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Ethical Climate

In: Business and Management

Submitted By MKHilda
Words 1917
Pages 8
Correlation between organisational culture and ethics in an organisation.

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Abstract
An ethical climate is part of the whole organizational climate and means the mutual perceptions of how ethical issues should be dealt with and what ethically right behavior. Olson defines ethical climate as the personal perceptions of the institute that affects behavior and attitudes and functions as a reference for the action of employee’s (Collins & Porras, 2000, p, 83). Attention to healthcare and nursing ethics has come up due to a heightened awareness of the effects and complexity of ethical issues in health care environs. Ethical climate can affect the beliefs and behavior of employees when challenging patient care difficulties are debated and resolved in work settings. Numerous studies have revealed the power of hospital ethical climates on job satisfaction, stress, turnover intentions, and ethics. Thus, it seems imperative to come up with valid measures so as to raise the standards of the ethical climate in health care institutions.
Ethical climate survey
Various self-assessment questionnaires have been established to determine the ethical climate in hospitals and health care settings. The most extensively used assessments are the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS) prepared in the United States by Olson (Kent, 2002, p.78). HECS recognizes five subscales in the ethical climate of hospitals and has good psychometric properties. Different cultures and countries including Turkey, the United States, Jordan, South Korea and Sweden. The following essay will address the ethical climate of The Italian hospital.
The Italian Healthcare Package has undertaken major reformations since new laws were approved in 1992 and 1993. These laws introduced a changeover from a primarily public system with funding isolated to the performance,

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