Free Essay

Talent Management

In: Business and Management

Submitted By hrmetrics
Words 3055
Pages 13
A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND GUIDE FOR
FUTURE RESEARCH ON APPLICANT ATTRACTION
JONATHAN C. ZIEGERT
Department Of Psychology
University Of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742
KAREN HOLCOMBE EHRHART1
San Diego State University
INTRODUCTION
One of the most important activities for the success of an organization is the attraction of high quality applicants (Rynes & Barber, 1990). While the importance of attraction to organizational functioning and effectiveness has long been noted, the theory and research on attraction has been surprisingly underdeveloped. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to fill this void and address the call for greater attention to the topic of individuals’ attraction to organizations by proposing a theoretical model based on three meta-theories of both how and why individuals are attracted to organizations. While we detail how past research fits into this model, we go beyond this existing work and suggest directions for future theory and research development by examining the boundary conditions of past research.
It is important to note that our approach examines why individuals are attracted to organizations from the applicant’s perspective. Indeed, the important role that the individual plays in the attraction process has been relatively neglected in prior reviews dealing with recruitment (see Barber, 1998 and Cable & Turban, 2001 for notable exceptions). To provide the widest coverage of the attraction construct, we define attraction broadly as having a positive affective attitude towards an organization, viewing it as a desirable entity, and wanting to engage in some relationship with it (Aiman-Smith, Bauer, & Cable, 2001). With this foundation and definition, we now turn to an examination of the theories underlying attraction.
THREE META-THEORIES UNDERLYING ATTRACTION RESEARCH
Research on applicant attraction has generally proceeded without a clearly articulated theoretical foundation. Indeed, the vast majority of attraction studies do not extensively refer to theory and primarily cite existing empirical research as a framework (see Judge & Cable, 1997;
Turban, 2001; Turban & Cable, 2003; and Turban & Greening, 1996 for exceptions).
Accordingly, in this section, we discuss a variety of theories that can either be explicitly or implicitly tied to attraction research, and we examine the commonalities, overlap, and complementary perspectives among them in order to develop three meta-theories that underlie attraction research. These meta-theories serve as the necessary foundation for our proposed theoretical framework illustrating how and why constructs and variables are related to attraction.
Cognitive Processing Meta-Theory
The first group of theories entails how information is processed to result in judgments of

Academy of Management Best Conference Paper 2004 HR: C1

attraction. In general, these theories propose that in the presence of some uncertainty, individuals directly or indirectly rely on what is known in developing perceptions of attraction.
We refer to this common theme as the cognitive processing meta-theory.
The theory that deals with the least amount of information individuals could possess involves exposure to or familiarity with an organization. Zajonc (1968) demonstrated support for the exposure-attitude hypothesis in that repeated exposure to an object yielded increasing positive evaluations of it. This mere exposure effect has been applied to attraction by a few researchers who have found that familiarity with an organization was positively related to ratings of its attractiveness (e.g., Turban, 2001; Turban & Greening, 1996).
Signaling theory (e.g., Rynes, 1991; Spence, 1973) proposes that in the absence of complete information, applicants interpret the information they have about an organization as signals of organizational characteristics (Turban, 2001). Research has shown direct effects on attraction for a number of variables considered to be signals, including organizational characteristics or policies (Cable & Judge, 1994), recruiter characteristics or behavior (Turban,
Forret, & Hendrickson, 1998), and recruitment activities (Turban, Campion, & Eyring, 1995).
Finally, models of persuasion such as the Heuristic-Systematic model (Eagly & Chaiken,
1984, 1993) have implications for attraction. This model proposes that the type of cognitive processing depends on characteristics of the message being processed. Systematic processing is comprehensive and analytical involving the incorporation of a greater amount of information, whereas heuristic processing involves less cognitive effort and relies on more limited information. Dineen, Ash, and Noe (2002) provide an application of this theory to attraction.
Social Psychological Meta-Theory
The second meta-theory draws upon social psychology and involves attitudes and views of the self. It is seen in several theories which propose that self-concept variables influence responses to environmental variables. Attraction, according to this meta-theory, stems from attitudes or views of the self in conjunction with the environment.
According to Consistency theory (Korman, 1966, 1967), individuals with high selfesteem use cognitions about the self to guide choices preferring work that corresponds to their self-image. Thus, individuals with high self-esteem should be more attracted to organizations that fit their needs. Saks and Ashforth (1997) noted support for this theory as evidenced by a significant relationship between self-esteem and perceptions of person-job fit.
Behavioral Plasticity theory is based on similar reasoning as it proposes that individuals with low self-esteem are more susceptible to and reliant upon external factors such as social cues or environmental cues (Brockner, 1988). This theory was supported by Turban and Keon
(1993), who found that for individuals with low self-esteem, organizational characteristics explained more variance in attraction than for individuals with high self-esteem.
Another theory that considers the role of the self in behavior is Social Identity theory
(Tajfel & Turner, 1986), which proposes that the self-concept is influenced by the evaluation of the group(s) with whom an individual identifies. Thus, when an organization is viewed in a positive light, this reflects favorably on the individuals within it, who receive positive outcomes such as approval from others (Barber, 1998). Accordingly, research has shown that people are more likely to be attracted to organizations that have a positive reputation (Turban et al., 1995).
Social Learning theory (Bandura, 1977) has also been applied to attraction research, particularly with regard to the concept of self-efficacy. For instance, Cable and Judge (1994)

