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Performing Arts Charter School

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Submitted By ShawnAlaska
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A Charter School is a school established to provide students and parents with more choices in the types of educational opportunities and programs that are available within the public school system. The Matanuska-Susitna Borough School Board approves of community-based charter schools. All Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District (MSBSD) Charter School programs are open to student’s applications who reside within the school district.
Starting a charter school is truly a community effort. However, the rewards we may find by creating a new educational option for children are well worth the effort. The first question we want to answer is why do we want to start a charter school?
As a charter developer, we need to have a clear answer to this question. Matanuska-Susitna Valley residents desire a school that provides a rich and comprehensive educational program for students with talents and potential in dance, instrumental music, vocal music, theatre, and visual art or media arts. This school will provide students and parents with expanded choices in the types of educational opportunities that are available within the public school system to maximize each student’s special talents. Our graduates will increase the quality of their life, the lives of people who surround them, and the respective communities of the Valley.
There are many people interested in helping to start our charter school waiting for recruitment. These founders will include parents, teachers, school principals, lawyers, business entrepreneurs and accountants. Our founding group needs to have expertise in a variety of areas, including:
• Curriculum & instruction
• Public school financing
• Real estate
• Human resources
• Public relations
• Management
• Governance
• Education law
• Drafting charter school applications
• Fund raising
• Assessment of student achievement
Our plan is to set forth with a mission and focus toward our local resources: parents, companies, corporations, businesses and foundations that we can wrap our arms around, develop long term financial relationships with, and build far-reaching community support for this school. Company representatives and sponsors are encouraged to attend events and visit the school directly to see the value of what we do both artistically and academically. We will forge lasting relationships with these resources in order to regularly demonstrate the value of what we do. This will encourage greater program support and greatly assist in attracting families of these companies to continue to send and attend our performing arts school.
The mission statement of the performing arts school will be the following: To create champions of academic excellence, social responsibility, self-expression, and life-long learning through the arts. Our vision is to create an independent public high school offering small academic classes including honors and advanced placement, as well as comprehensive academies for dance, drama, film, music, art, and new media. Students will come from diverse backgrounds and a wide geographic area. Kindness and respect for one another will predominate our campus.
Located in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, the school will begin with 150 students enrolled in 11th and 12th grade. The student body will come from a wide area that includes many parts of the Mat-Su Valley. Each school year we will add an additional grade and students for each grade level until we reach our goal of approximately 450 students in grades 9-12. This is a public charter school that does not charge any tuition.
At the heart of the school’s curriculum is a strong emphasis on academics and every student will be required to maintain a high level of competency in all subjects required for entrance to a state university. For optimum conditions teachings, the average student to teacher ratio is 25 to 1. Every student will excel in all subjects, including those that may have challenged them in the past.
Also, our school will have unique arts specialties and electives. Designed to enhance the educational experience of every student, these offerings will advance the skills of those training in a specific art form. These students will train up to 20 hours per week perfecting their skills, in addition to their rigorous academics. Here is a brief description of four academic units that we plan to offer:

Academic Academy
Dedicated to serving the academic student with advanced placement in honors classes available.
Performing Arts Academy
Dedicated to serving students specializing in theater, music and dance.
Visual Art Academy
Dedicated to serving students specializing hands-on activities in developing young artist’s technical abilities and personal vision through the study of a variety of traditional media.
New Media Academy
Dedicated to serving students specializing in digital multimedia, art and design programs.

All residents from the Matanuska-Susitna Borough are eligible for enrollment. However, a performing arts education will not be right for every student. Before considering enrollment, students and parents will need to review the student handbook and other information on the school website. If they like what they see, the application procedure begins.
The first step in applying is to attend an open house. Parents or guardians and students interested in the performing arts charter school should attend an Open House to learn more and decide whether performing arts charter school is the right choice for high school. Shadowing days and auditions will be scheduled during the Open House. In the second application step, students will participate in an audition and shadowing visit. All prospective students are encouraged to complete an assessment in their prospective major and a shadowing visit. Assessments are used for placement purposes. A shadowing visit allows students to attend academic and arts classes while school is in session. Each arts department conducts its own evaluations. They all have different requirements – for example, the music, theatre and dance evaluations are based largely on your performance at an audition, while literary arts and media evaluations are centered around a portfolio of your work – but every department scores candidates on a universal rubric. The third and final step is waiting to be notified. There will be more students interested in attending performing arts charter high school than there are spots available, and the number of students who want to attend will increase every year. It takes time for each department to evaluate its prospective students, and it also takes time for all the departments to decide how to apportion the available spots for new students. Generally, all prospective new students will be notified sometime in May on whether they have been accepted to the fall term. We will make every effort to give students and their families a timely response, but our first commitment is to insuring that every prospective student has a fair and thorough evaluation.
As per Alaskan statues, a charter school may be established as provided under AS 14.03.250 - 14.03.290 upon the approval of the local school board and the state Board of Education and Early Development of an application for a charter school. MSBSD shall apply for available federal funding and award federal funding made available under the grant program established under (a) of this section for not more than five years for approved projects for charter school facilities construction, lease, or major maintenance as follows:
1st Year – 90 percent of the allowable costs for the first fiscal year
2nd Year – 80 percent of the allowable costs for the second fiscal year
3rd Year – 60 percent of the allowable costs for the third fiscal year
4th Year – 40 percent of the allowable costs for the fourth fiscal year
5th Year – 20 percent of the allowable costs for the fifth fiscal year
The performing arts charter school will hope to receive financial support from its non-profit component unit, to be founded for the primary purpose of fundraising. The school building will be owned by MSBSD to which the school pays annual rent to satisfy the debt obligation. The board of trustees, the Principal/Director of School, and the interim management team will implement a systematic budgeting process. In the fall, the Principal/Director of School begins with a review of salary schedule and predicted increases in benefits. Each school department is asked to forecast for the upcoming year. The Principal/Director of School conservatively predicts revenue for the upcoming year. Once the Principal/Director of School has established a solid draft, the budget is presented to the finance committee for review. The committee then makes a recommendation to the entire board for full approval in the spring. A clear system of fiscal controls need to be in place. The Principal/Director of School presents the finance committee with monthly financial statements; a full report of income statement and balance sheet is presented to the board on a quarterly basis.
Performing Arts Charter High School staffing plan and school structure is based on several other existing charter schools within MSBSD.

