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Extinction of Childhood

In: Social Issues

Submitted By Selenaochoa24
Words 1514
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October, 11th. 2015

The extinction of childhood
Halloween is around the corner. First thing that comes to mind is candy; for adults and of course children. Usually the common solution for child safety during Halloween is to check your child’s good bag when they get back home. But what if, the homes own medicine cabinet is the real danger? Vyvanse, Concerta, Methylin, Ritalin, and Adderall being the most commonly used drugs prescribed for ADHD. Over 160 annual cases were pharmaceutical drugs that were maliciously used on children. Parents don’t realize the dangers they’ve put their own children at risk with when giving them these addictive, harsh drugs affecting children severely short and long term.
Pharmaceutical drugs are the 4th leading cause of death in the United States. According to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, America suffers from an estimated 45-50 million adverse effects, from prescription drugs, which by the way are serious, disabling or fatal. In 2011, physicians and patients submitted 21,002 adverse event reports to the FDA. These reports represent at least 2.5 million actual serious prescription drug injuries, including 128,000 deaths. Its modern day now and evolving more and more each year, with a generation that will wait in line, outside, rain or snow, for 3-7 days straight, for the latest technology release dates. Rather than attend a line to wait for 2 hours at max sometimes for a county or presidential election. People want the fastest, best way possible for everything, including a fix for their own bodies, no matter the rate of risk or sometimes even the cost. According to polls from the CDC, total child deaths in the United States were 9,143 with 6 main causes. Suffocation, being one of them, which increased 30% with 1,160 deaths. A decrease of 41%, involving motor vehicles with 4,564 deaths, following with a

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