Academy of Management Best Conference Paper 2004 HR: C2

proposed and found that people with high self-efficacy (who believe they are capable of high performance), were more attracted to jobs that reward their individual performance and skills.
Interactionist Fit Meta-Theory
The final meta-theory proposes that the interaction or fit between person characteristics and environment characteristics results in attraction. These environment characteristics can be studied at various levels of analysis (e.g., jobs, organizations), but the type of fit most relevant to the concept of attraction is person-organization (P-O) fit. Kristof (1996) defined P-O fit as the compatibility between people and organizations that occurs when there is (a) a similarity or match of some attribute, and/or (b) one entity provides what the other wants or needs.
One related theory is Expectancy (VIE) theory (Vroom, 1964). In the context of attraction, the expectancy component of the theory involves perceptions of the likelihood of being hired by a particular organization. This theory’s instrumentality and valence components, however, more clearly invoke the concept of fit, as they are associated with the idea that individuals are attracted to jobs or organizations that are likely to offer valued characteristics.
Other relevant theories are rooted in Interactional psychology, which proposes that behavior is a function of the interaction between person and situational characteristics (e.g.,
Terborg, 1981). Examples of attraction research guided by this perspective include work by
Judge and colleagues (e.g., Cable & Judge, 1996; Judge & Bretz, 1992; Judge & Cable, 1997).
Interactional psychology is the foundation for the Theory of Work Adjustment (Dawis &
Lofquist, 1984). According to the theory, individuals desire “correspondence” with their work environments, such that the individual and the work environment are congruent with each other.
The theory in this category that is the most frequently applied to attraction research is
Schneider’s (1987) Attraction-Selection-Attrition (ASA) theory. Central to this theory is the idea that people are attracted to organizations based on the fit or match between their characteristics and those of the organization (Schneider et al., 1995). A number of studies have supported the attraction component of this theory by demonstrating that people are differentially attracted to jobs and/or organizations with certain characteristics that match their own (e.g., Cable & Judge,
1994; Cable & Judge, 1996; Dineen et al., 2002; Judge & Cable, 1997).
THEORETICAL MODEL OF ATTRACTION
In order to develop a theoretical model of attraction, it is necessary to build upon these underlying meta-theories and examine prior research to make sense of and classify relationships into meaningful theoretical categories. Accordingly, we propose a multilevel framework that relates the general predictors, outcomes, and moderating variables influencing attraction. We group predictors into four broad categories: job, organizational, and process characteristics, as well as individual differences, with the latter category as a moderator of the relationship between the other predictors and the outcomes. On the outcome side, the framework incorporates both fit and attraction, with subjective fit as an antecedent of attraction. In what follows, we first focus on the main effects of job, organization, and process characteristics on attraction. We next focus on how these characteristics interact with individual differences (e.g., personality, values) to predict fit and/or attraction.

