch Helen Liesel Gransaull-Brown Judy Whilby Permilla Farrell

ACADEMIC

Educational Technologies and Distance Education

Library Services Division of Academic Affairs COMPASS Centre

Director Vice Director President Associate Vice President Dean ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS

POSITION

NAME
Dr. Gillian Paul Naseem Koylass

OfficeCriminal Justice and Legal Studies of the Associate Vice President Academic Affairs Management and Entrepreneurship School of Business and Information Technologies Information Science Human Services School of Liberal Arts and and Technology Management and Entrepreneurship Fine and Performing Arts School of Liberal Arts and Human Services Behaviour and Social Sciences Fine and Performing Arts Sciences Social and Behavioural Languages, Literature and Communication Studies School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences Mathematics Environmental Studies Health Science Technologies School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Studies Environmental Studies Natural and Life Sciences

Chair Associate Vice President Chair Chair Dean Chair Dean Chair Chair Dean Chair Chair Chair Chair Chair Chair Dean Chair Chair Chair Dean Chair Chair Chair

Naseem Koylass Sherwyn Millette Anisa Powder

Vacant Anisa Powder Kirwyn Pyle-Williams Neil Sylvester

Kirwyn Pyle-Williams Nadine Gonzales Neil Sylvester Clarinda Jack Cheryl Lewis Nadine Gonsalves Clarinda Jack Paula Sellier Anjenney Dwarika Paula Sellier Cheryl Lewis Anjenney Dwarika

Glenda Charles-Harris Suzette Rodriguez Glenda Charles-Harris Dr. Derek Emmanuel (Ag.) Delamae Wilson

270

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

Nursing and Life Sciences Natural Nursing Continuing Education and and Lifelong Learning School of Continuing Education Professional Development COMPASS Centre Foreign Language Institute Foreign Language Institute Prior Learning and Assessment Tobago Campus Library Services South Campus Trincity Learning Centre Port of Spain General Hospital Tobago Campus St. Ann’s Mental Hospital South Campus North Learning Centre

Chair Chair Chair Dean Dean Director Director Director Director

Delamae Wilson Rupert Jones Rupert Jones Lalita Ramlal-Chirkoot Roger Lalita Ramlal-Chirkoot Gopaul Permilla Chantale Leonard-St Clair Farrell Chantale Leonard-St. Clair Vacant Michael Simmonds Judy Whilby Mervyn Pooran-Roodal Gemma Richards Rupert Jones Linda Lewis-Suite XXXXXX Michael Simmonds (Ag.) Mervyn Pooran-Roodal

CAMPUS Director SITES Director Director Director
XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX

CAMPUS SITES
Director Director

City Campus

St. Anns Campus

Trincity Campus

271

Campus Information (maps, directions etc)

272

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

MAP TO COSTAATT CAMPUSES North Learning Centre; City Campus; Port of Spain Learning Centre

273

Tobago Campus, Glen Road, Tobago

274

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Trincity Learning Centre, College Avenue, Trincity

Trincity Mall

275

South Campus, Corner Sutton & Gomez Streets, San Fernando

276

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

2010 Annual Calendar

2011 Annual Calendar

2012 Annual Calendar

277

NOTES

278

CATALOGUE 2010-2012

NOTES

27

Transformed .. .

Lives

280

This Catalogue has been produced through the efforts, work and input of faculty and staff of the College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT). Published by: College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago. © College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago. No part of this publication may be copied or reproduced without the permission of COSTAATT.

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...Customer Satisfaction is termed as a measure of how products and services supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectation. Customer Satisfaction is a key requirement for organization’s success and growth. In this modern corporate world characterized by intensified competition, globalization and opening up of market, attracting and retaining customers is not a trouble-free process, but should be carried out after understanding customer requirements in the best possible manner. Customers in modern days posses wide knowledge and has often provided with wide range of products and services to select with. Customers decide the future of business. The banking sector in Sultanate of Oman is not an exception to this. Banks exist in a very competitive market environment in Oman, composed of local banks, foreign banks and other financial institutions. The survival of banks depends on how well it satisfies the customer requirements, by converting it to well defined products and services. Tarawneh (2006) noted regarding banking sector that the increasing competition in the national and international banking markets, the change over towards monetary unions and the new technological innovations, herald major changes in banking environment, and challenge all banks to make timely preparations in order to enter into new competitive financial environment. The term customer satisfaction is defined by Business Dictionary as “the degree of satisfaction provided by the goods or......

