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Use of Force in Urban Cities and Its Relation to Race

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By unknownbilly
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Use of Force by Police in Law Enforcement
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Abstract This paper seeks to explore the use of force among police officers in law enforcement in urban cities and how it relates with common variables regarding police officers. Some of the police variables that will be discussed include race, education, experience, age. These variables will be comprehensively studied so as to ascertain if there exists any relationship among these variables and use of force among police office in law enforcement.
Introduction
The use of force presents one of the most controversial sectors of law enforcement in any given society. Recent developments have escalated concern about police use of force. These ranges from properly publicized occurrences involving accusations of excessive force to the inception of violent policing whose frequent emphasis is on zero tolerance law enforcement. The kind of police actions that most provoke public concern include fatal shootings, severe beatings with fists or batons that result in hospitalization of the victims, choke holds that cause oblivion or even death. The use of force by law enforcement personnel is permitted by law under certain circumstances such as in self-defense or in defense of another individual or group of persons (Barrett 2008). Law enforcement officers receive direction from their respective agencies on when to apply force during law enforcement, but there exists no universal set of regulations that govern when law enforcers should use force and how much force should be inflicted in the line of duty. Additionally, situational consciousness is vital, and law enforcement officers are trained to evaluate when a crisis demands usage of force to regain control of the situation at hand. Officers should at all times apply the amount of force necessary to moderate an incident, make an arrest,...

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