Academy of Management Best Conference Paper 2004 HR: C3

Main Effects of Predictors
We first present studies that have focused exclusively on the main effect relationships between the predictor variables and attraction.
Job characteristics. One basis for organizational attraction may be the characteristics of the job of interest. One rationale for this relationship involves the cognitive processing metatheory. As jobs exist within organizations, job characteristics may be seen as signals of organizational characteristics such as priorities and values. Individuals’ evaluations of job characteristics may therefore not only determine whether they are attracted to the job, but also to the organization. Several studies have provided empirical justification for the direct main effect of job characteristics on attraction (Aiman-Smith et al., 2001; Barber & Roehling, 1993).
Organizational characteristics. Our model also proposes a direct effect of organizational characteristics on attraction. This main effect relationship is grounded in the social psychological meta-theory. For instance, when an organization is viewed favorably in terms of its characteristics or reputation, this reflects positively on its members, and potential applicants should be attracted (Barber, 1998). The cognitive processing meta-theory also would predict that visible organizational characteristics may serve as signals of the organization’s values or other unseen characteristics. A number of studies have supported the link between organization characteristics and attraction (e.g., Barber, Wesson, Roberson, & Taylor, 1999; Turban &
Greening, 1996), reflecting the social psychological and cognitive processing meta-theories.
Process characteristics. The final main effect relationship in our model is the direct influence of process characteristics on attraction. Of particular relevance to this relationship is the cognitive processing meta-theory, as process characteristics experienced by applicants are an obvious and readily available source of information about the organization that can be used to form judgments of attraction. A major area of research pertaining to this link has focused on the role of the recruiter in individuals’ attraction (e.g., Turban, 2001; Turban et al., 1995).
Interactive Effects of Predictors
Another way that the predictor categories may influence attraction is through interactive effects. These relationships allow for the moderating role of individual differences in the relationship between the various predictors and the criterion of attraction. The interactionist fit meta-theory is evoked as individual differences are considered in conjunction with job, organization, and/or process characteristics to predict attraction. Many conceptualizations of attraction do not explicitly acknowledge the key role that fit plays; however, we consider the role of fit (both objective and subjective) to be a central link among the characteristics and variables in our theoretical model.
Job characteristics. Our model proposes that job characteristics will interact with individual differences to influence fit and attraction. As the interactionist-fit meta-theory indicates, the fit or congruence between the individual and job (e.g., work/family balance) characteristics determines attraction. This relationship could also invoke the social psychological meta-theory. For example, individuals with low self-efficacy may be less attracted to jobs that they perceive to be too challenging or unattainable. Several empirical studies provide support for this link, including Cable and Judge’s (1994) study of pay preferences and
Honeycutt and Rosen’s (1997) research on work/family balance.
Organizational characteristics. Our model also proposes that organizational