Board of Trusteesoversight of school’s fidelity to Charter | Principal/Director of Schooldaily management and oversight of all school functions both academic and non-academic | Leadership Team Appointed by Principal | AssistantDirectoroversight of allnon-academicareas of management(human relations,admissions,school records,buildingmaintenance,purchasing,etc.) | SchoolCounseloroversight ofall areas ofSchoolClimate,Parentalinvolvementand volunteers | CoordinatorforCurriculumandInstructionLead CurriculumCoordinatorwith oversightof all testing, AIS and ELL | CoordinatorforMathematicsoversight ofMathematicscurriculumand instructionand testing | Coordinatorfor ELAoversight ofELA curriculumand instructionand testing | Coordinatorfor Scienceand SocialStudiesoversight ofScience andSocial Studiescurriculumand instructionand testing | Instructional Staff: Teachers, Assistant Teachers, Teacher Assistants, Aidesdelivery of curriculum and instruction and all areas of classroom management |

Performing Arts Charter High School will be governed by a Board of Trustees whose ultimate responsibility is to uphold the mission of our school by providing for the well-being of the institution in the present as well as the future. The Board protects the public interest and upholds the public trust by applying the highest standards of service in governing the school according to its Charter, by-laws, and relevant state and federal statutes. It is the duty of the Board of Trustees to make plans, establish policies, and assess the performance of the school as a whole. The Board also bears ultimate responsibility for the school’s finances and physical plant. The Board must also identify, select, work with, support and evaluate the Principal/Director of School, who is the professional educational leader of the school as well as its administrator. In order to successfully undertake all these responsibilities, the Board must organize, manage, and assess itself in an efficient, business-like manner.
First and foremost, Trustees are nominated and elected on the basis of a firm commitment to the mission, goals and objectives of the Performing Arts School; they should unequivocally support the educational philosophy espoused by the school and confirmed by the granting of a charter to the school. In addition, Trustees are nominated and elected for the qualities of leadership, service, and expertise in a range of fields that they bring to the school. No Trustee represents a specific constituency. It is imperative that the Board of Trustees make its decisions for the present and future welfare of Performing Arts Charter High School as a whole, rather than in response to personal priorities or the wishes of vocal factions. No Trustee may speak for the Board on any issue until the Board in its entirety has decided that issue. All Board meetings are held in compliance with the provisions of the “Open Public Meetings Act.” For a detailed review of the role of the Board of Trustees, please refer to the by-laws available upon request.
The Board of Trustees will include at least five members, with the exact number to be specified in the by-laws. The Performing Arts Charter High School Principal/Director of School sits on the Board ex officio. Members of the Board serve a term of three years, with approximately one-third replaced each year. Terms of office of outgoing trustees will expire on June 30, and incoming trustees will take office on July 1 annually. The by-laws provide for a majority of the Board members to be elected from among the parents and guardians of students enrolled in the school. Seats reserved for parent trustees are elected by the parents/guardians of enrolled students. Candidates are nominated by the nominating committee of the Board of Trustees, or by petition of the parents/guardians of students enrolled in the school. The number of signatures shall be no less than ten percent of the number of enrolled students. The non-reserved seats are filled by majority vote of the Board of Trustees and may provide desirable expertise or diversity.
Parents of students participate directly in the governance of the school through the seats reserved for them on the Board of Trustees. Because the Board is empowered by its by-laws to create committees that include non-Trustees as committee members, it is expected that the Principal/Director of School, parents, and faculty members will be included in such committees as appropriate. The Board may choose to create a standing Teachers’ Advisory Committee to serve as a permanent channel for teachers to make their concerns known directly to the Board, including the Principal/Director of School as a Trustee ex officio. Such a standing teachers committee would also provide feedback to the Board in its self-evaluation exercises which serve as the basis for future planning. The students may influence issues of immediate concern to them in their daily school environment by forming a school government which may provide input to the formulation of in-school discipline, codes of conduct, etc.
Charter schools have more flexibility in determining their curriculum, teaching methods, discipline approach and in hiring staff. Charter schools develop policies on these topics but do not have to follow district-adopted policies or materials. The Performing Arts Charter High School will seek teachers in many areas to take up the rigorous, joyous challenge of helping students chart their academic journey. The school staff will exceed state and district requirements for teaching. One of our most important goals is to have highly qualified teachers who continually strive to improve their skills and abilities through ongoing practice, research and professional development.
Finding high quality, mission- and vision-aligned teachers will be critical for our school. We need to find the appropriate balance between deep vetting of candidates and creating efficiency in the hiring of about 15-20 teachers initially and more each year for our growing school. In addition, some non-negotiable values into our hiring process:

* The support, or central, office coordinates and does the initial vetting of candidates through application and certification and phone interviews * Teacher and students need to have input in the hiring process * Principal/Director of School and Board of Trustees will have the final say over hiring of teachers

After going through an initial screening process, teacher candidates will spend a day at the Performing Arts Charter High School interviewing with students, faculty, and administration, as well as teaching a demonstration lesson, and developing a project in a group of candidates. With that model in mind, we developed our hiring process and call it Visualization Day. About 15 candidates participate at a time, and the day lasts about three hours. On the hiring end, we have been able to get a full picture of their potential for success at one of our schools.

Here are some points for why we do what we do:

* Hiring is the most important job we all do. If you do not have time to hire great people, think about how much time you are going to spend working with not great people. * Think about how to get students involved in the hiring process (the more, the better). * Students develop maturity, thoughtfulness, and an understanding of what the school is "all about" by participating in hiring. * Students do not need to be coached at how to interview. They can develop this together and on their own. Some adults have a tendency to hover over student interviewers and should be dissuaded from doing so. * We are excited about our new, innovative process for hiring great teachers. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to our friends at NLNS and HTH for their willingness to share their process. We continue to explore options for our hiring process.

The administrative structure of the school

Staffing levels

What size and type of facility will be needed. Typically classroom-based charter schools need to have 60 to 140 square feet per student in code compliant facilities

FINANCING
Many charter schools use a combination of private and public funds to get through the charter development process. Some charter development teams start with as little as $10,000. Depending on the circumstances, charter school development – from beginning to end – can cost between $250,000 and $2.5 million in loans and/or grants.

STAGE 3
WRITING THE CHARTER

STAGE 4
APPROVAL

MAKING IT HAPPEN
Getting a charter approved is not as simple as just filling out an application with the board of education and/or getting a public hearing.

Charter Developers need to:
Circulate a petition, as specified in law, that documents the support of parents and or teachers for the school

Bring community supporters of the charter to public hearings on the petition and submit letters of support from the community to the authorizing agency.

Secure support from community stakeholders

Circulate application to all parts of the community for their review

If possible, submit a draft application to the authorizing board of education or office of education for preliminary review

Consider advice that you receive about the petition and revise it accordingly.

This step may help strengthen community support.

Get to know people on the staff and the governance board of the authorizing agency

STAGE 5
OPENING THE SCHOOL

FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL
Once your charter has been approved by an authorizing agency, you will need to begin preparations to actually open the school.

Important steps include:

Creating a plan to complete everything that needs to be accomplished before the school opens. The plan should be clear about exactly what role each member of the development team will play and how the plan will be implemented.

Applying to the State Department of Education for a charter number and school code and completing information necessary to receive state operational funding

File articles of incorporation, if applicable

File for nonprofit status, if applicable

Create a governing board

Decide on system for testing students

Write bylaws and policies

Make clear agreements with the authorizing agency about the scope of their oversight and what additional services, if any it will provide to the charter school and the terms of those services.

