Free Essay

Social Issues

In: Social Issues

Submitted By nadz123
Words 3234
Pages 13
What is diaspora?
- To scatter
- Bringing together old ideas – about diaspora - with new notions of ‘transnationalism’, ‘hybridity’ and ‘integration’
- And language.
- What are the ‘traditional types’ of diaspora – victim, labour and imperial, trade and business, deterritorialised diasporas
- what other (newer) forms are there? Economic, political (EU border issues). More modern notions that might not ‘fit’ traditional ideas of ‘diaspora’. Even the word seems rather outdated now?
- Diaspora/transnational communities – relationships in the ‘hostland’, relationships with the ‘homeland’ – transnationalism and integration in the homeland

TYPES
Victim
Labour Imperial Trade Deterritorialised New ideas Characteristics of diaspora: key features they have in common
- Dispersal:
- Or – Expansion
- Memory of homeland – idealisation of home.
- Idealisation of the ancestral homeland –
- Development of a return movement to the homeland – transnationalism.
- A strong ethnic group consciousness – based on distinctiveness, common history, common cultural and religious heritage
- ‘troubled’ relationship with host societies – integration – suggesting a lack of acceptance: Mazzucato research below.
- empathy with co-ethnic members in other countries of settlement. Aided by electronic communication, Skype, email, facebook, cheap phone calls, cheap flights.
- possibility of a distinctive, enriching life in host countries – integration – those with a tolerance for pluralism, anyway.

INTERSECTIONS WITH LANGUAGE ISSUES

Emerging from diaspora/transnational communities. New forms being researched/written about:

1. Rampton: Crossing.
2. Translanguaging – Blackledge & Creese (2010),

3. Preece – posh and slang in HE, her book/phd thesis looking at this issue.

4. Scott Kiesling (2005) - New Australian English (NAusE) – the way English is spoken in Australia by Greek Australians and Lebanese Australians

TRANSNATIONALISM AND INTEGRATION - the folly of ‘common sense’ pronouncements
- the dangers of making policy by ideology: examples
- so what is this to do with transnationalism and integration of diaspora communities?
- Mazzucato, V. (2008) – is the relationship between transnationalism and integration a mutually exclusive one?

-------------------------------------------------
1. Migrants’ contribution to their home country begs the question of whether this somehow impedes their ability to participate in Dutch society.
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
2. Dutch politicians have argued that migrants are oriented towards their home country and therefore invest little in their lives and their surroundings in the Netherlands.
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
3. But does it have to be an either/or situation in which migrants’ involvement in their home country necessarily excludes them being interested in conditions in the Netherlands?
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
4. While most studies on migration follow either migrants’ remittance-sending behaviour or their participation in the receiving country’s economy and society, the transnational perspective of this study allowed both to be studied at the same time.
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
5. The researchers investigated the question posed above by linking remittance spending from the previous section with spending patterns in the Netherlands. What follows is an analysis of Ghanaian migrants’ objectives and the resulting spending patterns in the Netherlands.
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
6. Migrants’ simultaneous engagement in both their home and host country makes development and integration highly related matters.
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
7. Ghanaian migrants contribute to Dutch society in a variety of ways, even when some of their objectives are oriented towards Ghana.
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
8. Policies that impede migrants from legally participating in Dutch society are creating the largest barrier for migrants to integrate, and at the same time they hamper migrants’ possibilities to invest in their home country.
-------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------
9. Policy towards migration and integration should be based on the reality that migrants are doubly engaged and aim at creating room for juggling between their multiple loyalties. Such policies would create space for more investment in their home country while facilitating a more active participation in the host country with fewer resources being absorbed by the informal economy.
-------------------------------------------------

B. DIASPORA AND BRITISHNESS
What is Britishness? * Gordon Brown (2007) - If this had become a reality, then we might have seen more crossing boundaries – ie teachers learning about the‘new’ communities their pupils come from, and vice versa. * Alibhai Brown, Y. (2000) After Multiculturalism. Foreign Policy Centre: London. * Cantle suggests at pg 161, that the nature of working with the public – teaching, community work, healthcare, social care - sometimes reinforces difference rather than work across boundaries.
Questions to consider * How should transnational communities be national? * How much British and how much of ‘home’? Is it possible to be a little of both? * ‘Duality of identity’