Academy of Management Best Conference Paper 2004 HR: C4

characteristics and individual differences interact in influencing fit and attraction. Again, this clearly evokes the interactionist fit meta-theory. In addition, the social psychological metatheory would suggest that views of the self (e.g., self-esteem, self-efficacy), in conjunction with organizational characteristics, are important considerations in determining attraction. Finally, the cognitive processing meta-theory suggests that known or visible organizational characteristics should contribute to attraction by serving as signals of other organizational attributes. Interactive effects have been shown for organizational characteristics such as size
(Turban & Keon, 1993) and culture (e.g., Judge & Cable, 1997).
Process characteristics. Finally, process characteristics are proposed to interact with individual differences in predicting attraction. Similar to above, this relationship is clearly grounded in the interactionist fit and social psychological meta-theories. The cognitive processing meta-theory is also involved as applicants develop attraction perceptions by using their experiences with process characteristics as signals of less visible organizational characteristics. Examples of interactive effects have been illustrated in prior work on EEO or affirmative action policies (e.g., Barber & Roehling, 1993; Turban & Dougherty, 1992)
Conclusion
We have proposed a summary theoretical model, which includes an organization and categorization of prior variables studied as well as how all of these general categories are related through both main and interactive effects. We recommend this framework as a guide to future research; in it we have unified a fragmented literature and pointed out the “big picture” theoretical connections among variables that are sometimes examined in isolation from each other. Keeping the entire framework in mind should encourage researchers to draw new empirical connections among variables that are theoretically connected by the meta-theories.
BUILDING UPON EXISTING RESEARCH: ADDRESSING BOUNDARY CONDITIONS
In order to advance the understanding of applicant attraction, there are multiple ways in which research should be extended. The purpose of the following section is to identify several boundary conditions of prior work on applicant attraction including the sample and context, fit, and the environment, in order to stimulate future research.
The first boundary condition concerns the characteristics of the samples, which consist nearly entirely of undergraduate or MBA students approaching graduation who are either currently searching for a job or soon plan to engage in the recruiting process. The use of nonstudent samples could provide for a better incorporation and grounding in the social psychological meta-theory if the level of these individuals’ self-esteem or self-efficacy differed from traditional samples. Such research would also better incorporate the interactionist fit metatheory to the extent that it could account for or measure a broader array of individual differences.
Another contextual boundary condition concerns the medium used to describe organizational and job characteristics in laboratory studies. Research has generally failed to incorporate a widespread technique used by over 90% of large organizations as well as numerous applicants: web-based recruitment (Dineen et al., 2002). Based on signaling theory, an organization’s presence on the web may serve as a signal of other organizational attributes (e.g., a technologically advanced organization and workforce). Future research should address this issue

Academy of Management Best Conference Paper 2004 HR: C5

due to its increasing popularity and theoretical groundings in the cognitive processing metatheory.
Another salient boundary condition concerns the concept of fit, which has received insufficient attention in research on attraction. Several studies have demonstrated that the relationship between objective fit and attraction is mediated by subjective fit (e.g., Cable &
Judge, 1996; Dineen et al., 2002; Judge & Cable, 1997). Nevertheless, the majority of the research concerning fit concentrates on objective fit and does not consider the views or assessments of the individual. Consistent with the cognitive processing meta-theory, individuals may place different amounts of weight on their fit with various job, organization, or process characteristics (e.g., pay, location) in determining their overall judgment of attraction. Thus, these different potential combinations of subjective fit perceptions are a necessary area for future research. Also, little research has examined antecedents of individuals’ subjective perceptions of fit (outside of objective fit). Only Dineen et al. (2002) have specifically examined a factor other than objective fit as related to subjective fit perceptions in their illustration of the importance of fit feedback (the degree to which individuals were told that they fit with a company). This type of research is grounded in the cognitive processing meta-theory as it involves providing information to individuals and how this information is reflected in judgments of attraction.
The final boundary condition facing attraction research that we identify is the lack of attention to the external environment. Environmental factors have the potential to impact both the organization as well as the applicants in the attraction process. For example, the labor market may influence the degree to which companies can offer certain job characteristics (e.g., pay, benefits) as well as the number of vacancies available. Similarly, environmental conditions impact individuals’ available job options, their intensity of job search, and their perceptions of job options (Schwab, Rynes, & Aldag, 1987). Consistent with the social psychological metatheory, self-efficacy may be important such that individuals who perceive their ability to get jobs to be low may believe fewer options are available to them and therefore place less weight on attraction since they believe they have few choices (Eden & Aviram, 1993; Gore & Leuwerke,
2000).
CONCLUSION
We have provided an organizing theoretical framework which we hope will stimulate future theory development and research efforts on attraction, particularly in light of the metatheories and boundary conditions presented here. Our framework and the underlying metatheories have implications throughout the job search and employment process, and we encourage research attention to these issues as well. By taking into account these theoretical perspectives, researchers will greatly advance the understanding of why individuals are attracted to organizations. 1. As both authors contributed equally to the manuscript, order of authorship was determined randomly. REFERENCES AVAILABLE FROM THE AUTHORS