Recruit and admit students

Secure a facility for the school

Create a school calendar

Create systems for accounting, staff benefits, payroll, banking, purchasing, transportation, cafeteria services, legal services, technology and insurance

Plan professional development activities

Recruit and hire teachers and staff

Select and buy instructional materials

Secure start up and ongoing operational funding

The Expected Schoolwide Learning Results, commonly referred to as the ESLRs, are an interdisciplinary statement about what all students should know, understand, and be able to do by the time they graduate from our school: Academic Excellence
Proficient or above in the areas of English Literature, History, Math, Science, Foreign Language and Performing Arts.

Social Responsibility
Energized citizens prepared to lead their communities by example toward a peaceful and healthy environment.

Self-Expression
Creative thinkers able to evaluate, organize, and produce solutions in a complex technological and artistic world with practical and theoretical foundations.

Life-long Learning
Skilled in critical thinking strategies necessary to adapt to a rapidly evolving world.

…Through the Arts

New Media: Digital Image Design
New media is people designing graphics, moving images, sound, text, and storytelling to creatively advance digital communication, and to fulfill the need for interactivity using online social networks, collaboration, and sharing. The New Media Academy is a specialized training program for students who are interested in imaginative computer use, creative expression, are motivated and teachable, and are interested in exploring and building a foundation for a career in this expanding field.
New Media Academy’s objectives are to:
Train students to produce creative ways to communicate, educate, and entertain using digital media and the technical arts.
Prepare students for continued study in college or professional schools.
Increase the students’ overall self-confidence that comes from discovering and developing one’s talents, work ethic, and ability to productively work individually and in partnerships.
Provide ongoing direction, resources, and practice to make life-long learning a pattern.
Make some class time available to help students understand how to have fun using these skills to creatively complete homework for other classes and personal projects.
Each student will need to sign up for a free Google email account in order to gain access to the wide array tools they provide. This does not have to become your main personal email, it can be your dedicated school address.
Grading:
100%-90%=A | 89%-80%=B | 79%-70%=C | 69%-60=D | 59%-0=F
The four major elements that decide a student’s grade are:

Attendance:
Most projects are explained and completed in class, therefore attendance is very important.

Class participation:
There will be very little homework assigned, therefore, students need to be working on and completing class related projects in order to successfully complete each course. No myspace, unauthorized chats, or other off task activities.

Maintain a positive attitude: be nice, polite and supportive of others
Complete all Weekly Assignments: you can make up any missing assignments

Tardies:
Be in your seat and ready to work before the tardy bell rings. Lateness disrupts and wastes class time. Three unexcused tardies within a grading period will result in a “U” in Work Habits.
All of the following courses are required and sequential:
All students who have been accepted into the New Media Academy are required to pass all of their required courses with a C or better. Most academy courses require projects to be published online, as well as some short written research assignments.

The New Media courses have been developed using the new media workflow model that integrates a real-world combination of authoring tools that together contribute to the completion of each project. This method of production is very common in the professional small group and entrepreneurial business environments.

New Media Academy Year One

Introduction to New Media 1A and 1B
One-year - no prerequisites - meets daily – required for all student entering the New Media Academy (NMA)
This engaging course will help prepare students for academic and professional success. NMA students will build a foundation of the visual communication skills needed for a career in the growing field of web, video, and print design. Students will be introduced to photography and video composition and editing, digital image creation and manipulation, graphic design, color theory, and typography. They will also review correct keyboarding, word processing, and presentation skills, and create an electronic-web-portfolio and a short graphic novel. Software includes: Adobe CS3 Design Premium, Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, Google Docs and Presentation, iPhoto, iMovie, GarageBand, and other applications as they are needed. There are many equivalent software titles for Windows.
The Digital Lifestyle
“The only thing we can be sure of is change.” - Vaughan, B. W. This course is blended into the curriculum. It is designed to help students understand, enjoy, and feel the excitement in the ever-changing world of technology. Students will learn how to easily find key resources that will keep them on the front edge of new innovations and evolving social movements. They will be given in-class time to practice becoming a life-long learner through: podcast subscriptions, video news sites, blogs, and other resources. Each student will regularly prepare a short multimedia presentation on interesting new information they discovered.
New Media Academy Year Two
One-year – meets everyday - prerequisite: completion of New Media 1A and 1B
Visual Design 2
Students develop skills that lay the foundation for photography and producing print-ready communications: graphic design principles, print production development, shared project management skills such as interviewing and project scheduling, peer review, and redesign. Project activities focus on developing effective communications that can be deployed in print, on the web, or in a video. Students develop a variety of graphics: a logo, a business card, and a client advertisement. They produce design documents and visual comps that clients review. Students culminate the course with a portfolio project during which they reflect on the skills and topics they’ve covered thus far and begin to explore the career areas that interest them in visual design.
Students use Adobe Photoshop CS4 Extended to develop images, Adobe InDesign CS4 to design and build layouts and print materials, Adobe Illustrator CS4 to create vector-based graphics and illustrations to add interest. and Adobe Acrobat 8 Professional to review and improve content, produce print-ready materials, and develop a portfolio.
Digital Video 2
Digital Video 1 lays the foundation for skills in shooting video, composition, communications, story planning, audio and narration planning and recording, video editing, shared project management skills such as interviewing and project scheduling, peer review, and redesign. Project activities focus on developing effective communications that can be deployed on DVD, digital videotape, or the web. Students develop a variety of videos focused on genres such as an action video, a news story, and a public service announcement. Students culminate the class with a portfolio project in which they reflect on the skills and topics they’ve covered and begin their career exploration to better understand what areas interest them in digital video.
The key skills emphasized are:
• Ethical considerations for editing and producing videos
• Designing for a variety of audiences and needs
• The design process and effective communication
• Peer teaching and evaluation in a collaborative environment
• Shooting, capturing, editing, and enhancing video and audio
Web Design Foundations 2
This course lays the foundation for producing web-ready communications: storyboards, web development, shared project management skills such as interviewing and project scheduling, peer review, and redesign. Project activities focus on developing effective communications that can be deployed on the web. Students develop a variety of graphical images, an electronic portfolio, and a client website. Students work individually or on teams and produce rich media communications such as digital narratives and rich media elements of client websites. They focus on effective rich media design, multimedia storyboarding, and design specifications with clients. They produce design documents and visual comps that clients review. They develop rich media designs that solve specific communication challenges, and build technical skills to address client needs.
The key skills emphasized in this semester are:
• “Soft” skills such as interviewing and responding to feedback
• Communication with clients, using design documents or specifications
• Design and redesign according to client specifications
• Technical multimedia skills such as film effects and transitions
• Design solutions, including effective navigation systems and digital narratives
Students learn Adobe Flash CS4 to apply design solutions requiring rich media and interactivity. This content prepares students for the Adobe Certified Associate in Rich Media Communication using Adobe Flash CS4 examination.

