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Teaching English Language and Literature in Socio-Linguistic Context

In: English and Literature

Submitted By yourstrulygaurav
Words 4944
Pages 20
PADMASHREE DR. D. Y. PATIL ARTS , COMMERCE AND SCIENCE COLLEGE, PIMPRI, PUNE 18

M.A. PART 2

SEM 3 PAPER 2

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE TEACHING

PROJECT TOPIC: “TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN SOCIO-LINGUISTIC CONTEXT”

SUBMITTED BY: GAURAV .N. SHIMPI

CHECKED BY: PROF. DIPTI PETHE

YEAR : 2012 -2013

INDEX

Introduction

Aims and Objectives

Meaning and Nature of Language

English Language and Literature in India

Role of Language in Teaching Literature

Sociolinguistic Contest in Learning and Teaching English Language

Conclusion

Bibliography

INTRODUCTION

Sociolinguistics is the descriptive study of the effect of any and all aspects of society, including cultural norms, expectations, and context, on the way language is used, and the effects of language use on society. Sociolinguistics differs from sociology of language in that the focus of sociolinguistics is the effect of the society on the language, while the latter's focus is on the language's effect on the society. Sociolinguistics overlaps to a considerable degree with pragmatics. It is historically closely related to linguistic anthropology and the distinction between the two fields has even been questioned recently.

It also studies how language varieties differ between groups separated by certain social variables, e.g., ethnicity, religion, status, gender, level of education, age, etc., and how creation and adherence to these rules is used to categorize individuals in social or socioeconomic classes. As the usage of a language varies from place to place, language usage also varies among social classes, and it is these sociolects that sociolinguistics studies.

The social aspects of language were in the modern sense first studied by Indian and Japanese linguists in the 1930s, and also by…...

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