Academy of Management Best Conference Paper 2004 HR: C6

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...law oFFice maNaGemeNT & aDmiNisTRaTioN RePoRT large firms, down somewhat. TALENT MANAGEMENT — Given productivity improvements in many firms over the past several years, it will be increasingly difficult for those firms to achieve the same gains in productivity that characterized performance over the past half decade. How to make Talent acquisition easier in Today’s marketplace — While demand for litigation continues to grow, there are signs that rates of growth are leveling off. — The real estate market appears to be cooling down. — Many clients are working aggressively to reduce their legal costs, and convergence projects will take a toll on many firms. — Operational costs are rising and will perhaps continue to do so because of this latest round of associate “salary wars.” — continuing growth and consolidation in the legal market will make it increasingly difficult for firms to differentiate themselves from their competitors. o coming to future issues of LOMAr l New—and Indispensable—Data on Law Firm Finances l Must-See Resources from LOMAr’s Summer Management Reading List l Best Marketing practices: 50 Tactics to Try Now! l Technology Do’s and Don’ts for Firms Set to Buy at Year-End l Exclusive Reports from the Industry’s 2006 conferences and Annual Meetings l What’s New With the ALA? l Associate compensation Is on the Rise: Here’s What the Shift Means for partners l 4 How to......

Words: 1736 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...in frontier markets like much of sub-Saharan Africa, along with some countries in Central Asia, Latin America, and Southeast Asia face hurdles more challenging than anything they have seen in the BRICs, especially in recruiting, retaining, and developing employees. The frontier markets are at the heart of Etisalat’s long-term strategy and although telecommunication and technology are their main-business their biggest challenge lies in their talent management strategy. The nature of our industry and the dynamics of the market these days dictate that companies need people who are not just very capable but very adaptable to changing financial times and various geographic environments. Also, robust retention packages and incentives are required to retain talent. Etisalat has been able to attract, retain, and manage executive talent not just based on the compensation package, but also on their ability to create a long-term relationship and opportunities for professional development. They create a snapshot of each individual in their talent pipeline in terms of the three Es: education, experience, and exposure. And then they create the opportunities to make sure that they are well rounded. Etisalat maintains employee loyalty by offering not only competitive compensations and benefits but also by providing them with safe and interactive work environment. Employees in challenging markets with volatile political and economic situation are allowed to enhance their personal and......

Words: 405 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Talent Management

...ASSIGNMENT NO. 2 TALENT MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PAPER TABLE OF CONTENT I. Executive Summary…………………………………………………...............3 II. Introduction…………………………………………………………................4 III. What is the meaning and nature of talent or global talent management and succession planning in particular organizational contexts?.................................5 IV. What are the key challenges faced by organizations in their approach to talent management?.......................................................................................................7 V. What are the measures of success/critical success factors for talent management initiatives for both the management of the organization and its employees?......9 VI. Conclusion……………………………………………………………..….....13 VII. Bibliography & Reference..……………………………….…………………14 TALENT MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PAPER  By Ramy Emam                                                                                                      Page 2   I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY What is talent management? Wide variations exist in how the term ‘talent’ is defined across differing sectors, and organizations may prefer to adopt their own interpretations rather than accepting universal or prescribed definitions. That said, it is helpful to start with a broad definition and, from our research, we have developed a working definition for both ‘talent’ and ‘talent management’:  Talent consists of those individuals who can make a difference to organizational......

Words: 4768 - Pages: 20

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...Performance Appraisal Form of Talent Management Head a) Objectives: * Hiring culture fit employees * Talent Retention * Effective workforce planning b) Dimensions: Quantitative: 1. Cost per hire – A metric is designed to measure the costs associated with the sourcing, recruiting and staffing activities borne by an employer to fill an open position in the organization 2. Time to fill – From the time you advertise your vacancy till the time the candidate is actually on board 3. Performance of hired employees – Appraisal rating of employees joined after one year of hiring 4. Attrition rate – Attrition rates describe the rate at which employees leave a company Qualitative: 1. Aligning talent acquisition strategies with business needs – Identifying the business needs and aligning the talent acquisition strategy accordingly to contribute in fulfilling business strategy 2. Effective use of technology in hiring – Using the latest online mediums available (for example: portals, LinkedIn etc.) and targeting at reducing the cost c) Measures: S: Strengths to build upon P: Performs well & meets expectations D: Developmental needs I: Issue Dimension | Expectation | Actual | Measure | Quantitative | Cost per hire | 10% of CTC | 8% of CTC | S | Time to fill | 2 months | 3 months | D | Performance of hired employees | >= 3 | 3.5 | P | Attrition rate | < 6% | 5.8% | P | Qualitative | Aligning talent......

