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Treating People Equally Is Not the Most Important Moral Principle for Resolving Issues of Poverty

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By caitlinroshea
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In reality, treating people equally is not the most important moral principle for resolving issues of poverty, sexism and disabilities, notwithstanding the fact that the counter proposition is often propounded. Many people hold the view that we are responsible for looking after the world’s population by treating everyone the same and by providing equal treatment to everyone, regardless of the fact that individual situations may not allow for such actions. Unfortunately although this viewpoint is seen to hold ethical significance, it is simply not a reality that translates to a possibility. This paper argues in support of the ethical viewpoint, that treating people equally is not the most important moral principle in resolving issues of poverty, by employing fundamental arguments and supporting frameworks to contribute to this conclusion. Ethical grounds for my arguments shall be explored, such as theories propounded by Aristotle, Bentham, Stuart Mill and Kant, in order to support the framework and provide supporting claims.

Education and the opportunities that learning environments provide, are fundamental to the measurable successes and accomplishments within our modern day society. However, the great disparity in education standards across the globe are grounds to base an argument on the fact that subsequently treating people equally regardless of access or the ability to achieve certain levels of education, is not equitable and reasonable. Unfortunately it has been estimated that approximately 72 million children who were of a primary school age, were not enrolled or attending school in 2005, with about 57% of them being females (Shah, 2013). It is widely known that more affluent families of the world provide greater levels of education for their children, allowing them to perform at a higher standard and potentially attain outstanding levels within their...

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