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Global Trade: U.S./Mexico Trade—7 Steps to Close the Gap

In: Business and Management

Submitted By lunkhung
Words 1077
Pages 5
On May 1st 2013, the website released an article “Global Trade: U.S./Mexico Trade—7 Steps to Close the Gap”, which is about the strategies the U.S exporters and importers should acquire to improve the efficiency of trading goods through the border. By following these strategies, the U.S companies will more likely to get the most value possible when entering the Mexican market. This article explains very well why and how we, the U.S importers and exporters, should acknowledge these strategies. At the beginning of this article, the author introduces some facts about the increasing activities through the border between the U.S and Mexico. In 2012 alone, the trading values were $216 billion dollars in the U.S export and over $277 billion dollars in imports, which make Mexico the second largest export market of the U.S. We are expecting that in 2 more years, the our export to Mexico will be doubled from 2010. The author makes it very clear that the Mexican market is an” incredible market” that continues to grow 5 percent every year. By increasing exporting, the government is hoping to create millions of jobs. From the facts that the author mentioned above, it’s a huge motivation for the U.S companies to take advantages of this large and growing market to obtain the most benefit out of it. However, to succeed, the U.S importers and exporters have to understand the trending of the market and changes in regulation from both governments. The author mentions some challenges that could limit the increasing activities through the border. First of all, the illegal immigration through the border has become troublesome which force the U.S to increase protection along the border. The U.S regulator has increase border protection with new horse patrols, fencing, and around-the-clock surveillance by drones. This is a very good point to be said in the article since these...

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