C. MULTICULTURALISM AND COMMUNITY COHESION
A brief history of multiculturalism
What do we mean by the term ‘multiculturalism’? * Is it a goal, a concept, an attitude, a strategy, a value? * We know that when people mention multiculturalism, they are referring to all or some of the following:- race, socio-economic class, gender, language, culture, sexual preference or disability. * Mostly used in reference to ethnicity (or ‘race’). But also extended to other categories of diversity. * How has it come about? * Forcing us to question the degree to which we are in reality an open and democratic society. * Stephen Lawrence 1993 * Kincheloe, V & Steinberg, S (1997) Changing Multiculturalism. Open University Press: Buckingham & Philadelphia. * How it is responded to is determined by our definition of the social world that corresponds to particular social political and economic interests. Thus, power relations play an important role in helping to shape the way people, organisations, groups and institutions react to the reality of multiculturalism. * What do we mean by power relations? * Do we embrace diversity and make it a strength (Olympic bid – diversity a strength), or fear it, and insist that everyone become the same (otherness)? * Melting pot or salad bowl? * Adopting a critical perspective is essential – basically: what are your views and on what evidence are they based? Anecdotal stereotypes? Personal experiences? Measured and reviewed information? News reports? We know that these can be any of the above, but be aware of what you basing your views on. Evaluate those views in terms of their weight and reliability. * The most important thing is to be critical and self-aware in your thinking.

Adopting a critical perspective * Understand how power relations shape human interactions in the workplace, schools and everyday life. * Promote a consciousness of self – understand how and why your political opinions, socio-economic class, role, religious beliefs, gender role and ‘racial’ self image are shaped by dominant perspectives * Promote self-reflection – thinking about how your opinions are formed, the underlying reasoning * Looking beneath the surface of appearances – think: why is what is being said, said? What are likely to be the speaker’s motives? Do you agree with what these are? Why not/why so? Have a rationale for your response – always.

IS MULTICULTURALISM WORKING?

Ted Cantle’s critique (2002) & (2011): Multiculturalism as a catch-all term to mean many different circs – to the extent that it no longer means anything anymore.

Kenan Malik: Multiculturalism as an ideology and a lived experience

Sondhi (2009): on Multiculturalism: ‘the right to be equal was overshadowed by the right to be different’

Multiculturalism: an valuation of the concept * Cantle (2002 & 2011) segregation and separateness in a number of spheres in multicultural societies – divisions based on social class, ethnicity, faith. * ‘parallel lives’ – in which physical separation of different communities was compounded by a complete separation in education, employment and in other spheres. * Separation and segregation proliferates * ‘layers of separation’ Cantle pg 72 – segregation + separation mean that people don’t know about other cultures and rely on myths and stereotypes to define that relationship. Influences how each community views each other and is a denial of any multicultural reality. * degree of difference Cantle pg 78 Which domains of difference should be narrowed and which should be maintained? Languages (but not at the expense of the home language), participating in economic and political activity. Re the others, maintain, as long as understand others and their perspectives * Cantle writes about inequality of treatment to achieve fairness. Ie Sikhs can wear turbans instead of motorcycle helmets * Burial certificates for the dead can be expedited within 24 hours to enable swift burial of certain ethnic groups – Muslims and Hindus. * Incitement to religious hatred, new offence created. An extension of racial hatred. What do we think?

COMMUNITY COHESION: What is it?
Origins: Created in this country in response to the riots in the northern towns of England (Bradford, Burnley and Oldham) in 2001. Appears to have Canadian origins, growing out of the concept of ‘social cohesion’
Intended purpose: Adopted in the British context based on ethnicity and faith: remember this – it is significant. Underlines the necessity to develop shared values across ethnic divisions, as a response to community conflict and unrest.
What is it? Reflects divisions based upon identifiable communities, generally on the basis of faith or ethnic distinctions. It is also complemented by social capital theory of ‘bridging’ between communities. Undermined by disadvantage, discrimination and disaffection experienced by the community as a whole.
A cohesive community is one where: * there is a common vision and a sense of belonging for all communities * the diversity of people’s different background and circumstances are appreciated and positively valued * those from different backgrounds have similar life opportunities * strong and positive relationships are being developed between people from different backgrounds in the workplace, in schools and within neighbourhoods.
Source: Local Government Association, Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, Home Office, Commission for Racial Equality, Guidance on Community Cohesion 2002