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Customer Satisfaction

...included an announcement for the people interested to buy Warid connections to bring the documents like ID card, etc., to the designated franchise and customer care centers.  On October 1, 2007, Warid Telecom expanded its network to five more districts raising total number of districts under Warid coverage to 56, said a press release. Mymensingh, Jamalpur, Sherpur, Rajbari and Narail towns were covered by Warid network.  On November 10, 2007, 61 districts under Warid network coverage.  On June 10, 2008, Warid Telecom expanded its network to 3 more districts Bandarban, Khagrachhari and Rangamati. Now all 64 districts of Bangladesh are under Warid network coverage meaning Warid Telecom now has nationwide coverage.  On December 20, 2010, Warid Telecom was rebranded to airtel. Brand Airtel Airtel was born free, a force unleashed into the market with a relentless and unwavering determination to succeed. A spirit charged with energy, creativity and a team driven “to seize the day” with an ambition to become the most admired telecom service provider globally. Airtel has become one of the most preferable brands among the young people in just 12 months of operations in Bangladesh. Vision & Tagline “By 2015 Airtel will be the most loved brand, enriching the lives of millions.” "Enriching lives means putting the customer at the heart of everything we do. We will meet their needs based on our deep understanding of their ambitions, wherever they are. By having......

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Customer Satisfaction

... CUSTOMER SATISFACTION  Customer satisfaction is the individual’s perception of the performance of the product or service in relation to his or her expectation. Customer satisfaction is a key metric for banks to assess how effectively the web furthers their objectives of customer acquisition, retention and increased share of wallet.To assess the role of the online channel in meeting the needs and exceeding the expectations of customers. As banks have aggressively pursued multi-channel strategies, the online channel is growing in importance and adoption. Consumers want a personalized, integrated online channel that caters to their many financial management needs, including: One view of their total financial picture including anytime, anywhere access to account summaries and details, simplified tracking and progress toward achieving specific goals that they can establish, and the ability to make any type of payment from any account they choose on the date of their choosing.  Tools, training and support to assist with both short and long-range goals like savings strategies, debt reduction and money management, as well as access to others’ opinions and experiences, that help them make intelligent choices and alerts and reminders that keep them on track.  A financial partner and advisor who helps their customers achieve their financial goals and who proactively advises them on how to improve their financial situation.  Online banking households are more challenging customers,......

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Customer Satisfaction

...IMC and Customer Satisfaction IMC and Customer Satisfaction In the Robinson Consultation Firm we plan to get our name out to our customer with some advertising. We will have some ads that will be located in the local newspaper to get us started. We will also use social media sites to get our name and services known. The newspaper will be a good way to bring awareness to small businesses and people who want to start their own business. Once our name becomes known we can then use social media sites as people spread the word. Some work in the beginning may be done at a discount or for free to show people that the services we offer will be affective. This will allow customer to see who our planning can help their business. Once trust is establish and the work pays off then we will have something to show to other customers. So the main part of our advertising will be to get our name known with showing that our services will work and then have our name spread via word of mouth. TV ads will not be used in the beginning stages to save on cost. The firm will have a website that clients can go to see who we are and what we can make happen for them. Just like our clients who will be on the move our advertising plans will be made to suit them. By using these methods we can effectively meet our marketing goals. Our goals will be to get our name out to the public, Let our services do the talking, and to build long lasting relationships with our customers. We can do this by......

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Customer Satisfaction

...Customer Satisfaction Survey for a Modern Greek Bank and Relationships Between Customer Satisfaction, Customer Loyalty, Complaints Handling and Recommendation. Spyridon G. Aliferis, University of Paisley Business School, Scotland, UK (June 2006) Dr. Panagiotis Kyriazopoulos ABSTRACT The main subject of this survey is to measure and understand the elements of customer satisfaction and its impact to business growth and future. One of the aims of this survey is to confirm the validity of the hypothesis that modern banks keep their customers very satisfied and that is why they grow over older banks at a higher pace. Another aim of this research is to identify which are the areas that modern banks excel, through which actions they do it and what elements can be improved. Last aim is the identification of relationships and connections between customers’ satisfaction, loyalty, recommendation and complaints handling. It is supposed that the elements of customer’s satisfaction perception include easiness of Access, Service provided, Products and Personnel. The conceptual background deals with the literature review in customer satisfaction, service quality, complaints handling and loyalty. Reichheld & Sasser (1990) argued that loyalty is directly connected with profitability. The survey was conducted by the usage of anonymous questionnaires to customers of a Greek modern bank. The first conclusion was that the respondents were very happy with......