Words: 460 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...Summer Internship Report On TALENT MANAGEMENT & PRACTICE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The completion of this project is the result of the efforts of many people who are directly or indirectly involved with me from the initial stages onwards. I am therefore, indebted to all those who have made this project a success. Foremost, I would like to thank the almighty who has been the apostle of my strength throughout. It is my distinct honor & privilege to work under the able guidance of my faculty guide Mr. T.V.Raman & industry guide Mr. Rohin Dhar. I am thankful to both of them for their whole hearted support, kind inspiration, keen interest, affectionate guidance, valuable suggestions & analytical discussion in the research project. I am deeply indebted to their genial modesty & able guidance rendered during the course of the study. I acknowledge my sincere thanks to Director General Dr. Sanjay Srivastava, for providing necessary facilities & help for the study. Last but not the least, I feel indebted to my parents & friends who have provided help directly or indirectly in completion of this project. Also my special thanks to everyone in ICICI direct for their help & cooperation for the achievement of this goal. And a word of thanks to all those who remained unmentioned but contributed in some way or the other. They all may not be mentioned but no one is forgotten. Payal......

Words: 9359 - Pages: 38

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...echnical specialists in a technical career EMELIE BAEDECKE YLLNER ALEXANDRA BRUNILA Master of Science Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2013 i Talent management – Retaining and managing technical specialists in a technical career Emelie Baedecke Yllner Alexandra Brunila Master of Science Thesis ME200X 2013:31 KTH Industrial Engineering and Management Industrial Management SE-100 44 STOCKHOLM ii iii Master of Science Thesis INDEK 2013:31 Talent management – Retaining and managing technical specialists in a technical career Emelie Baedecke Yllner Alexandra Brunila Approved 2013-05-30 Examiner Kristina Nyström Supervisor Martin Vendel Commissioner Anonymous Contact person Anonymous Abstract The purpose of this thesis is to investigate talent management and how companies should work with talent management in order to retain and manage technical specialists in a technical career. Talent management is found to be important for modern organizations because of the advent of the knowledge economy, new generations entering the workforce and the need for businesses to become more strategic and competitive, which implies new ways of managing human capital. Furthermore, talent management is motivated by the fact that it has been found to lead to higher corporate profits when it is connected to the corporate strategy. The research method in this thesis is qualitative, and based on a case study of an organization in Norway active in the oil and gas industry, where qualitative semi-structured......

Words: 38034 - Pages: 153

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...-----------------------6-7 Inside Apollo------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------8-9 The need for change---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------9-10 Talent management practice Findings----------------------------------------------------------------10-11 Apollo’s Induction program----------------------------------------------------------------------------11-14 Suggestions--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------14 Conclusion------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------14-16 Appendix------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------17 References----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------18 Introduction Going forward, companies are faced with an array of challenges. They have to focus on costs cutting, evaluating and reevaluating business strategies and developing leadership competencies for top executives. To keep employees happy and for a company to thrive, employers must manage their talents; implement effective compensation and rewards strategies. Apollo Information Services, Inc. (AISI) is the largest medical coding and billing company in Southwest Florida. It is recognized in the community as a...