C. COMMUNITY COHESION
1. Introduction & historical perspective * Until WW2, immigrant population in Britain was ltd. Post-war, their labour was needed to fuel the post-war re-building and expansion plans. Easiest to draw on ex colonies – education, language made it easier for them to be put to work here. * If you want to look further back in history, there is a good account in Cantle chapter 2 * the ‘immigration problem’ was on the agenda almost from the time the Empire Windrush docked in summer 1948 with over 400 Jamaicans. Black people were subject to abuse and assaults with race riots up and down the country – Liverpool 1948, Deptford 1949, Camden 1954, Notting Hill 1958. * Andrea Levy – Small island: did you read this during the vacation? * In this hostile atmosphere, the supporting immigrants and helping them to integrate and develop positive interactions with the host community v difficult * 1962 Commonwealth Immigrants Act passed to control numbers of immigrants entering Britain. * General election 1964 – racist in tone – public seemed to prefer the prejudice of one candidate rather than the comparatively liberal views of his opponent. * Galvanised Govt into action RRA 1965 – estd Race Relations Board, to tackle discrimination and take up individual cases. Made in unlawful to discriminate on grounds of race or colour in areas such as housing, places of entertainment and employment. Also created a new criminal office of incitement to racial hatred. Now extended to religious hatred. * RRA 1968 extended and strengthened earlier measures * Despite this, continuing doubt about their effectiveness. Acknowledged in 1973 report by RRB, still a long way to go. * Early integration measures started as early as 1962 with setting up of the Commonwealth Immigrants Advisory Council (CIAC), two years later National Advisory Council for Commonwealth Immigrants (NACCI), 1965 both superseded by National Committee for Commonwealth Immigrants (NCCI). * At this stage there was a recognition that Britain had become a multicultural community and as a consequence, the host community and minority communities had to establish a rapport – get along with one another. The expectation was for the immigrant to integrate into the host community rather than an acceptance of, and respect for, separate cultures. * More detail in Cantle, suffices to say that at this time, govt and agencies were groping towards ad hoc solutions and policies. Patchy and poorly resourced. Focussed on ‘immigrant welfare’ and ‘trying to allay public fears about immigrants taking jobs and making demands on limited housing’ * Compared to mainland Europe, Britain made an early and more positive response to integration. Netherlands adopted measures in 1981, but US was much earlier – in 1940s and 1950s. * By 1970s diaspora communities in Britain putting down roots, marrying and having children who would only know this country. * 1976 RRA – tougher than predecessors – introduced and defined concepts like direct and indirect discrimination. Abolished RRB, set up CRE – present to this day. More extensive powers, a good legal advice service for those who experience racism at work. More prepared to address underlying causes of prejudice, as well as the discrimination and inequalities that result. Under the chairmanship of Trevor Phillips – whom I am now less bitter about him not winning the Mayoral election (bec Red Ken is not doing too bad a job) CRE is enjoying an enhanced public profile. Trevor Phillips controversial – BMEs should be integrating better, learning English, multiculturalism is dead. Mouth piece for Govt policies? * 2007 CRE merging with the Govt’s new Commission for Equality and Human Rights. * Cultural shift of the Act - recognition that ethnic monitoring and positive action programmes were a legitimate means of ensuring fair play for the BMEs – contrast with French, where monitoring illegal. Focus on the ‘rights agenda’. Focus in the employment field, different performance of black and white communities was most clearly apparent. Ethnic monitoring, a good thing, although need to follow through and use stats to define measures to redress balance. * 1980, 1981 riots in Bristol, Liverpool and Brixton. Scarman Inquiry Report. For the first time, linked the unrest to youth unemployment, also recognising the feeling of hopelessness and powerlessness in the black community. Poor relations bet police and black community. Recommended police training to address this. * Report thin on practical recommendations, so position did not improve. * Riots 1985 B’ham, Nottingham. Reports again refer to deprivation and inner city decay, but attention focussed on policing and poor relations bet police and black community. * 1993 Stephen Lawrence murdered. Report wide ranging but most important is establishing a commitment to tackling ‘institutional racism’. 2000 Amendment Act – duty to promote good race relations. * Significant event: 2001 riots in Bradford Burnley and Oldham involved Asian community. Different character from previous events of unrest:- * largely Pakistani and Bangladeshi Muslims involved * second generation British born, might have been expected to be more able to claim a stake in British society than their parents * beneficiaries of over 40 years of anti-discrimination and equal opps legislation * latter 2 issues no impact. Riots seen as a product of segregation over many years, lack of meaningful contact between White and Asian communities, and absence of any real stake in their communities * Ouseley (cited in Cantle pg 46) warned about this immediately before the riots. * Focus on equal rights had not been matched by serious attempts to break down barriers between communities, develop better understanding, leading to tolerance and trust. Authorities concentrated on one thing and failed to look at the other. * Failure to promote an open dialogue alongside equalities initiatives has led to disengagement of some sections of white communities. * Lack of justification for actions that promote the legitimate aims of minority communities to have equal opps, have meant that the mainstream/majority communities’ attitudes and values have not been challenged * Joint understanding has not been developed between communities. * Acceptance of new diversity brought by minority communities has been delayed as a result * Some mainstream communities have seen diversity as a challenge to their culture, that is somehow being eroded and diminished, rather than being.