The National Education Technology Standards addressed
“What students should know and be able to do to learn effectively and live productively in an increasingly digital world …”
2007 INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION http://www.iste.org/inhouse/nets/cnets/index.html - Choose: National Educational Technology Standards 2007
1. Creativity and Innovation
Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
2. Communication and Collaboration
Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
3. Research and Information Fluency
Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
4. Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving & Decision-Making
Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.
5. Digital Citizenship
Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
6. Technology Operations and Concepts
Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.
Alaska Department of Education: Career Pathway

PERFORMING ARTS DANCE ACADEMY
REQUIREMENTS & COURSES
All students who have been accepted into the Performing Arts Academy are required to take 4 periods of their performing arts major, along with 4 or 5 periods of academic classes per day. No exceptions.
Each Dance student follows a rigorous conservatory approach with a double period ballet class and a double period modern class per day. Supplementary courses include, dance history for sophomores, choreography and Theatre dance for juniors, and career management for seniors. All courses are required and sequential. Students must participate in summer dance programs to maintain their level of training.
Freshman Year
Courses:
Ballet AB
Ballet I AB is a course for the entering freshman or sophomore dance major with little or limited previous study and experience. Each dance student follows a rigorous conservatory approach to the study of classical ballet for two consecutive semesters. This class is an introduction to the concepts of ballet through Western European techniques developed by Agrippina Vaganova and Enrico Cecchetti. Students will learn the basic core concepts of the dance techniques listed above. This basic study will include extensive work at the barre to develop proper placement. As these students acquire strength and a basic understanding of ballet technique, their study will expand to work in center floor and simple ballet combinations across the floor.
Modern Dance 1 AB
Modern I is a course for the entering freshman dance major with little or limited previous study and experience. Each dance student follows a rigorous conservatory approach to the study of modern dance for two consecutive semesters. This class is an introduction to the concepts of modern dance through the techniques developed by Martha Graham, Lester Horton, Jose Limon, Katherine Dunham and other dance masters. Students will learn the basic core concepts of the dance techniques of the artists listed above. This basic study will include Martha Graham, and Lester Horton’s floor work, and will eventually evolve to include the flowing movements of Jose Limon, and the Caribbean influence of Katherine Dunham. As these students acquire strength and a basic understanding and vocabulary of these techniques, their study will expand to movement across the floor and simple dance combinations.
Tap Dance 1 AB
The study of the basics of this vernacular dance form. Students will be expected to master tap vocabulary, techniques of rhythmic clarity and use of weight shift, traditional steps such as the Shim Sham, Soft Shoe, and Time Steps, as well as learn different stylistic approaches from musical Theatre tap to rhythm tap.

Sophomore Year
Ballet 2
Applying technical foundations while increasing the physical and technical demands of classical ballet. Ballet vocabulary and terminology are expanded. Ballet 2 students are expected to master double pirouettes, and perform strong pointe work.
Modern Dance II AB
Each dance student follows a rigorous conservatory approach to the study of modern dance for two consecutive semesters. Modern II is for the entering student with previous study and experience. Modern II students are expected to work with emphasis on correct placement. Students will expand on the core techniques of Martha Graham, Lester Horton, Jose Limon, Katherine Dunham and other dance masters of modern dance learned in Modern I. Emphasis is placed on increased technical strength and vocabulary. As these students acquire strength and an expanded understanding of these techniques, their study will include movement across the floor and complex dance combinations.
Sophomore Dance Academy Drama provides the student with a deepening understanding of the Method acting process using principles developed by Stanislavski. Students will expand their physical and vocal instruments with further development of sensory awareness, imagination, ensemble, storytelling and improvisation skills. Students will apply Method principles to the development of characters and dance/movement pieces that demonstrate the ability to fill the creative process with an authentic and rich inner life.
Tap Dance 2
Further the development of musical theater and rhythm tap techniques. Study the art of tap improvisation, and the various styles of past and present day hoofers.
Dance History
An exploration of the history of both ballet and modern dance with an emphasis on guest artist/teachers who not only introduce various techniques, Limon, Taylor, Hawkins, Cunningham, and Tharp, but also teach repertory.
Drama A
In acting classes students explore and develop their instruments. They learn basic acting technique, beginning with work on self. These techniques are then applied to plays in scene work involving characters close to self.
Music Theory 1
This is the first in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony. Topics in this course will include all major and minor keys, diatonic triads and their inversions, and the V7 chord and its inversions. Students will also begin four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.

Junior Year
Ballet 3
The extension of classical ballet technique with an emphasis on virtuosity and preparation for the stage. Ballet 3 students are expected to know all terminology and maintain an intermediate to advanced level class.
Modern Dance III AB
Each dance student follows a rigorous conservatory approach to the study of modern dance for two consecutive semesters. Modern III students study advanced Martha Graham, Lester Horton, Jose Limon, Katherine Dunham, and other dance masters of modern dance, with an emphasis on stage technique and performance. The study of intermediate-advanced work added to previous work, learned in freshman and sophomore year, in Martha Graham, Lester Horton, Jose Limon, and Katherine Dunham technique and other dance masters of modern dance. Also expected, is the ability to execute complex technical and musical combinations with knowledge of stage and musical terms. Students will also gain audition experience learned through experience in school auditions conducted by guest choreographers.
Tap Dance 3
Continue to master the art of improvisation with an emphasis on clarity and speed. Explore the musicianship of tap rhythms coupled with music from around the globe.
Theatre Dance
Jazz and Musical Theatre Technique. The study of American jazz techniques as used in commercial Theatre, film, and television.
Drama B
In acting class students explore and develop their instruments. They learn basic acting technique, beginning with work on self. These techniques are then applied to plays in scene work involving characters close to self.
Music Theory 2
Prerequisite: Theory 1 or equivalent.
This course is the second in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony. This course is a continuation of topics covered in theory 1 and also includes secondary dominants, modal borrowing, and an introduction to species counterpoint. Students will also continue to hone skills in four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics. Choreography Workshop
The study of basic rhythmic, spatial and dynamic materials used in the designing of dance. The study of composition, dynamics, musical and choreographic devices, styles and techniques as it applies to the choreographic art. Students will explore the fundamentals of choreography for film. From short simple works, the student/choreographer will progress to larger pieces and produce a complete work for evaluation by the dance faculty and formal presentation during the senior year at the annual Dance Showcase.

Senior Year
Ballet 4
Advanced study of classical ballet with an emphasis on stage technique and performance. Ballet 7 and 8 are expected to maintain an advanced/professional level class and to perform the corresponding technique.
Modern Dance IV AB
Each dance student follows a rigorous conservatory approach to the study of modern dance for two consecutive semesters. The study of advanced Martha Graham, Lester Horton, Katherine Dunham, Jose Limon and other dance masters of modern dance technique with an emphasis on stage technique, performance, and audition experience learned through experience in school auditions conducted by guest choreographers. Modern IV students are expected to maintain an advanced/professional level class and to perform the corresponding technique.
Voice - Musical Theater.
Musical theatre surveys the history of musical Theatre featuring behind-the-scenes work on Broadway musicals. Students learn the basics of sight-reading, breathing, and vocalizing. Students sing songs in groups, trios, duets, and solo from musicals to learn to apply all acting techniques to songs. Students work on at least one duet, one upbeat song, and one ballad during the term to learn to act a song.
Career Management
The dancer's professional career, including contracts, unions, auditions, resumes, headshots, and self-produced concerts. Alternative careers within the field of dance are explored through the use of guest speakers

