The Effects of Globalization and Neoliberalism in Africa

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The Effects of Globalization and Neoliberalism on African Societies
Globalization and neoliberalism are concepts that can be applied to the analysis of any aspect of modern day society. Social life in a particular area is filled with the constant spread of ideas, practices and beliefs due largely to globalization. This paper will provide an in depth view on the effects Globalization and neoliberalism has had on culture and development in African societies. Within Africa lies various intricate backgrounds from its colonialism roots to the shift towards globalization in the effort to promote development. Exposing the dynamics of globalization as well as its impact on African societies will lead to a better understanding of the relationship between Africa and the international community.

Globalization, as defined by Held et al. , sees the issue “as a process (or set of processes) which embodies a transformation in the spatial organization of social relations and transactions--assessed in terms of their extensity, intensity, velocity and impact--generating transcontinental or interregional flows and networks of activity, interaction and the exercise of power.” (Held et al. 2004: 68), It involves the increased interaction between nations and the exchange of ideas, practices, relations and organization. (Ritzer 2008:574). One must be aware that the theory of globalization can be expressed through economic terms as well as sociologically. The effects of globalization is widespread throughout different societies and advocates homogeneity and can sometimes be referred as Mcdonalization. (Ritzer 2008:584). Globalization also relates similarly to the idea of neoliberism which Ritzer defines as “ [involving a combination of the political commitment to individual liberty… which is devoted to the free market and opposed to state…...

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