Words: 3324 - Pages: 14

Premium Essay

Definition of Talent Management

...the growing popularity of talent management and over a decade of debate and hype, the concept of talent management remains unclear’ (Collings and Mellahi, 2009) This assignment will explore this statement by conducting a literature review of the current commentary on the definition of ‘talent management’. Furthermore the impact any lack of clarity around the concept of talent management may have on the national and international markets which organisations source ‘talent’ from and any impact of Human Resource Management practices in terms of employee retention and exit strategies being managed fairly and ethically will also be looked at. After careful analysis of the academic literature on talent management and what it actually is, it becomes apparent that there is a ‘fundamental lack of consensus’ about the definition of talent management. Despite various attempts of countless academics to define and describe the concept of talent management, there doesn’t seem to be any consensus on what exactly TM entails. Before looking at the concept of ‘talent management’ as a whole, one must look at the definition of ‘talent’ first to gain a better insight into this confusion and lack of clarity. Here are some examples of some definitions that have been put forward in recent years: * ‘Talent’ is essentially a euphemism for ‘people’ (Lewis and Heckman, 2006:141) * The best and the brightest (McKinsey in Beechler and Woodward, 2009:274) * ‘Talent consists of those......

Words: 2863 - Pages: 12

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...with maximum efficiency. In the nonprofit sector, creating a competitive compensation and benefits strategy is important to attract talent, but developing a total rewards package may be more important. “Employees nowadays are looking at the whole package: ‘What’s my base salary, do I have incentives, what are my benefits, can I telecommute, can I have flex time, can I have a relaxed dress code and is it family-friendly?’” Glantz said. “[If] a not-for-profit can offer what’s considered an attractive total rewards package, [it’s] going to help that company.” The argument now is that these intangibles need to be measured and monitored, and subsequently tied to the bottom line. Re-defining the bottom to include intangibles such as leadership practices, organizational capabilities, and the ability to attract talented people is necessary. In addition, as organizations continue to automate business processes using technology, in order to remain competitive against others that are doing the same, they must now focus on their talent. Additionally, though talent can be cultivated and developed, it can also leave the organization, become sick, de-motivated, and perhaps influence others to behave in ways unfavorable for the organization. Worst of all, talent can deliver the “double-whammy” by moving to a direct competitor. The strategic management of talent as such a critical driver of corporate performance has become more and more important in the last few decades. Several key events......

Words: 1725 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Talent Management Strategy

...Talent Management Strategy Dr. Daniel Frost HRM532- Talent Management May 15, 2015 Companies have always had a focus on talent management; however, it was a very basic focus on acquiring, hiring and retaining employees. As companies evolved, their focus began to shift to create a higher performing workforce. They found that the key to igniting optimal performance is aligning the company strategy with talent management. Formulate a talent management strategy to encompass the entire talent requirements of the organization. According to Nancy Lockwood, talent management is the primary driver for organizational success. It is the implementation of integrated strategies or systems designed to increase workplace productivity by developing improved processes for attracting, developing, retaining and utilizing people with the required skills and aptitude to meet current and future business needs (Lockwood, 2006). By implementing an effective talent management process the company is more prepared to compete and improve their recruiting process. An effective talent management strategy consists of the following: Align the talent management plan with the company’s strategic plan and overall business need. By aligning this goal, it allows management to clarify job roles for individuals and add value to the employees in the organization by engaging them and taking ownership in the success of the company. All the employees in the organization understand what is expected......

Words: 1658 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Talent Management Strategy

...Formulate a talent management strategy to encompass the entire talent requirements of the organization. Epperson Fit Factory is a wellness center consisting of 200 employees in which 20 of those employees are in leadership positions. The talent management strategy of the wellness center is that employee engagement is the organization’s first priority because without the motivation of employees productivity goals will not be met and the customers we serve will not be loyal. In order to motivate employees Epperson Fit Factory not only formally and informally recognizes employees; we also offer a competitive benefits package, competitive salary and an effortless sense of family. In order to offer a competitive salary and benefits package, Epperson Fit Factory will research other wellness centers in the region. We will offer at least a 5% increase in pay and ability to increase pay through higher productivity and exceeding goals. The organization will offer vacation pay, sick pay, discounted child care and monthly after hour gatherings where employees may bring family members and mingle amongst one another. Epperson Fit Factory will also work with employees to find out what their goals are and how we can help them meet them through tuition reimbursement, on the job training, networking and shadowing. Determine the key components of talent management, including identifying, assessing, and developing talent. Talent management is defined as the implementation of......