PERFORMING ARTS DRAMA ACADEMY
REQUIREMENTS & COURSES
All students who have been accepted into the Performing Arts Academy are required to take 4 periods of their performing arts major, along with 4 or 5 periods of academic classes per day. No exceptions.
The Drama Department is a professional training program for students talented in acting. The vocational purpose of the training is to develop the student's instrument and to teach skills and techniques on which the actor can rely. The focus is on Theatre preparation through courses in acting, voice and diction, physical techniques, Theatre history and script analysis, in order to prepare students for professional careers in stage, film and television, as well as entrance into Theatre, Speech and Communications Departments of colleges, universities and conservatories.
•Pass all of the required courses
•Drama Comprehensive Exam: Passing grade

Courses:
All of the following courses are required and sequential
Active and consistent participation in class work is essential for completion of each course. Most courses require performance projects as well as written research/analytical assignments or projects.
Note: After school rehearsals are required for all performance classes.
Acting
Acting provides techniques derived primarily from the principles developed by Stanislavski. Students must complete and pass the full-year course of Acting in order to be promoted to the next year's level.
Freshmen
Acting 9AB
Students explore and develop their instruments. They learn basic acting technique, beginning with work on self. These techniques are then applied to plays in scene work involving characters close to self.
Voice and Diction 9AB
Voice and Diction training gives the actor an instrument capable of producing and projecting sound in a healthy manner, as well as articulating clearly in performance.
Physical Techniques
Presents a series of exercises adapted from various styles of dance movement that are natural to all body types and designed to facilitate the execution of specific actions that require increased range of motion, considerable strength, and moderate coordination. A basic vocabulary of movement is introduced in conjunction with definite rhythmical patterns to expose students to a practical method used in obtaining knowledge of dance. The first year establishes a foundation for a basic technique in contemporary dance and tap dance.
Improv 9 AB
Improvisation stimulates and develops imagination, spontaneity, creative risk-taking, responsiveness and ensemble skills through individual as well as group Theatre and problem solving improvisation exercises.
History Of Theater
This class is a chronologically sequential regarding Western theatre then ends with a study of non-Western theatre. This class includes lessons in each of several important areas of world theatre history. Various aspects are covered including social historical importance, physical theatres, costuming, masks, improvisation,

Sophomores
Acting 10AB
The Sophomores acting class introduces the concept of extension of self; students must go outside of self for the source of creating character. Students work on character stretches that are far from self, in scenes from modern Theatre, children’s Theatre, classical Theatre, absurdist Theatre, and farce.
Voice and Diction
The Sophomore class includes all of the above, adding articulation of new consonants and shaping vowels and diphthongs. Students are introduced to Eastern Standard Speech (to expand their character options in addition to working on clarity of speech when using their own regionalisms).
Physical Techniques
Furthers the student's experience of dance through the implementation of modern, jazz and rhythm tap dance
Improv 10AB
Improvisation stimulates and develops imagination, spontaneity, creative risk-taking, responsiveness and ensemble skills through individual as well as group Theatre and problem solving improvisation exercises.
Stage Craft
Stagecraft is an overview of Theatre for actors. Students become acquainted with the workings of professional Theatre. They learn actor and Theatre terminology, history of the development of acting principles, lines of authority in the Theatre, periodicals, books, and other source material about the field, professional Theatre organization, and an introduction to the business of Theatre. In addition, they learn to begin to think about plays as actors preparing for rehearsals or auditions. In the sophomore year, students acquire an overview of Theatre history that connects purpose, physical design, acting style, and plays performed throughout the ages.
Music Theory - Theory 1
This is the first in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony. Topics in this course will include all major and minor keys, diatonic triads and their inversions, and the V7 chord and its inversions. Students will also begin four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.

Juniors
Acting 11AB
The Junior acting class introduces the concept of extension of self; students must go outside of self for the source of creating character. Students work on character stretches that are far from self, in scenes from modern Theatre, children’s Theatre, classical Theatre, absurdist Theatre, and farce.
Voice and Diction 11 AB
This course will develop the student’s vocal instrument so that it’s capable of producing sound in a healthy manner. It will also develop the student’s vocal instrument so that it is capable of projecting sound in a healthy manner using the natural, free voice.and develop the student’s ability to articulate clearly in performance using the natural, free voice.
Physical Techniques
Develops classical techniques, which promotes strength, flexibility, control, endurance, coordination, and artistic expression as well as expand one's knowledge of movement terminology and ballet terminology. Junior class concentrates on techniques that will help portray expressive movements that exhibit a performer with versatility and style. Students learn approaches to interpretation and identification with certain musical qualities. Focus is on Theatre Dance as a means of gaining experience with floor, spatial, and rhythmical patterns as well as design, character, and showmanship.
Play Analysis for Character Study
Play analysis teaches the actor an approach to analyze scripts for playing characters. Students learn how to: distinguish text from subtext, distinguish between literary analysis and acting analysis, analyze scripts as actor's "homework" to prepare for work on roles, find textual clues about characters, find textual clues for actors in Shakespeare verse and in farce/comedy scripts.
Make-up
Make-up teaches the principles of facial anatomy, color, shading, as well as techniques for applying corrective, middle age, old age, character, and expressionistic make-up. Students learn to apply make-up on themselves and on classmates.
Voice - Musical Theater
Musical theatre surveys the history of musical Theatre featuring behind-the-scenes work on Broadway musicals. Students learn the basics of sight-reading, breathing, and vocalizing. Students sing songs in groups, trios, duets, and solo from musicals to learn to apply all acting techniques to songs. Students work on at least one duet, one upbeat song, and one ballad during the term to learn to act a song.

Seniors
Senior acting is the production year where the student actors apply their three years of acquired skills and techniques in working on scripted material with a director for invited audiences and public performances. Students learn ensemble acting and how to maintain a "life" on stage when they do not have lines. They work on large group scenes (four or more on stage at a time), in a fully mounted/professionally designed production, and on scenes for Showcase presented to invited casting directors and agents.
Senior class prepares the vocal instrument for public performance. Breathing, projection, and support are done for specific scripted stage work. Work is also done on accents and dialects for characters. In addition, each senior prepares a voice-over tape (in conjunction with Audition Technique class).
Audition Technique
Audition technique introduces and teaches practical application of the techniques necessary for successful auditioning for commercials, industrials, film, voice-overs, musicals, and stage. In addition, the actor learns how to work with the camera.
Career Management
Career management equips actors with skills and knowledge as to how to be working actors. Students are introduced to various job opportunities in Theatre, film, and media where they can apply the skills and techniques they have learned in our program. Students acquire practical professional information about unions, agents, resumes, pictures, interviews, and their options after graduation. Students meet visiting working professionals from Theatre, film, television, and radio, who speak about their fields and answer students' questions.