2. Definition and clarification * Cantle (2011) A cohesive community is one where: * there is a common vision and a sense of belonging for all communities * the diversity of people’s different background and circumstances are appreciated and positively valued * those from different backgrounds have similar life opportunities * strong and positive relationships are being developed between people from different backgrounds in the workplace, in schools and within neighbourhoods. * But what about the equality programme? * 2005 Govt’s final strategy – Improving Opportunity, Strengthening Society. Brought together for the first time race equality and community cohesion approaches into one strategy built around 4 themes:- * tackling inequalities and opening opportunities for all * promoting inclusive notions of citizenship, identity and belonging * eradicating racism and extremism * building community cohesion

3. What did Community Cohesion seek to achieve? * To tackle the ‘fear of difference’ more generally and to enable people to be more comfortable with all areas of difference, including those based on sexual orientation, disability, social class and age. Closing gap in areas of difference also.

* It relies on every one speaking a common language. * What does this mean for transnational communities * Has community cohesion been applied elsewhere? 4. Social Capital * Social capital instrumental in the thinking behind community cohesion – what is it? Used widely in the development of social policy. * Used to describe the extent and nature of community relationships, based on the belief that where social capital is strong, community cohesion will be reinforced. * So what actually constitutes social capital? * Social capital may contribute to a range of beneficial economic and social outcomes including : high levels of and growth in GDP; more efficiently functioning labour markets; higher educational attainment; lower levels of crime; better health; and more effective institutions of government; * Bolstering social capital is seen as fundamental to the success of community cohesion

5. Analysis * Arun Kundnani (2002) – community cohesion is about networks, identity and discourse. Ignores poverty, inequality and power relations – the underlying reason for the riots in 2001. This has not been addressed. * What do you think? * Cantle’s solutions include: cross-cultural contact, inter-faith dialogue, twinning of schools, fostering understanding and respect. Kundnani calls this ‘reconciliation without remedial action’. * Cantle laments the decline of civic pride but offers these towns nothing to take pride in – no hope of economic development or revival of local democracy, just more ‘neighbourliness’. * Where does religion fit with this notion of Britishness? Inconsistencies with govt policy that encourages faith schools. Community cohesion encourages the narrowing of the domains of ‘difference’ between communities. To what extent (if at any) do faith schools potentially undermine this? Kundnani: dangerous breeding grounds for separatism. * What do you think? * Secular education not without its concerns: the powers of self-determination afforded to city academies and free schools.
D. INTERCULTURALISM

* The successor to Community Cohesion – acknowledges the changes in transnational communities since 2001 and proposes a new way of engaging with diversity and difference. * The notion of ‘multiculturalism’ as being unsuccessful and not supported by communities and govts. * Presents an opportunity to consider the development of ‘interculturalism’, which is not defined by ‘race’ and embraces all areas of difference. * Recognises that cultures are more fluid than ever before and the interconnectedness. * Recognises ‘superdiversity’ (Vertovec, 2007) of the world, supports interaction between and within cultures to build trust and understanding, and promotes cultural navigational skills to enable us all to accept and endorse the change process.
Key elements 1. Super/hyperdiversity in the population acknowledged
2. Recognition of the power of transnational/global communities that potentially transcend sovereign govt ctrl
3. Identifies the ‘paradox of diversity’
4. The ‘bowling alone’ hypothesis
5. super/hyper diversity in the rhetoric, but not in the ways of examining the data
6. ‘failure’ of multiculturalism
So, what is it? * goes beyond equal opportunities and respect for existing cultural differences to the pluralist transformation of public space, institutions and civic culture. * Cultural boundaries as fluid but in a state of flux and remaking. An intercultural approach aims to facilitate dialogue, exchange and reciprocal understanding between people of different backgrounds. * The key feature of interculturality, and what differentiates it from multiculturality, is its sense of openness, dialogue and interaction between cultures leading to long term change. * Much more than ‘intercultural dialogue’. In terms of policy development, however, we have not yet seen the full potential * Sondhi (2009) So what then is different about the new concept of interculturality
Critiques