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Customer Satisfaction

...Customer Satisfaction in the Mobile Telecommunications Industry In Nigeria Author: | Dr. Samuel Eniola  anders.hederstierna@bth.se | Title: | Customer Satisfaction in the Mobile Telecommunications Industry In Nigeria | Translated title: | Customer Satisfaction in the Mobile Telecommunications Industry In Nigeria | Abstract: | Customer satisfaction is a fundamental marketing construct in the last three decades. In the past, it was unpopular and unaccepted concept because companies thought it was more important to gain new customers than retain the existing ones. However, in this present decade, companies have gained better understanding of the importance of customer satisfaction (especially service producing companies) and adopted it as a high priority operational goal. This study aimed at investigation the overall customer satisfaction of the mobile telecoms industry in Nigeria, factors influencing satisfaction and the relationship between satisfaction and demographics. The results obtained in this research indicated that 57% of the respondents were satisfied and 5% highly satisfied. The combination of network quality, billing, validity period and customer support (mobile services attributes) showed strong relationship with satisfaction while age, gender, location and employment variables showed weak relationship. | Subject: | Företagsekonomi - Business Administration\Management Control Företagsekonomi - Business Administration\Marketing Företagsekonomi -......

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Customer Satisfaction

...Customer Satisfaction: Best Practices Customer Satisfaction is the most prominent factor in the success of a company. It is what puts the wheels in motion for a company to establish a strong foundation while simultaneously fulfilling it’s overall purpose to offer the goods and services that it is designed to provide. Consequently; in order to maintain that status and to provide valued goods or services to those customers in which any company is marketing to, it has to understand the customers needs and more specifically what provides the customer with complete satisfaction. Understanding the customer’s needs and what they require in order to be satisfied, opens up doors and provides the company with the opportunity to generate financial growth, repeat business, and a competitive advantage. In doing so, research has indicated that the best practices to measuring customer satisfaction; is to assess the goals that a company expects to deliver and identify the targeted customer, like: the existing, former, potential, or internal customers. Once a company identifies what their targeted goal is and who the targeted audience may be it is imperative that they then seek input from the customer by asking the customer for feedback. The Voice of the Customer (VOC), (Evans & Lindsay, 2011) is the “customer requirements, as expressed in the customer’s own terms (p. 201).” To develop a clear understanding of what a customer requires in their own terms, companies have been......

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Customer Satisfaction

...activities without going to the bank and in a very short time. In this research study the researcher conducted a research on “Customer Satisfaction with Internet Banking Service Quality Based On Standard Bank ltd”. The main objective of this research is to identify the key factors that influence the internet banking and Helps to retain customers of the Standard Bank Ltd. 2. Background and Corporate Information of Standard Bank 2.1 Standard Bank Limited Standard Bank Limited (SBL) was incorporated as a Public Limited Company on May 11, 1999 under the Companies Act, 1994 and the Bank achieved satisfactory progress from its commercial operations on June 03, 1999. SBL has introduced several new products on credit and deposit schemes. It also goes for Corporate and Retail Banking etc. The Bank also participated in fund Syndication with other Banks. Through all these myriad activities SBL has created a positive impact in the Market While running practical orientation with SBL Pragoti sarani branch, I was placed in two vital Departments. These were: • General banking • Credit General banking is the starting point of all the banking operations. It is the department, which provides day-to-day services to the customers. It opens new accounts, remit funds, Issue bank drafts and pay orders etc. Provide customer through quick and sincere service Is the goal of the general banking department? Bank credit is an important catalyst for......

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Customer Satisfaction

...Pacific Business Review International Volume 5 Issue 7 (January 2013) 74 Determinants of Customers' Satisfaction for Stock Broking Services - An Empirical Analysis Dr Rajeev K Shukla*, Dr Ajit Upadhyaya** Liberalization and deregulation of financial sector have opened multidimensional growth opportunities for the financial service providers at the same time it has provided more profitable investment opportunities to the investors to invest their money in more diversified range of products. In this competitive environment it is very crucial to every business firm to ensure satisfaction to its customers. The main purpose of the study was to know the expectations and the satisfaction levels of investors with the services provided by the Broking Firms. The research was Descriptive in nature. Random Stratified sampling method used for collecting data from 80 respondents. Self structured questionnaire comprising of 25 statements was used. Degree of customer satisfaction measured with the help of Five point Likert scale ranging from Strongly Agree (5) to Strongly Disagree (1). Mean, Standard Deviation and one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) used for the data analysis. The study of Customer Satisfaction in Stock Broking Agencies has revealed that Customer Satisfaction in broking agencies is highly influenced by attributes of services and the way in which these services are delivered to the customer's. It was found in the study that customer's perceived......