PERFORMING ARTS MUSIC ACADEMY
REQUIREMENTS & COURSES
All students who have been accepted into the Performing Arts Academy are required to take 4 periods of their performing arts major, along with 4 or 5 periods of academic classes per day. No exceptions
MUSIC ACADEMY
REQUIREMENTS
The Music Academy offers vocal music, music theory and piano. Students in the Music Academy for the 2009-2010 school year receive a demanding college-level education. Our goal is to prepare our graduates for professional careers and the continuation of their studies at the nation's leading conservatories and universities. In addition to the rigorous coursework required to graduate, music students must pass individual performance exams and studio exams at the end of the third year.
COURSES
Freshman / Sophomore Year
VOCAL MUSIC COURSES
Sightsinging 1
A required course. This entry-level course is designed for all incoming vocal students with little or no knowledge of the materials of music. All entering vocal majors must take and pass this course. Topics discussed include: notes, staff, treble and bass clefs, key signatures with up to four sharps and flats, corresponding scales, simple intervals, sol-fa system. Students will use this knowledge to sing simple melodic lines using the sol-fa system and learn to write simple melodies in the music language as they are played on an instrument of choice. Creative work will also be encouraged. This course is for one term and given in the fall.
Sightsinging 2
A required course. This is a continuation of Sightsinging 1 Students will continue sightsinging using the sol-fa system. They will also continue melodic dictation on the next level. By the end of the semester, all key signatures and major scales will have been covered. Interval dictation will be added. Students will also begin to learn about major, minor, augmented and diminished triads in all major keys and be able to sing them. Creative work will also be encouraged. This course is for one term and given in the spring.
VOCAL ENSEMBLES
Elementary Chorus
A required introductory chorus for all freshmen. Students will study basic reading skills and methodologies that will prepare them for more advanced choral study. Standard repertoire will be studied and performed.
Mixed Chorus
An intermediate chorus. Students will advance reading and learning methods as well as musical comprehension that will be used in Senior Chorus. Portions of major works and standard choral repertoire will be studied and performed.
PIANO COURSES
Beginning Piano
A required course for all freshmen and incoming sophomores. Students will study basic piano techniques, sight-reading and musical comprehension. These skills will serve as a foundation for their continued musical study.
Intermediate Piano
An elective course for students who wish to advance their basic piano skills. Sight-reading, simple transposition and analysis of intermediate works will be studied and performed.
MUSIC THEORY
Theory 1
This is the first in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony. Topics in this course will include all major and minor keys, diatonic triads and their inversions, and the V7 chord and its inversions. Students will also begin four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.
Theory 2
Prerequisite: Theory 1 or equivalent.
This course is the second in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony. This course is a continuation of topics covered in theory 1 and also includes secondary dominants, modal borrowing, and an introduction to species counterpoint. Students will also continue to hone skills in four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.
Jazz Improvisation
Study of the basic approach to improvisation through the study and playing of compositions, chords, and scales. The study and understanding of jazz forms in the combo setting and a strong emphasis on time, meter, jazz swing feel, and the ability to work together. All instrumental and vocal students are invited and there is no audition required.
MUSIC ACADEMY
REQUIREMENTS
The Music Academy offers vocal music, music theory and piano. Students in the Music Academy for the 2007-2008 school year receive a demanding college-level education. Our goal is to prepare our graduates for professional careers and the continuation of their studies at the nation's leading conservatories and universities. In addition to the rigorous coursework required to graduate, music students must pass individual performance exams and studio exams at the end of the third year. Due to limited campus space during this 2007-2008 school year, Instrumental classes such as string, winds, and brass, will not be offered until the 2008-2009 school year.
MUSIC ACADEMY
COURSES
Freshman / Sophomore Year
VOCAL MUSIC COURSES
Sightsinging 1
A required course. This entry-level course is designed for all incoming vocal students with little or no knowledge of the materials of music. All entering vocal majors must take and pass this course. Topics discussed include: notes, staff, treble and bass clefs, key signatures with up to four sharps and flats, corresponding scales, simple intervals, sol-fa system. Students will use this knowledge to sing simple melodic lines using the sol-fa system and learn to write simple melodies in the music language as they are played on an instrument of choice. Creative work will also be encouraged. This course is for one term and given in the fall.
Sightsinging 2
A required course. This is a continuation of Sightsinging 1 Students will continue sightsinging using the sol-fa system. They will also continue melodic dictation on the next level. By the end of the semester, all key signatures and major scales will have been covered. Interval dictation will be added. Students will also begin to learn about major, minor, augmented and diminished triads in all major keys and be able to sing them. Creative work will also be encouraged. This course is for one term and given in the spring.
VOCAL ENSEMBLES
Elementary Chorus
A required introductory chorus for all freshmen. Students will study basic reading skills and methodologies that will prepare them for more advanced choral study. Standard repertoire will be studied and performed.
Mixed Chorus
An intermediate chorus. Students will advance reading and learning methods as well as musical comprehension that will be used in Senior Chorus. Portions of major works and standard choral repertoire will be studied and performed.
PIANO COURSES
Beginning Piano
A required course for all freshmen and incoming sophomores. Students will study basic piano techniques, sight-reading and musical comprehension. These skills will serve as a foundation for their continued musical study.
Intermediate Piano
An elective course for students who wish to advance their basic piano skills. Sight-reading, simple transposition and analysis of intermediate works will be studied and performed.
MUSIC THEORY
Theory 1
This is the first in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony. Topics in this course will include all major and minor keys, diatonic triads and their inversions, and the V7 chord and its inversions. Students will also begin four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.
Theory 2
Prerequisite: Theory 1 or equivalent.
This course is the second in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony. This course is a continuation of topics covered in theory 1 and also includes secondary dominants, modal borrowing, and an introduction to species counterpoint. Students will also continue to hone skills in four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.
Jazz Improvisation
Study of the basic approach to improvisation through the study and playing of compositions, chords, and scales. The study and understanding of jazz forms in the combo setting and a strong emphasis on time, meter, jazz swing feel, and the ability to work together. All instrumental and vocal students are invited and there is no audition required.
Tap Dance 1 & 2
The study of the basics of this vernacular dance form. Students will be expected to master tap vocabulary, techniques of rhythmic clarity and use of weight shift. They will explore the syncopation of rhythm tap and its musical significance.
Dance 1& 2
This class will present a series of exercises adapted from various styles of dance movement that are natural to all body types and designed to facilitate the execution of specific actions that require increased range of motion, considerable strength, and moderate coordination. A basic vocabulary of movement is introduced in conjunction with definite rhythmical patterns to expose students to a practical method used in obtaining knowledge of dance.
PROJECTED MUSIC COURSES
2008-2010 School Years
STRINGS COURSES
Strings 1
This course is open to beginning violin and viola students who have passed the preliminary audition on piano, guitar, or another instrument not ordinarily used in a symphony orchestra. It is a one-year course designed to acquaint students with the rudiments of violin or viola technique in the first position. Emphasis is on developing proper technique, pitch discrimination and posture.
Strings 2
This is a course open to beginning violin, cello or bass students who have passed the preliminary audition on piano or guitar, or on another instrument not ordinarily used in the symphony orchestra. It is a one-year course designed to acquaint students with the rudiments of cello or bass technique in the first position, later in higher positions as the students become more proficient. Emphasis is on developing proper technique, pitch discrimination, and posture.
Strings 3
This one-year course is open to violin and viola students who have complete Strings 1 or the equivalent. They will continue to expand their technique to include playing in all keys, using more advanced bow techniques, and they will learn to shift to positions two through five. Vibrato will be introduced in the second semester.
Strings 4
This one-year course is open to cello and bass students who have completed Strings 2 or the equivalent. They will continue to expand their technique to include playing in all keys, using more advanced bow techniques, and they will learn to shift up to the fourth position. Vibrato will be introduced in the second semester.
Strings 6
This two-semester course is open to string minors who have completed Strings 3, Strings 4, and Orchestra 5, and to string majors whose entrance exams indicate that they are at a comparable level of technical proficiency. Students will learn etudes and will do scale studies with the goal of giving them facility in playing over the entire range of their instruments. They will continue to shape their vibrates and to expand their bow techniques. In the second semester, they will add concertos or other solo works appropriate to their skills.
Strings 7
This two-semester course is a string ensemble repertoire class for higher intermediate and lower advanced students. They will perform at the Winter Musicale and the Spring Musicale.
String Ensemble 8
This two-semester course is open to the most advanced violinists, violists, cellists, and bassists. They will study and perform challenging works from the string ensemble repertoire with an emphasis on style and interpretation. They will perform in concerts throughout the year, including the Semi-Annual Concerts.
Theory 3
Prerequisite: Theory 1 and 2 or equivalent.
Third in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony, Theory 3 is a continuation of topics covered in Theory 1 and 2, and also includes modulation to related and distant keys, chromatic harmony, and introduction to 20th century compositional techniques. Students will continue to hone skills in four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.
Girls' Chorus
Skills learned in this course will ultimately prepare students for membership in Senior Chorus. Through a wide variety of challenging repertoires for two- to eight-part treble chorus, students will expand range, improve sightreading ability, and develop vocal skills, which include posture, vocal placement, breathing, and intonation. One semester of this course satisfies one of the five chorus requirements for vocal majors.
Senior Chorus
The most advanced chorus that studies and performs major choral masterpieces. Entrance into the chorus is through audition and teacher recommendation.
Solo Voice
This class is for the advanced vocal student. Students will perform solo repertoire from major choral masterpieces with the Senior Chorus. Entrance is by audition only.
Opera Workshop
A year-long course with admission by audition or recommendation. An appropriate opera, operetta, or operatic excerpt will be studies in class, both solo and ensemble parts, and performed in a production in the spring term. After-school rehearsals are required.
Audition Prep
Vocal students examine the audition process in various aspects of the music and entertainment industry: opera, Theatre, recording, and commercial work; also planning for auditioning for admission to colleges and music conservatories. Business aspects of the music industry, and preparation and formatting of resumes and publicity material, will be taught. Regular mock auditions are conducted, with feedback from auditioners.
Recording Technology
This course provides a comprehensive studio experience for all students including music production, engineering, musicianship, properties of sound, and the history of sound recording. Students also learn recording techniques via hands-on experience with state-of-the-art equipment. Open to all students. Provides students with hands-on experience using computers, keyboards, and synthesizers as a tool to create music. The course also offers a comprehensive study of the history of electronic music, MIDI, the properties of sound and basic recording technology