E. NEXT WEEK’S TOPIC

RP apr13

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Social Issue

...A social problem is a condition that at least some people in a community view as being undesirable. Everyone would agree about some social problems, such as murders and DWI traffic deaths. Other social problems may be viewed as such by certain groups of people. Teenagers who play loud music in a public park obviously do not view it as a problem, but some other people may consider it an undesirable social condition. Some nonsmokers view smoking as an undesirable social condition that should be banned or restricted in public buildings. Every newspaper is filled with stories about undesirable social conditions. Examples include crime, violence, drug abuse, and environmental problems. Such social problems can be found at the local, state, national and international levels. There are many social problems that teenagers go threw. Drugs and Teenagers Drug use is the increasing problem among teenagers in today’s high schools. Most drug use begins in the preteen and teenage years, these years most crucial in the maturation process. During these years adolescents are faced with difficult tasks of discovering their self identity, clarifying their sexual roles, assenting independence, learning to cope with authority and searching for goals that would give their lives meaning. Drugs are readily, adolescents are curious and venerable, and there is peer pressure to experiment, and there us a temptation to escape from conflicts. The use of drugs by teenagers is the result......

Words: 2163 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Social Issues

...Male vs Female : Social Issues Nowadays, social issues in our country become widely and it’s out of our control. The globalization makes our world become smaller and all the information could be easily to get by computers or which means emerge as internet. Social problems become more serious because bad things from other countries enter to ours. There are also has a good cultures however it also have bad things cultures that can influence to ours especially among teenagers. Most young generations cannot identify and also can’t analyze what are the different between good and bad things. They’re thinking speculation is far away from what adults do. The bad things that affect them could be eliminate the moral values for young generation. However, it’s not just among teenagers which means opposite sex such as male and female but almost many stage of people have this kind problem of social issues. To begin with, social issues are considered to affect the people of the society either directly or indirectly. The main things is, some people thought that it is from male carriage this kind of issues. For an example, a gay among of teenagers. Gay is the relationship within the same sex that involves man with man relation. When talking about same-sex relation, what comes in people’s mind is abnormal relationship. The first factor that caused this problem is biological influence. Therefore, natural biological is one of the reason why they get involve in gay. However, everyone knows......

Words: 786 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Social Issues

...Dimensions of Social Inequality Julie McElwain Park University Abstract Social inequality is how different categories of individuals are prescribed by the society. The society uses basic characteristics such as gender, sex, education, and ethnicity among other factors in order to categorize an individual. The social inequalities determine the access to limited goods such as market labor force, education, health care facilities, and other forms of participation in the society. Different forms of social inequalities are constructs of geographical distribution, and status within the country, however, cultural aspects, mostly integrated with cultural identities, of society are perceived to be the major contributor of social inequality. Discourses have, therefore, been raised on whether the poor deserve to be poor or not and whether the rich deserve to be rich or not. In order to address this question, I examined different dimensions of social inequalities in my life such as social class, educational level, and race among other factors. In this paper, I will also try to bring out understanding of different theories in attempt to explain social stratification. A comparison will be done between different perspectives through interviews and my own perspective of social inequalities. In essence all factors discussed in this paper show a link between social inequalities and different factors such as economic and political system. Trends such as widening......

