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Ethical Arguments Against Euthanasia

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Euthanasia could be socially acceptable for patients with chronic illnesses because it is an escape from pain felt from the illness, a decision made between the patient and family members, and the moral consideration of the physician to help end the life of a loved one.
The decision by the patient to end their life to relieve their chronic pain and suffering from their illness should be based on knowledge and not emotions. Patients with cancer suffer pain from chemotherapy and radiation. The patient could become ill and unable to function in their everyday life. Choosing to end their life could be a choice made by the patient because of the pain and sickness that they are feeling. The patient should research their options before making

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