Words: 1258 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...Talent Management What is talent managment? Talent management is kind of initiative planning that designed to source, attract, recruit, develop, advance, and retain a talented employees. Talent management also has another target which is to develop talented employees leadership and management functions critical to the organization’s success. The core idea of talent management is developing the human resources to attain organization’s strategic objectives. Why an organization does need talent management? The main reason of leaving an organization is “the feeling of detachment” in an employees from the organization’s objective and goal. They beleive that they are not being noticed by the people who actually hold the key of their career development. In many organization, people try to become visible by networking, personal contacts, recommendations. They do not need become extraordinary and talented but are often visible and getting caught by the eyes of top management. This situation makes many talented people inside the organization hide their presence, like a big fishes that love to stay in a deep water. Many talented people join the organization with a dream for achievement, success, and career development. Unfortunately, they realize and experience true culture of the organization, they become frustated and feel neglected. They gradually lose their interest, and become not innovative, and less participative. Through talent management, attention can be given to all......

Words: 268 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...Good talent and streamlined business processes are key for the survival and success of any organization, particularly in an upside economy and bad business climate. Although most organizations can lay claim to the establishment of well defined business processes, good talent that is could be difficult to find and keep. Even when an organization has such talent, any measures taken in difficult business cycles could result in such talents being overworked, negated and potentially underappreciated as organizations attempt to do more with far less. Ironically it is the same talents or lack thereof that could ultimately lead either to the demise or survival of the organization. This recognition and awareness has now forced organizations not only to pay close attention to their bottom line, but in acquiring the best and brightest workforce with developed processes measures to support and empower them. The old approach of dropping your talents in tough business cycles has now through the concept of talent management given way to not only holding on to such talents but given them a stake in the direction the organization pursues to remain and retain competitive edge. Talent management is about the sustainability and growth of the organization through empowerment of an organizational workforce. Talent management approach hinges on four Principals: Identification of right mix of talents; Communication; Support and recognition and finally Appreciation.(site) The concept of talent......

Words: 474 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Talent Management

...Talent Management at the Project Management Institute of Minnesota (PMI) primarily focuses on the senior leadership pipeline. People whom are considered to have “talent” reside within two teams, the Operations Committee and Board of Directors with a “Fit to Focus” (Garrow, Hirsh, 2008, p. 395) approach that directly aligns people with organizational goals. When a position becomes available on the Operations Committee, members of the Board of Directors usually find a replacement without consulting the volunteer coordinator. Their selection process is perceived as being secretive because there is little transparency or analysis of evidence-based data to support their decisions. Their leadership selection appears biased with an elitist mentality based on the perceptions of Board members, often times, with oversights on core-competencies needed in the selection process. Although the methods used in determining talent utilizes a lighter-touch approach, the focus is on, “pivotal talent-that are more strategically important to the organization” (Silzer, Dowell, 2010, p. 15). The ideal objective is to prepare Committee Chairs to serve on the Board of Directors when it is strategically imperative. Members who serve on the Board of Directors have the most talent potential in succession planning, with a longer-term focus. Board members have the opportunity to advance from their role into a President-Elect position, and eventually President. The President-Elect position is the...

Words: 618 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Hr - Talent Management

...Talent Management Globalization, competition and technological trends, and changes in the workforce make finding and retaining talented employees a major priority for any organization. In this highly demanding business environment, Human Resources departments are starting to move away from the traditional HR role to a more strategic position that unites the management of human capital with organizational goals. How could organizations overcome such a bottleneck? Through Talent Management. Talent Management is the implementation of integrated strategies or systems designed to increase workplace productivity by developing improved processes for attracting, developing, retaining and utilizing people with the required skills and aptitude to meet current and future business needs. Talent Management has moved away from being an administrative process to a continuous organizational practice with a strategic focus that drives organization outcomes. Human capital and Talent management are aligned in regards to the below management processes: * Succession planning * Development of leaders * Retention and career planning In this project, we have explored the talent management programs in several insurance organizations in Jordan. We've approached the organizations, did interviews with them, as well as surveys. Afterwards, we analyzed the data, and benchmarked the organizations' talent programs with the UNDP's talent program. We benchmarked against the United Nations......

Words: 1541 - Pages: 7