Words: 3161 - Pages: 13

Premium Essay

Social Issue

...A social issue (also called a social problem or a social ill) is an issue that relates to society's perception of people's personal lives. Different societies have different perceptions and what may be "normal" behaviour in one society may be a significant social issue in another society. Social issues are distinguished from economic issues. Some issues have both social and economic aspects, such asimmigration. There are also issues that don't fall into either category, such as wars. Thomas Paine, in Rights of Man and Common Sense, addresses man's duty to "allow the same rights to others as we allow ourselves". The failure to do so causes the birth of a social issue. Personal issues versus social issues[edit] Personal issues are those that individuals deal with themselves and within a small range of their peers and relationships.[1] On the other hand, social issues threaten values cherished by widespread society.[1] For example, the unemployment rate of 7.8 percent[2] in the U.S. as of October 2012 is a social issue. The line between a personal issue and a public issue may be subjective, however, when a large enough sector of society is affected by an issue, it becomes a social issue. Although one person fired is not a social issue, the repercussions of 13 million people being fired is likely to generate social issues. Caste system[edit] Caste system in India resulted in most oppressed Untouchables on earth for the past 3000 years . UK recently banned caste......

Words: 789 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Social Issue

...1) Ethical and conceptual issues Current research and research results It is increasingly recognized that within many areas (e.g., disability and handicap), conceptual issues and ethical issues about proper conduct and underlying values are highly intergrated. The treatment of ethical and policy issues depends on the content of the concepts employed and, at the same time, many central concepts are informed by moral opinions and, as a result, contested on ethical grounds. Taking this intergration of conceptual and ethical issues seriously from a research point of view requires that they are very strongly interconnected, i.e. mere studies of the way in which concepts are in fact informed by moral opinions and social values is not siffucient. Outright normative analyses of underlying ethical views need to underpin suggestions with regard to the way in which central concepts should be employed in policy contexts. This has been recognised in research on the basic ethical issue of what should be seen as the basic determinant of the quality of life or well-being (Brülde 1998, 2006), as well as research on applied ethics of relevance for disability (Brülde 2003; Munthe 1996, 1999; Juth 2005; Juth & Munthe 2006), and concepts such as happiness, health, illness, and mental disorder (Brülde 2000, 2006a, 2006b). Research on several of the conceptual issues has demonstrated how they are strongly connected to ethical problems related to health care policies and public health......

Words: 2008 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Social Issues

...always been and will be the subject of heated discussions among economists, sociologists and political scientists. This issue is not only an ideological one, but also of significant importance for the state functioning. It is undisputable that the implementation of particular tasks by the state turns out indispensable for the functioning of society, however, in terms of market existence the underlying advantages, to be discussed below, are much less favorable. The classification of social regulations In the course of the recent 50 years the decrease of economic regulations is quite noticeable while the social ones present an increasing tendency and have been gaining significance after the Second World War. New government institutions have been established and keep preparing an increasing number of regulations referring to social issues. This trend is present both in USA and in the EU countries. As opposed to economic regulations, which refer to market and economic variables, social regulations are focused on the influence of companies and the market on workers, clients and citizens. These regulations are mainly related to the following spheres: * employment, i.e. the protection of employees against discrimination, ensuring labor safety, proper working conditions, possibilities for promotion, appropriate remuneration for work, social security costs, social benefits, annuities and pensions (e.g. in USA OSHA, EEOC). * consumer protection against the threats......

Words: 1736 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Social Issue

... |Investigate a Social Issue | |Antonio Coleman | |Dr. Cameron D. Lippard | |SOC 100 | |12/09/2012 | | | In life today one of the most controversial social issues facing Americans today regards the rights of homosexuals. Specifically, the question of whether gay men and lesbians should be allowed to legally marry has come up in several states. Proponents of same-sex marriage argue that, by being denied the right to marry and to receive the social and financial benefits of marriage, they are being deprived of fundamental equal protection under the law. Supporters also argue that legalizing same-sex marriages will positively impact society at large, not just homosexuals. Opponents of same-sex unions claim that marriage is a religious tradition that must not “cave in” to immoral attitudes; in fact, many states have or have attempted to pass constitutional bans on same-sex marriage. After considering the arguments on both sides and reviewing several readings on the matter, it seems that homosexual couples should, in......