The study of the basics of this vernacular dance form. Students will be expected to master tap vocabulary, techniques of rhythmic clarity and use of weight shift. They will explore the syncopation of rhythm tap and its musical significance.
Dance 1& 2
This class will present a series of exercises adapted from various styles of dance movement that are natural to all body types and designed to facilitate the execution of specific actions that require increased range of motion, considerable strength, and moderate coordination. A basic vocabulary of movement is introduced in conjunction with definite rhythmical patterns to expose students to a practical method used in obtaining knowledge of dance.
PROJECTED MUSIC COURSES
2008-2010 School Years
STRINGS COURSES
Strings 1
This course is open to beginning violin and viola students who have passed the preliminary audition on piano, guitar, or another instrument not ordinarily used in a symphony orchestra. It is a one-year course designed to acquaint students with the rudiments of violin or viola technique in the first position. Emphasis is on developing proper technique, pitch discrimination and posture.
Strings 2
This is a course open to beginning violin, cello or bass students who have passed the preliminary audition on piano or guitar, or on another instrument not ordinarily used in the symphony orchestra. It is a one-year course designed to acquaint students with the rudiments of cello or bass technique in the first position, later in higher positions as the students become more proficient. Emphasis is on developing proper technique, pitch discrimination, and posture.
Strings 3
This one-year course is open to violin and viola students who have complete Strings 1 or the equivalent. They will continue to expand their technique to include playing in all keys, using more advanced bow techniques, and they will learn to shift to positions two through five. Vibrato will be introduced in the second semester.
Strings 4
This one-year course is open to cello and bass students who have completed Strings 2 or the equivalent. They will continue to expand their technique to include playing in all keys, using more advanced bow techniques, and they will learn to shift up to the fourth position. Vibrato will be introduced in the second semester.
Strings 6
This two-semester course is open to string minors who have completed Strings 3, Strings 4, and Orchestra 5, and to string majors whose entrance exams indicate that they are at a comparable level of technical proficiency. Students will learn etudes and will do scale studies with the goal of giving them facility in playing over the entire range of their instruments. They will continue to shape their vibrates and to expand their bow techniques. In the second semester, they will add concertos or other solo works appropriate to their skills.
Strings 7
This two-semester course is a string ensemble repertoire class for higher intermediate and lower advanced students. They will perform at the Winter Musicale and the Spring Musicale.
String Ensemble 8
This two-semester course is open to the most advanced violinists, violists, cellists, and bassists. They will study and perform challenging works from the string ensemble repertoire with an emphasis on style and interpretation. They will perform in concerts throughout the year, including the Semi-Annual Concerts.
Theory 3
Prerequisite: Theory 1 and 2 or equivalent.
Third in a series of three courses covering aspects of music theory and harmony, Theory 3 is a continuation of topics covered in Theory 1 and 2, and also includes modulation to related and distant keys, chromatic harmony, and introduction to 20th century compositional techniques. Students will continue to hone skills in four-part writing and composition, analysis, and harmonic dictation in the above topics.
Girls' Chorus
Skills learned in this course will ultimately prepare students for membership in Senior Chorus. Through a wide variety of challenging repertoires for two- to eight-part treble chorus, students will expand range, improve sightreading ability, and develop vocal skills, which include posture, vocal placement, breathing, and intonation. One semester of this course satisfies one of the five chorus requirements for vocal majors.
Senior Chorus
The most advanced chorus that studies and performs major choral masterpieces. Entrance into the chorus is through audition and teacher recommendation.
Solo Voice
This class is for the advanced vocal student. Students will perform solo repertoire from major choral masterpieces with the Senior Chorus. Entrance is by audition only.
Opera Workshop
A year-long course with admission by audition or recommendation. An appropriate opera, operetta, or operatic excerpt will be studies in class, both solo and ensemble parts, and performed in a production in the spring term. After-school rehearsals are required.
Audition Prep
Vocal students examine the audition process in various aspects of the music and entertainment industry: opera, Theatre, recording, and commercial work; also planning for auditioning for admission to colleges and music conservatories. Business aspects of the music industry, and preparation and formatting of resumes and publicity material, will be taught. Regular mock auditions are conducted, with feedback from auditioners.
Recording Technology
This course provides a comprehensive studio experience for all students including music production, engineering, musicianship, properties of sound, and the history of sound recording. Students also learn recording techniques via hands-on experience with state-of-the-art equipment. Open to all students. Provides students with hands-on experience using computers, keyboards, and synthesizers as a tool to create music. The course also offers a comprehensive study of the history of electronic music, MIDI, the properties of sound and basic recording technology

