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The Role of Social Support in Coping with Hiv/Aids

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By WRDCHE001
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Social Anthropology
Observations
Chesney Ward- Smith
Site D, Leslie Social
Basic setting from the top stairs looking down- to my direct left there is a large tree as well as a parking lot which is semi- full. Further down on my left is a large concrete, grey building known as the Geographical Sciences building. It has about ten stories. This building is covered with ivy which has variants of greens, browns and reds in contrast with the grey concrete. In front of me are also four different coloured bins for recycling. They are red, blue, green and yellow.
To my right is another concrete building, known as the Leslie Social building. It has five stories. There are glass doors which make it accessible from the side. To my immediate right, there is a small, round, little hut which is a cafe known as Bananazen. On the outside of it there are various pictures of fresh fruit. There are also many green, six- seater tables outside of the cafe which are covered by large white umbrellas.
Looking straight ahead and down there are multiple levels of grey concrete stairs leading down to the avenue. There are also more tables. Overhead there are many concrete beams connecting the two buildings. They are literally joined together. These are very angular and run diagonally across the buildings.
Observing with all my senses in detail
Sight-
This is a place of passing by and much human traffic in between lectures. During these times there are lines of people walking hurriedly to and from their classes. Multiple lines of people moving up and down like ants. During lectures it becomes a place of socialisation or quiet study for those who have a free period. There are about four groups of people occupying the tables and one or two individuals who are studying. There are also casual passer byes casually chatting about trivia.
Various types of people can be observed here, some…...

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