Words: 1099 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Social Issue

...ASSIGNMENT 4: Final paper Investigate a Social Issue By June 07th , 2014 SOC 100 Instructor: Professor NAZER In recent years, the relationship between crime and economy crises has been highly studied by economies and has sparked up interest among members of the general public, the media, policy makers, and criminal justice practitioners. Although there are many conflicting ideas on how the economy downturn affects crime rates, it is reasonable to study how crime rates have varied in the past and recent years. Taking a closer look at the current economy trend in the United States, both federal and state budgets have been affected as well as individuals. Many people have been laid off their jobs because the state cannot allocate money for them to be paid. Hence, many such people look for other means to raise money for survival including property theft and other related crimes. It is therefore convenient to say that more people are willing to commit crime in a declining economy so as to meet their daily needs, though it could be a difficult hypothesis to test. Bad economics leads to property theft and robberies as criminals steal items they cannot afford. Since 2008, there has been an increase recession in the United States as said by data from police records. However, the FBI in 2010 release records of a drop in violent crimes but not property theft and robberies. This can be seen on the media reports and even major adverts on the streets such as bus stops where......

Words: 2153 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Social Issues

...Research project on social issue Crime (robbery) Abstract Crime has increased rapidly over the years in Antigua. A major increase in robberies and many other crimes have impacted the economy and its citizens. The goals and objectives of this paper are to ascertain the causes and the effects of the high robbery rate in Antigua. The reasons behind these robberies and how it affects the economy, the level of education attained by these criminals, the impact these criminal activities have on the tourism industry and finally the effects it has on victims. In researching this topic, methods such as interviews which were conducted along with the distribution of questionnaires to citizens affected by this act, to get further information on how this crime has impacted their lives and the effect it has on businesses or operators who are victims to such a criminal activities. Newspaper articles, surveys, ministry of tourism statistical reports showing the number of tourists by sea and air has declined, Royal Police Force of Antigua and Barbuda statistical reports on the number of robberies carried out over the past 5yrs. Introduction Crime is prevalent in most societies it is an act that violates one’s mind. The crime I will be focusing on is robbery. This is a crime of taking or attempting to take something of value by force or threat of force or by putting the victim in fear. The citizens of Antigua and Barbuda are concerned, and are deeply distressed by the recent......

Words: 428 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Social Issues

...Social issues Social trend: The use of media as a marketing strategy to influence consumer behaviour Social factors have great influence and importance to businesses as it relates to changes in social structures, consumer lifestyles and behaviours. (100, 2013) Opinions of consumers play an essential role in the growth of a business. As such, businesses often make use of positive reviews from customers to attract new diners. (Solution, 2013) For instance, engaging reputable online personalities like Lady Iron Chef to review your dishes is a form of advertisement. Through positive blog reviews, it employs the influence of the blogger to market the name of the eatery in an appealing way to his/her followers. Fig 1.1: Blogger's webpage featuring eateries Fig 1.2: Updates on daily specials (Ladyironchef, 2013) (Twelve Cupcakes, 2013) It is evident from the figures above that the use of media is a common marketing strategy. With the surge in social networking sites like Facebook and twitter, businesses are seizing the opportunity to publicize their products. (Fig 1.2) Moreover, the use of review websites (Fig 1.1) is also an effective method employed to advertise. Fig 1.3: Twelve Cupcakes featured on The Walker (TwelveCupcakes, 2013) Social media creates opportunities for the F&B industry to prosper. Being an efficient and effective tool, sharing of information online can create opportunities for a business. One such company which benefitted from social media is Twelve......

Words: 452 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Social Issue

...worsens, as well as the enormous health challenges involved, the social and economic consequences may set these countries back, reversing some gains a number of these countries have made in recent years. Back to top Where does the Ebola virus come from? According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in the US, the initial human infection comes from contact with an infected animal, most likely a bat. From there, human to human transmission spreads the disease. Virus Ecology Graphic, CDC, August 1, 2014 As The Guardian has noted, drugs and vaccines for Ebola has typically been low priority for the main drugs companies although now there is a new focus and sense of urgency: Until now, pharmaceutical firms have given Ebola very low priority. The few potential drugs and vaccines under development are now being sped into trials. Healthy volunteers in the UK and US have been injected with a candidate vaccine to test safety. Drug trials will soon be set up in west Africa, but they are several months away and there is no certainty that they will work. — Briefing: West Africa’s Ebola crisis, The Guardian, last accessed, September 27, 2014 As has been mentioned on this site for years, unfortunately diseases affecting the poorest countries the worst have typically received little attention or investment, sometimes as there isn’t any profit in it for drugs companies, which raises a whole set of other issues about drug treatments and access to essential......