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Customer Satisfaction

...1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Customer satisfaction is a measure of how products and services supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectation. It is seen as a key performance indicator within business and is part of the four of a Balanced Scorecard. “Degree of satisfaction provided by the goods or services of a firm as measured by the number of repeat customers” In a competitive marketplace where businesses compete for customers, customer satisfaction is seen as a key differentiator and increasingly has become a key element of business strategy. However, the importance of customer satisfaction diminishes when a firm has increased bargaining power. For example, cell phone plan providers, such as AT&T and Verizon, participate in an industry that is an oligopoly, where only a few suppliers of a certain product or service exist. As such, many cell phone plan contracts have a lot of fine print with provisions that they would never get away if there were, say, a hundred cell phone plan providers, because customer satisfaction would be way too low, and customers would easily have the option of leaving for a better contract offer. There is a substantial body of empirical literature that establishes the benefits of customer satisfaction for firms. 1.2 OVERVIEW OF THE BANKING INDUSTRY: Banking in India originated in the last decades of the 18th century. The oldest bank in existence in India is the State Bank of India, a government-owned bank......

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Customer Satisfaction

...Customer Satisfaction in the Banking Industry Case Study – Barclays Bank of Kenya Ltd. Customer satisfaction is a major issue in almost all sectors. This can basically determine the success and profitability of a company as a satisfied customer would most likely to ‘spread the good word’ or would have be happy to do business again with the firm. It is an important theoretical and practical issue for market researchers and consumer researchers (Meuter et al, 2000). With positive results in most research, the significance of customer satisfaction and customer retention in strategy development for a “market oriented’’ and “customer focused’’ firm cannot be underestimated (Kohli and Jaworski, 1990). Specifically, Levesque and McDougall (1996) stated that customer satisfaction and retention are critical for retail banks, because of their impact on the company’s profit. With this, there is the challenge for banks to deliver a satisfactory quality service. After all, customer satisfaction is inarguably one of the two core concepts that are at the root of the marketing theory and practice (Spreng and Mackoy, 1996). The other one is service quality but it can be said it is not purely intertwined with customer satisfaction as a customer can be satisfied even though the service is not of high quality. But then, customer satisfaction is considered a must for customer retention and loyalty, and undoubtedly helps in realizing economic goals like profitability, market share,......

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Customer Satisfaction

...Customer Satisfaction towards Retailers ICA, ICA NÄRA and COOP FORUM Author: Phuc Hong Lu Ian Grace.B. Lukoma Subject: Master Thesis in Business Administration 15 ECTS Program: Master of International Management Gotland University Spring semester 2011 Supervisor: Ph.D Bo Lennstrand ABSTRACT In the midst of stiff and fierce competition and increased number of grocery retail outlets providing a variety of products, customers have become accustomed to patronizing multiple outlets. Retailers have recognized this trend and are of the view that customer satisfaction plays a role in the success of business strategies. Therefore it has become important for grocery retail stores to try and manage customer satisfaction. This paper was thus developed to investigate the satisfaction levels of customers in supermarkets. Data was collected from three supermarkets in Visby, Gotland. The study examined the importance of overall dimensions and specific elements of customer satisfaction towards the measurement of satisfaction levels. In addition, comparative analysis was conducted between the three relative grocery stores. Customer satisfaction levels were measured. The highest percentage of customers of the whole sample belonged to medium level of satisfaction. The statistical result concluded that customers of ICA Nära and customers of ICA were higher satisfied than those of Coop Forum. The results showed that customers felt satisfied with Location, Staff courtesy and Reliability of......

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Customer Satisfaction

...“Good customer relationship marketing creates customer satisfaction. In turn, satisfied customers remain loyal and talk favourably to others about the company and its products”. Refute or support this claim. By using different marketing approaches and activities, marketers build up relationships and loyalty with customers as well as brand value for long-term benefits. This is well known as Customer Relationship Marketing. The above statement is factual and the rest of this essay will demonstrate why I support it. Any chance a firm and the customers get to meet, relationship building should kick off and become the main focus of this encounter, as this will bring benefits for both, the firm and customer. The firm will need to emphasise on recognising the aspects that affect the relationship of the firm with the customer and try to improve or make amends in order to keep them coming back. In the field of stock markets more attention needs to be diverted towards the customers. Customer satisfaction plays a key role in influencing the risks on returns of a company’s stocks. (Sarlack and Fard, 2009; Jiang et al., 2009) As much as possible, the firm will sculpt the product depending on the likings and preferences of the customers as well as with the information it has complied about its target market. This assists with relationship building between the two. There is no need for the firm to focus only on making the customer remain loyal to the firm but instead, it is......

Words: 711 - Pages: 3