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...EDU-515 April 29, 2013 The organization I would like to work or prefer to work for would be the elementary level of school, preferably a Charter School grade level first or second. Reasoning behind this is these are minds that can be molded to become successful. You can instill greatness into these young minds, it where it all begins. Reading, writing and arithmetic will be my values. Yes of course technology would be part of the curriculum as well as the arts (liberal arts). I want my student to read from text books not from animation on a computer, they have to learn how to work with their minds. Maybe later on I would like to become an online professor for undergraduate students, because the curriculum is set or guide lines are there for you to follow. But teaching at the elementary level is far more important and rewarding. I would not just have a course of study; it would be used to improve student learning system. My curriculum would be effective with conscious planning efforts. Not to casual or different changes being made over week, month or even years. Yes time changes and learning abilities with new formats, with technology yet I will keep it ole school, if you will. Teachers, not all, depend on technology to teach our young minds. The text book isn’t used as much today as it was before. My students will be taught as I, reading, writing, speech and the ability to attain information in the brain. The curriculum would comprise......

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Teacher Strike

...The impact of the 7 day Chicago Public School teacher strike is a complex problem for each stakeholder. City officials, principals, teachers, parents and children all voice their frustrations and positions regarding the teacher strike. The strike was positioned as Emanuel vs. Lewis, but Lewis was contending with a union that installed her in order to take a more active stance and Emanuel’s plan, at least from publicly, was similarly aggressive. Inevitably, Emanuel and Lewis would meet. Consensus is that the CTU won, but Lewis admits that the actual contractual gains are unsatisfactory to her and the union. CTU came through over two decades of insufficiently strong (for the membership's desires) leadership, and Lewis took over after a major power shift. The teachers union expect that in the course of a couple of years that the union would change its internal stance and that by electing a competent head achieve all its goals in an anti-union environment during a period of austerity, all while contending with a figure like Rahm Emanuel. CTU positioned itself for future battles, such as school closings, and fighting attempts of the mayor to eliminate unions, close to up 120 and open charter schools with non-unionized teachers. Delegates for the Chicago Teachers Union filed a 10 day strike notice on August 29, 2012 and the strike was official Monday, September 10, 2012. Now, one week after the new school year start the city experienced its......

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Life Is Short

...in difficult due to politics and lack of buy in | Policy driven by all stakeholders, students and teachers included | First New York: Bloomberg did to help turn around the New York School System: Small Schools -  New York wanted to promote smaller schools.  Smaller schools emphasized academic rigor; strong, sustained relationships between students and faculty; and community partnerships that offer relevant learning opportunities outside the classroom.  New York was able to pay for this with a larger grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation.   Given the current funding challenges in Idaho and the conservative nature of the state this may be a tough sell at least in the short-term.    Choice -  New York school system decided to make all of their schools open to anyone that wanted to go but you have to apply.   Each student lists up to 12 schools that they want to attend in the order of priority.  This created competition among schools to attract top students to their programs.  If schools under performed, then they would be shut down.  More choice is needed in the Idaho School System.  Schools like Renaissance High School, Galileo STEM Academy, and Christian Donnell School of Arts are high performing schools that are in high demand but there are not enough of them.   Also many school districts have professional technical programs for students that do not want to go onto college but I think these programs can be better if taught by industry experts and coupled with......

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Free Essay

Contemporary Approach

...A Case Study Comparison of Charter and Traditional Schools in New Orleans Recovery School District: Selection Criteria and Service Provision for Students with Disabilities By Copyright 2008 Nikki L. Wolf B.S., Northwest Missouri State University, 1985 Submitted to the Department of Special Education and the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Dissertation Committee: _____________________________ Chairperson _____________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Dissertation defended: April 28, 2008 3336479 Copyright 2008 by Wolf, Nikki L. All rights reserved 2008 3336479 The Dissertation Committee for Nikki L. Wolf certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: A Case Study Comparison of Charter and Traditional Schools in New Orleans Recovery School District: Selection Criteria and Service Provision for Students with Disabilities __________________________ Chairperson Date approved _________________ ii ABSTRACT In post-Katrina New Orleans, there is a growing concentration of charter schools. The Recovery School District (RSD) has oversight for the majority of these schools. To explore charges from community advocates that RSD charter schools restricted admission and provided inadequate services for students with......

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Free Essay

This I Believe Essay

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Annotated Bib.

...Robinson is an author, speaker and international advisor on education. He emphasized on importance of education and how it is that we are to change the way we are teaching in America. He mentions that while the standardized testing is ok, we should however expand on the notion with state testing and expand within the arts. He mentions that 60% of children drop out of school before they get into high school. He also states the No Child Left Behind act is based not on diversity but conformity. He compared Finland to each state within the America. Finland does not use any standardized testing; yet they are consistently above average. The difference with Finland and any state in America can be summed up by 3 things. 1) America in general or state level does not individualize teaching and learning. 2) America in general or state level does not invest in the teacher. He states that America spends more money on Education compared to other countries. 3) Responsibility should be at school level where as within the America in general or state level; government plays a role. You take the government out and give the controls back to educators, odds are schools will perform. I think his speech will help me support the claim that teaching to a test is doing more harm to the American children and that we need to encourage the organic thinking. (Robinson, K. 2013) Edwards, H. (2015, Febuary) Leaving Tests Behind, Time Vol. 185 Issue 5, p28-31. 4p. 4 Color......

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Using John Dewey's Philosophical Approach to Improve Declining Educational Results in Botswana Since 2004

...Introduction Article # 28 of the universal Declaration of Human Rights Charter explicitly states that education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages of every child www.un.org. Therefore countries are by law bound to provide education to their citizens and even foreigners on conditions set out by their sovereign constitutions. Large sums of money are pumped into education to meet the targets of conventions which countries are signatory to, in line with universal education for all. Education for all is not the same thing as quality education for all (World Education Forum, 2000). The implication that can be drawn from the afore stated words is that, although countries are in pursuit of Education for All goals, they experience problems like low quality of teachers and high teacher pupil ratio which impede upon the quality and standards of their education systems especially at the level of primary, junior and secondary schools. It is thus the intent of this essay to focus specifically on the public concern about the declining quality of Primary School Leaving Examinations in Botswana with distinctive attention on the use of John Dewey’s philosophical trends to transform and improve the quality and standard of our education. This will be done in a pragmatic manner as maybe espoused by the head of department responsible for quality and standards in the ministry of education. Although the transformative philosophical approach discussed herein, focuses......

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Business Law

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