Words: 799 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Social Issues

...IS IT ETHICAL FOR EARNING MONEY FROM SELLING CUSTOMER’S INFORMATION? Social networks on the Internet are becoming powerful in our life due to a huge number of users. One of the reason for that success is the fact that those networks sell information of their customers for other companies such as: advertising firms, sale enterprises, etc. However, this issue has raised arguments about users’ privacy. Some people claim that it is not ethical for making profit from personal information while others state that it is not privacy detection when social networks give individual data, which users provide on public websites (e.g.: Facebook, Twitter, etc.), to business companies. The author of this essay believe that selling personal information is unethical business because of the following reasons that utilize Facebook as an circumstance to illustrate the author’s view. To begin with, it is possible that social networks such as Facebook has earned a great amount of money from its user’s data. Founded in 2004, Facebook is one of the biggest social networks providing a connection among people, and where a person can aware what is happening or share his/her own feelings. This network has achieved outstanding success by attracting a huge number of customers. In addition, it earned 7,872,000 in 2013 and there were 864 million daily active users on average for September 2014. One part of this success is proved to come from selling Facebook users’ information for the companies that want to...

Words: 1059 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Social Issues

...(2013). Including people who experience homelessness: A scoping review of the literature. The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, 33(3), 136-151. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/01443331311308203 * Problem Homelessness has been associated with isolation, marginalization and social exclusion. It is well understood that those impacted by homelessness often have fewer opportunities than the general population to participate in policy processes, especially in relation to decisions that affect them. Being homeless has many health and social consequences that affect an individual's life chances and opportunities for participation in decision-making over the life course. * Review of Literature Principles of inclusion in policy development have emerged in discourses on disability, the mental health consumer movement, and have begun to inform discussions of drug use. Without the voices and participation of those impacted by homelessness, there is a risk that important understandings essential to the development of effective solutions to homelessness will remain obscured. A search of peer reviewed and grey literature to generate recommendations for the development of guidelines for social inclusion of those impacted by homelessness as part of a community-based response to ending homelessness in effort to answer, how to foster social inclusion in programs and policy between housed and unhoused people? * Hypothesis The findings from the review......

Words: 1148 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Social Issues

...A social issue (also called a social problem, social conflict, or social illness) is a problem that influences a considerable number of the individuals within a society. It is often the consequence of factors extending beyond an individual's social issue is the source of a conflicting opinion on the grounds of what is perceived as a morally just personal life or societal order. Social issues are distinguished from economic issues; however, some issues (such as immigration) have both social and economic aspects. There are also issues that don't fall into either category, such as warfare. There can be disagreements about what social issues are worth solving, or which should take precedence. Different individuals and different societies have different perceptions. In Rights of Man and Common Sense, Thomas Paine addresses man's duty to "allow the same rights to others as we allow ourselves". The failure to do so causes the birth of a social issue. There are a variety of methods people use to combat social issues. Some people vote for leaders in a democracy to advance their ideals. Outside the political process, people donate or share their time, money, energy, or other resources. This often takes the form of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are often formed for the sole purpose of solving a particular social issue. Community organizing involves gathering people together for a common purpose. A distinct but related meaning of the term "social issue" (used......

Words: 297 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Social Issues

...Social Issues-Part 1 Elizabeth Putman Professor Beshah, PH D Sociology 101 January 24, 2012 How society defines sexuality. People commonly think of sex as sexual activities. Sexuality means much more this. Human sexuality comprises a broad range of behaviors and processes, including those of the physiological, psychological, social, cultural, political, philosophical, ethical, moral, theological, legal and spiritual or religious aspects. Sexuality includes: * Values regarding relationships, dating, marriage, sexual ethnics, sexual culture. * Psychology in relation to gender, sexual role * Physical factors such as sexual characteristics, sexual drive, sexual intercourse, sexual activities. * Sexual orientation, that is heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual. Describe the social category (ies) that may be affected by the social issue. A child’s sex is determined at the time of conception. Unfortunately, at the time of birth your gender will guide your life. From ancient Roman days, women have been known as the weaker and more inferior sex. If you were born a woman, you were a creature of inequality. Women have suffered through history fighting for their rights. In 1848, Elizabeth Cady Stanton drafted the first women’s rights movement, “The Declaration of Sentiments.” In this document she demanded equality with men before the law, in education and employment. Here, too, was the first pronouncement demanding that women be given the right to...

Words: 975 - Pages: 4